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Handbook of the First Presbyterian Church, Wilmington, N.C., 1892-1913

Date: 1913 | Identifier: BX9211.W7 F57X 1913
Handbook of the First Presbyterian Church, Wilmington, N.C., 1892-1913 : being a continuation of the memorial volume of 1892. [Wilmington, N.C., 1913?] 72 p. front., illus. 24 cm. Cover title: First Presbyterian Church, Wilmington, N.C., 1892-1913. NC Rare copy autographed on front paste-down by "John Hall ..." more...
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First Presbyterian Church
Wilmington, N.C.
1892-1913






















[Illustration:

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
WILMINGTON, N. C.

]





HAND BOOK
OF
THE FIRST
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

WILMINGTON, N. C.1892—1913BEING A CONTINUATION OF THE
MEMORIAL VOLUME OF 1892.








Prefatory Note

Wilmington Presbytery requested the Session of each of its churches to prepare an historical sketch of that church, to be read to the congregation, and a copy filed with the archives of Presbytery. In the Memorial Volume of 1892 such a sketch of this church, prepared by Dr. P. H. Hoge, largely from material gathered by Ruling Elder John McLaurin, has been preserved. To bring the history of the church down to the present the Session appointed a committee, consisting of Ruling Elders B. F. Hall, James Sprunt and C. H. Robinson, to prepare a supplementary sketch.

The Session also appointed a committee consisting of Dr. J. M. Wells, Rev. A. J. Howell and Ruling Elder A. M. Hall, to prepare a handbook of the church, in which the sketch referred to should be published, with rolls of officers and members, sketches of the mission stations supported by the church, and pictures of our various buildings.

The Memorial Volume prepared by Dr. Hoge in 1892, contains a complete roll of all the pastors of the church from its foundation to the present time, except the present pastor, Rev. J. M. Wells, D.D. But there have been many changes in the two official bodies of the church, the Session and the Board of Deacons. In this volume will be found complete rolls of all the Ruling Elders and Deacons who have served the church during its entire history.

We thank God for His blessing that has rested richly upon our church in the past. Inspired by His promises we look forward with hope to the future, and we pray that our people may be more and more consecrated to His service. With larger faith and richer love may He lead us forward into nobler service and greater usefulness.

B. F. HALL,

JAMES SPRUNT,

C. H. ROBINSON,

Committee.





Table of Contents

PREFATORY NOTE3
I. HISTORY
1. HISTORICAL SKETCH FIRST CHURCH 1892-19147
2. SKETCH IMMANUEL CHURCH21
3. THE BOYS’ BRIGADE23
4. DELGADO MISSION25
5. WINTER PARK CHURCH27
6. BETHANY MISSION29
7. QUEEN STREET MISSION (COLORED)31
8. KIANG-YIN STATION33
9. FIRST CHURCH SUNDAY SCHOOL35
10. MISSION SUNDAY SCHOOLS37
11. SOCIETIES38
II. ORGANIZATION
1. SESSION45
2. BOARD OF DEACONS46
3. TRUSTEES48
4. MISSIONARIES49
5. SUNDAY SCHOOLS50
6. SOCIETIES51
7. CHOIR51
III. ROLLS
1. OF ELDERS54
2. OF DEACONS55
3. OF COMMUNICANTS56
4. OF COMMUNICANTS AT DELGADO71

Illustrations

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, WILMINGTONFrontispiece FACING PAGE
MANSE, FIRST CHURCH14
IMMANUEL CHURCH20
BOYS’ BRIGADE ARMORY22
DELGADO MISSIONS CHAPEL24
WINTER PARK CHURCH26
BETHANY MISSION CHAPEL29
QUEEN STREET MISSION30
JAMES SPRUNT MALE ACADEMY, KIANG-YIN32
CHADBOURN MEMORIAL HALL34
MARION MISSION KINDERGARTEN36
IMMANUEL MISSION HOUSE40
LUOLA MURCHISON SPRUNT ACADEMY, KIANG-YIN48
WRIGHTSVILLE BEACH CHAPEL50





History








Historical Sketch
of the
First Preshyterian Church of Wilmington
North Carolina

The seventy-fifth anniversary of the founding of the First Presbyterian Church of Wilmington, N. C., was celebrated with appropriate services December 9th to 11th, 1892.

The pastor, Rev. Peyton H. Hoge, D.D., issued a Memorial Volume, containing an historical sketch of the church, prepared by himself, the sermons and addresses delivered on that occasion, together with a roll of all the pastors and officers of the church from its foundation, and a roll of the members then living. This volume is in the hands of many of the present members of the congregation, and the following sketch takes up the history of the church from that date.

Early in his pastorate, Dr. Hoge introduced the custom of Quarterly Congregational Meetings. The first Quarterly Meeting of 1893 was held on January 12th, and at this meeting the congregation resolved to build a larger Sunday School room in connection with the Abbie Chadbourn Memorial Hall, provided for in the will of Ruling Elder George Chadbourn, who died July 8, 1891.

Individual subscriptions, payable in quarterly installments, having already been secured for building and loan stock to cover the cost of the Sunday School building, the congregation authorized the Trustees to execute a mortgage in the sum of $5,000 on the Manse on the eastern end of the church lot, and appointed the necessary committees to secure plans and erect the building. This mortgage was subsequently executed for $4,500, but on account of the suspension of the bank in which the Chadbourn Memorial Fund had been deposited, the congregation, on June 26, 1893, authorized





the Trustees to increase the mortgage to $6,000, and to borrow from $4,000 to $5,000 more, as might be required, on the indorsement of certain members of the congregation, with the bank certificate of the memorial fund as collateral.

This building was completed early in 1894. The second floor, the Abbie Chadbourn Memorial Hall, was formally opened, for the social life of the church, with appropriate services February 9, 1894, and the first floor, the Anniversary Hall, for the Sunday School, was dedicated February 11, 1894. This building has served well the purpose for which it was intended, and has greatly aided in the social life and Sunday School work of the church.

A memorial tablet in the wall of Anniversary Hall contains the following inscription, fitly expressing the sentiments of the church towards the life and work of its past and its hopes for the future:

ANNIVERSARY HALL, 1817-1892.

IN MEMORY OF SEVENTY-FIVE YEARS OF TOIL AND BLESSING

AND OF THE BELOVED DEAD WHO HAVE GONE BEFORE

WE WHO HAVE ENTERED INTO THEIR LABORS HAVE ERECTED THIS

ANNIVERSARY HALL

FOR THE INSTRUCTION OF THOSE WHO COME AFTER US.

“THE MEMORY OF THE PAST IS THE INSPIRATION OF THE FUTURE.”

From March 18th to 24th, 1893, Evangelist D. L. Moody held a series of afternoon and evening services in the Champion Compress warehouse. Mr. Moody was accompanied by Miss Tyson, who held services for children in the First Baptist Church. The pastors of the Protestant churches of the city followed these services by a series of meetings of their own congregations, and there were many additions to the membership of the different churches. From March 24th to April 2d this church received fifty-three on examination and profession of faith and three by letter.

In the spring of 1894 the pastor, Dr. Hoge, was assisted by Rev. Dr. John A. Preston, of Charlotte, in the early morning prayer meetings held annually at this season, another





valuable custom instituted under Dr. Hoge's pastorate and still continued with much interest and benefit to the church. These meetings were followed by the addition of twenty-one members on examination and profession of faith and one by certificate.

In 1895 this church gave its first missionaries to the foreign field—Dr. George C. Worth and his wife, Mrs. Emma Chadbourn Worth. They were married in the church July 31, 1895. A farewell reception was tendered them August 1st, and on Friday, August 2d, they left for their station at Wuseh, China, moving later to Kiang-Yin. As will appear later in this sketch, this church now conducts a successful mission in this field, employing a large number of workers and covering a large territory.

On June 26, 1895, Mr. Barzillai G. Worth, the oldest Ruling Elder in the church, and his wife, celebrated the fiftieth anniversary of their marriage—their golden wedding. With the exception of a brief residence in New York, Mr. Worth had been a member of the Session since 1858. The Session on this occasion presented him and his wife with an address of greeting and congratulations on their long and happy union and the useful lives of their descendants, constituting a large family, without a single removal by death up to the date of this celebration. Mrs. Worth died in December of the next year, and Mr. Worth continued in faithful service as a member of the Session till his death, November 19, 1910. As a token of his affection for the church he loved and to which he had given faithful service as an Elder for more than fifty years, he made in his will a bequest of $1,000 to be used in the benevolent work of the church.

For several years the church had been conducting with varying success a mission in the southern part of the city, and had erected a neat and comfortable building, which was called Immanuel Chapel. On November 8, 1895, the Session, acting as a commission under appointment of Presbytery, organized this congregation into a separate church, with a membership of one hundred and fifteen communicants and





thirty-four noncommunicants, all transferred from the rolls of the First Church. Later in the same month eight other communicants were added to the membership, two Elders and two Deacons were elected, and the Rev. B. E. Wallace, then serving as an Evangelist, was called to the pastorate at a salary of $1,000, the Session of this church having agreed to raise $900 or so much thereof as might be needed for the expenses of the new church.

A review of the work of the ten years of his pastorate was given by the pastor, Dr. Hoge, on Sunday, December 8, 1895, showing the following results:

Additions to membership:

On examination and profession of faith, 375.

On certificate, 133.

Removals:

By death, 78.

By certificate and otherwise, 246.

Contributions to the church for all causes during the ten years, $145,342.67, a little more than half of this having been for benevolent causes outside of the congregation.

Papers on the following subjects were read at the evening service:

“The Church and the Children,” by Ruling Elder C. H. Robinson; “The Church and the Young People,” by Mr. A. J. Howell, Jr.; “The Church and the Poor,” by Rev. B. E. Wallace, of Immanuel Church; “The Church in Its Missionary Operations,” by Ruling Elder John McLaurin; “The Growth of the Church in Material Improvement,” by Ruling Elder Samuel Northrop; “The Growth of the Church in Membership and Spiritual Life,” by Ruling Elder B. G. Worth.

On Tuesday, December 10th, a reception was tendered the pastor and his wife in Memorial Hall. The congregation presented them with a handsome candelabra and two beautiful pieces of silver, accompanying the same with many expressions of love and confidence and appreciation of their faithful work.





This church had undertaken mission work in Brunswick County, just across the river from the city, in which there had not been an organized Presbyterian Church. This work had assumed a hopeful aspect at a point called Winnabow, about twelve miles from the city. A building had been erected and a congregation organized under the name of New Hope Church. On Friday, October 30, 1896, the Rev. John Wakefield was ordained the first pastor of this church, which was the first Presbyterian Church in Brunswick Country, and chiefly a colony from the First Church of Wilmington.

In the early part of 1897, because of local conditions, at a called meeting of Presbytery, held in the First Church, June 2, 1897, the pastoral relation between Rev. B. E. Wallace and Immanuel Church was dissolved, and the church was placed under the care of the Home Mission Committee of Presbytery.

The General Assembly, in session at Charlotte, N. C., during May, 1897, celebrated the two hundred and fiftieth anniversary of the Westminster Assembly by appropriate exercises and addresses. This church extended an invitation to the Commissioners of the Assembly to visit Wilmington and the seashore as its guests, on the adjournment of the Assembly. A large number accepted the invitation, but the Assembly having continued its session a day longer than was expected only about fifteen of those who accepted were able to come. Among these was the Hon. W. M. Cox, a Ruling Elder from the Synod of Mississippi, who repeated in this church an address which he had delivered before the General Assembly, and which excited much interest, on the subject, “The Influence of the Westminster System of Doctrine, Worship and Polity on Civil Liberty and Representative Government.”

A long cherished desire of the pastor to visit the Holy Land was made possible by the action of the congregation October 17, 1897, in giving him leave of absence for four and a half months, from January to June, 1898. During the pastor's absence on this trip the pulpit was supplied by the Rev. J. R. Wilson, D.D., a former beloved pastor of this church, who





always maintained a loving interest in the church. Between him and the Session the closest sympathy existed, and a friendly correspondence continued after he left the pastorate. The Session wrote him a letter of sympathy on the death of his wife, and a letter of congratulation on the election of his son, Woodrow, to the presidency of Princeton University, in June, 1902, for both of which he expressed the highest appreciation.

After retiring from active service, Dr. Wilson chose this city as the most congenial place in which to spend the winter months of his declining years, and his visits were a source of continued pleasure both to him and the people whom he loved. Dr. Wilson died January 21, 1903, at the home of his son, in Princeton, N. J., and on January 30, 1903, the Session adopted and read to the congregation a memorial of his life. On October 22, 1905, a tablet was unveiled in the church in grateful memory of his faithful and loving pastorate from 1874 to 1885, and as a tribute to his honored and useful life. The sermon on the occasion was preached by the Rev. Alexander Sprunt, D.D., of Charleston, S. C., a son of this church. The tablet bears the following inscription:

IN MEMORY OF

JOSEPH R. WILSON, D.D., L.L.D.,

FEB. 28, 1822—JAN. 21, 1903.

FAITHFUL AND BELOVED PASTOR OF THIS CHURCH

NOV. 1, 1874—APRIL 5, 1885.

A PREACHER OF RIGHTEOUSNESS.

Another tablet in the church is to the honored memory of the Rev. M. B. Greer, D.D., of Philadelphia, who was the highly esteemed pastor of the church from 1852 to 1861, and who died January 23, 1899. Dr. Greer's last visit to the city was on the occasion of the celebration of the seventy-fifth anniversary of the founding of the church. He contributed very much to the pleasure of the exercises by reminiscences of the church and people in the days of his pastorate.

On July 11, 1899, Dr. Hoge tendered his resignation as pastor of the church to accept the pastorate of the Warren





Memorial Church, of Louisville, Ky. His resignation, at his earnest request, was accepted, with sincere regret, thus closing a most fruitful pastorate of fourteen years, during which close ties of friendship and love had been established between pastor and people. On his departure the congregation, as a token of love and esteem, presented him and Mrs. Hoge with a beautiful silver tea service.

In the following October the Session's Committee on Pulpit Supply engaged the Rev. Hay Watson Smith, of Greensboro, N. C., as temporary supply. His services proved highly acceptable to the congregation, and on Sunday, February 20, 1900, he was tendered a unanimous call to the pastorate, which he declined.

On June 14, 1900, the Rev. J. H. Patton, of Marietta, Ga., was called to the pastorate, and he also declined.

During the summer and fall the pulpit was supplied by different ministers secured by the Committee on Pulpit Supply, but the need of a regular pastor was manifest in the failing interest of the congregation, both in church services and in the support of the church's benevolent causes.

On December 16, 1900, the congregation extended a unanimous call to the Rev. J. M. Wells, Ph.D., of Staunton, Va. This call was accepted, and on February 23, 1901, Dr. Wells entered upon the duties of pastor. The congregation proved responsive to Dr. Wells’ ministrations, as shown in the increased attendance, both on church services and Sabbath School, and in the larger contributions to benevolent causes.

The report to Presbytery in the spring of 1902 showed a gratifying increase over the previous annual report, both in membership and cash contributions. And it is worthy of note that each succeeding annual report during this pastorate has shown substantial growth both in membership and contributions, notably the reports for the last four years, which have shown the largest increase.

During the spring of 1902 the Deacons, under the advice of an architect whom they had employed to examine the heavy plastered ceiling of the church, recommended that it





be taken down and replaced with wooden ceiling. The congregation adopted this recommendation, and on August 7th, in a congregational meeting, ordered the change, as well as other minor repairs to the building and new cushions for the pews. At the same time the ladies of the church provided a handsome new velvet carpet for the church. These repairs and improvements were completed during the year 1902 at a cost of about $3,000, and a legacy of $250 left by Miss Henry Rothwell in 1903 was used to buy a new carpet for the Sunday School room.

In the early morning prayer meetings held, according to custom, in the spring of 1903, the pastor was assisted by the Rev. W. McC. White, of Petersburg, Va., and at the conclusion of the meetings there were twenty members added to the church on examination and profession of faith.

It had always been the custom to hold the midweek prayer meeting on Thursday evening, but on May 24, 1903, the Session changed the date from Thursday to Wednesday, to conform to the custom of the other churches in the city.

On June 3, 1903, at a congregational meeting, Rev. and Mrs. R. A. Haden, already located at Kiang-Yin, were elected as missionaries of the church, and their support assumed by the congregation.

On October 4, 1903, Dr. Geo. C. Worth, the church's medical missionary at Kiang-Yin, was ordained a Ruling Elder, just before returning to his station after a visit to his home.

On November 29, 1903, the congregation had the pleasure of hearing the Rev. Dr. H. L. Singleton, of New York, who was pastor of this church from 1866 to 1871, and who, on this occasion, was spending some time with friends in the city.

In the latter part of 1903, the heating of the church being found unsatisfactory, the Deacons were authorized to install a better heating plant, and this was accomplished in the early part of 1904 at a cost of about $550.

On August 1, 1904, the Session accepted from Mr. James H. Chadbourn, then a Deacon in the church, a gift of $600, to be used as a memorial to his two children, George and






[Illustration:

MANSE
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
315 ORANGE STREET

]









Blanche King, who died in November, 1901. This was called the Elders’ Fund, and the interest was used in benevolent work as the Session directed from time to time until 1910. Mr. Chadbourn, then a Ruling Elder in the Church, having become much interested in the mission established by the church at Winter Park Gardens, one of the growing suburbs of the city, proposed to increase this fund and to build a chapel at that point as a memorial to his children. This offer was accepted by the Session, and the chapel was built at a cost of about $1,800, and dedicated February 5, 1911, and is now used for the Sunday School and preaching services of the church at that point.

In the early part of 1905 the congregation decided to remove the old wooden manse on the eastern end of the church lot, and to erect a new and better building. This called for earnest effort and much sacrifice on the part of the congregation, and, as many of the members had left the city for the summer before the plans were perfected, the work was deferred till the fall. On November 10, 1905, the congregation authorized the expenditure of $7,500 in the building of a comfortable manse. The building, a very creditable one, was completed in the following year, and has not only added to the comfort of the pastor's family, but greatly improved the appearance of the church property.

Early in 1905 a Sunday School was opened in the chapel, built chiefly by contributions from this congregation, in the mill village of Delgado, about one mile from the city limits, and the Session appointed Mr. A. J. Howell, Jr., as Superintendent. There was much interest in the school and marked success has attended this work, which has developed into a successful mission. Later a kindergarten and industrial school and children's playgrounds were opened and supported by a Ruling Elder of the church, Mr. James Sprunt, and his wife, who erected a building for the school and young people's meetings, and equipped the playgrounds as a memorial to their daughter, Marion Sprunt, who died in 1902. The building and grounds were formally dedicated as The Marion Mission in December, 1907.





A similar memorial playground, provided by them for the children of Immanuel Church, in the southern part of the city, was formally opened on February 19, 1908, and the benefits of these benefactions were soon manifest in the improved health and habits of the children for whom they were provided.

In 1907 the Executive Committee of Foreign Missions of the Southern Presbyterian Church accepted Miss Jessie Dalziel Hall, a member of this church (daughter of Mr. and Mrs. B. F. Hall), as a foreign missionary, the third from this church. Dr. and Mrs. Geo. C. Worth were then at home on furlough, and preparing to return to the field. On July 1st a farewell reception was tendered to them and Miss Hall before their departure. Miss Hall is supported by the Jane Dalziel Sprunt Missionary Society, consisting of the direct descendants and the husbands and wives of the descendants of Mrs. Jane Dalziel Sprunt. It was organized April 25, 1907, in honor of her memory and for the advancement of the cause of Christ in missionary work, and undertook to assume the support of any of Mrs. Sprunt's descendants who should offer themselves for missionary service.

Miss Hall left the summer home of her family in the western part of the State on August 26, 1907, and about a week later sailed from Seattle for China in company with Mr. and Mrs. James R. Graham, then returning from furlough to their field of work, Tsing-Kiang-Pu. Miss Hall was assigned to the same station, thus giving the church representatives at two different stations in China.

In the spring of 1907 the Session invited Rev. Henry W. Stough, of Chicago, to conduct a series of evangelistic services. He began to preach on Sunday, May 5, 1907, and continued to present the Gospel with great power and earnestness for two weeks. Many of our most faithful young workers in the church made profession of their faith on that occasion. These services were preceded by preparatory meetings conducted at St. Andrews Church by Dr. J. M. Wells and at Immanuel Church by Rev. Henry Miller, of Virginia. All the Presbyterian





congregations of the city united in attendance upon Mr. Stough's preaching, and the union meeting was a great blessing to the Presbyterians of Wilmington.

The pastor, Dr. Wells, and three Ruling Elders of this church attended the convention of the Laymen's Missionary Movement in Philadelphia in February, 1908, the first great laymen's convention held in this country. The delegates from this church were deeply impressed with the possibilities of the movement towards the evangelization of the world and communicated much of their enthusiasm to the congregation on their return. Steps were taken for a Laymen's Convention in this city, which was held May 16th to 18th, 1908, all the Protestant churches in the city taking part in it. One of the Ruling Elders of the church, Mr. H. W. Malloy, conducted an active canvass, and made addresses in the country churches of the Presbytery during the summer and fall in the interest of the general movement, and with special reference to the Laymen's Convention to be held the following spring in Birmingham, Ala.

This church had for many years taken much interest in foreign missionary work, and from this time may be dated the beginning of its greatly enlarged activity in worldwide evangelization. The plan proposed by the Laymen's Movement of apportioning the unevangelized lands among the different denominations and branches of the church met with cordial approval, and this was the first church in the Southern Assembly to make application for a definite territory for its field. In answer to this appeal to the Assembly, the church was given the Kiang-Yin field in China, in which it was already supporting several missionaries, and which was estimated to embrace a population of at least 450,000 souls. An Elder of this church, Mr. James Sprunt, already a liberal contributor to the cause, assumed the support of Mr. J. Campbell White, secretary of the Laymen's Movement, and at the Birmingham Laymen's Convention, February 16th to 18th, 1909, gave $10,000 for the erection of two school buildings, one each for boys and girls, at Kiang-Yin. Another Elder of the church, Mr. Philander





Pearsall, assumed the support of one of the lady missionaries in this mission, and also of one of the General Assembly's home missionaries in Oklahoma.

In 1911 Ruling Elder A. J. Howell, feeling called to the gospel ministry, took the position of Lay Assistant to the pastor, and began his preparation for the ministry. His course was completed by a term at Union Seminary. In October, 1912, he was, after a creditable examination, ordained to the full work of the ministry as an evangelist working under the Session of this church. He was the second to enter the ministry from this church during the period covered by this sketch, Rev. William E. Hill having been ordained in 1905, and having at once entered upon a large and useful ministry.

The activities of this church are broad and far reaching. At the station at Kiang-Yin, China, the work is carried on by the following missionaries of this church: Dr. and Mrs. Geo. C. Worth, Rev. and Mrs. Lacy L. Little, Miss Ryda Jourolman, Mrs. Anna McG. Sykes, Miss Ida McK. Albaugh, Rev. and Mrs. Lacy I. Moffett, Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Allison and Miss Carrie Moffett. These are aided by twenty-five native workers. The expense of the mission there is $12,000 per annum.

In the Assembly's Home Mission work, the evangelist at Altus, Oklahoma, Rev. T. W. Griffiths, is the representative of this church. He is having a successful ministry.

In the Synod's Home Missions this church supports the work in Brunswick County, where churches have been organized at Winnabow, Southport, Shallotte, and Phoenix. In the Presbytery's Local Home Mission work the church supports the pastor, Rev. J. S. Crowley, and supplies the workers at Immanuel. The other mission points of the church are Delgado, Winter Park Gardens, and Bethany. Regular preaching is furnished at these points by Rev. A. J. Howell, and active Sunday Schools are kept up by workers from the First Church. In 1910 a mission for the colored people was begun by Dr. J. G. Murphy and a corps of faithful workers. An excellent building has been provided at





Twelfth and Queen Streets, and a good work is being done. The Rev. W. M. Baker (a volunteer for our work in Africa), has been secured to take charge of this mission.

One of the best departments of the work of this church is the Boys Brigade, carried on with great success by Col. Walker Taylor, one of the Deacons of the church. Beginning as a part of the mission work at Immanuel, it has become undenominational in its scope, and accomplishes great good. A splendid building has been provided as a memorial of Ruling Elder W. R. Kenan, by his daughter, Mrs. H. M. Flagler.

During the present pastorate at the season of services conducted each May and at other times, our people have been privileged to hear many of the ablest ministers of our own Southern Church and others. Doctors G. B. Strickler, W. W. Moore, T. C. Johnson and Theron H. Rice, of Union Seminary; W. M. McPheeters, R. C. Reed and H. A. White, of Columbia Seminary; James Orr, of Scotland, Merle d'Aubigne, of France; and from the pulpits of our church, Doctors A. M. Fraser, Alexander Sprunt, W. McC. White, A. A. McGeachy, R. O. Flinn and others, have preached for us. Many notable missionaries and missionary speakers have spoken here. Besides our own splendid men, Geo. C. Worth, Lacy L. Little, Lacy I. Moffett and A. Allison, we have heard P. F. Price, H. M. Woods, J. W. Paxton, C. N. Caldwell, the veteran G. W. Painter, and others from China. Drs. W. D. Reynolds and J. F. Preston, of Korea, and representatives of other stations have been with us.

Messrs. W. T. Ellis, J. Campbell White and Drs. S. H. Chester, J. O. Reavis and H. F. Williams have aided in developing the great missionary interest of the church.

The following table, compiled from annual reports to Presbytery for the past twelve years, gives gratifying evidences of the growth and activity of the church under the present pastorate, which in many respects has been the most successful in its history.





GROWTH AND ACTIVITY OF FIRST CHURCH FROM 1902 TO 1913.
YEAR190219031904190519061907190819091910191119121913TOTAL
Additions43545155485075114811076868814
Communicants388422446477492524586665724763763797
Sunday School265350308407347395413375494818862769
Foreign Missions$ 1,342$ 626$ 1,387$ 1,602$ 1,610$ 2,216$ 3,381$11,483$22,009$14,488$18,279$15,459$ 93,882
Home Missions1,7172,0382,0973,6923,9532,9176,3134,8694,4025,2658,68912,69658,648
Education261012,0098392,2181,2477262,9742,54814,1184,80134,79366,400
Other Causes1101211393552837549569372,1431,6018691,86010,128
Congregational5,1128,5145,5626,1055,26013,8139,1036,1267,6639,0218,9297,46692,674
Miscellaneous2,3734951,1864545105831,5702,4842,4792,7962,99316,09234,015
Total$10,680$11,895$12,380$13,047$13,834$21,530$22,049$28,873$41,244$47,289$44,560$88,366$355,747






[Illustration:

IMMANUEL CHURCH
FRONT STREET, NEAR QUEEN

]









Immanuel Church

When the sketch of Immanuel Chapel found in the Memorial Volume was written, the Rev. W. McC. Miller was in charge as Evangelist. Mr. Miller gave up the work in 1893. Rev. Geo. H. Cornelson, Jr., supplied the mission during the summer of 1894.

Rev. B. E. Wallace came as supply in the summer of 1895. The work had so grown that on November 8, 1895, the mission was organized into a church by a Commission of Presbytery. There were one hundred and twenty-three members in the new church, dismissed to same from the First Church.

Rev. B. E. Wallace was chosen as Pastor, Messrs. C. W. Dahlgren and A. B. Cook as Ruling Elders, and Messrs. P. Heinsberger, Jno. S. Barnes, A. N. Biggs and A. L. Rice as Deacons. Unfortunate dissensions having arisen, Messrs. Dahlgren and Cook resigned in April, 1897, and Deacons Heinsberger and Biggs were elected Elders.

Rev. B. E. Wallace resigned as Pastor in May, 1897. Ruling Elder Heinsberger was dismissed to St. Andrews Church in June, 1897. Rev. P. C. Morton came as stated supply in August, 1897.

No records of the church are available from 1897 to 1901, and the time of Mr. Morton's giving up the work is not known. During this interval Rev. E. E. Lane served the congregation very faithfully for more than a year.

In 1901 Presbytery appointed a commission, consisting of Ruling Elders B. F. Hall, Samuel Northrop and John McLaurin, to serve in place of a Session for Immanuel Church. During the summer of 1901 Rev. J. C. Story, of Union Seminary,





supplied the church. On June 1, 1902, Rev. C. W. Trawick came as stated supply, and faithfully supplied the church until March 1, 1904.

May 16, 1904, Rev. J. S. Crowley came as stated supply. He continues in this position, much beloved both by his own congregation and all those residing in the southern part of the city.

The Immanuel Mission House was presented by Mr. James Sprunt in 1913, and is a great help in the work.

In January, 1912, at a congregational meeting, Messrs. H. C. Walton and E. Register were elected Elders and Messrs. S. A. Matthews and B. F. Brittain, Deacons. The government of the church was duly transferred from the Commission of Presbytery to the Session. The church now numbers two hundred and ten members, and is progressing.






[Illustration:

BOYS’ BRIGADE ARMORY
CORNER SECOND AND CHURCH STREETS

]









The Boys’ Brigade

In December, 1895, Col. Walker Taylor, one of the Deacons of the First Church, took a Sunday School class in our Immanuel Presbyterian Mission, beginning his class with three boys. During December and January the need of an organization among the boys was most forcibly impressed upon his heart and mind. This resulted in the organization of the Boys’ Brigade, on February 14, 1896, in a room of the Immanuel Presbyterian Church. The organization started at this time with fifteen boys. From this small beginning has grown, under his wise and tactful guidance, the present splendid organization. The organization is in its scope and influence largely undenominational. One of the main requirements for membership is membership in some Sunday School, and regular attendance there is rigidly required.

During the first ten years of the existence of this organization regular weekly meetings were held in a room in the Immanuel Presbyterian Church. As a result of this ten years’ work the splendid armory now occupied by the Brigade was erected by Mrs. Henry M. Flagler, in memory of her father, Ruling Elder William Rand Kenan, who had been a sympathetic friend and wise counselor of the organization. It was built in 1905 and was dedicated on June 22, 1905. On this occasion the main address was delivered by Governor R. B. Glenn. The splendid library was the gift of Ruling Elder James Sprunt. Beginning with a little handful of boys, with meagre equipment, the organization has grown until now it numbers one hundred and thirty members, and has an equipment second to none.





Colonel Taylor has given of his time, energy, and sympathy, without stint, to this great work. His weekly talks have very largely molded the characters of the members, in the formative time of their character building. His personal interest and advice have been constantly given to his boys in their solving the problems of life, and his work has been richly blessed. The entire city has felt the good effects of the organization. From the early membership have come some of the most useful and respected citizens of our city, and the Brigade is still improving the physical, mental, and spiritual condition of the boys and young men of our city.






[Illustration:

DELGADO MISSION CHAPEL
]









Delgado Mission

Our mission at Delgado began its work formally on January 8, 1905, with the beginning of the Presbyterian Sunday School there. Previously a Union Sunday School had been conducted in the mill chapel, with workers from different denominations, but largely Baptists.

Before the opening of the Sunday School preaching services were held in the chapel by Revs. Paul C. Morton and J. S. Crowley. To the latter, particularly, in the early years of our mission at Delgado, is due much of the success of the work.

Mr. Andrew J. Howell, then an Elder of the First Presbyterian Church, was the first Superintendent of the Presbyterian Sunday School, which numbered thirty-six at its opening session. Several young ladies and young men of our church became interested in the new school and began work as teachers. Their earnest efforts resulted in a large growth in the school from the start. The largest attendance noted to date is one hundred and ninety-seven. The other Superintendents of the school have been Messrs. G. L. Allen and W. C. Scoggins.

The school has been a great blessing to the community, making its influence felt in many ways. For several years the leading class has been the Men's Bible Class, which is always largely attended. Its teachers have been Messrs. A. J. Howell, M. S. Willard, G. L. Allen and D. M. McIntosh.

The Sunday School has been a great feeder of the church, and has furnished nearly all of the two hundred members received into its membership to this time.

The mission has been blessed with several seasons of revival under the earnest preaching of Evangelists R. Murphy





Williams, J. M. Plowden and William Black, each occasion resulting in a large increase of membership. Mr. Plowden was called from his work as Evangelist of Wilmington Presbytery to take charge of the Delgado Mission, and began his labors there on December 1, 1908. Since January 1, 1911, when Mr. Howell became a candidate for the Gospel ministry, he has also worked among the Delgado people as preacher and pastor. The Delgado work is as yet conducted as a mission of the First Presbyterian Church, and its members are enrolled on its register.

In the fall of 1912 the church building, which is the property of the mill company, was repaired at considerable expense with funds furnished by Mr. James Sprunt, an Elder of the First Church.

In connection with our church and Sunday School at Delgado, the Marion Mission has done a great work in the mill village. For it the mill company donated nearly an acre of land as a playground, and Mr. James Sprunt erected thereon a handsome mission building for the use of the kindergarten supported by him, which had already been established. The building was completed for occupancy in December, 1907. Later a larger demand for the use of the building was observed, and a library was donated by Mrs. Kate W. Murchison, a reading room fitted up, and arrangements made for social gatherings. An additional room was afterwards erected, in response to a pressing need for same. The kindergarten was established in 1907, the teachers being successively Misses Mary Duffy, Nan J. Huggins, Olive P. Thompson, Nell M. Thompson, Reba Plowden, and Robbie McIntire. This work for the children, which is supported entirely by Mr. and Mrs. Sprunt, has been very successful and pleasing in its results.






[Illustration:

WINTER PARK CHURCH
]









Winter Park Church

The Chapel at Winter Park was built by Mr. and Mrs. James H. Chadbourn in loving memory of their children, George and Blanche, who died on the threshold of manhood and womanhood. The funds were in large part amounts which had been given to the two young people and by their parents wisely applied toward the building of this Chapel. The building was dedicated by services held on Sunday afternoon, February 5, 1911.

The Sunday School, which had for some time been conducted in the residence of Mr. G. C. McIntire, moved to the new building, Dr. Geo. C. Worth, who was on furlough from his mission work in China, becoming Superintendent. He was succeeded by Mr. E. T. Huggins, who continues as the efficient head of the school.

Regular preaching services were held in the Chapel by Dr. J. M. Wells and Rev. J. M. Plowden until October 1, 1913, when Rev. Andrew J. Howell, by direction of the Session, took charge of the work. By reason of special attention given by Mr. Howell the membership was largely increased during the following two months, so that it was considered advisable to petition the Presbytery to take steps for the organization of a separate church there.

The organization took place on Sunday afternoon, December 14, 1913. At that time the following officers were elected: Elders, Messrs. L. D. Latta, Earl W. Jones and G. C. McIntire; and Deacons, Messrs. A. B. Sandlin, R. T. Sinclair and C. M. Robinson. There were thirty-five charter members of the new church, and the prospects are good for a considerable growth of the church from the Presbyterians locating at Winter Park and neighbouring suburbs.






[Illustration:

BETHANY MISSION CHAPEL
WRIGHTSBORO, N. C.

]





Bethany Mission

For several years the Yokefellows’ Band of the Young Men's Christian Association of Wilmington held services on Sunday evenings in the schoolhouse near Wrightsboro Station, belonging to Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Lineker. From time to time certain officers and young men of the First Presbyterian Church conducted these services, Mr. Andrew J. Howell, then an Elder, having a regular appointment there monthly. Later the demand for a Presbyterian Church was felt, and the Yokefellows expressed a willingness to withdraw and turn the work over to the Presbyterians if they would assume responsibility for it.

The opportunity for establishing a church at this point appealed to Mr. James Sprunt, an honored Elder of our church and he generously donated funds sufficient to provide a suitable church building. The old school site was acquired and the building standing upon it removed to another lot. The erection of the new structure was placed in charge of a committee consisting of Rev. A. J. Howell, chairman, and Messrs. J. A. Springer, J. L. Sprunt, D. R. Foster, and Dr. John Thames, and on November 10, 1912, the committee turned the building over to the Trustees of the First Presbyterian Church. Dedicatory services were held on the afternoon of that date. By action of the Session the name of Bethany Chapel was given to the building.

The work at the Chapel is conducted as a mission of the First Presbyterian Church of Wilmington, and the members received there are enrolled on its register.

The Sunday School has been an important part of the mission's work. Dr. John Thames, a Deacon of the First Church, has been in charge of it as Superintendent for a year





or two and, under his wise guidance, the school is growing in numbers and influence. Its present enrollment numbers about fifty. This school succeeds the work done for many years in a Union Sunday School conducted by Mrs. W. A. Lineker, now a devoted member and worker of the Bethany Mission.






[Illustration:

QUEEN STREET MISSION, COLORED
CORNER TWELFTH AND QUEEN STREETS

]









Queen Street Mission
(Colored)

Probably the supreme Home Mission task of the South is the uplift of the Negro race. The zealous people of our church here, realizing this fact and awakened, in a measure, to their duty and privilege by a lecture of Rev. John Little on the work being done in Louisville, Ky., decided to undertake a similar work for the Negroes in Wilmington.

A committee was appointed to investigate conditions. After looking the field over and studying the needs, it decided to begin Sunday School work. An old dwelling at 609 South Ninth Street was rented and a Sunday School organized May 8, 1910, with thirty-three scholars present. Dr. J. G. Murphy was elected Superintendent, Mr. P. Heinsberger, Jr., Assistant Superintendent, and Mr. Robert Hunt, Secretary and Treasurer.

Soon after the work was started, Mr. P. Pearsall, an Elder of our church, who had for some time been conducting a Bible class for his colored porters and others every Sunday afternoon, in his office on Water Street, moved his class to the Sunday School, to give it his help and encouragement.

The school soon outgrew its cramped quarters and new ones were sought. The beautiful little church, shown in the accompanying cut, was purchased from the Episcopal Church, at the corner of Sixth and Queen Streets, and moved to Twelfth and Queen Streets, its present location. The first of November, 1911, the school moved into its new church and began plans for larger development and greater usefulness under Dr. Murphy and his devoted helpers.

The conviction that there was room for greater effort and larger activities grew to such an extent in the next twelve





months that our church invited the St. Andrews Presbyterian Church to unite with it in securing a man to give all of his time to the work among the Negroes, under both churches. The effort resulted in securing the services of Rev. Wm. M. Baker, who graduated at Union Theological Seminary in May, 1913. He came to us in June and entered upon his work at once, giving half of his time to the work under our church and half to a similar work under St. Andrews Church.

With Dr. Murphy still Superintendent our Sunday School has had a steady, conservative growth, till now we have about one hundred and sixty-five scholars enrolled and an average attendance of over one hundred. At present we have preaching services twice each month, and the results are very encouraging. It is our plan to begin some social and industrial work among the boys and girls of the Sunday School. The work grows slowly, but the results are very gratifying; so let us take courage from what has been accomplished, and double our efforts in the future, asking God for greater things in our work among the Negroes in our city.






[Illustration:

JAMES SPRUNT MALE ACADEMY, KIANG-YIN, CHINA
]









Mission at Kiang-Yin

The foreign mission efforts of this church are almost entirely given to the station at Kiang-Yin, China. This station was opened in 1895, at which time Rev. Lacy L. Little and wife began their evangelistic work there. Later Dr. George C. Worth and wife removed there from Wuseh, and other workers have been added from time to time.

The city of Kiang-Yin, which has a population of 60,000, is advantageously located for easily reaching the whole county, which bears the same name, with a population of 450,000, and this church requested the privilege of having the whole county as its field, and of supporting an adequate corps of workers, which was granted. The equipment of the station consists of a modern hospital, built principally through the efforts of the Ladies’ Union of Wilmington Presbytery, the James Sprunt Male Academy and the Luola Murchison Sprunt Girls’ Academy, both built from gifts of Mr. and Mrs. James Sprunt, of this church, amounting to more than $13,000, and several auxiliary buildings and chapels.

The corps of workers consists of George C. Worth, M.D., Mrs. George C. Worth, Rev. Lacy L. Little, Mrs. L. L. Little, Miss Ryda Jourolman, Mrs. Anna McG. Sykes, Miss Ida McK. Albaugh, Rev. Lacy I. Moffett, Mrs. L. I. Moffett, Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Allison and Miss Carrie Moffett. Dr. Worth, assisted by Dr. Wang, a Chinese physician, is in charge of the hospital. Miss Albaugh is a trained nurse. The other missionaries are engaged in evangelistic and teaching work. There are twenty-five native helpers who assist them.





The missionary budget of the church has steadily increased from year to year until it amounts to about $12,000 at the present time. Dr. Frank R. Crawford, of Virginia, has been engaged to assist Dr. Worth at the hospital, his support to be furnished by the Wilmington Presbyterial. He is now enroute to his work.

Miss Jessie D. Hall, of this church, joined the mission workers of Tsing-Kiang-Pu in 1907, where she is still at work. Her support is provided by the Jean Dalziel Sprunt Missionary Society.






[Illustration:

CHADBOURN MEMORIAL HALL
]









First Church Sunday School

The Sunday School has filled an important place in the life of the church. It has trained the young people in the knowledge of the Bible and of the doctrinal teachings of the Presbyterian Church; and it is estimated that about nine-tenths of its scholars become members of the church. To this fact, in a large measure, is due the devoted and intelligent membership of our church. The school has been under the leadership of Mr. William M. Cumming as Superintendent since 1893, with the exception of about two years, and he has made a record for efficiency surpassed by no officer of the school in its long history. Mr. Cumming succeeded Mr. C. H. Robinson who was for many years the honored Superintendent of, the school.

The school is divided into three departments, viz: Primary, Intermediate, and Senior. It has a corps of intelligent and devoted teachers in each department. A distinction of the Sunday School is the fact that from its membership have largely gone forth those who have been officers and teachers in the several mission Sunday Schools established by this church. The Primary Department is under the superintendency of Miss M. E. Cook, whose long service in the interest of the beginners in the Sunday School has been a blessing in the lives of many of our congregation. The present enrollment of the school is about three hundred, and the number of teachers and officers about thirty-five.

A Home Department is also conducted in connection with the school, and for several years Mrs. P. Pearsall has been its efficient Superintendent.

The Brotherhood Bible Class of our Sunday School was organized in the fall of 1909. Its first officers were: Mr.





W. D. McCaig, President; Mr. John R. Adams, Secretary; Mr. P. Heinsberger, Treasurer; Mr. Andrew J. Howell, Teacher. During the years of its existence it has enrolled as members a large number of the men of the church, and met every Sunday for the study of the Sunday School lesson. Several times during each year the class has held social gatherings, featured by stereopticon exhibits, lectures and other forms of entertainment. Many of its members have gone forth into active Christian work in the various missions of the church. The present officers of the class are: Mr. J. F. Roache, President; Mr. T. F. Wood, Vice-President; Mr. Claude Murray, Secretary; Mr. E. N. Clark, Treasurer; Dr. J. M. Wells, Teacher. The class has supported for two or three years a Chinese native Evangelist at Kiang-Yin station.

The Young Ladies’ Bible Class is an organized class whose sessions are held in connection with the Sunday School. It has been organized for several years, Miss Margaret Gibson having been its first teacher. Mr. G. A. P. Bowman is the present teacher, and the President of the class is now Miss Davie Duffy.

The school takes pride in the fact that Woodrow Wilson, President of the United States, was a member of it during the pastorate of his father. Many other leading men in various departments of life have also been members of the school.






[Illustration:

MARION MISSION
KINDERGARTEN BUILDING
DELGADO

]









Mission Sunday Schools

The First Presbyterian Church has under its care at the present time five mission Sunday Schools, which draw their officers and teachers almost entirely from the home church These schools are: Immanuel, Mr. S. A. Matthews, Superintendent; Delgado, Mr. Wm. C. Scoggins, Superintendent; Winter Park, Mr. E. T. Huggins, Superintendent; Bethany, Dr. John Thames, Superintendent; and Queen Street Mission (colored), Dr. J. G. Murphy, Superintendent. These schools form a large part of the home mission work of the church; and they are all meeting with much success.





Societies

A sketch of this church would be incomplete without some account of our various societies. One of the most effective ways in which the church has put forth its spiritual power in work for the Master has been through these organizations.

Ladies’ Foreign Missionary Society

This Society celebrated its twenty-fifth anniversary in April, 1913. Its present membership numbers about seventy, and throughout its history it has been the source of a great deal of missionary interest in the life of the church. For several years past the principal object to which its contributions have been applied is the part assumed of the salary of Miss Ida McK. Albaugh, a trained nurse in the Kiang-Yin, China, hospital, in charge of Dr. Geo. C. Worth. For this purpose the Society gives $350 a year. It also has a part in the Home Mission work of the church. For many years Mrs. B. F. Hall has been its earnest and devoted President. Miss Ellen D. Bellamy has been its faithful Treasurer since the beginning of the organization. The present Secretary is Mrs. Eugene Philyaw.

Ladies’ Home Missionary Society

Second in point of age, the Ladies’ Home Missionary Society does an important work in the church. It was established by Mrs. David G. Worth more than twenty years ago; and, through all of its history, it has supported the kindergarten at Immanuel Church. Their contributions to this object amount to about $65 a month. In this object the Society





now receives aid from the Home Missionary Auxiliary. The present membership of the Society numbers about forty. The officers at present are: President, Mrs. Chas. W. Worth; Secretary, Mrs. C. F. Howell; Treasurer, Mrs. W. G. Whitehead.

Home Missionary Auxiliary

This Society grew out of the Home Missionary Society, and has reached a membership of about thirty-five. It supports the sewing school conducted in connection with Immanuel Church, and also helps materially the Home Missionary Society in its work. In addition to this, the Society is paying the expenses of a girl student at Albemarle Normal and Industrial Institute. The officers of the Society are now Mrs. W. H. Pemberton, President; Miss Duralde Borden, Secretary; Miss Elizabeth Peck, Treasurer.

Lucy Chadbourn Orphan Society

This Society has a special work that appeals to everyone in the congregation. For several years the ladies who are its members have been bearing the expenses for clothing, etc., of ten or twelve orphans each year at the Orphanage of the Presbyterian Church at Barium Springs. Besides this, general contributions are made to the Orphanage. Twice a year boxes of clothing are sent, and at Christmas a special box with presents and sweetmeats goes to the children. The Society estimates its contributions to the Orphanage at about $300 a year. Mrs. P. Heinsberger, Jr., is now President of the Society, and Mrs. E. T. Huggins, Secretary and Treasurer.

Elizabeth MacRae Society

Eleven girls organized this Society in 1901 to help in the Foreign Mission work of the church. The name was given in honor of a saintly Christian who was earnestly devoted to





the cause of missions, which was the great burden of her thought and prayers during the last years of her life. The membership has now grown to twenty-two, and many of the original members are still connected with the Society. For some time the special object of its efforts has been to provide $75 a year toward the salary of Miss Albaugh, the trained nurse at Kiang-Yin, China. This amount is raised, and the Society also has pleasure in making a substantial yearly contribution to the General Foreign Mission fund of the church. The President is Miss Jane S. Hall, and the Secretary and Treasurer Miss Elizabeth Bell.

Relief Committee

No organization of the church does a better work than this committee. Composed of devoted Christian ladies, it dispenses almost altogether the charity funds of this church. For many years it has had regular pensioners on the list, and it also meets a large number of calls made on it from time to time in special cases of need. The work of the committee requires a good deal of visiting among the poor, as well as attention to the giving of money and other necessary things. Mrs. F. H. Russell is Chairman, and Miss Jeannie M. Bell, Treasurer.

Christian Endeavor Society

This has been a most fruitful means of developing the young people in the ability to take part in public services. It may well be considered an excellent training school for future officers and active Christian workers in the church. The membership and attendance has been large and active ever since the organization of the Society, five years ago. Monthly business and social meetings are held regularly on week day evenings, and add greatly to the social life of the congregation. The present officers of the Society are Mr. James L. Wells, President; Mr. W. M. Shaw, Jr., Secretary,






[Illustration:

IMMANUEL MISSION HOUSE
CORNER FRONT AND QUEEN STREETS

]









and Miss Nellie Durham, Treasurer. The Society numbers at present one hundred and thirty-five members, is growing finely, and does a splendid work.

Children's Missionary Societies

There are three societies for the children of different ages, viz: Helping Hand Society, Miss Bessie Harriss, President, and Miss Elizabeth Thames, Treasurer; Willing Workers Society, Mrs. D. M. McIntosh and Mrs. W. M. Prall, leaders; and Gleaners’ Missionary Society, Mrs. W. P. Sprunt and Mrs. John Hall, leaders. These societies jointly are paying the expenses of a girl student at the Luola Murchison Sprunt Girls’ School at Kiang-Yin, China. Their meetings are made occasions to inform the children as to the mission fields of the world, and as to the privilege of Christians to give to the support of the work of the Gospel.









Organization








Session

REV. J. M. WELLS, D.D., Moderator

MR. A. M. HALL, Clerk

MR. C. H. ROBINSON

MR. B. F. HALL

MR. JAMES SPRUNT

MR. P. PEARSALL

DR. GEO. C. WORTH

MR. C. W. WORTH

MR. H. C. MCQUEEN

MR. R. A. BRAND

MR. J. A. SPRINGER

MR. W. M. CUMMING

DR. J. G. MURPHY

Committees of Session

1. Delgado Mission: MESSRS. J. A. SPRINGER, JAMES SPRUNT, C. H. ROBINSON.

2. Bethany Mission: MESSRS. B. F. HALL, R. A. BRAND, J. A. SPRINGER.

3. Immanuel Church: MESSRS. W. M. CUMMING, H. C. MCQUEEN, A. M. HALL.

4. Queen Street Mission (Colored): MESSRS. P. PEARSALL, J. G. MURPHY, W. M. CUMMING.

5. Auditing Committee: MESSRS. W. M. CUMMING and C. W. WORTH.





Territory of Elders

The Session has divided our part of the city into districts and assigned one to each of our Elders for the more efficient conduct of our work.

These divisions are assigned as follows:

Between Castle and Church Streets, to Ruling Elder A. M. Hall.

Between Church and Nun Streets, from the river to Second Street, to Ruling Elder James Sprunt.

Between Church and Nun Streets, from Second to Ninth Street, to Ruling Elder W. M. Cumming.

Between Nun and Ann Streets to Ruling Elder P. Pearsall.

Between Orange and Ann Streets to Ruling Elder C. W. Worth.

Between Orange and Dock Streets to Ruling Elder H. C. McQueen.

Between Dock and Market Streets to Ruling Elder J. G. Murphy.

Between Market and Princess Streets to Ruling Elder J. A. Springer.

Between Princess and Chestnut Streets to Ruling Elder C. H. Robinson.

Between Chestnut and Grace Streets to Ruling Elder R. A. Brand.

Between Grace and Red Cross Streets to Ruling Elder B. F. Hall.

By keeping the Pastor advised of all cases of sickness, of the coming of strangers, and of any religious interest within their districts the Elders can be of the greatest help. It is planned that the Elders visit each family in their district once a year.

Board of Deacons

MR. GEO. R. FRENCH, Chairman

COL. WALKER TAYLOR, Vice-Chairman

MR. M. S. WILLARD, Treasurer

MR. W. D. MCCAIG, Auditor

MR. C. W. WOODWARD, Secretary

MR. R. W. HICKS

MR. E. C. HOLT

MR. C. N. EVANS

MR. W. C. SMITH

MR. J. O. CARR

MR. JOS. W. LITTLE

MR. R. M. SHEPPARD

DR. JOHN THAMES

MR. GEO. L. MITCHELL.





Committees

Finance Committee: GEORGE R. FRENCH, WALKER TAYLOR, M. S. WILLARD.

Church Buildings and Grounds:

(a) First Church, JOS. W. LITTLE.

(b) Manse, W. C. SMITH.

(c) Immanuel, WALKER TAYLOR.

(d) Delgado, J. O. CARR.

(e) Winter Park Chapel, GEO. L. MITCHELL.

(f) Bethany Chapel, DR. JOHN THAMES.

(g) Colored School, W. D. MCCAIG.

(h) Beach Chapel, C. N. EVANS.

Ushering, Strangers, and Sittings: W. C. SMITH, GEO. L. MITCHELL, R. W. HICKS, JOS. W. LITTLE.

Committee on Collections:

North Aisle, C. W. WOODWARD; Alternate, JOS. W. LITTLE.

North Side Middle Aisle, R. M. SHEPPARD; Alternate, E. C. HOLT.

South Side Middle Aisle, DR. JOHN THAMES; Alternate, C. N. EVANS.

South Aisle, W. D. MCCAIG; Alternate, WALKER TAYLOR.

Gallery, W. C. SMITH.

Joint Committee on Music: M. S. WILLARD, E. C. HOLT.

Insurance: WALKER TAYLOR, M. S. WILLARD.

Light, Heat, and Sexton: GEO. R. FRENCH, M. S. WILLARD, J. O. CARR.

Poor: J. O. CARR, R. W. HICKS, DR. JOHN THAMES.

Calendar: R. M. SHEPPARD, C. N. EVANS.

Treasurers

ChurchMR. M. S. WILLARD
Foreign MissionsMR. R. M. SHEPPARD
Benevolent CausesMR. C. W. WOODWARD
Poor FundMISS JEANNIE M. BELL
Local Home MissionsMR. J. A. SPRINGER
Immanuel Church FundMR. D. RUSSELL FOSTER

Joint Committees

Music: MESSRS. P. PEARSALL, R. A. BRAND, M. S. WILLARD, E. C. HOLT, W. E. WORTH.

Synodical Home Missions: MESSRS. P. PEARSALL and GEO. R. FRENCH.

Sunday School Extension and Publication: MESSRS. W. M. CUMMING and JOS. W. LITTLE.

Ministerial Education and Relief: MR. R. A. BRAND, Chairman.

Ministerial Education: MESSRS. H. C. MCQUEEN and R. W. HICKS.

Ministerial Relief: MESSRS. C. W. WORTH and M. S. WILLARD.





Foreign Missions: MR. JAMES SPRUNT, Chairman; MESSRS. J. A. SPRINGER, C. W. WORTH, W. M. CUMMING, GEO. C. WORTH, R. A. BRAND, J. G. MURPHY, P. PEARSALL, R. M. SHEPPARD, WALKER TAYLOR, W. J. CRAIG.

Assembly's Home Missions: COL. WALKER TAYLOR, Chairman; MESSRS. P. PEARSALL, A. M. HALL, E. C. HOLT.

Barium Springs Orphanage: MESSRS. M. S. WILLARD, J. G. MURPHY, GEO. L. MITCHELL.

Bible Cause: MESSRS. C. H. ROBINSON and W. C. SMITH.

Schools and Colleges: MESSRS. B. F. HALL and J. O. CARR.

The Chairmen of these committees are reminded that a report either written or verbal is desired at each monthly business meeting of the Session.

Trustees

H. McL. GREEN, Chairman

C. P. BOLLES, Secretary and Treasurer

J. W. JACKSON

A. D. BROWN

WILLIAM GILCHRIST

U. M. ROBINSON

W. C. SMITH

G. J. BONEY






[Illustration:

LUOLA MURCHISON SPRUNT ACADEMY, KIANG-YIN, CHINA
]









Missionaries
Our Foreign Missionaries

DR. GEORGE C. WORTHKiang-Yin, China
MRS. GEORGE C. WORTHKiang-Yin, China
MISS JESSIE D. HALL*Tsing-Kiang-Pu, China
REV. LACY L. LITTLEKiang-Yin, China
MRS. LACY L. LITTLEKiang-Yin, China
MISS RYDA JOUROLMANKiang-Yin, China
MRS. ANNA MCG. SYKESKiang-Yin, China
MISS IDA MCK. ALBAUGHKiang-Yin, China
REV. LACY I. MOFFETTKiang-Yin, China
MRS. LACY I. MOFFETTKiang-Yin, China
MR. ANDREW ALLISONKiang-Yin, China
MRS. ANDREW ALLISONKiang-Yin, China
MISS CARRIE MOFFETTKiang-Yin, China
TWENTY-FIVE NATIVE WORKERSKiang-Yin, China

Our Some Missionaries

REV. J. S. CROWLEYImmanuel Church, Wilmington, N. C.
REV. ANDREW J. HOWELLEvangelist, Wilmington, N. C.
REV. W. M. BAKER(One Half Time), Evangelist, Wilmington, N. C.
REV. T. W. GRIFFITHSEvangelist, Altus, Okla.

Our Some Mission Teachers

MISS FLORENCE L. BONITZImmanuel Kindergarten
MISS ANNIE WOLFFImmanuel Kindergarten
MISS ANNA DERUITERImmanuel Kindergarten
MISS REBA PLOWDENDelgado Kindergarten
MISS ROBBIE MCINTIREDelgado Kindergarten

[note]



Sunday School
First Church

MR. W. M. CUMMING, Superintendent

MR. R. A. BRAND, Assistant Superintendent

MR. G. A. P. BOWMAN, Assistant Superintendent

MISS NELLIE COOK, Principal Primary Department

MISS JEANNIE JACKSON, Principal Intermediate Department

MRS. P. PEARSALL, Superintendent Home Department

MRS. JOHN HALL, Superintendent Cradle Roll Department

Brotherhood Bible Class: MR. J. F. ROACHE, President: REV. J. M. WELLS, D.D., Teacher.

Young Ladies’ Bible Class: MISS DAVIE DUFFY, President: MR. G. A. P. BOWMAN, Teacher.

Immanuel School: MR. S. A. MATTHEWS, Superintendent

Delgado School: MR. W. C. SCOGGINS, Superintendent

Winter Park School: MR. E. T. HUGGINS, Superintendent

Bethany School: DR. JOHN THAMES, Superintendent

Queen Street School (Colored): DR. J. G. MURPHY, Superintendent






[Illustration:

WRIGHTSVILLE BEACH CHAPEL
]









Societies

Ladies’ Foreign Missionary Society: MRS. B. F. HALL, President; MISS ELLEN BELLAMY, Treasurer.

Ladies’ Home Missionary Society: MRS. C. W. WORTH, President; MRS. W. G. WHITEHEAD, Treasurer.

Home Missionary Auxiliary: MRS. W. H. PEMBERTON, President; MISS ELIZABETH PECK, Treasurer.

Lucy Chadbourn Orphans’ Society: MRS. P. HEINSBERGER, JR., President; MRS. E. T. HUGGINS, Treasurer.

Elizabeth MacRae Society: MISS JANE S. HALL, President; MISS ELIZABETH K. BELL, Treasurer.

Relief Committee: MRS. F. H. RUSSELL, Chairman; MISS JEANNIE M. BELL, Treasurer.

Christian Endeavor Society: MR. JAMES L. WELLS, President; MR. W. M. SHAW, JR., Recording Secretary.

Helping Hand Society: MISS BESSIE HARRISS, President; MISS ELIZABETH THAMES, Treasurer.

Willing Workers’ Society: MRS. D. M. MCINTOSH, MRS. W. M. PRALL, Leaders.

The Gleaners’ Missionary Society: MRS. WALTER P. SPRUNT, MRS. JOHN HALL, Leaders.

Choir

MISS CARRIE BOWEN, Soprano

MRS. JAMES D. SMITH, Contralto

MR. JOSEPH B. FENLEY, Tenor

MR. HERBERT K. HOLDEN, Basso

MR. EDWARD H. MUNSON, Organist









Rolls




Roll of Elders

CHARLES H. ROBINSONFeb. 2, 1868
B. F. HALLDec. 21, 1879
H. H. MUNSON*May 17, 1896—Sept. 9, 1900
JAMES SPRUNTMay 17, 1896
W. R. KENAN*May 17, 1896—Apr. 16, 1903
W. S. WARROCK*June 7, 1896—Mch. 19, 1900
JAS. H. CHADBOURN†Feb. 23, 1902—Apr. 27, 1913
PHILANDER PEARSALLFeb. 23, 1902
GEO. C. WORTHOct. 4, 1903
R. A. BRANDMay 28, 1905
H. C. MCQUEENMay 28, 1905
H. W. MALLOYMay 28, 1905—Apr. 21, 1911
C. W. WORTHNov. 12, 1905
J. A. SPRINGERDec. 22, 1907
A. J. HOWELLDec. 22, 1907—Oct. 20, 1912
W. M. CUMMINGMay 7, 1911
A. M. HALLMay 7, 1911
DR. J. G. MURPHYJan. 5, 1913
DR. J. W. STANLYJan. 5, 1913—Mch. 2, 1913

[note][note]



Roll of Dearons

C. W. WORTHJan. 19, 1896—Nov. 12, 1905
WALKER TAYLORJan. 19, 1896
PHILANDER PEARSALLJan. 19, 1896—Feb. 23, 1902
A. J. HOWELLJune 7, 1896—Dec. 22, 1907
GEO. D. PARSLEY*June 7, 1896—Jan. 8, 1906
R. W. HICKSJune 7, 1896
A. M. HALLJune 8, 1902—May 7, 1911
MARSDEN BELLAMY*June 8, 1902—Dec. 1, 1909
H. W. MALLOYDec. 11, 1904—May 28, 1905
M. S. WILLARDDec. 11, 1904
R. A. BRANDDec. 11, 1904—May 28, 1905
J. A. SPRINGERDec. 10, 1905—Dec. 22, 1907
E. C. HOLTDec. 10, 1905
J. O. CARRDec. 10, 1905
C. N. EVANSDec. 29, 1907
JOS. W. LITTLEDec. 5, 1909
R. M. SHEPPARDDec. 5, 1909
W. C. SMITHDec. 5, 1909
GEO. R. FRENCHDec. 5, 1909
DR. J. W. STANLYDec. 5, 1909—Jan. 5, 1913
C. W. WOODWARDApl. 13, 1913
W. D. MCCAIGApl. 13, 1913
GEO. L. MITCHELLApl. 13, 1913
DR. JOHN THAMESApl. 13, 1913

[note]



Roll of Communicants
First Church

ADAMS, J. J.808 Market Street
ADAMS, MRS. J. J.808 Market Street
ADAMS, J. R.1806 Market Street
ALBAUGH, MISS IDA MCKKiang-Yin, China
ALBRIGHT, MISS JULIETTE HOWARD114 South Third Street
ALBRIGHT, MRS. PERCY R.114 South Third Street
ANDERS, E. J. W.105 North Ninth Street
ANDERS, MRS. E. J. W.105 North Ninth Street
ANDREWS, B. N.208 Grace Street
ATKINSON, MISS ALICE412 South Third Street
BACON, CARL K.Winchester, Mass.
BACON, MRS. CARL K.Winchester, Mass.
BACON, MISS LUCY ELIZABETHWinchester, Mass.
BANNERMAN, MRS. SARAH E.314 Ann Street
BARENTINE, MRS. BERTHA M.115 Grace Street
BARRETT, VIRGIL T.Richmond, Va.
BELL, BENJAMIN306 South Fourth Street
BELL, MISS JEANNIE M.306 South Fourth Street
BELL, MISS ELIZABETH K.306 South Fourth Street
BELL, MRS. MARY M.318 Ann Street
BELL, MISS MARY P.The Carolina
BELL, Z. K.306 South Fourth Street
BELLAMY, CHESLEY C.611 Market Street
BELLAMY, MRS. CHESLEY C.611 Market Street
BELLAMY, MISS ELIZA503 Market Street
BELLAMY, MISS ELLEN503 Market Street
BELLAMY, MRS. HATTIE611 Market Street
BELLAMY, JNO. D., 3RD.121 South Second Street
BELLAMY, MRS. MARY W.121 South Second Street
BELLAMY, ROBERT HARLEE612 Princess Street
BENNETT, C. T.Newbern, N. C.
BENNETT, THORBURN POWELLNewbern, N. C.
BIDDLE, MISS ANNIE LUCILLE606 Castle Street





BIDDLE, JOHN WILLIAM606 Castle Street
BIDDLE, MISS JULIA ELIZABETH606 Castle Street
BIDDLE, MISS MARY E.606 Castle Street
BLACKWELL, MRS. MARY JANE121½ South Front Street
BLAIR, MISS CARO BELLNew Orleans, La.
BLAKE, MRS. FLORA CROMARTIEWrightsboro, N. C.
BLALOCK, MRS. D. W.322 South Fifth Street
BLOSSOM, MISS ELIZABETHWrightsboro, N. C.
BOLLES, C. P.119 Nun Street
BOLLES, MRS. C. P.119 Nun Street
BONEY, BRUCE CORNELIUSBisbee, Ariz.
BONEY, MRS. CHRISSIE W.810 Orange Street
BONEY, MISS FLORA114 Grace Street
BONEY, G. JAMES110 Grace Street
BONEY, J. W.810 Orange Street
BONEY, MRS. J. W.810 Orange Street
BONEY, MISS KATE S.810 Orange Street
BONEY, R. B.Auburn, Ind.
BONEY, MISS SALLIE P.810 Orange Street
BONITZ, MISS FLORENCE L.322 South Fifth Street
BORDEAUX, MRS. ELIZABETHCarolina Beach Road
BORDEAUX, GROVER C.Carolina Beach Road
BORDEAUX, MRS. GROVER C.Carolina Beach Road
BORDEAUX, MISS JIMMIE ALEXANDERWinoca Terrace
BORDEN, MISS DURALDE S.419 North Third Street
BORDEN, MRS. M. O.419 North Third Street
BOWDEN, MRS. B. C.Kenansville, N. C.
BOWDEN, EDWARD J.415 South Front Street
BOWDEN, MRS. HENRY415 South Front Street
BOWDEN, J. ATWOOD508 Princess Street
BOWDEN, MISS NELL J.415 South Front Street
BOWMAN, G. A. P.609 Chestnut Street
BOWMAN, MRS. G. A. P.609 Chestnut Street
BRADLEY, MRS. SARAHNew Haven, Conn.
BRAND, MISS ETTA SLOAN313 Chestnut Street
BRAND, MISS MARGARET E.313 Chestnut Street
BRAND, R. A.313 Chestnut Street
BRAND, MRS. R. A.313 Chestnut Street
BRAND, MISS SUSIE COVERT313 Chestnut Street
BREWER, MISS ETHEL SCOTT412 Chestnut Street
BRIGHT, MISS HELEN MAY214 North Fifth Street
BRITTAIN, MRS. J. S.110 Church Street
BROWN, ALEXANDER D.213 South Fifth Street
BROWN, MISS GRACE VIRGINIA916 Market Street





BROWN, H. K.Wrightsboro, N. C.
BROWN, MRS. H. K.Wrightsboro, N. C.
BROWN, JAMESWrightsboro, N. C.
BROWN, ROYALWrightsboro, N. C.
BROWNE, OTWAY LEON916 Market Street
BROWNE, MRS. OTWAY LEON916 Market Street
BRYAN, EGBERT KEDAR11 South Fifth Street
BRYAN, THOMAS R.Atlanta, Ga.
BULLOCK, R. H.221 Market Street
BURLINGAME, MRS. JESSIE L.319 South Front Street
BURLINGAME, MISS JOSEPHINE319 South Front Street
BURLINGAME, LEESpartanburg, S. C.
BURR, MRS. MASON G.616 Princess Street
BURRUSS, MISS ELOVINE T.Norfolk, Va.
BURRUSS, MISS SUSIENorfolk, Va.
CAMPBELL, J. I.315 South Third Street
CAMPBELL, MRS. J. I.315 South Third Street
CARR, JAMES O.1901 Market Street
CARR, MRS. JAMES O.1901 Market Street
CARTWRIGHT, L. W.515 Market Street
CHADBOURN, MRS. JAS. H.1901 Market Street
CHADWICK, MRS. N. B.121 South Eighth Street
CHADWICK, MISS JENNIE L.121 South Eighth Street
CHINNIS, SAMUEL412 North Front Street
CLARK, CHARLES HAIGH9 South Seventh Street
CLARK, EDWIN N.411 Orange Street
CLARK, MRS. EDWIN N.411 Orange Street
CLARK, LANDON GARLAND411 Orange Street
CLARK, MRS. MARY C.412 Market Street
CLEMENT, ROBERT T.A. C. L., City
COLWELL, MRS. ROBERT F.408 Chestnut Street
COOK, MISS NELLIE602 Walnut Street
COOPER, WILLIAM S.Castle Hayne, N. C.
COTTLE, JOSEPHWrightsboro, N. C.
COTTLE, MRS. JOSEPHWrightsboro, N. C.
CRAIG, MISS ELIZABETH MASON117 South Fourth Street
CRAIG, ROY ALEXANDER117 South Fourth Street
CRAIG, W. J.117 South Fourth Street
CRAWFORD, R. W.The Carolina
CROMARTIE, MISS JULIA MCNEILL403 South Fifth Street
CRONLY, MRS. ELIZA L.14 South Third Street
CRONLY, MISS JANE M.215 South Third Street
CRONLY, MISS MARGARET LONDON14 South Third Street





CRONLY, MICHAEL215 South Third Street
CROOM, A. B., JR.114 North Fourth Street
CROOM, MRS. G. H.114 North Fourth Street
CROOM, G. F.Currie, N. C.
CROOM, MRS. G. F.Currie, N. C.
CROSSWELL, H. MARKHouston, Tex.
CROW, MRS. EMMETTHouston, Tex.
CUMMING, MISS KATE115 Church Street
CUMMING, MISS MARY115 Church Street
CUMMING, WILLIAM COOPER115 Church Street
CUMMING, WILLIAM M.115 Church Street
CUMMING, MRS. WILLIAM M.115 Church Street
CURRIE, MRS. FLORA E.1709 Princess Street
CURTISS, GORDON W.308 Grace Street
DAMON, MRS. S. C.Kingston, R. I.
DARDEN, W. H.Wrightsboro, N. C.
DAVIS, MRS. T. W.1707 Market Street
DAVIS, J. HOLMES412 Chestnut Street
DAVIS, MRS. J. HOLMES412 Chestnut Street
DAVIS, MISS MAYME807 Ann Street
DENNY, WILLIAM C.The Carolina
DEROSSET, MRS. R. C.518 South Third Street
DEROSSET, R. C., JR.518 South Third Street
DEVANE, J. D., JR.613 Orange Street
DUFFY, MISS CAROLYN ELIZABETH8 South Eighth Street
DUFFY, MRS. CHARLOTTE GRETTER8 South Eighth Street
DUFFY, MISS DAVIE GRETTER8 South Eighth Street
DUFFY, JAS. LEE8 South Eighth Street
DUNN, ROBT. W.410 Grace Street
DUNN, MRS. ROBT. W.410 Grace Street
DURHAM, MRS. J. H.304 South Second Street
DURHAM, MISS NELLIE ALSTON304 South Second Street
EASON, ANDREW J.Wrightsboro, N. C.
EASON, WALTER E.Wrightsboro, N. C.
EILERS, MISS MATILDA124 South Fifth Street
EMERSON, MRS. WILLIAM P.318 South Front Street
EVANS, CHARLES N.914 Market Street
EVANS, MRS. CHARLES N.914 Market Street
EVERETT, LAWRENCE S.112 South Seventh Street
FAIRWEATHER, MISS ELIZABETH903 Princess Street
FAISON, MISS KATHERINE SPRUNT210 Nun Street
FAISON, MISS JULIA MATTHEWS210 Nun Street





FARLEY, MRS. J. A.611 Grace Street
FARMER, WILLIAM GRAHAM16 North Eighth Street
FARMER, MRS. WILLIAM GRAHAM16 North Eighth Street
FARMER, WILLIAM LOVE16 North Eighth Street
FITCHETT, D. J.812 Orange Street
FITCHETT, MRS. D. J.812 Orange Street
FITCHETT, MISS RUTH812 Orange Street
FLANNER, MRS. A. J.New York, N. Y.
FOREMAN, MRS. J. W.513 South Sixth Street
FOSTER, D. RUSSELL110 North Sixth Street
FOSTER, MRS. D. RUSSELL110 North Sixth Street
FREEMAN, MRS. J. W.19 North Fifth Street
FRENCH, GEORGE R.302 South Third Street
FRENCH, MRS. GEORGE R.302 South Third Street
FRENCH, MRS. EMMA IRENE113 North Eighth Street
FRIELING-SCHORTINGHUIS, WILLEMVan Eeden, N. C.
FRIELING-SCHORTINGHUIS, MRS. WILLEMVan Eeden, N. C.
FRIELING-SCHORTINGHUIS, MISS GERARDAAlbemarle, N. C.
FRIELING-SCHORTINGHUIS, MISS MARGARETHA106 North Sixth Street
GALLOWAY, MISS MINNIE A.219 South Front Street
GASKILL, MRS. J. W.910 South Fourth Street
GAUSE, MRS. T. J.420 South Front Street
GIBSON, MISS MARGARET L.1804 Market Street
GIBSON, MRS. R. W.1804 Market Street
GILBERT, MRS. ANNIE M.Gilbert House
GILBERT, CHARLES DAVID212 Market Street
GILCHRIST, MRS. WILLIAM708 Market Street
GILCHRIST, MISS JENNIE BUCHANAN708 Market Street
GRADY, R. G.108 Nun Street
GRADY, MRS. R. G.108 Nun Street
GRAHAM, MISS MARGARET117 North Third Street
GREEN, MRS. H. C.422 South Fifth Street
GREEN, H. MCL.406 South Third Street
GREEN, MRS. H. MCL.406 South Third Street
HACK, F. C.Denver, Colo.
HALL, A. M.111 Church Street
HALL, MRS. A. M.111 Church Street
HALL, B. F.820 Princess Street
HALL, MRS. B. F.820 Princess Street
HALL, MISS JANE SPRUNT820 Princess Street
HALL, MISS JESSIE DALZIELTsing-Kiang-Pu, China
HALL, JOHN6 South Ninth Street





HALL, MRS. JOHN6 South Ninth Street
HALL, L. E.711 Dock Street
HALL, MISS MAGGIE B.318 South Front Street
HALL, MISS MARY HARGRAVE111 Church Street
HALL, MISS SUSAN ELIZA820 Princess Street
HALL, W. D.316 North Second Street
HALL, WILLIAM GEORGE316 North Second Street
HALLET, ALLEN P.New York, N. Y.
HAND, MRS. LAURACarolina Beach Road
HARPER, JOHN W.311 South Front Street
HARPER, MRS. JOHN W.311 South Front Street
HARRISS, MRS. ADA219 South Sixth Street
HARRISS, MISS ELIZABETH FOY219 South Sixth Street
HARRISS, MISS EUGENIA WILLIAMS503 South Third Street
HARRISS, GEORGE503 South Third Street
HARRISS, MRS. GEORGE503 South Third Street
HARRISS, MISS JOSEPHINE SANDERS219 South Sixth Street
HARRISS, MISS MARYLumberton, N. C.
HASHAGEN, MISS CARRIE BRADFORD517 Orange Street
HASHAGEN, MISS ESTHER DANVERS517 Orange Street
HASHAGEN, MRS. F. E.517 Orange Street
HASHAGEN, FREDERICK E., JR.517 Orange Street
HASHAGEN, GEORGE LOVE517 Orange Street
HASHAGEN, WALTER G.517 Orange Street
HATCHELL, BOYD D.121½ South Front Street
HEAD, MRS. J. F.216 South Second Street
HEDRICK, MRS. J. D.118 South Ninth Street
HEDRICK, JAS. D., JR.118 South Ninth Street
HEDRICK, MARION118 South Ninth Street
HEINSBERGER, EDWARD LEWIS807 Ann Street
HEINSBERGER, MISS MARGARET STUART807 Ann Street
HEINSBERGER, PHILIP, JR.807 Ann Street
HEINSBERGER, MRS. PHILIP, JR.807 Ann Street
HERRING, MISS GLADYS MURPHY302 South Third Street
HERRING, WILLIAM GRAHAM210 North Second Street
HICKS, MISS ATHANASIA ROYAL418 South Third Street
HICKS, JOHN MOORE GRAY418 South Third Street
HICKS, LEWIS GLASGOW418 South Third Street
HICKS, RUFUS W.418 South Third Street
HICKS, MRS. RUFUS W.418 South Third Street
HICKS, RUFUS W., JR.418 South Third Street
HILL, MISS JULIA HAYWOOD405 Princess Street
HOFFMAN, MISS DAISY IRENE705 Dock Street
HOLLADAY, WILLIAM WALTER412 Nun Street





HOLT, E. C.1711 Market Street
HOLT, MRS. E. C.1711 Market Street
HOLT, MISS DOLORES STEVENS1711 Market Street
HOWELL, MRS. ANDREW J.1918 Market Street
HOWELL, CLEWELI1918 Market Street
HOWELL, MRS. C. F.The Carolina
HOWELL, DUDLEY9 South Seventh Street
HOWELL, MISS ELIZA BELLAMY7 South Seventh Street
HOWELL, MISS LAURA1918 Market Street
HOWELL, WILLIAM HARRISS9 South Seventh Street
HUGGINS, MRS ANN M.705 Dock Street
HUGGINS, MISS ANNIE JAMES705 Dock Street
HUGGINS, EDWIN TOOMER101 North Sixth Street
HUGGINS, MRS. EDWIN TOOMER101 North Sixth Street
HUGGINS, GEORGE W.412 Market Street
HUGGINS, MRS. GEORGE W.412 Market Street
HUGGINS, H. ALLEN412 Market Street
HUGGINS, MRS. H. ALLEN412 Market Street
HUGHES, MRS. B. F.110 South Sixth Street
HUNT, H. LACY223 South Fifth Street
HUNT, RAYMONDThe Carolina
HUNT, ROBERT414 South Second Street
HUNT, MRS. ROBERT414 South Second Street
HUNTINGTON, J. B.224 South Fourth Street
HUNTINGTON, MRS. J. B.224 South Fourth Street
JACKSON, CLAUDE L.217 South Second Street
JACKSON, MISS ELOISE310 South Fourth Street
JACKSON, GEORGE CHADBOURN310 South Fourth Street
JACKSON, JAMES W.310 South Fourth Street
JACKSON, MRS. JAMES W.310 South Fourth Street
JACKSON, MISS JEANNIE310 South Fourth Street
JAMES, MRS. GEO. P.Washington, D. C.
JARMAN, J. FRANK1910 Princess Street
JARMAN, MRS. J. F.1910 Princess Street
JOHNSON, MRS. ANNA14 North Fourth Street
JOHNSON, GEORGE T.504 North Fourth Street
JOHNSON, MISS KATIE ELLISON602 Walnut Street
JOHNSON, MISS REBECCA LOVE14 North Fourth Street
JOHNSON, MISS RENA LOUISE14 North Fourth Street
JOHNSON, WARREN S.1519 Chestnut Street
JOHNSON, MRS. WARREN S.1519 Chestnut Street
JONES, MRS. F. H.Atlanta, Ga.
JONES, THOMAS A.Councils, N. C.





JORDAN, A. R.317 North Third Street
JORDAN, MRS. HETTIE B.317 North Third Street
JORDAN, MISS ELIZABETH317 North Third Street
JORDAN, MISS KATIE B.317 North Third Street
JORDAN, MISS LAURA BELL317 North Third Street
KENAN, MRS. GRAHAM202 South Third Street
KENAN, MRS. MARY H.202 South Third Street
KENLY, MISS EDNA MANNINGWinchester, Mass.
KENLY, MRS. J. R.405 South Third Street
KEYES, STUART ROBERTSON115 North Fourth Street
KING, A. M.Winoca Terrace
KING, MRS. A. M.Winoca Terrace
KING, MRS. J. S.Petersburg, Va.
KING, MRS. MARIANA KATHLEENWrightsboro, N. C.
KNAPP, L. A.Dallas, Tex.
KNAPP, MRS. L. A.Dallas, Tex.
KOCH, MRS. W. W.320 Chestnut Street
LARKINS, MISS DURALDE112 South Seventh Street
LATHAM, MRS. GRACE NAYSMITHThe Carolina
LEGRAND, MISS FLORENCE903 Princess Street
LEITNER, MRS. J. F.217 Dock Street
LEWIS, MRS. MARY HOLMES404 North Sixth Street
LEWIS, ROBERT B.613 Walnut Street
LEWIS, MRS. ROBERT B.613 Walnut Street
LEWIS, MRS. SALLIE G.418 South Third Street
LILLY, MISS KATE BUCHANAN504 Orange Street
LINAKER, MRS. SUSAN DRISSEIWrightsboro, N. C.
LITTLE, JOS. W.108 South Third Street
LITTLE, MRS. JOS. W.108 South Third Street
LIVELY, GEORGE H.16 North Eighth Street
LOVE, MISS ANNIE ELIZABETH305 South Second Street
LOVE, WILLIAM W.Winoca Terrace
LOVE, MRS. WILLIAM W.Winoca Terrace
LUCAS, GEORGE F.515 Market Street
MACRAE, MRS. MARTHAAtlanta, Ga.
MCCAIG, W. D.1711 Princess Street
MCCAIG, MRS. W. D.1711 Princess Street
MCCLINTOCK, HOWARD120 South Fifth Street
MCCLINTOCK, MRS. HOWARD120 South Fifth Street
MCCORMICK, AUSTIN D.405 Walnut Street
MCCRARY, MRS. R. E.114 Grace Street





MCDONALD, SIDNEYWrightsville, N. C.
MCDONALD, THOMASWrightsville, N. C.
MCDONALD, MRS. THOMASWrightsville, N. C.
MCINTIRE, MISS FLORA BELL819 Market Street
MCINTIRE, JAMES EDWIN819 Market Street
MCINTIRE, JOHN MCKAYCleveland, Ohio
MCINTIRE, MISS LOUISE819 Market Street
MCINTIRE, MISS ROBBIE EARL819 Market Street
MCINTIRE, MRS. SARAH L.819 Market Street
MCINTIRE, WILLIAM LOVE819 Market Street
MCINTOSH, D. M.507 Orange Street
MCINTOSH, MRS. D. M.507 Orange Street
MCINTOSH, MISS MONTIE9 South Fourth Street
MCKOY, MISS ELIZABETH F.402 South Third Street
MCKOY, FRANCIS K.402 South Third Street
MCKOY, HENRY B.402 South Third Street
MCKOY, MRS. W. B.402 South Third Street
MCKOY, WILLIAM A.Memphis, Tenn.
MCLAURIN, MISS SARAH125 South Fifth Street
MCQUEEN, H. C.318 South Front Street
MCQUEEN, MISS SUE MOORE318 South Front Street
MANNING, MRS. KATE T.509 Orange Street
MANNING, MISS KATHARINE TAYLOR509 Orange Street
MATHERS, J. A.Dundee, Scotland
MATHERS, JOHN M.718 Chestnut Street
MATHERS, MRS. JOHN M.718 Chestnut Street
MATTHEWS, JOHN E.210 Nun Street
MATTHEWS, MRS. JOHN E.210 Nun Street
MAYO, ARTHUR, JR.Washington, N. C.
MEISTER, MRS. C. L.521 Dock Street
MERRIMAN, JOEL ATWOOD404 Orange Street
MERRIMAN, MISS KATIE LEE404 Orange Street
MERRIMAN, L. J.404 Orange Street
MERRIMAN, MRS. L. J.404 Orange Street
MERRIMAN, LEONARD W.404 Orange Street
MERRITT, MRS. WILLIAM E.210 South Ninth Street
MILLER, STEPHEN LEEAsheville, N. C.
MILLER, WILLIAM L.515 Market Street
MILLER, MRS. WILLIAM L.515 Market Street
MILLS, MRS. B. S.The Cape Fear
MITCHELL, GEORGE LINWOOD113 North Fourth Street
MITCHELL, MISS FANNIE STARR113 North Fourth Street
MONROE, JAMES CLARK423 South Third Street
MONROE WILLIAM G.423 South Third Street





MOORE, MISS LUCY JONES212 South Second Street
MOORE, MAURICE HARDIN104 South Fourth Street
MOORE, W. HOUSTON203 North Third Street
MOORE, MRS. W. HOUSTON203 North Third Street
MOORE, MRS. P. Q.104 South Fourth Street
MORSE, MRS. C. S.403 Dock Street
MUNDS, MRS. W. C.818 Market Street
MUNSON, EDWARD HARDING319 Walnut Street
MUNSON, MISS KATE CLARK319 Walnut Street
MURPHY, HUGH T.514 Princess Street
MURPHY, J. G.The Carolina
MURPHY, MISS MARGARET514 Princess Street
MURPHY, ROBERT N.514 Princess Street
MURRAY, CLAUDE405 Princess Street
NEVENS, GEORGE S.Wrightsville, N. C.
NEVENS, MRS. GEORGE S.Wrightsville, N. C.
NEVENS, GEORGE S., JR.Wrightsville, N. C.
NEWELL, MRS. KATE L.410 North Third Street
NORTHROP, MISS LIZZIE MAY506 Dock Street
NORTHROP, MISS MARY M.506 Dock Street
NORTHROP, ROBERT H.108 South Fifth Street
NORTHROP, WILLIAM HARRISSWrightsville Beach, N. C.
O'BERRY, MRS. C. H.318 Ann Street
O'BERRY, MISS GOURNEY SALES318 Ann Street
O'HANLAN, MISS KATETenafly, N. J.
PARSLEY, MISS AMANDA NUTT112 South Seventh Street
PARSLEY, MISS BLANCHE1901 Market Street
PARSLEY, MRS. KATIE KING1901 Market Street
PARSLEY, MISS LAURA BROWN112 South Seventh Street
PARSLEY, MRS. MARY D.112 South Seventh Street
PARSLEY, MISS THERESA1901 Market Street
PARSLEY, WILLIAM M.112 South Seventh Street
PATTERSON, G. K.504 Orange Street
PATTERSON, MRS. G. K.504 Orange Street
PEADRICK, MRS. IDA710 Walnut Street
PEARSALL, PHILANDER314 South Front Street
PEARSALL, MRS. PHILANDER314 South Front Street
PEARSON, MRS. J. E.114 Grace Street
PEATROSS, A. S.The Cape Fear
PEATROSS, MRS. A. S.The Cape Fear
PECK, MRS. ELIZABETH P.311 South Third Street





PECK, MISS ELIZABETH PARSLEY311 South Third Street
PECK, WILLIAM M.311 South Third Street
PEMBERTON, MISS HATTIE BORDEN715 Dock Street
PEMBERTON, MISS ELIZABETH TAYLOR715 Dock Street
PEMBERTON, W. H.715 Dock Street
PEMBERTON, MRS. W. H.715 Dock Street
PENNEY, E. O.3 North Ninth Street
PETERSON, MRS. JANET A.105 North Ninth Street
PHILYAW, MRS. E.1802 Market Street
PINER, T. D.309 North Ninth Street
PINER, MRS. T. D.309 North Ninth Street
PLOWDEN, MISS MARIE LUCILLE308 South Fifth Street
PLOWDEN, MISS REBECCA CAROLINE308 South Fifth Street
PLUMMER, MRS. SUSAN V.312 North Fifth Street
POWELL, MRS. J. W.510 Dock Street
POWERS, MISS HELEN MURIEL714 Dock Street
POWERS, MRS. EMMA T.216 South Second Street
PRICE, MISS BETTIE K.125 South Fifth Street
PRICE, MRS. RICHARD J.224 South Third Street
RAPALJE, HERBERT DEWITTThe Carolina
REESE, P. W.315 South Fifth Street
REESE, MRS. P. W.315 South Fifth Street
REILLY, MRS. JAMES OWEN212 Nun Street
REMICK, MRS. R. C.318 South Third Street
RENNEKER, W. E.218 South Fourth Street
RENNEKER, MRS. W. E.218 South Fourth Street
RENNEKER, MISS FLORENCE EMMA218 South Fourth Street
REYNOLDS, B. B.211 South Fifth Street
ROACHE, JESSE F.419 South Third Street
ROACHE, MRS. JESSE F.419 South Third Street
ROBERTS, C. J.720 Market Street
ROBERTS, MRS. C. J.720 Market Street
ROBERTS, MRS. LENA SANDLINChicago, Ill.
ROBINSON, CHARLES H.109 North Fifth Street
ROBINSON, CHARLES H., JR.Bay St. Louis, Miss.
ROBINSON, MRS. ISABELLE109 North Fifth Street
ROBINSON, UEI. M.New York, N. Y.
ROGERS, MRS. L.Asheville, N. C.
ROGERS, ELIJAH205 South Second Street
ROGERS, MRS. ELIJAH205 South Second Street
ROSE, MRS. R. S.314 South Fifth Street
ROYALL, MRS. W. N.207 North Third Street
RUARK, EDSON C.417 South Fifth Street
RUSH, MISS ROSE GERTRUDE110 North Sixth Street





RUSSELL, B. MCD.111 North Seventh Street
RUSSELL, MRS. B. MCD.111 North Seventh Street
RUSSELL, FRANK H.115 South Third Street
RUSSELL, MRS. FRANK H.115 South Third Street
RUSSELL, MISS KATHARINE115 South Third Street
SAVAGE, MISS ANNA PARSLEY120 South Third Street
SAVAGE, MRS. JANE120 South Third Street
SCHADT, MRS. E. J.918 Princess Street
SCHONWALD, BYRON B.116 Nun Street
SCHONWALD, JOHN T.116 Nun Street
SCHONWALD, MRS. JOHN T.116 Nun Street
SCHROEDER, MRS. MARION M.118 South Ninth Street
SCOTT, ROBERT101 North Fifth Street
SEARS, J. F.520 Dock Street
SEARS, MISS LILLIE MAY517 North Third Street
SELLERS, M. M.312 Red Cross Street
SELLERS, WALLACE W.611 South Second Street
SHAW, HARRY218 South Third Street
SHAW, HEMAN S.218 South Third Street
SHAW, MISS RUTH218 South Third Street
SHAW, MRS. W. M.218 South Third Street
SHAW, WILLIAM M., JR.218 South Third Street
SHEPARD, MRS. L. M.119 Chestnut Street
SHEPARD, MISS MARY LOUISE317 South Second Street
SHEPARD, NORMAN C.119 Chestnut Street
SHEPPARD, RALPH M.414 Princess Street
SHEPPARD, MRS. RALPH M.414 Princess Street
SHEPARD, MISS WINIFRED BOWDEN317 South Second Street
SHEPARD, MRS. J. C.317 South Second Street
SIDBURY, MRS. K. C.1010 Market Street
SIKES, MRS. CHATHAM216 South Second Street
SINCLAIR, D. B.Waycross, Ga.
SKINNER, MISS LUCILLE E.308 South Front Street
SMITH, A. C.The Cape Fear
SMITH, MRS. A. C.The Cape Fear
SMITH, MRS. AMANDA N.102 North Fifth Street
SMITH, MISS HATTIE LOU609 Orange Street
SMITH, R. E.519 South Third Street
SMITH, MRS. ROSE B.315 South Third Street
SMITH, MISS RUTH STUART519 South Third Street
SMITH, MRS. O. B.414 Nun Street
SMITH, W. C.609 Orange Street
SNEED, E. H.422 South Front Street





SNEED, MRS. E. H.422 South Front Street
SOUTHERLAND, MRS. ELLA E.16 North Eighth Street
SOUTHERLAND, MRS. F. MCKOY104 Church Street
SPRINGER, J. A.102 North Fifth Street
SPRINGER, MRS. J. A.102 North Fifth Street
SPRINGER, S. J.513 Princess Street
SPRINGER, MRS. S. J.513 Princess Street
SPRUNT, JAMES400 South Front Street
SPRUNT, MRS. JAMES400 South Front Street
SPRUNT, JAMES LAURENCE411 South Front Street
SPRUNT, MRS. WALTER P.219 North Third Street
STANLY, J. W.323 South Front Street
STANLY, MRS. J. W.323 South Front Street
STEVENSON, WILLIAM M.17 South Eighth Street
STEVENSON, MRS. WILLIAM M.17 South Eighth Street
SULLIVAN, MRS. H. C.714 Dock Street
SUMMY, ALBERT T.23 South Second Street
SUZUKI, SUIWashington, D. C.
TAPP, MRS. R. E.1819 Princess Street
TAYLOR, MISS FANNIE509 Orange Street
TAYLOR, MRS. C. L.Wrightsville, N. C.
TAYLOR, MISS FLORENCE ALLENWrightsville, N. C.
TAYLOR, MISS VIRGINIA CUMMING714 Market Street
TAYLOR, WALKER714 Market Street
TAYLOR, MRS. WALKER714 Market Street
TAYLOR, WALKER, JR.714 Market Street
THACKER, B. W.113 North Eighth Street
THACKER, MRS. B. W.113 North Eighth Street
THAMES, MISS ELIZABETH319 South Front Street
THAMES, FRANCIS CECIL319 South Front Street
THAMES, DR. JOHN319 South Front Street
THAMES, MRS. JOHN319 South Front Street
THAMES, JOHN ALLEN319 South Front Street
THOMAS, CHAS. L. C.Patten School, Asheville, N. C.
THOMAS, ROYWashington, D. C.
THOMPSON, MRS. F. A.109 North Fifth Street
THOMPSON, MISS FANNIE DELL217 Market Street
THOMPSON, MISS GORDON ELMIRA217 Market Street
THOMPSON, MRS. N. G.407 North Seventh Street
THOMPSON, MISS JULIARed Springs, N. C.
THOMPSON, MISS LUCILLE MARY217 Market Street
THOMPSON, MISS NELLIERed Springs, N. C.
THOMPSON, WILLIAM EDWARDDavidson, N. C.





THOMPSON, W. G.Red Springs, N. C.
TOON, MISS EMILY WORTH516 Princess Street
TOON, WILLIAM PINCKNEY516 Princess Street
TOON, MRS. WILLIAM PINCKNEY516 Princess Street
TOON, WILLIAM P., JR.516 Princess Street
TRENHOLM, MRS. J. B.103 South Fourth Street
TURRENTINE, MISS ANNIE PRENTISS314 North Fifth Street
TURRENTINE, MISS CATHERINE314 North Fifth Street
TURRENTINE, MISS HARRIET B.314 North Fifth Street
TURRENTINE, HUGH W.505 Ann Street
TURRENTINE, JOHN R.814 Market Street
TURRENTINE, MRS. JOHN R.814 Market Street
TURRENTINE, JOHN R., JR.314 North Fifth Street
TURRENTINE, MRS. JOHN R., JR.314 North Fifth Street
TURRENTINE, JOHN WILLIAMSON314 North Fifth Street
VON GLAHN, MISS CARRIE MAY19 North Fifth Street
WALLACE, O. T.Birmingham, Ala.
WARROCK, MRS. G. A.307 South Second Street
WARROCK, MRS. V. F.307 South Second Street
WEATHERS, C. M.117 North Third Street
WEATHERS, MRS. C. M.117 North Third Street
WEATHES, MISS HELEN117 North Third Street
WEBB, MRS. SADIE D.Wrightsboro, N. C.
WELLS, JAMES L.311 North Fifth Street
WELLS, JOHN M., JR.315 Orange Street
WELLS, MRS. JOHN M., JR.315 Orange Street
WELLS, THOMAS M.315 Orange Street
WELLS, WILLIAM CALVIN315 Orange Street
WESTBROOK, MISS EMILY S.Greensboro, N. C.
WHITEHEAD, MRS. Z. W.212 Orange Street
WHITEHEAD, THOMAS RUFFIN212 Orange Street
WHITEHEAD, MRS. WILLIAM A.401 South Third Street
WHITEHEAD, WILLIAM G.401 South Third Street
WHITEHEAD, MRS. WILLIAM G.401 South Third Street
WHITLOCK, HAROLD W.Columbus, Ohio
WIGGINS, MISS AUGUSTA224 South Third Street
WIGGINS, J. M.213 North Second Street
WIGGINS, MRS. J. M.213 North Second Street
WIGGINS, MISS MARY MCLAUGHLIN224 South Third Street
WILLARD, MARTIN S.520 Orange Street
WILLARD, MRS. T. B.1419 South Third Street





WILLIAMS, DUNCAN M.513 Market Street
WILLIAMS, E. D.115 North Fourth Street
WILLIAMS, MISS FANNIE REID10 South Fifth Street
WILLIAMS, MISS MARTHA10 South Fifth Street
WILLIAMS, ZEBNewbern, N. C.
WILLIAMS, MRS. ZEBNewbern, N. C.
WILLSON, JAMES E.615 Princess Street
WILLSON, MRS. JAMES E.615 Princess Street
WILLSON, JAMES E., JR.615 Princess Street
WILLSON, MISS LASSIE PRICE615 Princess Street
WILLSON, MISS MARY S.615 Princess Street
WILLSON, MISS MAUD ELIZABETH615 Princess Street
WINDLEY, MRS. MARY J.Wrightsboro, N. C.
WISE, MRS. JESSIE K.110 Nun Street
WISE, MISS LOUISE CLISBY110 Nun Street
WOOD, EDWARD JENNER407 South Third Street
WOOD, MRS. EDWARD JENNER407 South Third Street
WOOD, MISS ETHEL320 Chestnut Street
WOOD, MISS JEANNIE DALZIEL201 Chestnut Street
WOOD, JOHN HUNTER81 Waban Avenue, Waban, Mass.
WOOD, MRS. JOHN HUNTER81 Waban Avenue, Waban, Mass.
WOOD, MISS MAGGIE HALL201 Chestnut Street
WOOD, MRS. MARY K.201 Chestnut Street
WOOD, THOMAS F.519 South Third Street
WOOD, MRS. THOMAS F.519 South Third Street
WOODARD, CHARLES W.1806 Market Street
WOODARD, MISS EMMA M.210 North Second Street
WOODARD, MRS. MARY J.210 North Second Street
WORTH, MISS ANNIE ELIZABETH412 South Third Street
WORTH, CHARLES W.412 South Third Street
WORTH, MRS. CHARLES W.412 South Third Street
WORTH, CHARLES WILLIAMKiang-Yin, China
WORTH, MISS EMMA ADELAIDE412 South Third Street
WORTH, GEORGE C.Kiang-Yin, China
WORTH, MRS. GEORGE C.Kiang-Yin, China
WORTH, MISS LOUISE GASTON412 South Third Street
WORTH, MISS MARY412 South Third Street
WORTH, WILLIAM CHADBOURNKiang-Yin, China
WORTH, WM. E.211 Orange Street
WORTH, MRS. WM. E.211 Orange Street
WRIGHT, MISS MARY C.107 South Seventh Street
YEAGER, ALEX S.704 Castle Street
YEAGER, MRS. ALEX S.704 Castle Street





Delgado Mission

ADAMS, O. H.DEW, MISS LOTTIE MAY
ARTHUR, ROBT. E.
ELLIS, T. MOODY
BARFIELD, LOTELLIS, MRS. LULA R.
BENTON, MRS. CALLIEEVANS, MISS ROWENA
BENTON, CLARENCE LEO
BIGGS, BENJAMIN R.FAULK, MISS ELLA
BENSON, MISS GERTRUDEFLOYD, MISS MORTIE MAY
BENSON, MISS MARY LFOWLER, MISS HATTIE
BENSON, MISS HALLIEFRYAR, WALTER N.
BRANCH, WILLIAM A.
BRANCH, MRS. IDA L.GODBOLD, R. L.
BROWN, MISS DAISY V.GODBOLD, MRS. R. L.
BROWN, EDGARGOINS, MISS PEARL I.
BROWN, ERNEST L.GOLEY, JOHN W.
BUCK, MRS. JOHNNIE L.GOLEY, MRS. BERTHA H.
BUIE, H. R.GOLEY, LAWRENCE B.
BUIE, MRS. H. R.GRADY, MISS PEARL
BUIE, MRS. HOLLAND H.GRAY, MISS ANNIE
GURGANUS, MRS. MARY S.
CALL, ALBERT EDWARD
CALL, MISS ISABELLAHARRIS, MRS. FLOSSIE G.
CANFIELD, J. SHEPHERDHAYS, MISS IDA G.
CARLSTROM, JOSEPH H.HAYS, WILLIAM THOMAS
CARTER, HAMILTONHILL, GASTON N.
CLEMMONS, JOSEPHHILL, MRS. G. N.
CLEMMONS, MRS. HETTIE E.HINES, ISAAC F.
COBLE, MARTINE V.HOBBS, MRS. MAGGIE S.
COBLE, MRS. MAUDE C.HOLLOMAN, CHAUNCEY
COOK, GRADY BANKSHOLT, WILLIAM L.
COOK, MRS. VALLIE M.HOLT, MRS. WILLIAM L.
COOK, ELIJAH TILDENHORNE, MISS PEAN
COOK, MRS. SMITHY W.HORNE, JOHN
COOK, GROVERHOWARD, MRS. KATIE W.
COOK, MRS. BESSIE MAYHUFFHAM, BENJAMIN B.
CREECH, H. C.
JOHNSON, ORIN
DEW, WILLARD V.JOHNSON, MRS. ORIN
DEW, MRS. MARY C.JOHNSON, MRS. CLARA B.





JOHNSON, ORIN RUFUSSCOGGINS, MRS. LUCY P.
JOHNSON, JNO. MAHONEYSIMMONS, MRS. NETTIE
JOHNSON, MISS MARIE THERESASIMMONS, MISS ADA BELL
JOHNSON, MRS. VICTORIA R.SIMMONS, MRS. LIZZIE
JORDAN, MRS. ANNIESIMMONS, ERNEST CARR
JORDAN, LAWRENCE G.SIMMONS, MISS SUSANNA
JORDAN, MRS. OLIVE T.SIMMONS, MISS MYRTLE
JORDAN, MISS MAGGIESKIPPER, CHAS. L.
JORDAN, PAUL R.SKIPPER, MRS. CHAS. L.
JUSTICE, CLIFTON E.SMITH, MRS. NETTIE W.
SMITH, MRS. IDA LOUISE
LIGON, A. G.SUMMERLIN, JOHN
LITTLE, DONNIE C.SUMMERLIN, MRS. ALICE
SUMMERLIN, CLARENCE
MCNEILL, MRS. MARY E.SUMMERLIN, GEORGE
MILLIGAN, J. R.THOMPSON, MISS ETTA
MILLIGAN, MRS. SALLIE
MILLIGAN, MISS JESSIEWAGNER, IRVIN BOYD
MOORE, MRS. MINNIE R.WAGNER, MISS VALVIE HOPE
WAGNER, MISS MARY E.
PRUITT, MRS. H. R.WALLACE, MISS ELSIE L.
PRUITT, MISS RACHEL L.WALLACE, MRS. JULIA C.
WALLER, JOHN T.
RACKLEY, J. R.WARD, MISS MANDY VIRGINIA
RACKLEY, MRS. J. R.WARD, MISS DELLA
REYNOLDS, MRS. ALBERTA C.WARREN, MISS LIZZIE M.
REYNOLDS, MISS MYRTLEWATTS, MISS ADDIE BELLE
RIGGANS, JESSE R.WEAVER, MRS. LUCY
RIGGANS, MRS. MARY W.WEAVER, MISS ELIZABETH
ROBINSON, MISS JENNIE M.WEAVER, SAMUEL THOMAS
ROGERS, ANDREW J.WEAVER, MRS. CARRIE E.
ROGERS, GEO. R.WELLS, MISS MAGGIE M. C.
ROGERS, MISS GRACE J. D.WHITE, MISS SALLIE IRENE
ROGERS, MRS. NYCIE OVILLAWILLIAMSON, MRS. CLAUDIA F.
ROWAN, MRS. MARYWOODCOCK, CARL
ROWAN, MRS. MINNIEWOODCOCK, FREDERICK HERBERT
ROWAN, JOHN D.WOODS, WALTER A.
WOODS, MRS. JENNIE H.
SCOGGINS, WM. C.WOODS, MISS NEENAH FAY

































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