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Hobson Pittman: retrospective exhibition : his work since 1920 : February 2-March 3, 1963

Date: 1963 | Identifier: ND237.P68 N6 1963
Hobson Pittman: retrospective exhibition : his work since 1920 : February 2-March 3, 1963. Raleigh : North Carolina Museum of Art, [1963] 96 p. : ill. (1 col.), ports. ; 26 cm. more...
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[Illustration:


TULIPS WITH VASES]

Hobson Pittman













(Cover)

TULIPS WITH VASES

Oil on panel, 30 × 42 inches

Ca. 1960-61. Signed upper right: Hobson Pittman

COVER COLOR PLATE COURTESY OF MR. AND MRS.

HENRY W. BREYER, JR., HAVERFORD, PENNSYLVANIA

Inpaper figure drawings courtesy of the artist










[Illustration:

HOLIDAY INTERIOR
]

33. HOLIDAY INTERIOR

Oil on panel, 22 × 19 inches

Ca. 1948. Signed upper right: Hobson Pittman

Reference:

American Artists Group, Inc., New York

Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Arthur C. Kaufmann, Haverford, Pennsylvania

Color plate courtesy American Artists Group, Inc., New York, New York





HOBSON PITTMAN


RETROSPECTIVE EXHIBITION
HIS WORK SINCE 1920



FEBRUARY 2-MARCH 3, 1963
The Hobson Pittman Retrospective Exhibition is the third in the North Carolina Museum of Art's series devoted to great North Carolina artists. The first exhibition in the series, in 1961, honored Francis Speight; the second, held last year, paid tribute to Josef Albers.

NORTH CAROLINA MUSEUM OF ART, RALEIGH,
NORTH CAROLINA




LENDERS TO THE EXHIBITION

Mrs. Donald Alexander, San Antonio, Texas

Mr. and Mrs. Henry W. Breyer, Jr., Haverford, Pennsylvania

Brooks Memorial Art Gallery, Memphis, Tennessee

The Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio

Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

The Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, Ohio

Corcoran Gallery, Washington, D. C.

Miss Lucy Cherry Crisp, Florence, South Carolina

Mr. and Mrs. Harry L. Dalton, Charlotte, North Carolina

The Florence Museum, Florence, South Carolina

Mr. and Mrs. James Hall, Lumberton, North Carolina

Mrs. Dunham Higgins, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Huber, Gladwyne, Pennsylvania

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur C. Kaufmann, Haverford, Pennsylvania

M. Knoedler and Co., Inc., New York, New York

Mr. and Mrs. Henry R. Luce, New York, New York

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

The Milch Galleries, New York, New York

The North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh, North Carolina

The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

The Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

The Phillips Collection, Washington, D. C.

Mr. Hobson Pittman, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania

Mr. and Mrs. R. Barclay Scull, Villanova, Pennsylvania

The Toledo Museum of Art, Toledo, Ohio

Mrs. William Thomas Tonner, Torresdale, Pennsylvania

Mr. and Mrs. William Van Alen, Edgemont, Pennsylvania

The Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond, Virginia

Mrs. G. Earle Weeks, Tarboro, North Carolina

Mrs. C. Newbold Welsh, Ardmore, Pennsylvania

Mr. William Welsh, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania

The Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, New York

Mr. and Mrs. Ben F. Williams, Raleigh, North Carolina

Mr. and Mrs. Walter F. Young, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Mr. and Mrs. George S. Zoretich, University Park, Pennsylvania





FOREWORD

In North Carolina's Tercentenary year, the North Carolina Museum of Art is pleased to honor an illustrious native son, the celebrated artist from Tarboro, Hobson Pittman.

It is particularly fitting that Hobson Pittman should be formally recognized during the year in which North Carolina is taking a renewed look at its past and, in the process, rediscovering the gifts of its people. This is not to say, however, that the gifts of Hobson Pittman need to be “rediscovered.” Hobson Pittman has never through the years been in any sense neglected by North Carolinians; he has, on the contrary, been a constant source of pride to the people of his State. We are today not so much then “rediscovering” Hobson Pittman as refreshing our delight in him and his works.

The North Carolina Museum of Art, in fact, very early in its existence expressed its regard for Hobson Pittman by seeking and acquiring two works by the artist for its permanent collection: Studio in Charleston and House in the Country. These will be on view in this exhibition.

For yet another reason it is appropriate to honor Hobson Pittman in this historical year. Hobson Pittman's works uniquely provide a continuity that would otherwise be lacking in any chronological recording through art of North Carolina's past. It is too true that in the 19th century North Carolina was clearly experiencing a fallow period in painting, and yet there was much to be painted. The beauties and distinctive flavor of the years during the latter part of the 19th century, so worthy of being recorded, simply did not find expression on canvas. It remained, then, for Hobson Pittman to set down in his poetic and gentle way his echoings of things past. In his preoccupation with the things he saw around him, most of which had remained the same since the Civil War, he was and is, as much as any other painter working today, an artist imbued with the spirit of his homeland. And his homeland, in its interiors, landscapes, and objects, reflected an age of the past.

In the pages that follow, the reader will find notes and tributes written by various people who have been closely associated with Hobson Pittman in his career. Included are impressions by many familar names in the art world and also comments by former students. Taken together, these remarks project a revealing picture of the man we are honoring and form a highly appropriate preface to the catalogue.

BEN F. WILLIAMS





PREFACE

It is an altogether pleasant assignment to be asked to write a note on Hobson Pittman. There are few men in America today who have combined their abilities as a creative artist of the first rank, and of international reputation, with a career of matching importance as a teacher.

Throughout his entire life he has continually been fed from the remembrances of his youth in the South but has absorbed, to an extraordinary extent, the many and varied manifestations through which the painting profession has progressed. It can be truly said that the quality of beauty has not been of first importance in much which is presently contemporary, but the qualities inherent in this word have pervaded his every work.

JOSEPH T. FRASER, JR.

Mr. Fraser is the Director of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts.

Hobson Pittman has commented upon his work in these words:

“I have always been interested in painting things of the past, things I have loved and still do. Things I feel and understand. . . .

“The furniture—color and spirit of a place—all impress me very deeply and mean more to me even than the idea of merely painting a canvas. A chair, a window, a book — all have the same living qualities of a human being. Hardly ever do I paint or draw from any real object but from reminiscenses or memory. The actual object has always—even from earliest experiences—confused me to no ends.”

This statement is a full length portrait of Pittman, the artist-poet and the painter-dreamer. Little remains to be said unless it be a word concerning his personal and unique sense of color through which he draws to produce the haunting mystery of his recollections of things past. One senses that his interiors must have existed only to come away realizing that they belong in the never-never land of dreams and memories.

Hobson's contributions to the art scene of Philadelphia go back over the years. As a teacher, lecturer at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and at the Philadelphia Museum of Art he has had a wide and important influence upon the professional and amateur painter. His enthusiastic and outgoing personality has helped to make painters and collectors in our City. We are fortunate to have him in our midst.

HENRI MARCEAU

Mr. Marceau is the Director of the Philadelphia Museum of Art.





Hobson Pittman has a unique and well established place in American art. His style is very much his own. His paintings are derived from his imagination. Color areas, nuances and lines are used to create space. These may be drawn from objects or they may be pure invention. For the interest is not in representation, but in creating a painting. His paintings do not seem to be of any particular location or place. At the same time, one who knows something of eastern North Carolina feels that there is distinctly an influence—or echo—of Pittman's early environment in his paintings of interiors and gardens. These spacious interiors, with glimpses of sky and gardens from the windows and open doors, are sensitively painted. But, above these, it is the continuing search of the artist that gives each painting its quality.

Not only has Pittman made a contribution to American art in his paintings, he has not spared himself in giving encouragement and help to other artists. It has been remarked that, as a teacher, he has unusual ability to discern talent. He does not try to impose his own ideas on his students. Instead, he urges them to keep their individuality and seeks to help them develop in ways of their own choosing. And in helping his pupils to be true to their ideas, Pittman has perhaps been stimulated to go forward in his painting toward the fuller expression of his own individuality.

FRANCIS SPEIGHT

Mr. Speight, a former colleague of Mr. Pittman's at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, is presently artist-in-residence at East Carolina College, Greenville.

It seems odd to me, come to think of it, that I have never seen a one-man exhibition of Hobson Pittman's paintings. This is a misfortune. But I know his work well and, as I look back over many years, I recall vividly different canvases seen singly or, perhaps, two at a time in his studio or in exhibitions in the company of other paintings. This latter circumstance, where comparison was unavoidable, has enhanced for me the highly personal flavor of his work—its distinctive, nostalgic poetry. This quality, or dimension, or overtone has no factual source. One could not, from any condition or circumstance outside of these paintings, regenerate it for oneself. But it is not forgotten. It is a Pittman phenomenon, and each visitor to this important one-man retrospective exhibition will leave with an enriched and extended realm of experience.

FRANKLIN C. WATKINS

Mr. Watkins is a colleague of Mr. Pittman's at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts.





Anything I write about Hobson Pittman's work must be colored by my having known him over a period of some years in Philadelphia when we worked together at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. A favorite contention of mine, which I often state, is that artists should not know critics and critics should not know artists, since the artist's creative function is so personal, and the critic's evaluative exercises should be as objective as possible. Complete critical objectivity is impossible, of course, but anyone who is rash enough to write criticism should, at least, avoid increasing his confusion. The character of the artist as a person should not be confused with the character of his work. In the case of Hobson Pittman I am in a double position, since I knew his work well, over a period of time, before I met him. I had admired the gentle, poetic character of his paintings, at once nostaglic and visionary, particularly as summarized in his pictures of quiet rooms that seemed still peopled by the remembered presences of romantic personages who had just stepped out into moonlit gardens beyond half-screened terraces. Did my acquaintance with Hobson Pittman affect my way of seeing his work? Yes, to the extent that it increased my already considerable respect for the esthetic disciplines he imposes upon himself. A genuinely nostalgic and romantic temperament, which I discovered to be his, frequently falls into habits of convenient sentimental expression. The sentiment of Hobson Pittman's art, I discovered, is effective because he subjects it to intense scrutiny and demands (of himself) that it be expressed in calculated, rather than impulsive, terms.

JOHN CANADAY

Mr. Canaday is Art Editor of the New York Times.

A weaver of fantasies, a painter whose brush is dipped in nostaglic memories of bye-gone days, a spirit touched by whimsy; such is Hobson Pittman. He has painted through the years with singular integrity and singleness of purpose, his works continually growing in intellectual penetration and depth of vision. He has a peculiar power of evocation which brings to life whatever subject he touches.

WILLIAM MATHEWSON MILLIKEN

Mr. Milliken is Director Emeritus of the Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, Ohio.





For many years the paintings of Hobson Pittman have been to me a constant song raised in praise of beauty and of quiet, ordered peace; a song rising at times to a paean of delight, as in his brilliant paintings of flower bouquets transfigured by the sunlight; and, again, a muted chamber music of full-blown delicate poppies gathered with consummate grace into a white vase on a high Victorian mantel, set in the midst of a serene, high-ceiled room with an open door or window leading out into infinite space beyond.

Fully aware of the strong and varied undertows and currents of abstraction in the art of today, and catholic in his appreciation, as evidenced in the widely varied nature of the paintings and sculpture comprising his private collection, Hobson Pittman has steadfastly maintained his highly personal vision, his unique mode of expression of response to life. In his years of cosmopolitan living in Philadelphia and abroad, he has never lost the warmly personal, romantic sense of experience, the elfin sense of humour, that are a part of his inheritance from his boyhood in the South, in Edgecombe County, North Carolina. Out of a richly endowed imagination, a dedicated devotion to perfection, he paints with knowledge, understanding, and integrity, and withal, a moving tenderness.

LUCY CHERRY CRISP

Miss Crisp is Director of the Florence Museum, Florence, S. C.

Hobson Pittman's paintings are like a breath of fresh spring air in today's art world—so filled with the sounds of rent garments. These beautifully personal and intimate statements with their very subtle message bespeak of a calm and serene excitement of timelessness. With his almost precisionist's placement of shapes and colors coupled with a fervent, passionate application of paint, Pittman is immediately identifiable as a painter's painter, an artist's artist, an assured individualist among the herd.

It seems to be of Pittman that his distinguished colleague, Franklin Watkins, wrote in his “Advice to Students”: It seems to me that only the strong painters can be tender without going sappy, and I doubt those who are continually pointing in their paint to their virility.” As an inspired artist and teacher, Pittman has few peers.

CHAPMAN KELLEY

Mr. Kelley conducts the Atelier Chapman Kelley in Dallas, Texas.





Hobson Pittman is an artist who has distinguished himself as a creator and teacher. His many years at The Pennsylvania State University have contributed immeasurably to the understanding and practice of painting. Hundreds of students have benefitted from his inspiring and gifted teaching.

His art documents his sincerity and devotion to painting. His presence on the American scene is of lasting importance. His steadfast performance and integrity are unique in our day of challenge and change.

GEORGE S. ZORETICH

Mr. Zoretich is Associate Head, Department of Art, The Pennsylvania State University.

While a student at Penn State, it was my great good fortune to encounter the almost legendary painter-teacher, Hobson Pittman. I use the word “legendary” advisedly. For this fabled man was known to be conducting summer courses almost mystical, so profound was the seriousness of their purpose. The teacher was said to be devoted to Art almost as a monk cloistered with his faith. The students were said to hold almost hysterical devotion toward their teacher and to be enormously busy in their efforts to meet the teacher's demands that they secure the highest possible purchase upon their own art.

I joined the class with some skepticism. World War II had not made a mystic of me, and, besides, I held to the view that good art was non-objective or that, if figurative, it had better be Picassoid in character. To my surprise, Mr. Pittman did not object to abstraction or non-object painting. But, as I say, I was suspicious, for it seemed to me that Pittman's own painting was 19th century in conception and execution. At last, and after much shuffling about of my opinions in the matter, I eventually concluded century had little bearing upon the case. Pittman's art was personal, clearly; and his images sprang from his deepest affections: his love for gardens, his memory of the lost days of his youth. Time passed its winged way and I awoke one day to the realization





that here was unique painting, and valid painting. I realized that no one in American art has captured the shape of nostalgia with the success of Hobson Pittman.

I was, in those days of our acquaintance, also wary of Hobson Pittman's critiques, so dramatic were they, so fervent, so knowing. And then I discovered the drama to have the most serious implications for his classes who sat about, mouths agape, so absorbed were they in their master's criticism and advice. I soon found that Mr. Pittman's instinct for what was right or wrong in painting was seldom if ever incorrect. He would come by my non-objective panels, and I found that each time I followed his suggestion a problem was solved.

Mr. Pittman drove his classes by driving himself. He lived at an amazing pitch, blazing with nervous energy as if his flames were stoked by huge gangs of firemen. Each of his students became kindled, and he unremittingly tended each little spark and fanned them into the heat of a blaze.

But his eye turned toward the larger talents in his classes. He could not help himself. Despite his sympathy for everyone, he gave advantages to the ablest among us. He could not resist talent. He encouraged, nurtured it. He was on his very knees before it. Never envious. Never spiteful. Never condescending. He cherished talent as no other man in my experience (and I live among teachers). It was as if he had found a way to seize hold of life through another's talent. You see, Hobson Pittman's own fires were fed from fuel that he found stored in the untried abilities of others.

Well, time has its way of winging, as I have said, and much time had passed since those wonderful, remarkable days I'd spent in Pittman's storied classes. A day came when I received word that the Museum of Modern Art wished to see my work. Hobson Pittman was behind it all. He had kept an eye upon me as I matured, and then, when he thought I was ready, he had recommended my painting to the museum. The museum purchased a picture of mine, and later Mr. Pittman told me how he had screwed up his courage to talk to Miss Dorothy Miller about me, and Miss Miller has told me how wonderfully Hobson Pittman presented to her his belief in my work, and how he had stressed its worth and what a fine impression of selflessness he himself made upon her. I am confident the many things Mr. Pittman has done for me he has done in other ways for others, surprising students years away from him that he had not forgotten them. We are his children in Art and, like a good parent, he is unflagging in his desire for us that we are each grown to the highest possible artistic and worldly success.

Appreciative words are so often lame. Right now I feel as if these words are cripples, and yet, perhaps I've given a partial insight into the value of Hobson Pittman. To recapitulate, I think he will be remembered as the painter who found a way to shape the best expression of nostalgia, and generations of students must thank him for the inspiration to make the best art to be found in them. It is unimaginable to me that anywhere lives a teacher who has been more generous with the contribution of himself or more dedicated to something men call Art. His students and art have been the only concern of Hobson Pittman's life; both are vastly the richer for it.

HIRAM WILLIAMS

Mr. Williams is a member of the Art Department at the University of Florida.






[Illustration:

Pittman in his studio in Bryn Mawr
]





PITTMAN ON HIS WORK

It is difficult for an artist to put into words how he feels about his work, but I firmly believe in the keenest observations of nature and a constant study and reflection of the museum at large. These are the best teachers. It is the assimilation of all this that one uses as a painting vocabulary; but be reminded at the start that a personal translation should take place. The artist “sees” his way, and there is a difference between an artist and a painter.

Nature can and does suggest endless ideas: color, light, shape, form, movement. The painter allows these suggestions to take shape on the canvas through a new visual experience, not in terms of trying to copy nature itself. Trying to put down nature verbatim is treacherous and usually unsuccessful; it is for the power of suggestion that the artist struggles. Thomas Eakins and Winslow Homer used nature as a visible framework but never allowed it to become a dictator. They disciplined nature into what they needed. Compare their work with others who are not affected by the elements of such a glorious stimulation. The personal transcription is, like handwriting, what the artist seeks. Both memory and imagination are essential factors in developing such a personality, and the subject “seen” in such a way should reach a greater sense of simplification and abstraction.

To me, color is the most important element in a painting. Color theory does not interest me, as I am afraid of theory or rules. A glance at a painting will tell immediately whether the painter possesses a beautiful and sensitive color sense. White, of all colors, is baffling yet so magnificent. Like a mirror, it reflects all nuances around it. This is not an absolute rule however; Giorgione, who used white as a mirror, is very unlike Picasso, who uses it on occasion directly out of the tube. Both ways work, and they should. It is a matter of the artist's vision and purpose.

The museum is an invaluable source of inspiration and communion and should be used as such, but to pause too long before a single “name” or “school” (we might also add “style”) is perilous. Embrace all schools, drinking them in to the fullest and using them as a mirror, reflecting but never memorizing.

Painting today excites me greatly. There is the exploration of ideas constantly to be discovered among the more daring and searching painters. There are many important and new visions to be dealt with among painters the world over. It may take years to see who will survive out of this large and vital mass. It will be interesting to find which of the more experimental directions are still being pursued at the end of the present period.

And without this fearless and adventurous spirit, unbridled as it may seem at times, what would become of our art?





PITTMAN TEACHES PAINTING


[Illustration:


Pittman with students]

(Reprinted from Commonwealth, the Magazine for Pennsylvania, June, 1947)

It was not surprising to find Hobson Pittman among the prize-winners of the recent Biennial Exhibition at the Corcoran Gallery in Washington. Pittman in his upper forties is a veteran major-league painter, and his pictures are often before the public.

He has exhibited widely in this country and abroad, and is well represented in our larger museums and in private art collections. His poetic and subtly-toned canvases—wistful Victorian interiors, landscapes fresh and delicate as eternal Spring—appeal alike to critical and to untrained sensibilities. They are frequently reproduced in popular as well as in art periodicals. Life Magazine has twice shown Pittman's art in full color, recently in his series of nostalgically-seen interiors from Charleston, S. C.





But while much has been published concerning Pittman the artist, little has been said about his work as a gifted teacher of painting. In this, also, he is a veteran, having served for many years as Director of Art at the Friends Central Day School at Overbrook, Pennsylvania, and for the past fourteen summers as instructor in oil painting at the Pennsylvania State College.

During these summers I have watched Pittman at work and have witnessed the achievement of what seemed to be pedagogic miracles. I have seen a student, to cite one example, whose daubings under a competent instructor were almost empty of merit, after a few weeks with Pittman startlingly transformed into a painter of exquisitely fresh and sensitive canvases—in short, into an artist. And this student shortly gave proof of it by entering pictures in some of the major art shows, having one canvas hung in a Corcoran Biennial on a wall that displayed some of the foremost names in contemporary American painting.

Unexpected revelations of talent have been normal occurrences among Pittman's pupils. His student exhibitions each summer are, in fact, wholesale revelations of an intensive fomenting of artistic energies that would be difficult to match anywhere under similar circumstances. Both in quantity and in quality the work produced by Pittman's students in the brief summer interval of six weeks have been something astonishing to behold.

How is it done?

As always with the best teaching, the explanation centers not so much in methods of instruction as in the personality of the one who instructs. Pittman is a relentless driver. Giving of himself without stint, he expects and obtains the same of others. He infects students with something of his own dynamic force, and they work like demons.

One purpose motivates his teaching: it is to induce the student to realize his individual potentialities through the medium of oil painting. Pittman unquestionably possesses an uncanny knack of finding and releasing the sometimes hidden springs of creative impulse, very often to the surprise and delight of the person in whom artistic talent has been latent. He is a master at drawing out the hesitant newcomer who has never handled a brush, and at whipping the more experienced painter into sensitive reaction to his own feelings, persuading him if necessary to discard the tricks and mannerisms of slick painting.

Good painting must, of course, be deeply experienced. Under Pittman the student must go it alone. He follows no pre-ordained course. He feels and thinks his way through his own problems. He is never set with a group in front of a studio-arranged still life. He never sees the instructor performing sleight-of-hand with a brush, for Pittman refrains from touching any canvas and discourages pupils from studying his own paintings.

In putting paint to a canvas the individual may use any method he pleases so long as he uses it as well as he is able. He is not instructed in a technique, for there is no emphasizing any mode of pictorial expression per se. His pictures can be realistic or abstract; they may be well drawn or hardly drawn at all in the academic sense. As “form follows function” in modern architecture, so painting is to take shape and quality from the needs and purposes of the artist struggling with his problem.

The student is endlessly encouraged to explore the realms of art to discover all that he can of the timeless essence of fine painting, ancient and modern. But he is forbidden





to imitate without valid reason, without being prompted by an urgent desire to experience something for himself.

Pittman is in his element when talking before and about paintings. In the field, in the studio, and above all in weekly criticisms before the classes his acute commentary plays over every inch of painted canvas, judging, comparing, everlastingly driving for quality and the exercise of taste. He is a highly perceptive and sensitive critic, who is as skillful at transmitting the meaning of art in words as he is at embodying the actuality in paint.

With novice and expert alike the pointed critiques strike sparks, and things happen. The cumulative results are displayed at the end of the courses in an exhibition that contains work by every student enrolled. Most of them are teachers in the public schools or students attending college; many return summer after summer and have made gallery connections and many have only five weeks of painting experience behind them. Yet they do unfailingly succeed in filling the large gallery at State College with downright exciting painting.

One quickly senses there the enormous amount of purposeful and well-guided effort that lies behind such a display. Hackneyed and insensitive performance, the blight that so commonly infects exhibitions of this sort, is almost totally absent. It is obvious that these assembled paintings are the works of so many individuals each of whom is speaking for himself and in his own way. . . .

Last spring when a group of seven of Pittman's school-teaching painters exhibited at the Norlyst Gallery in New York City, critic Robert Coates commended the show as “an unusually good one”; of the artists he observed, “they come mostly from small towns in Pennsylvania, and if they can teach as well as they can paint, the children of the region must be counted especially fortunate.”

It is fortunate indeed that not only the ability to paint well, but an infectious love and respect for good painting in all of its manifestations is carried by Pittman's students into their widely scattered home communities. This is the far-reaching achievement of inspired teaching.

HAROLD E. DICKSON

Professor of the History of Art

Pennsylvania State University





CHRONOLOGY


[Illustration:


Drawing of women with umbrellas]





CHRONOLOGY


[Illustration:


Painting of wine glass and fruit on table]

January 14, 1900Born on plantation, Epworth, North Carolina.
1906Moved to Tarboro, North Carolina.
1912-1916Attended Rouse Art School (private), Tarboro, North Carolina. (Generally copied unimportant reproductions).
1916First visited Pennsylvania.
1918Moved permanently to Pennsylvania.
1921-1922Attended The Pennsylvania State University.


[Illustration:


Painting of houses and trees]





1925-1926Attended Carnegie Institute of Technology.
1920-1931Spent summers in Woodstock, New York. Studied chiefly with Albert Heckman at Woodstock. Mainly interested in figure and landscape painting.


[Illustration:


Drawing of woman in chair]


[Illustration:


Drawing of vase and fruit on table]

1928First trip abroad. Studied museums and galleries of Europe and England. Did series of watercolors.
First one-man show, Edward Side Gallery, Philadelphia. Street scenes, flowers and interiors.


[Illustration:


drawing of corner store]


[Illustration:


drawing of lines of trees and road]





1930Traveled abroad continuing study of museums. Sketched and did series of watercolors.
Began series of linoleum and woodcuts (made about 50 or more blocks).


[Illustration:


Painting of Arc De Triomphe]


[Illustration:


Cubist painting]

1931Became Director of Art, The Friends’ Central Country Day School, Overbrook, Pennsylvania.
Began annual Philadelphia exhibitions. Started Permanent Collection for the school.
Began teaching (summer) The Pennsylvania State University.
Began the study of etching with Earle Horter. Executed about 20 plates, all of which unsuccessful.






[Illustration:


painting of flower and vase]


[Illustration:


Painting of woman and furniture]

1933Represented in “Painting and Sculpture from 16 American Cities,” Museum of Modern Art, New York.
1934One-man show, “American Group,” Barbizon Plaza Galleries, New York. Oils.
Represented in the 19th Biannale Exhibition, Venice, Italy.
1935Group Show, Jacques Seligmann Galleries, New York.
Group Show, Boyer Galleries, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
1938Exhibition, Maynard Walker Galleries, New York. Oils and pastels.
Traveled abroad, continued study of museums and galleries in France, Germany, Italy, Hungary, Austria, Czechoslovakia, Holland and England.
1939Exhibition, Harold Hambridge Warner Galleries, Los Angeles, California. Paintings and woodcuts.
Received Honorable Mention, San Francisco World's Fair.
Exhibition, Phillips Gallery, Washington, D. C.
One-man exhibition, Dayton Institute of Art, Dayton, Ohio.





1940Represented in Survey of American Painting, Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
1941Exhibition, Philadelphia Art Alliance. Oils and pastels.
1942Exhibition, Biltmore Galleries, Los Angeles, California. Oils.
First Honorable Mention, Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio. Oil.
One-man exhibition, Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio. Oils and pastels.
1943Represented in exhibition, “Romantic Painting in America,” Museum of Modern Art, New York.
Exhibition, Biltmore Art Salon, Los Angeles, California. Oils.
Scheidt Memorial Prize, The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
1944One-man exhibition, Milch Galleries, New York. Oils and pastels.
Dawson Memorial Prize (pastel), the Philadelphia Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
1945Began teaching. The Philadelphia Museum of Art.
Commissioned by Gimbel Brothers to participate in painting “Pennsylvania as Artists See It.”
Represented in “Critics Choice” exhibition, Cincinnati Museum of Art.
Represented in New York Armory Show, “Critics Choice.”
One-man exhibition, Santa Barbara Museum of Art, Santa Barbara, California.
1946Commissioned by Life magazine to paint interiors of well-known houses in Charleston, South Carolina.
Commissioned by Clare Boothe Luce to paint landscapes of “Mepkin Plantation,” South Carolina. (At that time, Mr. and Mrs. Luce owned “Mepkin.”)
Exhibition, pastels of flowers in one-man show, The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts.
American Exhibition “From Colonial Times to Present,” Tate Gallery, London, England.
Honorable Mention, New Haven Paint and Clay Club.
1947Exhibition, Biltmore Galleries, Los Angeles, California. Pastels.
Exhibition, Milch Galleries, New York. Pastels of Charleston.
Second Prize, The California Palace of the Legion of Honor, San Francisco, California.
Fourth Clark Prize, Corcoran Gallery, Washington, D. C.
1948Exhibition, Biltmore Galleries, Los Angeles, California. Oils and pastels.





1949Special trip to England, France and Switzerland with Margaret Sanger. Visited museums and archeological excavations.
Became member of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts Faculty.
Third Prize, “Painting in the United States,” Carnegie Institute.
Honorable Mention, Los Angeles County Fair, Pomona, California.
1950Exhibition, State Art Gallery, Raleigh, North Carolina. Oils and pastels.
1952Exhibition, “70 Contemporary American Painters,” Vose Galleries, Boston, Massachusetts.
1953Exhibition, Philadelphia Art Alliance—Invitation Philadelphia Watercolor Club. Pastels.
Elected member National Academy of Design, New York.
Second Clark Prize, Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D. C.
1954One-man exhibition, Milch Galleries, New York. Oils and pastels.
1955First Prize, Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio. Oil.
1956Recipient of Guggenheim Fellowship Grant. Spent year abroad visiting Spain, Mallorca, Sicily, Africa, Greece, Turkey, Italy, France. Special study of sculpture and architecture. Did series of small watercolors.
Honored with reception by artists in Parma — Mallorca.
1957Invited as visiting lecturer, Richmond University Area, Virginia. Lectured at: University of Virginia, College of William and Mary, Randolph Macon College, University of Richmond, Mary Washington College.
Resigned as Director of Art, Friends’ Central Country Day School, Overbrook, Pennsylvania.
Exhibition (small), East Carolina College, Greenville, North Carolina. Oils and pastels.
1958One-man exhibition, The Pennsylvania State University. Oils and pastels.
1959Represented in “250 Years of Art in Pennsylvania,” The Westmoreland County Museum of Art, Greensburg, Pennsylvania.
Exhibition of pastels, flowers and still-life, The Woodmere Gallery, Chestnut Hill, Pennsylvania.
1960Elected Honorary Member, International Institute of Arts and Letters.
Awarded Brevoort—Eickemeyer Prize, Columbia University, New York. (Awarded for first time in 1960).





1962Invited to lecture at the Dallas Museum of Art and the Fort Worth Museum, Texas. Also to conduct series of seminars in art.
Presented “Parallels in Music, Architecture, Painting and Sculpture” as benefit for the Philadelphia Orchestra, The Academy of Music, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
1963First Retrospective Exhibition, The North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh, North Carolina.


[Illustration:

Pittman in his house in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, with his collection of contemporary art.
]





CATALOG


[Illustration:


Illustrative drawing]





CATALOG

1. A GROUP OF EARLY WORKS Watercolors and Drawings Lent by the Artist


[Illustration:


Drawing]


[Illustration:


Watercolor]


[Illustration:


Watercolor]


[Illustration:


Watercolor]





2. WOMAN WITH CAT

Oil on canvas, 20 × 16 inches

1923. Signed upper left: Pittman

Lent by The Pennsylvania Academy of The Fine Arts, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania


[Illustration:

WOMAN WITH CAT
]


[Illustration:

PORTRAIT OF MILDRED
]

3. PORTRAIT OF MILDRED

Oil on canvas, 16 × 12 inches

1923

Lent by the Artist


[Illustration:

FOUNTAIN AT VERSAILLES
]

4. FOUNTAIN AT VERSAILLES

Oil on canvas, 20 × 16 inches

1928. Signed lower right: Hobson Pittman

Lent by the Artist





5. STREET IN FLORENCE

Oil on canvas, 16 × 20 inches

1928. Signed lower right: Hobson Pittman

Lent by the Artist


[Illustration:

STREET IN FLORENCE
]

6. VENICE

Oil on canvas, 16 × 20 inches

1928. Signed lower right: Pittman

Lent by the Artist


[Illustration:

VENICE
]

7. MAN RESTING

Oil on canvas, 16 × 18 inches

1929

Lent by the Artist


[Illustration:

MAN RESTING
]






[Illustration:

NINE P. M.
]

8. NINE P. M.

Oil on canvas, 16 × 22 inches

Signed lower left: Hobson Pittman

Exhibition:

Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, 1955; New York World's Fair, 1939, Inc.; The Walker Galleries, New York, New York

Lent by the Phillips Collection, Washington, D. C.






[Illustration:

THE GOSSIPS
]

9. THE GOSSIPS

Oil on canvas, 30 × 40 inches

1939-40. Signed lower left: Hobson Pittman

Exhibition:

“Fiftieth Annual Exhibition,” St. Albans School, Washington, D. C., 1959; Chester County Art Association, West Chester, Pennsylvania, 1954

Reference:

James Gurskin, American Painting (reproduced); Art News (reproduced), 1939-40

Lent by The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, (Presented by William S. Wassell, 1952)





10. THE WIDOW

Oil on canvas, 15 × 25 inches

1937. Signed lower left: Hobson Pittman

Exhibition:

Four Arts Society, Palm Beach, Florida, 1962; The Walker Galleries, New York, New York; Museum of Modern Art, New York, New York, 1943

Collection of the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, New York


[Illustration:

THE WIDOW
]






[Illustration:

EARLY SPRING
]

11. EARLY SPRING

Oil on canvas, 32 × 40 inches

Exhibition:

“Forty-fourth Annual Exhibition,” Cincinnati Museum, Cincinnati, 1937; “One hundred thirty-third Annual Exhibition,” The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, 1938; Munson-Williams-Proctor Institute, 1944; “Group IV,” Knotts Circulating Exhibition, 1948

Lent by the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, New York

(George A. Hearn Fund, 1938)





12. THE LOVERS

Oil on canvas, 30 × 40 inches

Signed lower left: Hobson Pittman

Exhibition:

“Second Biennial Exhibition of Contemporary American Paintings,” 1940; Norfolk Museum of Arts and Sciences, 1947; “Exhibition of Southern Artists,” 1948; “From Southern Museum Collections,” The Mint Museum, Charlotte, North Carolina, 1949

Collection of the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond, Virginia

(The John Barton Payne Fund, 1940)


[Illustration:

THE LOVERS
]






[Illustration:

HOUSE IN THE COUNTRY
]

13. HOUSE IN THE COUNTRY

Oil on canvas, 19 × 28 inches

Exhibition:

“Annual Exhibition” (Honorable Mention), New Haven Paint and Clay Club, New Haven, Connecticut, 1945; “New Year Show” (First Honorable Mention in Oils), Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio, 1942

Collection of the North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh, North Carolina

(Anonymous Gift)





14. BIRTH OF SPRING

Oil on canvas, 38 × 53 inches

1938-’62. Signed upper left: Hobson Pittman

Exhibition:

The Art Association of Newport, 37th Annual Exhibition, 1948; Corcoran Biennial, 1945

Lent by the Artist


[Illustration:

BIRTH OF SPRING
]






[Illustration:

THE SPINSTER
]

15. THE SPINSTER

Oil on canvas, 19½ × 27½ inches

Signed lower right: Hobson Pittman

Exhibition:

“One Hundred Thirty-fourth Annual Exhibition,” Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, 1939; “Work of Philadelphia Artists,” Woodmere Art Gallery, Philadelphia, 1947; The Art Alliance, Philadelphia, 1941

Lent by the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

(The Gilpin Collection)





16. SOUTHERN SPRING

Oil on canvas, 31½ × 46 inches

1938. Signed lower left: Hobson Pittman

Exhibition:

“Hobson Pittman,” Walker Gallery, New York, 1938; “16th June Show,” Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, Ohio, 1940; “Contemporary American Art,” Swope Art Gallery, Terre Haute, Indiana, 1942; “Artists for Victory,” Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 1943, Cat. p. 9; “Museum's Choice,” Art Gallery of Toronto, Toronto, 1945

Reference:

Art Digest, April 1, 1942, p. 11

Lent by Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, Ohio

(Mr. and Mrs. William H. Marlatt Fund, 1943)


[Illustration:

SOUTHERN SPRING
]






[Illustration:

WINTER AND ROSES
]

17. WINTER AND ROSES

Oil on canvas, 27 × 34¼ inches

Signed lower left: Hobson Pittman

Exhibition:

“Second National American Exhibition,” Pennsylvania Academy, Philadelphia; “Forty-sixth Annual Exhibition, American Painting and Sculpture,” Art Institute of Chicago; Corcoran Biennial, 1937

Lent by the Phillips Collection, Washington, D. C.






[Illustration:

SUMMER EVENING
]

18. SUMMER EVENING

Oil on canvas, 30 × 23½ inches

1940-41. Signed lower left: Hobson Pittman

Exhibition:

“Painting in the United States,” Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh, 1944; Columbus Gallery of Fine Arts, Columbus, Ohio, 1952

Reference:

Carnegie Magazine (reproduction), January, 1945

Collection of Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

(Patron's Art Fund)






[Illustration:

THE GOSSIPS
]

19. THE GOSSIPS

Pastel, 20 × 25 inches

Signed lower left: Hobson Pittman

Exhibition:

“New Accessions 1956,” Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center, Colorado, 1956

Lent by the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania






[Illustration:

NOSTALGIC SCENE
]

20. NOSTALGIC SCENE

Oil on canvas, 30 × 36¼ inches

1940-1950. Signed lower right: Hobson Pittman

Lent by the Artist






[Illustration:

THE MODEL
]

21. THE MODEL

Oil on panel, 13 × 18½ inches

1942. Signed lower left: Hobson Pittman

Lent by Mr. and Mrs. William L. Van Alen,

Edgemont, Pennsylvania





22. MISS PAT AND MISS EVA LYON

Oil on canvas, 30 × 40 inches

Ca. 1943-1944. Signed lower left: Hobson Pittman

Exhibition:

Milch Galleries, New York, 1944; “Critic's Choice of Contemporary American Painting,” Cincinnati Art Museum, 1945; Mint Museum, Charlotte, North Carolina, 1946

Reference:

Art Digest (reproduced on cover), July, 1944; Life (reproduced), February, 1945; Cincinnati Art Museum catalogue (reproduced), 1945; American Artist (reproduced), 1945; Art Digest; July 1, 1944, p. 8; American Artist, September, 1945, p. II

Lent by Brooks Memorial Art Gallery, Memphis, Tennessee


[Illustration:

MISS PAT AND MISS EVA LYON
]






[Illustration:

YELLOW ROSES
]

23. YELLOW ROSES

Pastel, 13 × 20 inches

1945. Signed upper left: Hobson Pittman

Exhibition:

The Woodmere Gallery, Chestnut Hill, Pennsylvania

Lent by Mrs. C. Newbold Welsh, Ardmore, Pennsylvania






[Illustration:

THE MUSIC ROOM
]

24. THE MUSIC ROOM

Pastel, 17¾ × 23¾ inches

Ca. 1946. Signed lower left: Hobson Pittman

Lent by Mrs. William Thomas Tonner, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania






[Illustration:

INTERIOR — POMPION (PUNKIN) HILL CHAPEL
]

25. INTERIOR — POMPION (PUNKIN) HILL CHAPEL

Pastel, 14⅝ × 19¼ inches

1946. Signed upper left: Hobson Pittman

Reference:

Life Magazine (reproduced in color), April 14, 1947

Lent by Miss Lucy Cherry Crisp, Florence, South Carolina


[Illustration:

VIEW FROM THE PORCH
]

26. VIEW FROM THE PORCH

Oil on panel, 12 × 16 inches

1947. Signed lower left: To sister from Hobson Jan. ’47

Lent by Mrs. G. Earle Weeks, Tarboro, North Carolina





27. THE BUFFET

Oil on canvas, 32 × 45 inches

Ca. 1948. Signed upper right: Hobson Pittman

Exhibition:

National Academy of Design, New York, 1950; The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, 1948; “Thirty-seventh Annual Exhibition of Contemporary Paintings,” Toledo Museum of Art, Toledo, 1950

Reference:

Toledo Museum News (reproduced), July, 1951

Lent by the Toledo Museum of Art, Toledo, Ohio


[Illustration:

THE BUFFET
]






[Illustration:

TWO SISTERS
]

28. TWO SISTERS

Oil on canvas, 20 × 30 inches

Signed lower left: Hobson Pittman

Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Henry R. Luce, New York, New York





29. FULL MOON

Oil on panel, 30½ × 40 inches

Signed lower right: Hobson Pittman

Exhibition:

Faculty Exhibition, The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, 1960

Reference:

Life, February 19, 1945, p. 68

Lent by the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania


[Illustration:

FULL MOON
]





30. THE VIEW

Oil on panel, 11 × 24 inches

Signed upper right: Hobson Pittman

Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Harry L. Dalton, Charlotte, North Carolina


[Illustration:

THE VIEW
]

31. OLD MAID

Oil on panel, 16½ × 23 inches

Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Harry L. Dalton, Charlotte, North Carolina


[Illustration:

OLD MAID
]





32. CHALICE

Pastel, 9⅛ × 11¾

1948. Signed lower left: H. P.

Lent by Mrs. C. Newbold Welsh, Ardmore, Pennsylvania


[Illustration:

CHALICE
]

33. HOLIDAY INTERIOR

Oil on panel, 22 × 19 inches

Ca. 1948. Signed upper right: Hobson Pittman

Reference:

American Artists Group, Inc., New York

Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Arthur C. Kaufmann, Haverford, Pennsylvania


[Illustration:

HOLIDAY INTERIOR
]






[Illustration:

CONVALESCENCE
]

34. CONVALESCENCE

Watercolor, 16¾ × 22¾ inches

Signed lower right: Hobson Pittman

Lent by the Phillips Collection, Washington, D. C.





35. THE OLD PAINTER

Oil on panel, 17½ × 21½ inches

Signed lower left: Hobson Pittman

Lent by Mr. William Welsh, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania


[Illustration:

THE OLD PAINTER
]

36. DYING FLOWERS

Pastel, 11¾ × 18¼ inches

1950. Signed lower left: Hobson Pittman

Exhibition:

The Woodmere Gallery, Chestnut Hill, Pennsylvania

Lent by Mrs. C. Newbold Welsh, Ardmore, Pennsylvania


[Illustration:

DYING FLOWERS
]





37. POPPIES

Pastel, 24 × 19 inches

1950. Signed lower left: Hobson Pittman

Lent by Mr. and Mrs. R. Barclay Scull, Villanova, Pennsylvania


[Illustration:

POPPIES
]






[Illustration:

QUIET SUMMER
]

38. QUIET SUMMER

Oil on canvas, 24 × 42 inches

Exhibition:

National Academy of Design, (Saltus Medal), 1953; Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, 48th Annual Exhibition, 1953

Lent by the Milch Galleries, New York, New York






[Illustration:

VEILED BOUQUET
]

39. VEILED BOUQUET

Oil on canvas, 25 × 30 inches

Signed upper right: Hobson Pittman

Exhibition:

“The Twenty-third Biennial Exhibition,” The Corcoran Gallery of Art, 1953; “Traveling Exhibition of Selections from the Twenty-third Biennial Exhibition,” American Federation of Arts, 1953-1954; “The Second Quarter of the 20th Century,” Jacksonville Art Museum, Jacksonville, Florida, 1956; Columbus Museum of Arts and Crafts, Columbus, 1957; “Four Centuries of Flower Painting With Flower Arrangements,” Fort Worth Art Center, Fort Worth, Texas, 1960

In the collection of the Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D. C.






[Illustration:

MANTEL ARRANGEMENT
]

40. MANTEL ARRANGEMENT

Oil on canvas, 30 × 46 inches

1954. Signed lower left: Hobson Pittman

Exhibition:

“Mid-Year Show” (purchase prize), Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio, 1955

Lent by the Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio






[Illustration:

STUDIO IN CHARLESTON
]

41. STUDIO IN CHARLESTON

Oil on canvas, 19¼ × 33⅜ inches

Exhibition:

“A Faculty Exhibition,” The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, 1960, Cat. No. 92; “As Others See Us,” Gibbs Art Gallery, Charleston, South Carolina, 1961, Cat. No. 8; “Mid-Year Show,” Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio, 1954

Lent by the North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh, North Carolina

(Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Sam Clark, Miss Nan Clark and Mr. D. Russell Clark, Tarboro, North Carolina)






[Illustration:

POMEGRANATES AND WHITE PLATE
]

42. POMEGRANATES AND WHITE PLATE

Oil on panel, 11 × 24 inches

Signed upper left: Hobson Pittman

Lent by the Milch Galleries, New York, New York

43. FLOWERS IN A WHITE CUP

Pastel, 11⅜ × 18 inches (sight measurement)

Signed upper left: Hobson Pittman

Exhibition:

Woodmere Art Gallery, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Lent by Mrs. Dunham Higgins, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania


[Illustration:

FLOWERS IN A WHITE CUP
]





44. THE PAINTER

Oil on panel, 16 × 12 inches

Signed lower left: Hobson Pittman

Lent by the Milch Galleries, New York, New York


[Illustration:

THE PAINTER
]

45. STUDIO IN CHARLESTON

Oil on panel, 11 × 20 inches

Signed upper left: Hobson Pittman

Lent by the Milch Galleries, New York, New York


[Illustration:

STUDIO IN CHARLESTON
]






[Illustration:

POPPIES
]

46. POPPIES

Oil on panel, 17½ × 13½ inches

Signed upper left: Hobson Pittman

Lent by the Milch Galleries, New York, New York

47. POPPIES AND SHELLS

Oil on canvas, 26 × 18 inches

Lent by the Milch Galleries, New York, New York


[Illustration:

POPPIES AND SHELLS
]






[Illustration:

INTERIOR
]

48. INTERIOR

Oil on canvas, 34¾ × 48¼ inches

Signed upper left: Hobson Pittman

Lent by the Milch Galleries, New York, New York





49. THREE LADIES IN HALLWAY

Oil on canvas, 16¼ × 24¼ inches

Signed lower left: Hobson Pittman

Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Harry L. Dalton, Charlotte, North Carolina


[Illustration:

THREE LADIES IN HALLWAY
]






[Illustration:

SUMMER EVENING
]

50. SUMMER EVENING

Oil on canvas, 24¼ × 36⅜ inches

Signed lower left: Hobson Pittman

Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Harry L. Dalton, Charlotte, North Carolina





51. CONVERSATION NO. II

Oil on panel, 25 × 39 inches

Signed lower left: Hobson Pittman

Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Huber, Gladwyne, Pennsylvania


[Illustration:

CONVERSATION NO. II
]






[Illustration:

AZALEA GARDEN
]

52. AZALEA GARDEN

Oil on panel, 44½ × 33½ inches

Signed lower left: Hobson Pittman

Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Henry R. Luce, New York, New York


[Illustration:

MEPKIN BY THE RIVER IN MOONLIGHT
]

53. MEPKIN BY THE RIVER IN MOONLIGHT

Oil on panel, 26½ × 16½ inches

Signed lower right: Hobson Pittman

Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Henry R. Luce, New York, New York






[Illustration:

REFLECTIONS
]

54. REFLECTIONS

Oil on canvas, 24 × 36 inches

Signed upper left: Hobson Pittman

Exhibition:

Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio, Mid-year Show, 1957

Lent by the Milch Galleries, New York, New York






[Illustration:

STILL LIFE—PEACHES
]

55. STILL LIFE—PEACHES

Pastel, 18½ × 15 inches

Ca. 1955. Signed upper right: Hobson Pittman

Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Henry W. Breyer, Jr. Haverford, Pennsylvania






[Illustration:

INTERIOR WITH ORANGE SCREEN
]

56. INTERIOR WITH ORANGE SCREEN

Oil on canvas, 34 × 27 inches

Signed lower left: Hobson Pittman

Lent by the Milch Galleries, New York, New York






[Illustration:

STILL LIFE WITH BOTTLE
]

57. STILL LIFE WITH BOTTLE

Pastel, 19 × 12 inches

1955. Signed upper left: Hobson Pittman

Lent by Mr. and Mrs. R. Barclay Scull, Villanova, Pennsylvania






[Illustration:

YELLOW CHAIR
]

58. YELLOW CHAIR

Oil on canvas, 30½ × 40¼ inches

Signed lower right: Hobson Pittman

Lent by Mr. and Mrs. James Hall, Lumberton, North Carolina






[Illustration:

MUSIC ROOM
]

59. MUSIC ROOM

Oil on canvas, 30 × 36 inches

1955-1962. Signed upper right: Hobson Pittman

Lent by the Artist

(opposite)

60. INTERIOR WITH FLOWERS

Oil on canvas, 44½ × 30 inches

Signed upper left: Hobson Pittman

Exhibition:

“Annual Exhibition,” National Academy of Design, 1960

Lent by the Milch Galleries, New York






[Illustration:

INTERIOR WITH FLOWERS
]






[Illustration:

SUNLIT WINDOW
]

61. SUNLIT WINDOW

Oil on canvas, 49½ × 57¾ inches

Signed lower left: Hobson Pittman

Exhibition:

“Exhibition of Philadelphia Artists,” The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, 1956

Lent by Mrs. William Thomas Tonner, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania





62. LIDO AT OSTIA #1

Watercolor, 8 × 12 inches

1956. Signed upper left: Hobson Pittman

Lent by the Artist


[Illustration:

LIDO AT OSTIA #1
]

63. LIDO AT OSTIA #3

Watercolor, 8 × 12 inches

1956. Signed upper left: Hobson Pittman

Lent by the Artist


[Illustration:

LIDO AT OSTIA #3
]





64. LIDO AT OSTIA #6

Watercolor, 8 × 12 inches

Signed upper right: Hobson Pittman, September, 1956

Lent by the Artist


[Illustration:

LIDO AT OSTIA #6
]

65. LIDO AT OSTIA #7

Watercolor, 8 × 12 inches

1956. Signed upper right: Hobson Pittman

Lent by the Artist


[Illustration:

LIDO AT OSTIA #7
]






[Illustration:

LAWN SCENE WITH TABLE AND CHAIRS
]

66. LAWN SCENE WITH TABLE AND CHAIRS

Oil on panel, 18 × 18⅝ inches

Signed upper left: Hobson Pittman

Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Harry L. Dalton, Charlotte, North Carolina






[Illustration:

ROSES IN WHITE VASE WITH PEACHES
]

67. ROSES IN WHITE VASE WITH PEACHES

Pastel, 17½ × 13 inches

Signed upper right: Hobson Pittman

Lent by the Artist


[Illustration:

A PEAR AND A PEACH
]

68. A PEAR AND A PEACH

Pastel, 9 × 12 inches

Signed upper left: Hobson Pittman

Lent by the Artist





69. POPPIES IN PEWTER CONTAINER

Pastel, 17¼ × 12¾ inches (sight measurement)

Signed upper left: Hobson Pittman

Exhibition:

The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Woodmere Art Gallery, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Lent by Mrs. Dunham Higgins, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania


[Illustration:

POPPIES IN PEWTER CONTAINER
]


[Illustration:

GRAPES IN A WHITE CUP
]

70. GRAPES IN A WHITE CUP

Pastel, 10 × 12½ inches

Signed upper left: Hobson Pittman

Lent by the Artist


[Illustration:

POPPIES IN A VASE
]

71. POPPIES IN A VASE

Pastel, 18½ × 12 inches

Signed upper left: Hobson Pittman

Lent by the Artist





72. STILL LIFE WITH PEARS AND GOOSEBERRIES NO. II

Pastel, 18 × 24½ inches

Signed upper left: Hobson Pittman

Lent by Mrs. William Thomas Tonner, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania


[Illustration:

STILL LIFE WITH PEARS AND GOOSEBERRIES NO. II
]

73. PEARS IN A WHITE PLATE

Pastel, 24¼ × 17 inches

Signed upper right: Hobson Pittman

Lent by M. Knoedler & Co., Inc., New York


[Illustration:

PEARS IN A WHITE PLATE
]

74. FRUIT AND FLOWERS

Pastel, 24¼ × 14¼ inches

Signed lower right: Hobson Pittman

Lent by M. Knoedler & Co., Inc., New York


[Illustration:

FRUIT AND FLOWERS
]





75. FLOATING PETALS

Pastel, 25⅜ × 18¼ inches

Signed upper right: Hobson Pittman

Lent by M. Knoedler & Co., Inc., New York


[Illustration:

FLOATING PETALS
]

76. FRUIT AND ROSE PETALS

Pastel, 24¼ × 18¼ inches

Signed upper right: Hobson Pittman

Lent by M. Knoedler & Co., Inc., New York


[Illustration:

FRUIT AND ROSE PETALS
]

77. NECTARINES AND PLUMS

Pastel, 23½ × 14¼ inches

Signed upper left: Hobson Pittman

Lent by M. Knoedler and Co., Inc., New York


[Illustration:

NECTARINES AND PLUMS
]






[Illustration:

INTERIOR WITH YELLOW CHAIRS
]

78. INTERIOR WITH YELLOW CHAIRS

Oil on panel, 9 × 15⅛ inches

1958. Signed upper left: Hobson Pittman

Exhibition:

“Instructors Exhibition,” Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia; Women's Cosmopolitan Club, Philadelphia

Reference:

Reproduced for Slide Library, Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia

Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Walter F. Young, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania


[Illustration:

MIXED BOUQUET
]

79. MIXED BOUQUET

Pastel, 18 × 12 inches

Signed lower left: Hobson Pittman, ’58

Exhibition:

Woodmere Art Gallery, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1959

Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Henry W. Breyer, Jr., Haverford, Pennsylvania






[Illustration:

STILL LIFE — ROSES
]

80. STILL LIFE — ROSES

Pastel, 11½ × 17¾ inches

Ca. 1958. Signed upper left: Hobson Pittman

Lent by the Florence Museum, Florence, South Carolina


[Illustration:

NECTARINES AND PLUMS NO. II
]

81. NECTARINES AND PLUMS NO. II

Pastel, 25 × 30 inches

1959. Signed upper right: Hobson Pittman, July, ’59

Lent by M. Knoedler & Co., Inc., New York





82. FLOWERS

Watercolor, 7⅜ × 4⅝ inches

Signed lower left: Hobson Pittman

Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Ben F. Williams, Raleigh, North Carolina


[Illustration:

FLOWERS
]

83. FLOWERS IN THREE VASES

Pastel, 20 × 25 inches

Signed upper right: Hobson Pittman

Lent by the Artist


[Illustration:

FLOWERS IN THREE VASES
]





84. THREE PEACHES ON A CLOTH

Pastel, 9 × 12 inches

Signed upper left: Hobson Pittman

Lent by the Artist


[Illustration:

THREE PEACHES ON A CLOTH
]


[Illustration:

ENTR'ACTE
]

85. ENTR'ACTE

Oil on canvas, 22 × 22 inches

Exhibition:

Butler Institute of American Art, 1961, Mid-year Show

Lent by the Milch Galleries, New York, New York






[Illustration:

TULIPS WITH VASES
]

86. TULIPS WITH VASES

Oil on panel, 30 × 42 inches

Ca. 1960-61. Signed upper right: Hobson Pittman

Reproduced in color on cover

Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Henry W. Breyer, Jr., Haverford, Pennsylvania





87. SUMMER ROSES NO. 1

Oil on panel, 30 × 40 inches

1959-60. Signed upper right: Hobson Pittman

Lent by Mrs. Donald Alexander, San Antonio, Texas


[Illustration:

SUMMER ROSES NO. 1
]






[Illustration:

SOUTHERN STUDIO
]

88. SOUTHERN STUDIO

Oil on canvas, 32 × 40 inches

Exhibition:

The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, 1960; National Academy of Design, New York, 1961

Lent by the Milch Galleries, New York, New York






[Illustration:

FRUITS AND PETALS
]

89. FRUITS AND PETALS

Pastel, 19½ × 25 inches

Signed upper left: Hobson Pittman

Lent by the Artist


[Illustration:

VIEW FROM ELEANOR THACHER'S
]

90. VIEW FROM ELEANOR THACHER'S

Watercolor, 7⅜ × 9½ inches

1961. Signed lower left: Hobson Pittman

Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Ben F. Williams, Raleigh, North Carolina






[Illustration:

SUMMER PLEASURES
]

91. SUMMER PLEASURES

Oil on panel, 48 × 56 inches

Exhibition:

American Exhibition, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, 1962

Signed lower left: Hobson Pittman

Lent by the Artist





92. FLOWERS IN A GLASS

Pastel, 25 × 19 inches

Signed upper left: Hobson Pittman

Lent by the Artist


[Illustration:

FLOWERS IN A GLASS
]

93. SUMMER BOUQUET

Pastel, 28 × 33 inches

1962. Signed upper left: Hobson Pittman

Lent by Mr. and Mrs. George S. Zoretich, University Park, Pennsylvania


[Illustration:

SUMMER BOUQUET
]






[Illustration:

TULIPS NUMBER II, 1962
]

94. TULIPS NUMBER II, 1962

Oil on panel, 30 × 42 inches

Lent by the Artist





95. A GROUP OF LATER WORKS

Watercolors, Drawings and Pastels

Lent by the Artist


[Illustration:


Watercolor]


[Illustration:


Watercolor]


[Illustration:


Drawing]


[Illustration:


Watercolor]





BIBLIOGRAPHY

Painting and Sculpture from Sixteen American Cities, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, 1933.

Martha Davidson, “Twenty-one Artists Present America's Views,” The Art News, December 5, 1936.

“Early-Spring” (painting) reproduced from The Metropolitan Museum of Art Hearn Fund Collection, The London Studio, November, 1938.

Margaret Breuning, “Hobson Pittman, Romantic Renderer of Our Victorian Past,” The Art News, November 26, 1938.

Edward Alden Jewell, “To Embody or to Imply,” The New York Times, November 20, 1938.

Art News, published by The Art Foundation, November 26, 1938.

American Art Today, (Federation of Arts) Oxford University Press, 1939.

Survey of American Painting, introduction by Homer Saint-Gaudens. Department of Fine Arts, Carnegie Institute, 1940.

J. Burn Helme, “The Paintings of Hobson Pittman,” Parnassus, May, 1941.

Kaj Klitgaard, Through the American Landscape, The University of North Carolina Press, 1941.

James W. Lane, “The Old Guard Never Surrenders,” Art News, February 1, 1941.

James Thrall Soby and Dorothy C. Miller, Romantic Painting in America, The Museum of Modern Art, 1943.

Margaret Breuning, “Hobson Pittman Follows No Convention,” Art Digest, November 15, 1944.

Ernest W. Watson, “Hobson Pittman,” American Artist, September, 1945.

“Hobson Pittman—American Artist Recaptures the Past in Scenes of His Victorian Childhood,” Life, February 19, 1945.

Donald Bear, “Contemporary American Painting,” Encyclopedia Britannica Collection, Duell, Sloan and Pearce, New York, 1945.

American Artist, September, 1945.

Donald Bear, “Pittman Canvases Reflect Genuine Charm and Vision,” Santa Barbara News Press, California, 1946.

Harold E. Dickson, “Pennsylvania As the Artists See It,” Commonwealth, The Magazine for Pennsylvania, November-December, 1947.

Harold E. Dickson, “Pittman Teaches Painting,” Commonwealth, The Magazine for Pennsylvania, June, 1947.

“In Bermuda Moonlight” (cover), Holiday Magazine, April, 1947.

“Old Charleston” (color reproductions), Life, April 14, 1947.

John Oliver La Gorce, “Artists Look at Pennsylvania,” The National Geographic Magazine, July, 1948.

Emily Genauer, Best in Art, Doubleday and Co., Inc., 1948.

Margaret Breuning, “Carnegie Presents Last and Best All-American Annual,” The Art Digest, October 15, 1949.

“Carnegie Winners,” The Pittsburgh Press, October 16, 1949.

“Carnegie Prize Winners,” Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, October 16, 1949.

“Painting in the United States,” Boston Sunday Herald, October 30, 1949.

“Atlanta Mansion” (cover), Holiday Magazine, January, 1951.

“Miss Pat and Miss Eva Lyon” (cover), Art Digest, 1954.

“Arts in North Carolina,” The Student Publication of the School of Design, North Carolina State College, Raleigh, North Carolina, 1957, vol. 7, no. 3.

Other:

Ernest Watson, Twenty Painters and How They Work.

Allen Gruskin, American Painting.

Dorothy Grafly, editor, Pennsylvania As Artists See It, The Gimbel Collection.





MUSEUMS AND INDIVIDUALS OWNING
WORKS BY HOBSON PITTMAN

The Abbott Laboratories, Chicago, Illinois

Miss Mary Adair, Johnstown, Pennsylvania

Miss Katherine Adams, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania

Dr. and Mrs. Francis Heed Adler, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Mrs. Donald Alexander, San Antonio, Texas

Mr. and Mrs. George Anderson, Overbrook, Pennsylvania

Miss Irma Ayers, Newark, Delaware

Mr. and Mrs. Emmanuel Benson, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Dr. and Mrs. Paul Bishop, Gladwyne, Pennsylvania

Mr. and Mrs. Russell Bleakley, Ardmore, Pennsylvania

Miss Rebecca Boyle, Hazleton, Pennsylvania

Mrs. Henry Breyer, Sr., Jenkintown, Pennsylvania

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Breyer, Jr., Haverford, Pennsylvania

Brooks Memorial Art Gallery, Memphis, Tennessee

Mrs. David Bunim, New York, New York

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Butler III, Youngstown, Ohio

Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio

Mr. John Canaday, New York, New York

Capehart Collection, Fort Wayne, Indiana

Elizabeth Luther Carey (deceased), New York, New York

Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Mrs. Nancy Carrell, Dallas, Texas

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Chaplin, Haverford, Pennsylvania

Mr. and Mrs. Albert Christ-Janer, Brooklyn, New York

Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, Ohio

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Clifford, Radnor, Pennsylvania

Miss Mary Cochlin, Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania

Mr. and Mrs. James Collins, Haverford, Pennsylvania

Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D. C.

M. François Couillard, Saulzais le Potier, France

Cranbrook Academy of Art, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan

Miss Lucy Cherry Crisp, Florence, South Carolina

Mrs. June Crunick, York, Pennsylvania

Mr. and Mrs. Harry L. Dalton, Charlotte, North Carolina

Mr. and Mrs. Meyer Davis, New York, New York

Miss Natalie De Marco, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania

Dr. and Mrs. Harold Dickson, State College, Pennsylvania

Mr. Frank Dutcher, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Eaton Paper Company Collection, Pittsfield, Massachusetts

Mr. and Mrs. Emlen Etting, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Mr. Richard Ferguson, Narberth, Pa.

Florence Museum, Florence, South Carolina

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph T. Fraser, Jr., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Geisler, Willow Grove, Pa.

Mr. Henry Gerstley, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Gimbel Collection, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Phillips Goodwin (deceased), New York, New York

Mr. and Mrs. Donald Gordon, Fort Monroe, Virginia

Mrs. Dougherty Grace, Haverford, Pennsylvania

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Graham, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Gray, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Miss Betty Greenfield, St. Louis, Missouri

Mr. Paul Griffith, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Mr. Chester Gutner, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Mr. and Mrs. James Hall, Lumberton, North Carolina

Mr. Don Hartman, Beverly Hills, California

John Herron Art Institute, Indianapolis, Indiana

Mrs. Dunham Higgins, Chestnut Hill, Pennsylvania

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Huber, Gladwyne, Pennsylvania

Mr. and Mrs. Francis Hyslop, University Park, Pennsylvania

Mrs. Dorothy C. Jack, Haverford, Pennsylvania

Mrs. Sam Jaffe, Beverly Hills, California

Mr. Oliver B. James, New York, New York

Mr. Eric Johnson, Germantown, Pennsylvania

Mrs. Walter Johnson, Gladwyne, Pennsylvania





Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Kaufmann, Haverford, Pennsylvania

Mr. Chapman Kelley, Dallas, Texas

Dr. and Mrs. A. D. Klarmann, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Mrs. Myrrl Krieger, Cincinnati, Ohio

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Kuhn, State College, Pennsylvania

Mr. James Lord, State College, Pennsylvania

Mr. and Mrs. Henry R. Luce, New York, New York

Mr. and Mrs. Giovanni Luciolli, Rome, Italy

Mr. Wright Ludington, Santa Barbara, California

Mr. and Mrs. James P. Magill, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Campbell McAdoo, Jr., Rome, Italy

Dr. and Mrs. Norman MacFarland, Paoli, Pennsylvania

Mr. and Mrs. John W. Merriam, Wynnewood, Pennsylvania

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, New York

Mr. and Mrs. Dan Miller, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Mrs. Gerrish Milliken, New York, New York

Mr. and Mrs. Cameron Morris, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania

Dr. Otto Mueller, State College, Pa.

North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh, North Carolina

Oklahoma City Museum of Art, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Miss Josephine Paul, Johnstown, Pennsylvania

The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Miss Ethel Pew, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Pew, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania

Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Phillips Collection, Washington, D. C.

Mr. and Mrs. Duncan Phillips, Washington, D. C.

Mr. Ogden Phipps, New York, New York

Mr. and Mrs. M. Potamkin, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Rae, Radnor, Pennsylvania

Miss Elizabeth Rees, Rosemont, Pennsylvania

Mr. Glen Ruby, State College, Pennsylvania

Mrs. Margaret Sanger, Tucson, Arizona

Mrs. Gertrude Scandrett, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Mr. and Mrs. Barclay Scull, Villanova, Pennsylvania

Count and Countess Edgardo Sogne, Milan, Italy

Miss Ann Sothern, Hollywood, California

Mrs. Otto Spaeth, Dayton, Ohio

Mr. Dean Stambaugh, Washington, D. C.

St. Albans School, Washington, D. C.

Mr. G. G. de Sylva, Los Angeles, California

Mr. and Mrs. George Taylor, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Theodore, Los Angeles, California

Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Tobias, Cynwyd, Pennsylvania

Toledo Museum of Art, Toledo, Ohio

Mrs. William Thomas Tonner, Torresdale, Pennsylvania

Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph Troncelliti, Ardmore, Pennsylvania

Twentieth Century Fox, Hollywood, California

Mr. and Mrs. William L. Van Alen, Edgemont, Pennsylvania

Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond, Virginia

Miss Gertrude Walker, Haverford, Pennsylvania

Mr. Maynard Walker, New York, New York

Mr. and Mrs. William W. Wallis, New York, New York

Miss Lela Waring, Charleston, South Carolina

Mr. and Mrs. Franklin C. Watkins, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Mr. and Mrs. Cameron S. Weeks, Tarboro, North Carolina

Mrs. George Earle Weeks, Tarboro, North Carolina

Dr. and Mrs. H. E. Weeks, Tarboro, North Carolina

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Welsh, Haverford, Pennsylvania

Mrs. C. Newbold Welsh, Ardmore, Pennsylvania

Mr. William Welsh, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania

Mrs. Morris Wenger, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, New York

Mr. S. B. Wilder, Hollywood, California

Mr. and Mrs. Ben F. Williams, Raleigh, North Carolina

Mr. Hiram Williams, Gainesville, Florida

Mrs. John Wintersteen, Villanova, Pennsylvania

Mrs. Eva Worchester, Grosse Pointe Shores, Michigan

Mr. and Mrs. Phillips Youtz, Ann Arbor, Michigan

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Young, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Mr. and Mrs. George S. Zoretich, University Park, Pennsylvania





BOARD OF TRUSTEES
OF THE
NORTH CAROLINA MUSEUM OF ART

Governor Terry SanfordRaleigh
Mrs. Charles B. AycockKinston
Charles F. CarrollRaleigh
Egbert L. Davis, Jr.Winston-Salem
Edwin GillRaleigh
Robert Lee HumberGreenville
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Mrs. Arthur W. Levy, Jr.Raleigh
Henry L. BridgesRaleigh
Gregory IvyRandleman

STAFF OF THE MUSEUM

Justus BierDirector
Ben F. WilliamsGeneral Curator
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