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Camp Lejeune leathernecks

Date: 1946 | Identifier: VE24.N8 C37 1946
Camp Lejeune leathernecks : Camp Lejeune, N.C., Marine Corps' largest all-purpose base / by Gertrude S. Carraway ; with the cooperation of the Public Information Division of Marine Corps Headquarters and Camp Lejeune authorities. New Bern [N.C.] : O.G. Dunn Co., 1946. 100 p. : ill., map, ports. ; 23 cm. Advertising matter included in paging. more...
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Camp Lejeune Leathernecks

[Illustration:

Semper Fidelis
United States Marine Corps Official Seal]


UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS
TRAINING CENTER

Campe Lejeune
North Carolina









Camp Lejeune Leathernecks


[Illustration:

Semper Fidelis
United States Marine Corps Official Seal]






[Illustration:

Camp Lejeune General Area Map
]





Camp Lejeune
Leathernecks


[Illustration:


vignette]

CAMP LEJEUNE. N. C.
MARINE CORPS’ LARGEST ALL-PURPOSE BASE

BY
GERTRUDE S. CARRAWAY

With the Cooperation of the Public Information Division of
Marine Corps Headquarters and Camp Lejeune Authorities.
All Illustrations, Unless Otherwise Designated, are Official U. S. Marine
Corps Photographs. Assisting with the Advertising Pages were Members
of the Joseph Montfort Chapter, Daughters of the American
Revolution, of Jacksonville, N. C.
This Booklet is Dedicated and Donated to the Camp Lejeune Leathernecks,
with the Compliments of the Author and the Advertisers
NEW BERNOWEN G. DUNN COMPANY
PublishersOctober, 1946




[Illustration:

VIEW OF MAIN TRAFFIC CIRCLE AND ROSE GARDEN NEAR ADMINISTRATION BUILDING IN THE AREA AT HADNOT POINT
]





CAMP LEJEUNE

The largest all-purpose Marine base in the world and generally conceded to be one of the most beautiful military posts anywhere in the country, Camp Lejeune is located strategically on the scenic banks of New River in Onslow County in the south coastal area of North Carolina, a few miles from Jacksonville, which is 37 miles southwest of New Bern and 51 miles northeast of Wilmington.

Only a little more than five years old, this miracle camp was constructed and developed at a crucial period in American history. Here were trained many of the famous Leatherneck units which played such vital roles in helping win the conflict in the Pacific during World War II.

Under extensive peacetime plans for its permanent use as the center of the varied training activities of the United States Marine Corps on the East Coast, it will be the home base of approximately 22,000 Leathernecks in a complete Marine Division and units of the Atlantic Fleet Marine Forces. It is slated to continue as the best-equipped Marine station in the nation for practically all types of training for America's oldest branch of military service.

All Marine assignments of almost every kind are rehearsed at Lejeune, except that preliminary boot training for recruits is conducted at Parris Island, S. C., and officer training forms the main feature at Quantico, Va. In addition, facilities are here for Seabees, the Navy Construction Battalions. The Navy mans the landing barges, lighters and Higgins boats used in the training for amphibious warfare. These boats were manned in the war period by Coast Guardsmen. The modern airport at Peterfield Point served during the war as an outlying field of the Marine Air Station at Cherry Point.

The mammoth reservation of 173.68 square miles includes 111,155 acres, of which 85,155 acres are on land and 26,000 are under water. Eleven miles skirt directly along the Atlantic Ocean and are used not only for recreational purposes but also for the amphibious tactics which have made famed for 171 years the versatile “Soldiers of the Sea.”

Noted for its many, different facilities and wealth of modern equipment, Camp Lejeune presents an unusually attractive appearance. Planned carefully from the outset and built systematically for practical usage, instead of “just growing,” as is true of numerous other posts, it is closely coordinated, despite the fact that it is spread over such a vast area. As of July 1, 1946, a total of approximately $75,000,000 had been spent or authorized on its construction.






[Illustration:

DIVISION HEADQUARTERS OVERLOOKING SCENIC NEW RIVER
]

All of the buildings, with the exception of those in the Industrial Area, follow the general lines of the Georgian style of Colonial architecture, appropriate for the historic region and picturesque in general aspect. The main trend is towards red brick with white woodwork trim.

There are 3,150 buildings on the site, including the Division Headquarters overlooking New River, the Administration Building, Camp Dispensary, Main Heating Plant, Hostess House, two churches, mammoth camp theatre, regimental theatres, mess halls and recreation centers at Hadnot Point; large warehouses, offices and a commissary covering four acres in the Industrial Area; homes and stores at Midway Park; officers’ quarters at Paradise Point; and numbers of other structures at Montford Point, Courthouse Bay, Onslow Beach, Camp Knox and the Rifle Range.

Through the camp run 130 miles of paved highways, about 500 miles of unpaved roads, and 85 miles of sidewalks. With steam and Diesel electric generating plants, there are 150 miles of electric lines, with six electrical sub-stations as well as extra service from the Tide Water Power Company. A total of 165 miles of telephone lines connect three dial and three manual telephone exchanges.


[Illustration:

ADMINISTRATION BUILDING IN MAIN AREA AT HADNOT POINT
]





Eighteen central heating plants have 45 miles of steam distribution. There are 3.91 miles of fuel oil distribution lines and 12 miles of propane gas distribution lines. Seventy miles of sewer lines lead to 13 sewer pumping stations. There are seven sewage treatment and two water treatment plants.

One of only a few of its kind, the main ultra-modern water treatment plant, built at a cost of more than $1,000,000, is the largest in the country. It purifies 2,100 gallons of water an hour. Its daily capacity of 3,000,000 gallons will be increased soon to 5,000,000 by addition of four more tanks.

The water is fed into the Spiractor System from 21 well pumper stations in the Hadnot Point area. Pumping is by electricity, but in case of emergency gasoline pumps may be used. By a remote control outfit, the pumping mechanisms may be turned off in the wells whenever deemed advisable.


[Illustration:

WATERWORKS HAVE SERVED AS MODELS FOR OTHER CAMPS
]

All water is tested continuously in the plant's laboratory to be sure it is free from contaminating substances. This system also works on electric power, but three of the four pumps may also be run by gasoline should the need arise. Two chemicals are added to the water to insure its purity. These are lime and chlorine. About 250 pounds of lime and 11 pounds of chlorine are mixed daily. Most of these chemicals are filtered out later in the process of softening and purifying the water.

Another mammoth structure, tallest on the reservation, is the central heating plant in the Industrial Area. Heat and steam are furnished from it to Hadnot Point and surrounding sections as far away as the Naval Hospital.

Considered the most efficient plant of the type in naval service, the automatic steam plant burns powdered coal, which is pulverized before being injected into the combustion chamber. There are four main boilers, not all of which are required to operate at the same time. The boilers are so enormous that the outside walls of the building were constructed around them after they had been installed.






[Illustration:

STONE BAY CAMP AT THE RIFLE RANGE
]

An addition to the Cold Storage plant will double the cold storage space and provide more room for fresh vegetables, meat and other products which require refrigeration.

Storage will also be available at the old Tent Camp site, on Highway 17, just southwest of Jacksonville, which was the first part of the reservation to be used for construction headquarters and Marine training. It may also be utilized for Summer training of Marine Corps Reserves.

Since the First Division Marines trained in the Fall of 1941 and Spring of 1942 at the Tent Camp, the post has been phenomenally expanded. The permanent buildings at Hadnot Point and the numerous structures at Montford Point, Courthouse Bay, Onslow Beach and the Rifle Range have the most up-to-date equipment for the most modern amphibious training anywhere in the world.

Schools of many various types are conducted on the reservation for specialized training. Three swimming pools—two at Hadnot Point and one at the Negro Marine training center at Montford Point—are used for teaching combat methods in water. Each is 110 feet long and 60 feet wide, built at cost of $225,000. These are among the many training facilities at this outstanding military establishment.


[Illustration:

CAMP DISPENSARY IS AN ATTRACTIVE GEORGIAN STRUCTURE
]





Probably the longest railroad on any military post in the United States connects farflung portions of Lejeune's property. It extends for 17 miles from the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad tracks outside the reservation a mile northeast of Jacksonville.

A booming utility operated and maintained by a crew of 19 Civil Service employees, who took over the task from the original Marine operators, it owns a steam locomotive, three General Electric Diesel engines, seven freight cars and a caboose. Along its route are 35 switches, two bridges, and 11,560 ties per mile.

Freight includes construction materials, gasoline, oil and camp supplies. An average of 350 cars per month, or about 22,000 tons of materials, move through the post. Two round-trips are made daily, in about 22 minutes each way, between the A. C. L. junction and the Industrial Area.

All troop trains are provided by the A. C. L. and are run into the camp for loading Marines and their equipment. Thousands of Leathernecks were thus conveyed out of North Carolina for their trips to Pacific battlefronts.


[Illustration:

RAILROAD IS PERHAPS THE LONGEST ON ANY MILITARY POST
]

Urgently needed in 1941 to haul materials for the camp construction, the eight-mile section to the Industrial Area was completed in record time of 60 days. The remaining sidings, yards, switches and extensions were finished later. The railroad was turned over to the Marine Corps by the A. C. L. on Dec. 2, 1943.

Proud of their excellent safety record, the operators set a top speed of 30 miles an hour for their trains. Moving almost noiselessly, without sparks, the engines travel only in the daytime now, thus not disturbing the night slumbers and peace of the nearby residents.

Just across Highway 24 from the main camp entrance, about five miles from Jacksonville on the way to Swansboro, is Midway Park, a modern housing project community of around 4,000 civilian employees and military personnel.






[Illustration:

ROW OF HOMES IN HOUSING PROJECT AT MIDWAY PARK
]

Planned Sept. 1, 1941, to provide living quarters for the several thousand construction workers, in addition to the 900-unit Trailer Camp, this permanent little city of nearly 1,200 units now boasts a new $350,000 shopping center, with stores, bank, postoffice, theatre, service stations and a telephone exchange.

Offering rents at reasonable prices, houses may be obtained there with or without furnishings at costs scaled from $15.60 to $47.60 per month, including utilities. The 36 different rental grades prove that every effort is made to be fair equally to the civilian, corporal or sergeant occupant.

Residents pay county and state revenue, but there is no local tax, as all civic maintenances such as sanitation and fire protection are provided by the Marine Corps. There is a civilian police force. A community clubhouse is a main feature, with nursery, library, canteen, clinical facilities and an auditorium for church services, home nursing classes, club meetings and social events.

A well-staffed grammar school teaches the boys and girls from kindergarten through the fifth grade. Nearby on the base is the Paradise Point school, which takes pupils from the sixth grade on up through high school. Accredited by the Southern Educational Association, the Midway Park-Camp Lejeune school system is one of those in North Carolina whose graduation credits are accepted without special examination for college admission.


[Illustration:

PARADISE POINT SCHOOL LOCATED ON THE RESERVATION
]





Named not because of its midway location but in honor of the Battle of Midway, in which Leathernecks played such a successful part, the little city is proud of its heritage and its future. It runs no risk of becoming a “ghost town” or losing its distinctive personality as an essential metropolis serving a great military installation.

At the entrance to Montford Point Camp from Highway 24 nearer Jacksonville is the Federal Cemetery, to which all white bodies were moved with their tombstones from the private cemeteries found on the reservation. Negroes were similarly buried together near Verona.

Besides the approximately 22,000 Marines in the Second Marine Division and the Fleet Marine Force, Atlantic, who will be assigned to duty at Camp Lejeune, there will be post troops for maintenance, guard and service duties and the provost marshal's office. About 900 civilians are also engaged for maintenance.


[Illustration:

ONE OF THE FIRE HOUSES WHICH GUARD AGAINST FIRES
]

Nine postoffices are at the camp, all under the supervision of the New Bern postoffice. The main civilian branch is at Hadnot Point, where the Marine Corps has a distributing branch. Marines run the postoffices at Montford Point, Tent Camp, Courthouse Bay and the Rifle Range. Civilians are in charge of the postoffices at the Naval Hospital, Trailer Camp and Midway Park. About 35 civilians are employed. Postal receipts during 1945 aggregated $190,000, considered a large amount since most of the letters are mailed free by servicemen.

Five fire towers are manned by Civil Service employees and there are a number of fire houses, connected by a fire control system. At times of threatening forest fires outside the reservation, the camp sends fire fighters and has been of inestimable value in keeping down fire losses through the region.

Forestry experts conduct projects in thinning and cutting out trees and brush. Highway roadsides are beautified. A sawmill is operated on the base, and it is reported that it handles enough timber to furnish the entire Marine Corps with almost all its lumber needs.





Attention at first was necessarily devoted to building the camp and training the Leathernecks for combat. All the commanding officers had important parts along these lines. With the end of the war in Europe and the close of the Pacific conflict in sight, Maj. Gen. John Marston, then commanding general, began during May, 1945, to beautify sections of the permanent camp, which by then had been practically finished so far as main construction was concerned.

From the outset Navy and Marine authorities endeavored to keep the natural beauty of the river resort. Trees had been left standing wherever possible. General Marston directed the planting of thousands of trees, shrubs and flowers to make the site one of the state's showplaces.


[Illustration:

MAIN CAMP THEATRE WITH SEATING CAPACITY FOR 2,000
]

With amazing luck almost all of the 30,000 azalea plants set out lived and bloomed in April, 1946, to be admired by thousands of visitors. They were arranged attractively under tall pine trees in numerous vistas, being especially lovely at Paradise Point. Since then 75,000 more azaleas have been planted.

Set out also during the past year were 1,200 trees, including maple, live oak, cherry and other varieties. Among them were 500 weeping Japanese cherry trees, one of which was planted by Governor R. Gregg Cherry of North Carolina. Many holly trees have been planted, as well as 30,000 camellia japonica seedlings. The huge camellia “trees” which formerly grew at the Coddington Estate at Town Point were transplanted at Paradise Point.

Along the grassy parkway for the five and a half miles along the double Holcomb Boulevard from the main camp entrance to the river have been planted trailing roses. At the main traffic center near the Administration Building is a rose garden of 900 rose bushes.






[Illustration:

OFFICERS’ CLUB AND MESS AT PARADISE POINT
]

Rhododendron, for which Western Carolina is famous, is also being planted for another touch of color at the Eastern Carolina camp. Dogwood, the official State flower, blooms in both white and pink varieties, with striking effects in the Spring from numerous woodlands which dot the huge post.

A large nursery is operated by the Quartermaster department. Twenty acres have a profusion of young trees, plants, shrubs and flowers of all kinds, including 50 varieties of camellias and huge specimens of Easter lilies. There are greenhouses and beds galore for raising plants to be moved to various parts of the base.

Those persons familiar previously with the white, dry sand of Onslow County will be better able to appreciate how the Leathernecks and their civilian associates have had to plan and work to get such outstanding results. In most cases they have provided special beds of fertile soil, spent much money for the best fertilizers and then kept plenty of water on tap for frequent use. Only scrub oak and pine used to grow in many of the places where roses and azaleas now flourish.


[Illustration:

QUARTERS FOR A GENERAL IN OFFICERS’ COUNTRY
]






[Illustration:

POST EXCHANGES CARRY VARIED LINES OF MERCHANDISE
]

All this planting and landscaping have been paid for by profits from the post exchange sales on the camp, with the exception of 250 trees bought by the government for the fronts of the officers’ quarters. No post exchange profits can be used for officers.

Gross sales at the post exchanges during the past year came to $13,000,000. Profits amounted to $1,250,000. The profit margin is held to 15 per cent; but pennies can not be given in change, so the profit is greater on some articles for which the charge has to be set up at the nearest nickel. The volume of business is tremendous. Marines trade extensively at the post exchanges. Although the number had dropped to around 12,000 by May, 1946, under the accelerated discharge system at the camp separation center, there were 42,000 stationed here in August, 1945.


[Illustration:

INTERIOR OF CAMP COMMISSARY IN INDUSTRIAL AREA
]






[Illustration:

LANDSCAPED ADMINISTRATION AREA AT HADNOT POINT
]

The Marines publish their own newspaper, the Camp Lejeune Globe, which carries weekly news of all local events and plans as well as items of interest from around the globe. On Feb. 15, 1944, the 16-page paper was born, the largest of all service newspapers. It succeeded the earlier eight-page New River Pioneer; and its mimeographed predecessor, “The Word.”

Thus Camp Lejeune is practically self-sufficient. On its grounds are almost every phase of civic life to be found in any city. Spirituality and recreation and beauty are blended intrinsically with the training provided for the men in uniform.

During the war the camp was not open to visitors and sightseers, for reasons of military security. Since April, 1946, however,


[Illustration:

ONE OF PARADISE POINT BACHELOR OFFICERS’ QUARTERS
]





the general public has had a cordial welcome there at any time, without official passes. Thousands have taken advantage of their opportunity to view the site, resembling as it does a huge college campus, with sloping lawns, landscaped grounds, tall trees, flowering shrubs and blooming flowers but incorporating varied facilities for educating and training Leathernecks to continue their reputation as “The toughest fighters in the world.”

Money alone did not build the post. Months of planning and revising were required on the parts of the architects, engineers, public works department employees, civilian workers and Marine authorities. All together, they have designed a camp that ranks as a great credit not only to them but also to the State of North Carolina which is proud to include it in its boundaries.


[Illustration:

AERIAL PHOTOGRAPH OF DIVISION HEADQUARTERS
With Parking Spaces at Right and New River in the Background

]





STORY OF CAMP

The construction record at Camp Lejeune reads like a miracle story of outstanding achievement. Envisioned when the world crisis tended to draw the United States into global conflict, it was built under the phenomenal magic of expert craftsmanship in time to play a paramount role in World War II.

Realizing that as always they would be called upon to be “First to Fight,” Marines anticipated the need for a mammoth East Coast Fleet Marine headquarters and training center. Their expansion plans had outgrown Quantico and Parris Island.

On Feb. 15, 1941, their request for new ground and air bases was approved by the House Naval Affairs Committee. Chairman Fred M. Vinson issued the following report to accompany a bill authorizing the Secretary of the Navy to proceed with the project:

“After detailed reconnaissance by a board of Marine officers of various areas along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts between Norfolk, Va., and Corpus Christi, Tex., it was determined that the areas in the vicinity of the New River and Neuse River in North Carolina, were the only ones which meet the requirements. . . .

“In order that there will be no operational interference between airplanes and elements of the ground forces, such as artillery and anti-aircraft, it is advisable to establish the air facilities in an area outside the divisional area proper. The distance between the two, however, should not be so great as to render the necessary ground-air liaison and combined training impractical. They should be as close as possible without mutual interference.

“A suitable training area for all elements of a Marine division requires that there be access to deep-water ports; that it include an area of at least ten miles square, unobstructed by public roads, railroads, industries or habitations which would interfere with firing by artillery weapons up to six inch, or with aircraft and anti-aircraft gunnery; that landing beaches providing varying surf conditions be available; that suitable sites exist for the operation of land and sea planes; that it be in proximity to recreation areas; and that rail transportation and power be readily available.”

Even prior to this report it had been rumored that Eastern North Carolina would be the most ideal place for such national defense programs by reasons of its geographical situation, climatic conditions, long oceanfront, topographical advantages, and isolated areas.

At the request of Representative Graham A. Barden of New Bern, Governor J. Melville Broughton of North Carolina had on his inauguration day in January, 1941, pledged the aid and co-operation of the State.





Lt. Raymond P. Murphy, USNR, was the first government representative to arrive in the region in connection with actual beginning of preliminary work on the bases. Even before the site had been definitely chosen, he reached Jacksonville on February 4 to survey and appraise lands involved in the proposed project. William G. Broadfoot and Leslie N. Boney, of Wilmington, N. C., were engaged for engineering assignments. An initial appropriation of $1,500,000 for surveys and land purchases was announced February 15 by President Franklin D. Roosevelt and Secretary of the Navy Frank Knox.

First papers condemning the first 6,000 acres of land contemplated for the ground base were filed in Federal Court at New Bern the first of April by Clyde Gooch, of Salisbury, N. C., special assistant to the United States Attorney General. Cost of all property desired was estimated at $1,200,000. Approximately 600 farm families had to be evacuated from their homes in the area.

From all parts of the region had come promises of support. Prominent leaders lent their efforts to encourage landowners to comply with government requests to keep prices from being raised too high on the property. Comparatively few suits were taken eventually to court, and most of these were settled amicably.

Members of the special Marine Corps board appointed to select the sites were Brig. Gen. (now Maj. Gen.) Julian C. Smith, Col. (now Maj. Gen.) Pedro del Valle, and Lt. Col. (now Brig. Gen.) Thomas J. Cushman. From land, sea and air careful inspections were made over a wide territory. By April 10 they submitted a definite recommendation that New River be chosen for the ground base and Neuse River for the air station.

The Navy Department announced April 22 in Washington that three firms of Charlotte, N. C., had been awarded the contract for building a $14,575,000 Marine base in Onslow County, the largest original contract up to that time awarded in the South for the nation's defense. These co-venturers were the Goode Construction Corporation, Blythe Brothers Company and the Harrison-Wright Company.

Previously the architect's contract had been let to George Watts Carr, of Durham, N. C., with whom the J. E. Greiner Company, of Baltimore, was associated as engineers for the camp.

Construction plans were rushed. F. J. Blythe was named project manager. The Goode Corporation undertook the erection of buildings as the major part of its share of the contract; Blythe Brothers had charge of roads and public utilities, including drainage and sewers; and the Harrison-Wright Company handled all electrical installations.

A call for 100 laborers to report April 28 for work in Onslow County was issued through the New Bern district office of the





United States Employment Service. Attention was first given to the erection of construction offices at what later became the Tent Camp. Office and administration buildings were finished there in rapid order. A New River branch of the New Bern postoffice was opened there during the last part of May to handle the heavy mails.

On July 16 Secretary of the Navy Knox arrived at the New Bern airport for his first official inspection of the Marine Barracks site. He was met by Col. W. P. T. Hill, USMC, liaison officer between the Marine Corps and the Navy engineers; and Lt. Comdr. Madison Nichols, USNR, first resident naval officer in charge of construction. The Secretary expressed hearty approval of the progress and plans, although heavy rains during his visit made the dirt roads so muddy that the automobile in which he rode became mired more than once.


[Illustration:

PART OF TENT CITY AS IT APPEARED IN OCTOBER, 1941
]

By then Tent City was nearing completion. More than 1,000 tents were expected to be ready within several weeks for the arrival of the first Marines. Construction had been begun on the permanent camp site on the north side of New River between Hadnot Point and French Creek. Roads, sewers and foundations had been started, and clearing and grading of the grounds were under way. Progress had been made on the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad's spur track to the site.

Maj. John Kaluf, now a colonel in the Marine Corps, arrived in New Bern to make his home during July, as the purchasing and disbursing officer for the Marine Barracks. He kept busy buying supplies for the 6,000 Marines expected at the Tent Camp.

Although no stone had been known before to exist in coastal Carolina, limestone was discovered fortunately in the nearby White Oak River section, and was dug from the first machine mine in Eastern North Carolina at Belgrade by the Superior Stone Company for urgent use on roads, railroad tie ballast and concrete foundations.





In August foundations were poured for a 6,000-horsepower REA Diesel electric plant on North East Creek near Jacksonville to furnish electricity for the camp. A route for 110,000-volt transmission lines was staked off through the pocosin to connect with the planned $1,800,000 steam power plant at Cherry Point.

Two companies of Civilian Conservation Corps youths assisted with road work, forestry and other phases of developing the Onslow swamp lands into a modern military post. Much malaria control drainage and mosquito eradication work were also accomplished by the Navy and Public Health authorities.

During September First Division Marines landed at Tent City under the command of Brig. Gen. Philip H. Torrey, soon promoted to major general, who arrived on September 26. A few Leathernecks had come earlier and occupied an old structure at Paradise Point to act as a fire guard. And a number of Marines, sailors and soldiers had been on temporary duty off Onslow Beach during Summer maneuvers.

Col. D. L. S. Brewster, afterward promoted to brigadier-general, (now deceased), arrived at New River September 9 as the first post commandant. Temporary camp headquarters were established in a renovated building at Montford Point, formerly used as a rod and gun clubhouse. This Marine Barracks headquarters was officially opened September 15, and the colors were raised there September 20.

The next month the offices of Colonel Hill and Lieutenant-Commander Nichols were moved from Tent City to the permanent camp site across New River. By that time construction work on the 120 acres at Tent City had been practically completed. One or two of the 400 Marine officers were assigned to each officer's tent; and six of the 6,000 enlisted Marines shared each larger tent. General Torrey used a farmhouse.

About 5,500 persons were then employed at the permanent site at Hadnot Point, and within a few weeks the number was increased to 8,000. So many laborers resided in distant rural sections that a fleet of Navy buses took them to and from work.


[Illustration:

STEEL FRAMES FOR FIRST BARRACKS IN OCTOBER, 1941
]





Of the 48 fireproof barracks planned for permanent use of approximately 13,000 Marines, foundations had been laid for 42 and steel structures were up for 18. They were made of strip steel frames with brick veneer, plastered interiors, concrete floors and asbestos shingle roofs.

As proof of the headway being made and the efficiency of the workers, a red, white and blue pennant was won for the quarter from September through November for ranking first in its class among the naval stations operating under the cognizance of the Bureau of Yards and Docks. Two monthly certificates of award were received for September and October and the base earned second place in November, being nosed out of first place by the new Marine Air Station at Cherry Point.

Not satisfied with their first speed, however, engineers, contractors and laborers toiled many extra hours after the declaration of war by the United States, following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor Dec. 7, 1941. Longer hours daily were reported, in accordance with President Roosevelt's desire to rush all defense projects.

Completion of the permanent quarters was a gigantic task for 1942. More than 1,400 permanent buildings and 1,000 huts were projected. The aggregate space was to be in excess of 102,000,000 cubic feet.

So rapid was the translation of blueprints into reality, however, that by August, 1942, the base headquarters was moved from Montford Point to Administration Building No. 1 at Hadnot Point. Montford Point was taken over by the new Negro Marine recruits. Post troops were also transferred to Hadnot Point headquarters. Well before that time the First Division had left for the Pacific and their part in the winning of the war, under the command of Maj. Gen. A. A. Vandegrift, who had succeeded General Torrey, but their places at Tent City were filled by other Leathernecks.

A month later the Rifle Range, with three 50-target ranges and a pistol range, was finished. Marine boots were brought there for rifle practice after undergoing the first phases of boot training at Parris Island. On the range in September, 1943, Gunnery Sergeant John C. Cochrane fired a world's record for the M-1 rifle—337 out of a possible 340.

In June, 1942, Brig. Gen. Allen Hal Turnage, later promoted to major-general, returned to his native state and for four months served as commanding officer of the New River training center. On October 1 he assumed charge of combat elements of a Marine division here and was succeeded in his former assignment by Maj. Gen. Julian Constable Smith, who served until the next Spring when he went overseas. Brig. Gen. James L. Underhill, also later promoted to major-general, was his local successor.






[Illustration:

AIR VIEW OF A SECTION OF THE PERMANENT AREA OF THE MARINE BARRACKS AT HADNOT POINT IN OCTOBER, 1942
]






[Illustration:


Photo of anchored blimps on base]

During September the base's eighth library was opened at Tent City. The following month the Barrage Balloon School and Guard Battalion were started. Officers moved into some of the attractive quarters at Paradise Point in October. Protestant and Catholic chapels opened the next month at Hadnot Point.

Towards the end of the year the name of Marine Barracks at New River was officially changed to Camp Lejeune.

Soon after the opening of a new officers’ mess at Paradise Point, the brick quarters for bachelor officers and a guest house were ready for occupancy in the same vicinity early in 1943. Colors were raised at the training center at Hadnot Point on January 22. The Parachute, Quartermaster and Engineer Schools were made independent battalions; and the Artillery Battalion, Amphibian Tractor, Tank, Quartermaster Service Troop and Dog Detachments were established.

The year of 1943 brought to fruition elaborate programs for athletics and recreation. Supplementing the area theatres, gymnasiums, post exchanges, mess halls and barracks were servicemen's clubs, a staff non-commissioned officers’ clubhouse, and a large recreation hall for Women Marines.

The Hostess House at Hadnot Point was opened during February, as an inn for the guests of enlisted men and non-commissioned officers. The next August the camp theatre, seating 2,000, became the ninth motion picture hall. It was used frequently for USO, camp talent and radio shows and Broadway productions. “Salute to the Marines,” a movie filmed partially on the reservation, had a premiere showing there on August 28.

A stadium, with a capacity for 10,000 persons, was dedicated October 16 by the camp's first football team, one of the finest service elevens. Winter Chapel Forums were begun that month.






[Illustration:

MEDICAL FIELD RESEARCH LABORATORY
]

At about the same time that the Naval Hospital was finished, the Medical Field Service School had been instituted in May to train medical officers and men for duty with combat Marines. The health of the personnel was at all times carefully protected.

Brig. Gen. Henry L. Larsen, later promoted to major-general, became commanding general of the camp in June, relieving Brig. Gen. James L. Underhill, who was transferred overseas. One of his first actions was the installation of a water transport system, to aid the national program for conserving gasoline, rubber and motor vehicle parts.

About 5,000 gallons of gasoline were saved monthly, besides a considerable amount of rubber and wear and tear on equipment. Diesel-driven craft replaced many trucks and buses in use around the base. Intensive conservation methods effected other savings.

The Marine Women's Reserve Schools were moved to Camp Lejeune during July. They were inspected in October by the directors of the women's naval service branches: Capt. Mildred McAfee of the WAVES; Commander Dorothy Stratton of the SPARS; and Col. Ruth Cheney Streeter of the Marine Reserve.


[Illustration:

ONE OF THE MESS HALLS IN A REGIMENTAL AREA
]





A number of other distinguished officers visited the camp during the Autumn: Secretary of the Navy Knox; Admiral Ernest J. King, commander-in-chief of the United States Fleet; and Lt. Gen. Thomas Holcomb, then Marine Corps Commandant, now retired from active service in the rank of a full general.

In December Colonel Hill, who had been transferred the previous Summer to Washington, was nominated for the post of Quartermaster of the Marine Corps, and upon his promotion was made a general. He succeeded Maj.Gen. Seth Williams, who had cooperated valuably in helping plan Camp Lejeune.

Construction was continued as the camp and its diversified training expanded during the war. All was directed by the Navy's Bureau of Yards and Docks. Acting under this was the Public Works Department, collaborating with the Marine Corps and the civilian contractors.


[Illustration:

OFFICERS’ GUEST HOUSE AT PARADISE POINT
]

Capt. Carl Henry Cotter, (CEC), USN, now an admiral, was the first officer in charge of construction, with Lieutenant-Commander Nichols as resident officer. The latter assumed charge in May, 1942. He was transferred to Texas during August, 1942, and was succeeded by Comdr. Richard A. Williams, (CEC), USN, who remained at Lejeune until April, 1944.

During April and May Comdr. William H. Godson, (CEC), USNR, was officer in charge of construction, followed by Lt. Comdr. Gordon W. Battey, (CEC), USNR. Since August, 1945, Comdr. John A. Scoville, (CEC), USN, has been officer-in-charge.






[Illustration:

PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT INSPECTED CAMP DEC. 18, 1944
]

The Goode Construction Corporation, Blythe Brothers and Harrison-Wright Company remained as chief contractors on a cost-plus-fee basis until August, 1943. After that date all contracts were let to the low bidders on a competitive basis. However, the three firms have continued to obtain the contracts for about 80 per cent of the later construction work. They were awarded the Army-Navy “E” pennant, for “Excellence in the Performance of War Production.”

A number of sub-contracts were let by these three contractors in the early days, including plumbing, heating and mechanical work to Rowe and Coward, of Durham, N. C.; and the $3,000,000 low-cost housing project, the first quarters for officers, and a $5,000,000 amphibian base, rifle range and additional Tent City housing contract to George W. Kane, of Greensboro, N. C. Two Kinston firms also held sub-contracts: E. L. Scott, roofing and sheet metal, and the G. W. Carter Tile Co., tile and marble work.


[Illustration:

THEATRE IN A REGIMENTAL AREA AT HADNOT POINT
]






[Illustration:

GOLF HOUSE FOR ENLISTED MEN AT 26-HOLE COURSE
]

About $3,000,000 worth of construction was still pending July 1, 1946, under a new expansion program to take care of the Second Marine Division upon its arrival from the Pacific. This incorporated extension of the Industrial Area, Engineering School facilities, Onslow Beach bathhouses, and new officers’ quarters. These allotments made a total of $75,000,000 spent or authorized for construction at the camp.

Fifty-eight of the new homes for officers were constructed by the H. L. Coble Company, of Greensboro. Bids were called for 100 additional houses, to make a total of 453 officers’ quarters on the scenic bluffs of New River at Paradise Point. The Nello L. Teer Company, of Durham, received the contract for utilities at the new officers’ quarters, after completing a new magazine area for the additional storage of munitions.

Following the departure of General Larsen for overseas duty in the Spring of 1944, Col. Samuel A. Woods, Jr., commanding officer of the Montford Point Camps, served temporarily as acting commanding officer of the post until the arrival of Maj. Gen. John Marston in late April.

During his more than 26 months here, General Marston directed the camp's growth and improvement as one of the finest military establishments in the country. Upon retirement from the corps after 38 years of service, he was succeeded July 2, 1946, by Maj. Gen. Thomas E. Watson, who was also reassigned as commanding general of the famed Second Marine Division, which he had previously commanded in the Pacific.


[Illustration:

CAMP ENTRANCE ON ROUTE 24 HAS PICTURESQUE SETTING
]






[Illustration:

Upper Left—Interior of Enlisted Men's Guest House. Upper Right—One of the Camp Libraries. Center—Jose Iturbi plays
the piano for representatives from the Camp Bands. Lower Lower Left—Protestant Chapel. Lower Right—Catholic Chapel.

]





HISTORIC SITE

Of interest to Marines at Camp Lejeune is the fact that the reservation is located in an historic part of Onslow County, one of the oldest counties in North Carolina. New River, along both sides of which the camp stretches for many miles, is one of the most unique rivers in the country.

Formed in 1734 from New Hanover County, Onslow County was named for Sir Arthur Onslow, who for more than 30 years was Speaker of the House of Commons in the British Parliament. Even prior to its creation, many English and German residents resided in this coastal territory. For a few years there was an Onslow precinct of the early, extensive County of Bath. Courts for the precinct were authorized Nov. 23, 1731.

Records in the Register of Deeds office at the county courthouse in Jacksonville date back to 1713, originating then perhaps from the nearby Carteret County. In 1723 the Carteret Court recognized the growth of settlements on the White Oak and New Rivers by ordering a road to White Oak River, “the inhabitants between New River and Newport River to do their labours in laying out of the same.” Three years later this same court established a ferry over New River at Snead's Ferry. A commission was appointed by the Carteret Court in 1728 to lay out a road on both sides of the river.

The first courthouse for Onslow County is believed to have been located at Courthouse Bay, six miles from the mouth of New River, now an integral part of Camp Lejeune. The second county seat and courthouse were on North East Branch, around 20 miles from the mouth of the river, where the officers’ quarters have been erected at the scenic Paradise Point. Stocks and a whipping post were ordered, along with the courthouse and jail. Court met there from April, 1737, until April, 1744, when it was recorded:

“The court being met at ye place where ye court house formerly stood & finding ye house by some malishious and evil disposed person was burnt, they were pleased to adjourn to ye house of John Taylor.”

Third came a courthouse location at “Johnston,” named for Royal Governor Gabriel Johnston. This site was later known as Town Point, 14 miles from the river's mouth, a part of the Coddington estate before being included in the military post. The village failed to grow, and the incompleted courthouse, along with almost all other buildings at Johnston except the jail, was destroyed by a hurricane in September, 1752.

Courts were then held at Jonathan Melton's, near the Northeast Primitive Baptist Church, until the first Tuesday in July, 1757, when the county seat was moved to “Wantland Ferry,” now the site of Jacksonville, “convenient to a good spring.”





An acre of land for the purpose was given by James Wantland in 1756, and a courthouse was finished there in 1761. For some years the place was called Onslow Court House. Not until 1842 was it chartered and then named Jacksonville, in honor of Gen. Andrew Jackson, President of the United States.

The first four courthouses on the same site in Jacksonville were followed by the present edifice, erected in 1904. When the contractors of Camp Lejeune called for laborers during the Spring of 1941, an employment office was set up in the courtroom.

Wars seriously affected the New River regions throughout their early history. After the Indian wars, Spanish buccaneers and pirates beset the region. During the Spanish “invasion” in the 1740's prisoners were brought into Onslow sections through Bear Inlet. Henry Morgan and his pirate associates are said to have used the New River Inlet as a hideout.

Militiamen were trained for the French and Indian wars and for the Revolutionary conflict, and Onslow residents had courageous parts in the fight for freedom and independence.

Within two years after creation of the Marine Corps American Marines were on duty in the coastal area, being assigned to the Privateer Sturdy Beggar of New Bern in 1777. They sailed against two English brigs which had arrived within the bar on the Carolina seashore and had captured several vessels.

President George Washington passed through Onslow County during his Southern tour in 1791, while en route from New Bern to Wilmington. He took breakfast at Everett's near Richlands, had dinner at Capt. James Foy's on Hicks’ Run, and spent the night at Sage's Ordinary in the Southern part of the county.

Modern Leathernecks probably have complained of the barren section, but they were not the first to criticize, the First President writing in his diary: “The whole road from Newbern to Wilmington (except in a few places of small extent) passes through the most barren country I have ever beheld.”

Otway Burns, famed for his naval feats during the War of 1812, was a native of the Queens Creek section of Onslow County. Onslow citizens were also active in the War Between the States.

Older than Jacksonville, a number of the coast communities also may boast proud records. Swansboro, picturesque town on White Oak River, just one mile from Bogue Sound, is said to have been settled in 1713. Its name was changed in 1783 from “New Town” to Swansboro to honor Samuel Swann, who served in the General Assembly from 1738 to 1762.

Strangely enough, when the Marines arrived in 1941, they found on the reservation a little town named Marines. However, it did not take its name from the Leathernecks but had been named years previously for one of the oldest families of the county. Its buildings were razed to make way for military structures.





Among the residents moved out of the Marines area was Thomas G. Samworth, noted hunting and fishing writer and small arms expert and publisher. There he had built duck ponds for actual tests of his shots, and he had a regular arsenal for the testing of various kinds of guns. He had surrounded his house with a moat, so he could “live alone and like it.”

Two Governors of North Carolina may be claimed by Onslow County, though both also lived elsewhere. Governor Edward B. Dudley, elected from New Hanover County as the first governor elected by direct vote of the people in North Carolina, serving two terms from Dec. 31, 1836, to Jan. 1, 1841, was born and reared in Onslow County. His mother is buried there.

Gov. Daniel L. Russell, born in Brunswick County, was the son of two Onslow natives and spent his childhood at the Onslow home of his grandfather, David W. Sanders, a member of the Council of State. He served as Governor of North Carolina from Jan. 12, 1897, to Jan. 15, 1901. The Russell home still stands in the Maysville section. The governor is buried on Hickory Hill.

Onslow County is one of the few coastal counties in North Carolina whose mainland borders the ocean without an intervening sound, and its name is given to the long curve between Beaufort Harbor and Cape Fear.

New River, despite its name, is known to be the mouth of one of the oldest rivers in America. It is the only large river in North Carolina with headwaters and mouth in the same county, and it is one of the few rivers of any size in the United States that flows due north. Its three forks are also unusual, in that they bring little water to feed the main stream. Another peculiarity is that it seems to be all mouth and nothing much more. The estuary is around 20 miles long and three to five miles wide. At points it is hemmed in narrowly by beautiful high bluffs.

Tar, pitch and turpentine used to form the chief products of the county, but the pine business has now been put into the discard. Tobacco, corn, peanuts, soybeans and livestock now form important sources of income for Onslow farmers. Onslow County hams are known far and wide for their delicious flavor. Seafood from Onslow waters is also exceptionally fine. New River oysters are large and luscious. They grow singly instead of in clusters. The section is famed for its fishing and hunting.


[Illustration:


Photo of sailboats in harbor]






[Illustration:


Photo of sailboats on lake]





RECREATIONAL FACILITIES

With faith in the adage, “All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy,” Camp Lejeune authorities have arranged extensive recreational facilities for the Marines assigned to duty here.

Blessed by nature with exceptional oceanfronts, river and creek advantages in this “Land of Enchanting Waters,” the camp offers outstanding water sports.

Game fish have been stocked in the fresh water so that the Leathernecks may go fishing and actually catch fish whenever they like. Dams have been constructed to aid the fish supply.

At the boat docks are 100 rowboats, 100 sailboats, and 100 canoes for the free use of the personnel on New River and its creeks. The boat basin on Wallace Creek is intended to be attractive and enjoyable for the men during their spare hours as well as useful and helpful in their military training. Boat races and colorful regattas are held frequently.

Directly across this creek is the handsome Marston Pavilion, named for the commanding general who planned it for the enlisted men. Erected at a cost of $168,000, it is considered the most modern and spacious dance hall at perhaps any service center.

The two huge dance floors contain more than 11,000 square feet. Two dances can be held at the same time, with apparatus to relay music by a camp band or by a big-name orchestra from one room to another. Since its grand opening on the 170th anniversary of the Marine Corps, it has been used by thousands of Marines and their guests. At a recent dance at which Louis Armstrong's band played 4,000 persons were in attendance.

The central lounge is complete with a mammoth soda fountain, snack bar and enclosed kitchen. Adjoining the lounge are powder rooms, coat rooms and an office. An extensive veranda around the front and one side of the building has refreshment and card tables. From it a wooden pier leads over the creek.

At Onslow Beach on the Atlantic Ocean, one of the safest and widest beaches in the nation, where the Leathernecks practice for antiaircraft firing and amphibious landings, they may enjoy ocean sports. As many as 10,000 Marines visited the beach on Sundays last Summer.

For their use are a $100,000 officers’ club; a $200,000 beach house for enlisted Marines with 1,000 lockers, snack bars, and a motion picture auditorium; and a $50,000 pavilion for Negro Marines. Buses are run on regular schedules to the beach.

The entire area between French Creek and North East Creek is a bird sanctuary and no hunting is permitted there. As many as 200 acres have been planted with bird food, grains that will attract birds. A total of $25,000 was spent during the past year on birds and bird foods.






[Illustration:

MARSTON PAVILION OVERLOOKING WALLACE CREEK CONTAINS TWO LARGE DANCE HALLS FOR ENLISTED PERSONNEL
]






[Illustration:

OFFICERS’ CLUBHOUSE ON OCEAN AT ONSLOW BEACH
]

In the woods elsewhere on the reservation, where hunting is allowed, 500 pairs of quail have been placed; and there are also deer, fox, weasels, skunks and other animals for sportsmen.

The golf course of 36 holes is one of the heaviest-played in America. Last year it was used by 58,000 persons. No charge is made except for the golf balls. There are 300 sets of clubs furnished without charge for the military personnel. The large golf house for enlisted men is unusually attractive, with lounge, snack bar, screened patios, lockers, showers, dressing rooms and living quarters for the club professional and his family. For officers there is a clubhouse with a rose garden in front.

Plans are under way for the erection of a $500,000 field house on the reservation, to be used for boxing and basketball. There are numerous tennis courts, baseball diamonds, football gridirons and athletic fields. Some of the best service teams in the country have been trained at the camp.

Five large service clubs are maintained at Hadnot Point, the main camp area, as well as six theatres, including one of the largest in the South. The service clubs are equipped with snack bars, pool tables, bowling alleys, musical instruments and varied table games. Theatres and recreation halls also are at Tent City, the Rifle Range, Courthouse Bay and Montford Point. Besides motion pictures, camp, USO and Broadway shows are often presented.


[Illustration:

ENLISTED MEN'S BEACH BATHHOUSE COST $200,000
]






[Illustration:

DIVERSIFIED RECREATION FOR THE PERSONNEL AT CAMP LEJEUNE
Upper Left—Gene Sarazen demonstrates his golfing skill to amateur golfers
and spectators on the Paradise Point Golf Course. Upper Right—A champion
Montford Point Marine baseball team. Left Center—A real “catch” for Izaak
Walton sportsmen from the waters at Camp Lejeune. Right Center—Basket-
ball forms one of the major competitive sports at the camp. Lower Left—A
scene at the Onslow Beach sands and surf. Lower Right—Betty Grable
James, popular movie star, was kept busy signing autographs in a mess hall
during her visit to New River in 1942.

]





Fifteen libraries are kept open on the reservation. Other recreations for the Marines range from roller skating to skeet shooting.

Even in their recreation buildings, the spirit of efficiency and fair play is emphasized. Signs at the bowling alleys read: “Fouling is carelessness and is not honored here. Stay behind the foul line.”

Practically all these recreational projects are financed through profits at the post exchanges which dot the site, with the exception of the officers’ quarters. No camp recreational funds can be used for officers. They maintain their own club and mess, one of the most attractive buildings at the post. Its dining room features pastel murals of Marine scenes by Mignon Worley of Kansas City. In the bar are murals depicting fighting Marines. The large lounge features a portrait of Lt. Gen. John A. Lejeune. Outside is an outdoor swimming pool overlooking New River.

Trees, shrubs and flowers add to the natural beauty of the entire camp. The Catholic chapel at Hadnot Point has a picturesque setting in front of woods. The Protestant chapel had to be built in a field, but to make it more attractive a forest is being planted in the rear. General Marston explained that it was impractical to move mountains here, but forests could easily be moved or planted for the enjoyment of the Marines and their visitors.

A number of chaplains representing various faiths minister to the spiritual needs of the Marines and assist them with their personal problems and recreational programs. Special services officers and many other leaders also aid with the diversified recreation offered on the reservation.


[Illustration:


Photo of soldiers posing on a tank]






[Illustration:

COMBAT TRAINING OF MANY TYPES AT CAMP LEJEUNE
Upper Left—In rehearsal for a landing operation, Marines leave a transport
near Camp Lejeune. Each rubber boat carries a squad of men literally armed
to the teeth with automatic rifles, machine guns, light mortars, pistols and
knives. Upper Right—Rubber boats near shore for invasion tactics lessons in
Onslow County. Note blackened faces of Leathernecks in lead boat, and the
gun on the boat's bow. Left Center—Instructions in bayonet fighting form an
important part of the war training at the camp. Right Center—Hand-to-hand
combat, judo and jiujitsu are taught the “Soldiers of the Sea.” Lower Left—
Landing at an “enemy” beach in Onslow County, Marines spread out to form
a firing line. Lower Right—Armored Scout Car crews also practiced at Camp
Lejeune for actual combat in the Pacific during World War II.

]





WAR ROLES

“This large camp of many thousands of acres, housing and training thousands of men and women for service in this war, is a monument to those who have with wisdom and foresight planned and built this permanent military establishment so complete in its composition and beautiful in design. It is also a symbol of the determination of the youth of America who have chosen to join our branch of the service to protect those principles which we hold dear and which aggressor nations have challenged.

“In future years, many scores of thousands of personnel of the Army, Navy and Coast Guard as well as Marines will remember their tour of duty at Camp Lejeune and the mission it has performed in giving intensive specialist training in preparing individuals for every kind of duty. It was here that most of the Marines were trained who later made the initial landing in the Solomon Islands, thus turning the Pacific War in our favor. It was here that Army Divisions trained in amphibious operations and then went overseas to spearhead the African and Continental invasions.”

In writing thus about Camp Lejeune, Maj. Gen. Henry L. Larsen, former commanding general, emphasized some of the outstanding roles played by service men trained here during World War II.

The first Marines “landed” temporarily during the Summer of 1941, when units of the First Marine Division under Brig. Gen. Holland M. Smith, now a retired lieutenant-general, and the First Army Infantry Division held maneuvers as units of the Atlantic Amphibious Force, a new streamlined combination of Army, Navy and Marine Corps.

The heavy surf off Onslow Beach proved to be a stronger test than were the waters at Cuba and in the Chesapeake area. Many of the men, who later took part in the Solomons offensive, received “battle” experience while beached in Coast Guard boats and then moving inland under simulated combat conditions to “capture” Starling, 11 miles away. At one time 25,000 troops were put ashore in three and a half hours.

Cooperating in the “war” were Marine aviators and parachutists on temporary duty at New Bern's airport, then named Mitchell Field, in honor of Maj. Gen. Ralph J. Mitchell, Director of Marine Aviation and now commanding general of the Marine Air Bases at Cherry Point.

During September about 6,000 Marines of the First Division moved into Tent City, under the command of Brig. Gen. Philip





H. Torrey, at present a retired major-general, who arrived here September 26. The now-famous Eleventh Regiment bivouacked in summer tents in a muddy camp near Verona. Arriving from Cuba for maneuvers, they were caught by war and winter.

Life was rugged that bitter winter. But after the attack on Pearl Harbor the Leathernecks were so busy preparing for war and learning the many things a Devil Dog must know, they did not complain about their crude tents, miry roads and lack of recreational facilities. The basic training, routine exercises and war maneuvers prepared them well for their future Pacific combat.


[Illustration:


Photo of Armored Boats in water]

In April Gen. A. A. Vandegrift, assistant division commander, was promoted to division commander, succeeding General Torrey, who was transferred to Quantico. Although troop movements were kept quiet as military secrets in those days, it was learned later that he and Brig. Gen. William H. Rupertus, assistant division commander, who later died in the rank of major-general, led the Leathernecks overseas from Camp Lejeune in the Spring and Summer to capture Guadalcanal and other parts of the Solomons that August in the first Allied offensive action of the war. Thus they started their victorious march towards Tokyo.

Besides this famed First Marine Division, units of other divisions received much of their amphibious practice at Camp Lejeune, including the 22nd, 23rd, and 27th regiments. Replacements were organized here to take over from their comrades in the Gilberts, Marshalls, Tarawa, Saipan, Iwo Jima and Okinawa. Many of the war's greatest heroes trained or visited here.

At Courthouse Bay, where barracks are now maintained for the Navy personnel who work closely with the Marines in manning boats including landing craft and lighters used in river traffic, a barrage balloon school was operated for some time. Paramarines were also trained here until the corps discontinued parachute troops. Glider training was planned but was never consummated. An amphibian tractor-tank base was of outstanding importance.






[Illustration:


Photo of tanks]

A large “mockup,” built to resemble the side of a transport, with cargo nets along its side, enabled Leathernecks to learn how to scramble rapidly from a ship, fully equipped with weapons and ammunition.

Anti-aircraft units were trained at Lejeune, as were infantry companies, artillery groups, anti-tank outfits, motor transport organizations, armed scouting car units, engineer battalions, sabotage and demolition specialists and raider battalions—in fact, every kind of training for a complete Marine division.

With every branch of modern warfare represented in its framework, the Fleet Marine Force, referred to at times as “A Panzer Army That Swims,” not only trained its Camp Lejeune Marines for invasions but also for guerilla warfare and hand-to-hand combat.


[Illustration:


Photo of soldiers with minigun]






[Illustration:


Photo of officers observing artillery gun firing]

Basic training was like that of the Army infantryman but they also had to understand Navy tactics as well as many types of specialized fighting, for the Navy's Soldiers have to use perhaps more different kinds of equipment per man than any other branch of the service.

Camp Lejeune became the only final place for Marine Women Reserves to receive their boot and officer training. Here, too, was the only recruit depot and training center for Negro Marines. Dutch Marines studied here. And the famous Marine war dogs were trained here.

American Marines are justly given a large share of credit for victory in the Pacific, and those trained at Camp Lejeune earned a high place in the Leatherneck Hall of Fame. Their outstanding feats might not have been possible had it not been for their excellent training at Lejeune.


[Illustration:


Photo of soldiers storming a beach]





COMMANDING OFFICERS

COL. W. P. T. HILL, Liaison Officer—May, 1941, to Summer of 1943. (Now Quartermaster of Marine Corps, with rank of Major-General.)

COL. D. L. S. BREWSTER, Post Commandant—Sept. 9, 1941, to Spring of 1943. (Died in July, 1945, in rank of Brigadier-General.)

MAJ. GEN. PHILIP H. TORREY, First Division Commander—September, 1941, to April, 1942. (Now retired.)

BRIG. GEN. A. A. VANDEGRIFT, Assistant Division Commander—December, 1941, to April, 1942. Division Commander—April, 1942, through departure of Division troops for overseas. (Now Marine Corps Commandant, with rank of Four-Star General.)

BRIG. GEN. ALLEN HAL TURNAGE, Commanding General of New River Training Center—June, 1942, to Oct. 1, 1942; Commanding Officer of combat elements of Third Marine Division here—Oct. 1, 1942, through departure for overseas duty in December. (Now Assistant Commandant of Marine Corps with rank of Lieutenant-General.)

MAJ. GEN. JULIAN C. SMITH, Commanding General—Oct. 1, 1942, to April, 1943. (Now retired.)

BRIG. GEN. JAMES L. UNDERHILL, Commanding General—April, 1943, to June, 1943. (Now retired in rank of Major-General.)

MAJ. GEN. HENRY L. LARSEN, Commanding General—June, 1943, to April, 1944. (Now on retired list.)

COL. SAMUEL A. WOODS, JR., Acting Commanding Officer—April, 1944, to May, 1944. (Now retired.)

MAJ. GEN. JOHN MARSTON, Commanding General—May, 1944, to July 1, 1946. (Now retired.)

MAJ. GEN. THOMAS E. WATSON, Commanding General of Camp Lejeune and Commanding General, Second Marine Division—July 1, 1946—






[Illustration:

THE NAVAL HOSPITAL, ONE OF THE LARGEST IN THE NATION, IS BEAUTIFULLY SITUATED ON A 144-ACRE PENINSULA
]





NAVAL HOSPITAL

The Naval Hospital at Camp Lejeune, with a maximum bed capacity for 2,400 patients, is the largest naval hospital in the South. It is a complete hospital plant in itself.

Located in the Fifth Naval District, it is under the supervision of the Commandant of that naval district. It serves the Marine personnel at Camp Lejeune and Cherry Point and the Navy personnel throughout the area.

During the war its peak occupancy neared the 2,300 mark, but since the close of the conflict, despite the number of wounded and sick Marines from the Pacific battlefronts, its patients have been reduced. Members of service families are treated in the 83-bed family hospital, which is a separate hospital from the main plant.

The hospital reservation, situated on Hadnot Point, consists of a beautiful peninsula of 144 acres which extends into New River. Its waterfront is unusually attractive, with shaded lawns sloping gently down to the shoreline. The 48 buildings include officers’ quarters, bachelor officers’ quarters, corpsmen barracks, nurses’ quarters, power plant, laundry and garage, with tennis courts and athletic fields.

Every room in the main hospital buildings is an outside room. They are arranged conveniently in a chain of two-story ward wings, leading by a 1,000-foot corridor to the center three-story administration and office portion.


[Illustration:

CENTRAL BUILDING OF MAMMOTH NAVAL HOSPITAL
]





On the first floor is a dining room, seating 800, with an adjoining model kitchen. On the second floor is a theatre, with capacity for 700 persons, including a large space to which patients can be moved in their beds to hear musical programs or to see moving picture shows. On this floor also are sun decks, and a “business” section, with tailor shop, barber shop, general store, refreshment room, snack bars, postoffice, library and recreation room.

The best equipment available, valued at hundreds of thousands of dollars, makes the hospital generally recognized as one of the most up-to-date institutions in the country. There is a specially-designed complete physiotherapy department, in addition to the operating rooms, X-ray and clinical laboratories. Some of the wards are thoroughly equipped for the isolation of patients suffering from contagious and infectious diseases.

Opened in early May, 1943, after construction at original cost of $7,500,000, its first 1,000 beds have been more than doubled. Construction work is being continued, to meet increasing needs. Plans are being made for the hospitalization of veterans. Since March, 1944, the commanding officer has been Capt. J. R. White, (MC), USN.

American Red Cross representatives are on duty at the hospital as well as at the camp.


[Illustration:

NURSES’ HOME ON NAVAL HOSPITAL RESERVATION
]





WOMEN RESERVES

Women Marines, who rendered magnificent service during World War II in freeing men to fight, will point with pride for years to Camp Lejeune as the only final place where they received boot training and officer training. On the other hand, camp authorities, like the public in general, will take pride in the thousands of young women who volunteered to join the corps and became good Marines in a period of national emergency.

The Women's Reserve Battalion was dissolved here June 1, 1946. Those members not eligible for discharge or who had expressed a desire to remain in the WR for an additional month were transferred earlier in the week for duty in Washington.

After organization of the reserve on Feb. 13, 1943, Maj. Ruth Cheney Streeter, of Morristown, N. J., director of the new branch, paid her first visit to Camp Lejeune March 23-24 and made plans for the arrival of one of the largest contingents of Women Marines anywhere in the country. Accompanying her was Lt. Louise Stewart, of Philadelphia, public relations officer. Major Streeter was afterwards promoted to colonel, and Lieutenant Stewart to captain.

The first women to be stationed here, ten officers, made their appearance in late April. On May 1, the first enlisted personnel, 145 strong, arrived from Hunter College, New York, where they had received their indoctrination training. Forty of them started a four-weeks’ course at a new non-commissioned officers’ school set up within the Women's Reserve Battalion. Seventy were sent to the quartermaster school for three months; twenty undertook a six-weeks’ course at the cooks and bakers school; and fifteen reported for four weeks of classes at the motor transport school.

The largest mass movement of Women Marines up to that time took place here July 16 when 75 officer candidates and 525 recruits from all parts of the country arrived to form the first classes at the new Marine Corps Women's Reserve School, the first school of the kind ever to be established at a regular Marine post. Thereafter new classes arrived bi-weekly until approximately 3,000 were here to study or to train, under rules and along diversified lines similar to those for men.

They were quartered in special new barracks erected in a separate women's area at Hadnot Point. They had their own theatre, mess hall, recreation building and post exchange, all staffed by women.





Appropriately one of their main streets was named for Virginia Dare, first white child born of English parentage in the New World, on Roanoke Island, North Carolina; and another thoroughfare was named for Lucy Brewer, the first Woman Marine, who served in masculine attire on board the renowned frigate Constitution during the War of 1812.

The first women officer candidates were commissioned here in August, 1943, with Major Streeter attending the first graduation ceremonies and reviewing the battalion parade. She expressed keen gratification at their progress and spirit, and warmly commended the arrangements for their housing and training.

On October 13 and 14 an inspection of the women's quarters and schools was made by Major Streeter; Lt. Comdr. Mildred McAfee, director of the WAVES; Lt. Comdr. Dorothy C. Stratton, director of the SPARS; Lt. Jere Knight, assistant to the director of the WACS; and a number of their associate officers.

Secretary of the Navy Frank Knox was chief speaker November 15 at the graduation exercises of the seventh officer candidate class. With him were Major Streeter; Lt. Gen. Thomas Holcomb, Marine Corps Commandant; and Mrs. Allie Murdoch Lejeune, of Norfolk, Va., widow of the Commandant for whom the post was named, their daughter, Eugenia Lejeune, being one of those commissioned second lieutenants.


[Illustration:


Photo of female soldiers marching]





Since then Women Marines have proved their value to the corps by participating in almost every type of Marine study and job except actual fighting. They actually fought “by proxy,” releasing many men for combat duty. In their latter days they even served in Hawaii.

At Lejeune they worked their way up to high executive offices. One became assistant camp fuel administrator; another, assistant to the camp engineer; a third, officer in charge of water transportation and freight consolidation; still another, camp public relations officer. Maj. Katherine A. Towle, for eleven months commanding officer of the WR here, was later promoted to colonel and succeeded Colonel Streeter as director of the Reserves. She was followed in this latter office by Maj. Mary L. Parks, who had also commanded the battalion on this reservation.


[Illustration:


Photo of female military marching band]

The first and only Woman's Reserve Band, organized here, was acclaimed by large audiences at public concerts in many cities.

Perhaps in no phase of the war effort did women play a more important and loyal part than in the Marine Corps Reserve. Their original 30 duties increased to more than 200 and were performed so efficiently that the early prejudice of tough sergeants developed into deep admiration.

These diversified tasks of the 19,000 World War II Women Marines were vastly different from the limited service of the 305 Marinettes of World War I. In paying tribute to the Modern Women Marines, Maj. Gen. John Marston, commanding general of the camp, on their third birthday anniversary, declared:

“It is with a great sense of pride that I look back on the fine record of accomplishments of the Women Reserve—not only in this camp but throughout the Marine Corps—accomplishments which have distinguished them among women's auxiliary organizations. The Marine Corps is grateful for their faithful services






[Illustration:


Photo of female soldier aiming a rifle]

and each and every member is to be congratulated upon a job well done.

“The Women Marines at Camp Lejeune, by their attention to duty and technical skills, have contributed outstandingly to the successful completion of the mission of this camp during these years of emergency. It is with heart-felt admiration that I state that the performance of the Women Reserves has met with the highest traditions of the naval service and we are honored to know them by the name ‘Marine’.”


[Illustration:


Photo of female Marine fixing a car engine]





MONTFORD POINT MARINES

As a high tribute to their wartime record in many parts of the world, Marine Corps authorities have announced that Negro Marines will be retained on a limited scale in the corps.

Approximately 1,200 Negroes will be trained at Camp Lejeune as the corps’ only recruit depot. There will be a stewards’ branch, depot companies and anti-aircraft batteries.

In all the wars in which the United States has been engaged, Negroes have fought in the Army, but World War II was the first conflict in which there were Negro Marines. For the first time in the history of amphibious invasions, the race participated in South Pacific landings and campaigns.

When Japanese troops staged a desperate counter-attack on American positions during the bloody struggle for Saipan, a dozen Negro Leathernecks were ordered into the defense lines of the Fourth Marine Division. Despite intense rifle, machine gun, mortar and artillery fire, they advanced bravely against the enemy, killing about 15 Japs and assisting materially in checking the counter-attack.

One of the Negroes was given a hand grenade by a wounded white Marine. He had never used one before. After a few brief instructions, he threw the grenade and scored a direct hit on three Nipponese at a deadly machine gun.

Receiving their baptism of fire on Guadalcanal where their ships were raided by Jap planes, Negro Devil Dogs moved forward into active battle zones. Their courage under fire and their untiring efforts without rest on Bougainville, New Georgia, New Caledonia, the Russell and Mariana Islands spoke well for their military training at Camp Lejeune.

Their outstanding record seems all the more remarkable when it is realized that they have been in this branch of the service only four years, beginning from scratch June 1, 1942, when the corps, breaking its 167-year-old tradition, started enlisting Negroes.

History-making events have transpired since August 26, 1942, when the first recruit arrived at the new Montford Point Camp, a separate post along the scenic New River on the huge reservation at Camp Lejeune, the corps’ only Negro recruit depot and training center.

More than 18,000 Negroes have been trained there. Most of them were in service companies, but practically all requested combat duty.





On more than one occasion when fighting units departed from Montford Point for overseas assignments, men from other outfits there felt such an impelling desire to serve in battle that several stowed away on board the trains and remained hidden until they reached the Port of Embarkation. Then they revealed their presence. Usually, their commanding officers took the attitude that if they were this willing to undergo risks and difficulties, they would make valuable fighters, and steps were taken hurriedly to have the stowaways officially transferred to the overseas groups.

Montford Point was originally constructed for the initial quota of 1,200 Negroes; but, as the number of Negro Leathernecks increased, the site was considerably expanded. Five different commands were maintained there during the war period: recruit depot, headquarters, stewards’ branch, defense battalion, and a separate infantry battalion with attached depot and ammunition companies which assisted ably in landing operations of the Fleet Marine Force.

In the recruit depot battalion, every “boot” received basic training similar to that given white Leathernecks at Parris Island, S. C., and San Diego, Cal. Rules and regulations were the same at these Marine boot camps.

At first white non-commissioned officers had charge of Negro drilling, but soon Negro non-commissioned officers took over this function. There were no commissioned officers among the Negroes, but several attained the top rank of sergeant-major.

They liked to drill. Often when mess attendants grew weary of dish washing or floor polishing, they stopped their work and rushed outdoors to “drill a bit.” When they had “rested themselves by drilling,” they returned contentedly to their galley chores.

Many preferred to be stewards. By June, 1943, a Stewards’ Branch Battalion was formed to train cooks, bakers, butchers, stewards and waiters for Marine messes in all parts of the world. Soon after its organization, the Commandant's inspection was “passed with flying colors.”


[Illustration:

CHAPEL IS ONE OF MANY BUILDINGS AT MONTFORD POINT
]






[Illustration:

MANY KINDS OF COMBAT TRAINING AT MONTFORD POINT
]

The 51st Defense Battalion was activated at Montford Point during late August, 1942. Since then it has become the pace setter and yardstick by which can be measured the progress of Negroes in the corps. The 52nd Defense Battalion was patterned along similar lines.

Practically every weapon handled by Devil Dogs on land or sea was studied by the Montford Point Marines. At special schools they became familiar with the construction, maintenance and functions of weapons varying from .30-calibre cartridges to 155mm shells.

Adapting themselves expertly to military life and procedure, they were woven into hard-hitting infantry, defense, depot, ammunition, artillery, antiaircraft, seacoast artillery and specialized





weapons groups. Landing operations were conducted under simulated combat conditions. It was such thorough practice which made possible their record on Saipan and other Pacific Islands.

Visitors praised the high morale and military courtesy at their camp, reflected in the behavior of the Marines when they traveled to other parts of the region, with the result that they won the respect of civilians throughout Eastern North Carolina.

“They're so damn proud to be Marines,” a white officer explained.

An exceptionally smart appearance was made on their parade grounds. When the bass orders were sung out, with the boys marching in characteristic rhythm to the music of their fine band, few reviews could equal theirs in military dignity and public inspiration. Before his death the late Secretary of the Navy Frank Knox attended one of their programs and was lavish in his praise.


[Illustration:


Photo of Negro Military Marching Band]

Much of the credit for their success is given to their first commanding officer, Col. Samuel A. Woods, Jr., now retired from the corps. He remained in command until detached for duty in the field during October, 1944, being succeeded by Col. Augustus W. Cockrell, who continued to June 1, 1946, when he was relieved by Col. Kenneth W. Benner.

Their esprit de corps was exemplified not only in their military training, specialized schools and educational pursuits but also in their religious services, with their fine choir, and in their recreational activities, with their outstanding baseball, basketball and boxing teams.

Many times the men declined liberty, preferring to remain in camp to sing. At their camp they had a moving picture theatre, library, chapel, hostess house, post exchange and superb dance orchestras. Frequently they staged amateur shows. On the nearby river and creeks they enjoyed swimming, boating and fishing.

“We're proud to be in the Marine Corps, and we want the Marine Corps to be proud of us,” one of the Montford Point lads asserted. “Now that we have landed, we will keep the situation ‘well in hand.’ ”





DEVIL DOGS

The canine Marine Devil Dogs, who proved their values as aides to the fighting Leathernecks in the Pacific, were trained at the Marine Corps’ only War Dog Training School at Camp Lejeune.

For the first time in American history, a trained war dog unit landed with the Marines on Bougainville Island, last major Japanese stronghold in the Solomons, and immediately lived up to the Marine motto, “Semper Fidelis,” or “Always Faithful.”

The dogs included 21 Doberman Pinschers and three German Shepherds. One group was sent ahead to smell out enemy nests, another carried messages and a third searched for wounded Marines. Six of the dogs were officially cited for bravery, and were promoted from first-class privates to the rank of corporal.

Official reports set forth the record that the dogs were “constantly employed during the operation of securing and extending the beachhead and proved themselves as messengers, scouts and agents of night security. They gave no trouble while they lived in crates on the ship for more than three weeks.”

Although the use of dogs in combat did not originate with the Marines, when during August, 1942, they decided to train canines for the war in the Pacific, the operation was regarded as an experiment. For, Devil Dogs had new duties in trained units.

That they proved highly efficient is shown by the fact that dogs will again be recruited in case of later war emergency, Marine authorities say. All the World War II dogs are being discharged from service, following detraining and rehabilitation programs at Camp Lejeune. No War Dog Reserve is planned. But their achievements in the Pacific are regarded as so noteworthy that they will undoubtedly be used in any future war.

More than 450 dogs, mostly Doberman Pinschers, were effectively trained at Camp Lejeune from the 1,048 processed here. Thirty-nine were killed in action, five were reported missing, 12 died at sea, and 47 died at Camp Lejeune. Of the 147 destroyed in camp, most were unmanageable in training, but six were veterans who could not seem to readjust themselves to civilian life.

Service dogs provided many incidents from the humorous to the tragic. Ruff, a Doberman Pinscher, was the first Marine dog to become a mother overseas. Nine puppies were born to her and her mate, Mike, on Guadalcanal. She was returned to Lejeune with one of the pups, which was given the name, “Bougainville.” Had the war lasted longer, Bougainville probably would have been trained to join his dad in the fight against the Japs.





Caesar, a strapping German shepherd, was the first dog ashore on the initial Bougainville landings. Trained as a messenger, he became the only means of communication between “M” Company and headquarters. For two days and nights he slipped through enemy fire to carry messages and maps.

On the third night he and his trainer were halted by a road block. They dived into a foxhole. The dog smelled a Jap. Springing up, he grabbed the enemy by his right arm. His quick action prevented the Nip from throwing a hand grenade into the hole. The Japanese soldier yelled and fled. But two bullets from his friends his Caesar. Like any other wounded hero, he was placed on a stretcher and carried to the rear for treatment.


[Illustration:


Photo of Marine and German Shepard dog]

Jack, another German shepherd, was cited for conveying a vital message, despite wounds, after telephone lines had been cut. A Doberman Pinscher, “Otto,” flushed a Japanese machinegun nest, thus saving many American lives. Rex, assigned to guard duty, also saved his Leatherneck companions, when he heard strange noises and warned of an approaching attack.

Andy, a Doberman Pinscher, sniffed enemy snipers and alerted his patrol, with the result that “scattered the enemy and saved many lives.” Within a few minutes 15 Japs had been killed. Previously Andy had smelled out three other Jap snipers. Afterwards he was accidentally killed by a truck.

Cookie is credited with ten alerts of Japs, and assisted the division command post in recapturing the island of Guam. When Japanese overran a field hospital and killed the wounded Marines there, he took a message through intense fire for four miles, jumping from rock to rock along rough trails, to inform his handler at the command post: “All hell is breaking loose.”

The care of dogs in the field did not present as many problems in some respects as did that of the men. Field rations, with its biscuits and meat, kept the canines in excellent fighting trim.

Female dogs comprised the chief trouble. Although the only dog to “crack up” completely under the strain of battle was a






[Illustration:


Photo of soldiers training Army dogs]

male, the endurance percentage of males was found to be much higher than that of females. Four females with the first invading platoon at Empress Augusta Bay beachead went deaf at once, developed “war neurosis” after eight days and had to be retired from the conflict. Thereafter, despite the fact that four males suffered from shell shock, only male dogs went overseas.

The strict discipline that served most of the dogs so well in combat grew out of new types of training at Camp Knox, the Marine War Dog Training School at Camp Lejeune. Opened during January, 1943, under the direction of Capt. Jackson H. Boyd, USMCR, of Southern Pines, N. C., a fox hunter and sportsman of national note and a former Army officer during World War I, the war dog school gained a national reputation.

The most modern kennels and equipment possible were used there. Strict care was exercised in selecting applicants. Owners


[Illustration:


]





had to answer such questions as the following in the name of their dogs: “Are you nervous?” “Gun shy?” “Storm shy?” “Do you run away?” “What is your attitude towards strangers?” Official records were kept for each canine, with daily reports on aptitudes and progress.

For several days after arrival, the recruits were isolated in the Sick Bay. They were given complete physical examinations before being turned over to the trainers. Their first duty was to get acquainted with their two trainers, then to learn to “heel.”

After about two weeks they were started in attack classes, at first from a leash. They were taught always to jump for the “pistol arm.” During their three months or so at the boot camp they received more than three weeks of lessons of “agitation” in the attack courses, but only a little of it each day. One of their specialties was to guard prisoners.


[Illustration:


Photo of Army dog looking at Marine manual]

During their final training they were subjected to rifle fire, exploding land mines and other battle noises. They were lowered over the side of a “mockup,” so they would be accustomed to getting off transports. They were given repeated experience in attacking in woods or jungles, in standing guard in foxholes.

While in training, the dogs began work each day about 7:30 a. m. After brisk run-downs, they went through exercises and close-order drills. Often they were taken on long walks or runs, besides going through routines at the training grounds. These classes lasted five hours a day, at intervals, for six days a week.

Just one big meal was given the dogs in Bow Wow Boot Camp. This was served between 3 and 4 o'clock in the afternoon. The food ration weighed about four pounds, varying with the size of the dog, and consisted mainly of horse meat. If a dog became sick and had to be confined to the Sick Bay, he was given eggs and other light diets. Much attention was paid to their health.

Like all good soldiers, they were taught principally to obey orders without question. Their training inspired them to trust and protect the two regular handlers assigned to their care, but to suspect and attack strangers upon orders from the trainers. Persuasion, patience and firmness, with praise and scolding, rather than force or punishment, were the principal instruction methods. That they were effective is borne out in the reports from the Pacific.





DUTCH MARINES

Forming the first complete military organization of any foreign country to be trained on American soil, Royal Netherlands Marines arrived at Camp Lejeune in December, 1944, and after training here for about nine months under the guidance of the United States Marines moved to nearby Camp Davis where they continued their American Leatherneck studies for a few more months before leaving for military duties in Central Malaya.

Prior to the reorganization of the 279-year-old Netherlands Marine Corps here, individuals of other nations had been trained in America; but the Dutchmen were the first foreigners to form a complete corps as a corps anywhere in the United States.

Disorganized by World War II conditions and unable to drill in their own Nazi-held homeland, the Dutch settled in special areas at Hadnot Point and Montford Point here to model their reformed corps along lines similar to those of the United States Marine Corps, which was formed more than 109 years after the original Dutch Marines had seen action June 11-14, 1666.

Under the direction of Lt. Col. L. Langeveld, commanding officer, a cadre of officers and non-commissioned officers was organized here from members of the old Netherlands Marine Corps, the Netherlands Army in the Indies, air units of the Dutch Army and Navy, and recruits from liberated Holland.

They wore uniforms like those worn by the native Devil Dogs, but they had their own insignia featuring a standing lion surmounted with a crown. Their shoulder blaze was a simple curved oblong patch with the words, “Netherlands Marines.” Their traditional motto was “Je Maintiendrai,” or “I shall maintain.”

Their training for amphibious operations was similar to that of their American brothers. They followed the same rules and regulations. At Camp Lejeune they had the same privileges of using post exchanges, theatres and recreational facilities.

After the end of the conflict in the Pacific, the Dutch moved to Camp Davis, which was taken over temporarily by the United States Marine Corps as an adjunct to Camp Lejeune. Camp Davis, a $50,000,000 post in Onslow County, had made history during the early war days as the most complete anti-aircraft firing and training center in America, then, after being abandoned by the Coast Artillery, became for a short time in 1945 an Army Air Forces convalescent and redistribution station.

A detachment of the Dutch Brigade left Norfolk on the Dutch ship Noordam November 18, en route to the Malay States. A second group left December 11 on the ship Bloemfontyn.

Through their long history Dutch Marines have made valiant records in many parts of the globe.





MARINE CORPS HISTORY


[Illustration:

MAJ. SAMUEL NICHOLAS
]

“The Marines have landed . . .”

This terse communique has been announced from many different parts of the world in all wars in which the United States has been engaged ever since the Marine Corps was created by Act of the Continental Congress on Nov. 10, 1775. The amphibious commando tactics have remained virtually the same, though improved by new techniques and twists.

Prior to World War II, when they made history glow with accounts of their exploits and victories in the Pacific, the Devil Dogs had made some 200 forced landings on hostile shores: Japan, Korea, China, Abyssinia, Egypt, Formosa, Sumatra, Tripoli, the Fiji Islands and many other distant realms.

Up to the time of World War II, the United States government had been at war only 24 of the 165 years, but its Leathernecks had been in action 90 of those years. Their nickname dates to their early days when they wore leather stocks.

Months before the nation became an independent republic, George Washington requested the Continental Congress to authorize the formation of two battalions of Marines, “of dependable and religious nature combined with robustness of body.” The “father” of the corps, Maj. Samuel Nicholas, was a fighting Quaker, “full of piety blended with fiery Old Testament love of battle.”

Almost immediately this oldest branch of military service began its remarkable career of successful landings as “Soldiers of the Sea.” On their first expedition in 1776 their landing operations resulted in the capture of munitions and supplies and the fall of Nassau and New Providence Islands in the Bahamas during the Revolutionary War.

During that war they also participated in all the naval engagements of Commodore Esek Hopkins and John Paul Jones, and distinguished themselves with Washington's Army in the battles of Princeton and Trenton.

Following reorganization of the corps in 1798, the Marines landed on the Barbary Coast during the early years of the 19th century. Derna fell to them, and they raised there the Stars and Stripes for the first time over a fortress in the Old World.

Some years later they drove pirates from Sumatra, and in the middle of the century landed in China to protect American lives and property. In 1853 they were with Commodore Matthew C. Perry when he opened Japanese ports to world trade.

In the Mexican War they helped storm Chapultepec and take California. Later they accompanied Lt. Col. Robert E. Lee, then of the United States Army, when he captured John Brown at Harper's Ferry.

Through the War Between the States they participated in numerous battles on land and sea. When the Cumberland went down in the terrific fire from the Confederate craft, “Merrimac,” a young Marine captain, Charles Heywood, stayed by the last gun on the Union ship, jumping overboard just in time to save his life. Later he became Commandant.

In 1867 Marines were sent to Formosa to punish natives who had killed the crew on an American vessel. Four years afterwards they captured Korean forts, and in 1882 landed at Alexandria, Egypt, to protect Americans during a native revolution.

After an expedition to Hawaii to suppress a revolt in 1893, the Marines were the first to land troops in Cuba during the Spanish-American War. One battalion held Guantanamo Bay against assaults of 6,000 Spaniards.





Since then their missions have been carried out successfully, with courage and efficiency, in the Philippines, Mexico, Haiti, Santo Domingo, and Nicaragua. They aided with rescue work after the Messina earthquake.

First shots for this country were fired by Marines during the first World War. Rifle bullets were sent flying across the bow of a German vessel at Guam. They won 1,668 individual citations and decorations during that conflict. One Marine took 60 Germans as prisoners, though his only weapon was a shovel.

Better known to the modern public is their heroic, victorious record in World War II, at Wake, Midway, the Solomons, Gilberts, Marshalls, Marianas, Iwo Jima, and Okinawa, well in keeping with the historic traditions of their distinguished corps.

LT. GEN. JOHN A. LEJEUNE


[Illustration:

LT. GEN. JOHN A. LEJEUNE
]

Announcement of the change in name for the Marine Barracks at New River was made Dec. 18, 1942, by the Navy Department, less than a month after the death of General Lejeune on November 20.

Camp Lejeune was named for the late Lt. Gen. John Archer Lejeune (pronounced Lezhern), who was Commandant of the Marine Corps from 1920 to 1929.

The colorful commandant was the only Marine Corps officer ever to hold an Army division command up to 1918 when he commanded the Second Division in France during World War I. Half of the division's Infantry force was made up of the 5th and 6th Marine regiments. The division led all others in the number of Distinguished Service Crosses awarded to its officers and men.

Son of a Confederate officer, General Lejeune was born Jan. 10, 1867, in Pointe Coupee Parish, La., the birthplace and boyhood home of Gen. Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard, famous Confederate leader, who was young Lejeune's idol.

Unable to get an appointment to the United States Military Academy at West Point, he attended Louisiana State University for three years, then obtained an appointment to the Naval Academy at Annapolis. Upon graduation in 1890 he chose the Marine Corps for his branch of service.

During the Spanish-American War he served at sea and was promoted to a captainey shortly before the close of that conflict. Then followed expeditions to the West Indies, Panama, the Philippines, Japan and Vera Cruz, interspersed with tours of duty in Washington and elsewhere.

Prior to the entry of the United States in World War I, Lejeune became a brigadier-general, serving as assistant to the Marine Corps Commandant. He was promoted to major-general Aug. 31, 1918.

Under his command, the Second Division led the all-American offensive at St. Mihiel and participated in the battles of Champagne, Souain, Somme Py, Meuse-Argonne, Suippes, Vandinny Farm, Exermont and Argonne Forest. Characterized as “the greatest of all Leathernecks,” he was described by General Petain as “a military genius who could and did do what the other fellow said couldn't be done.” The shooting accuracy of his Marines caused General Pershing to remark, “the deadliest weapon in the world is the United States Marine and his rifle.”

After nine years as Commandant he retired in March, 1929, and for seven years was superintendent of the Virginia Military Institute. His autobiography, “Reminiscences of a Marine,” was one of the popular books of 1930. One of his three daughters, Eugenia D. Lejeune, received a commission in the Marine Women's Reserve in November, 1943, at Camp Lejeune.





ONSLOW COUNTY

HISTORIC—MODERN—PROGRESSIVE 1734-1946


[Illustration:

ONSLOW COUNTY COURTHOUSE AT JACKSONVILLE
]

ONSLOW COUNTY IS PROUD TO BE THE HOME OF CAMP LEJEUNE, AMERICA'S FINEST MARINE BASE AND THE MARINE CORPS’ LARGEST ALL-PURPOSE BASE ANYWHERE IN THE WORLD. ONSLOW COUNTY CITIZENS POINT WITH PRIDE TO THE OUTSTANDING RECORDS OF THE CAMP LEJEUNE LEATHERNECKS HERE AND IN THE PACIFIC.

BOARD OF ONSLOW COUNTY COMMISSIONERS

H. M. ENNETT, Chairman
J. C. PETTEWAYH. V. MOORE
W. VICTOR VENTERSTHOMAS MARSHALL





*“Welcome home, the Second Marine Division! This, your permanent home, has seen many valiant outfits, the First Marine Division, and units that composed the other brave divisions, including your heroic Second. We on the outside appreciate them all—the U.S. Marine Corps’ job well done. Yours is a deserved rest. Welcome to it.”

NEWS & VIEWS

The Only Newspaper in The World That Gives a Whoop About Onslow County

BILLY ARTHUR, Publisher and Editor

MEMBER THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PUBLISHED EVERY TUESDAY AND FRIDAY

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[note]



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ROY L. GOODE, President

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[Illustration:

LUXURY LINER—AIR CONDITIONED
]

SEASHORE TRANSPORTATION COMPANY SERVES EASTERN NORTH CAROLINA

On Our Routes you will find the world's largest Marine Corps training centers—Camp Lejeune at Jacksonville and the Marine Air Station at Cherry Point—and Camp Davis at Holly Ridge, N. C., as well as several auxiliary air fields.

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SEASHORE TRANSPORTATION COMPANY SETS THE PACE

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United States Marine Corps

Headquarters


[Illustration:


United States Marine Corps Official Seal]

Washington, D. C.

To all who shall see these presents, greeting:

Be it known that a Special Commendation has been awarded to

ATLANTIC AND EAST CAROLINA RAILWAY KINSTON, NORTH CAROLINA.

By reason of your unselfish and tireless efforts in fulfillment of the requirements of the United States Marine Corps, and through your cooperation and loyalty which enabled us to do our part in bringing victoriously to a close World War II, the United States Marine Corps does hereby gratefully extend this Special Commendation.

Dated20 DECEMBER, 1945

A. A. Vandegrift

GENERAL A. A. VANDEGRIFT, USMC THE COMMANDANT OF THE MARINE CORPS

W. P. T. Hill

MAJOR GENERAL W. P. T. HILL, USMC THE QUARTERMASTER GENERAL OF THE MARINE CORPS

Copy of Official Commendation





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[Illustration:


Drawing of Queen Anne Hotel]





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The City of New Bern

1710—1946

“PIVOT OF COASTAL CAROLINA”

Down Where Inland Waters Prepare to Meet the Sea

PROUD OF ITS DOUBLE DISTINCTION AS

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Marines and Their Families Always Have a Cordial Welcome in Our Progressive City—Famed for its Historic Traditions, Modern Advantages and Recreational Facilities. Special Entertainment Programs for Servicemen.

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OWEN G. DUNN CO.

MANUFACTURING STATIONERS

PRINTERS, RULERS AND BLANK BOOK MAKERS

NEW BERN, NORTH CAROLINA





• REMEMBER

YOU ALWAYS SAVE AT

BELK'S

NEW BERN, N. C.

THE FINEST IN PETROLEUM

Carolina Oil and Distributing

Company

PHONE 4164

NEW BERN, N. C.





FOR THE FINEST IN WATER CRAFT

COMMERCIAL VESSELS AND PLEASURE BOATS OUTBOARD MOTORBOATS IN NEW MODERN DESIGNS

CHRIS-CRAFT INBOARD RUNABOUTS AND CRUISERS

STORAGE—SERVICE—REPAIRS—EQUIPMENT

COMPLETE LINE OF MARINE HARDWARE NEW ENGINE RECONDITIONING PLANT PROPELLER RECONDITIONING A SPECIALTY

Barbour Boat Works

NEW BERN, N. C.

DRINK


[Illustration:


Coca-Cola classic Logo]

TRADE-MARK REG. U. S. PAT. OFF.

IN BOTTLES





Coplon-Smith Company

READY-TO-WEAR DEPARTMENT STORE

NEW BERN'S FINEST STORE

Branch Banking & Trust Company

“THE SAFE EXECUTOR”

OLDEST BANK IN CRAVEN COUNTY

GENERAL BANKING, TRUSTS, FIRE INSURANCE

H. D. BATEMAN

President

FRANK F. FAGAN

Manager New Bern Branch

MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION





HOTEL NEW BERNIAN

NEW BERN, N. C.


[Illustration:


Photo of Hotel New Bernian]

Completely Renovated

Newly Furnished

Hospitality Service

Reasonable Rates

OPERATED BY GRENOBLE HOTELS, INC.

“STOP AT RECOGNIZED HOTELS”

THE STORE WHERE YOU ALWAYS FEEL AT HOME

J. C. PENNEY CO.

NEW BERN, N. C.

THE FARTHER YOU GET FROM ONE PENNEY STORE THE CLOSER YOU GET TO ANOTHER





MOREHEAD CITY

“GATEWAY TO THE GULF STREAM”

SHOPPING CENTER FOR CENTRAL CAROLINA COAST EXCELLENT RECREATIONAL FACILITIES

HUNTING—FISHING—SURF BATHING SAILING—YACHTING

WELL ESTABLISHED INDUSTRIES

CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C.

West Construction Company of North Carolina

Paving Contractors

KINSTON, NORTH CAROLINA

WE ARE PROUD TO HAVE PAVED ROADS FOR THE CAMP LEJEUNE LEATHERNECKS





BLUE RIBBON CLUB


[Illustration:

BLUE RIBBON CLUB
Photo of Blue Ribbon Club]

EASTERN CAROLINA'S ORIGINAL AND MOST EXCLUSIVE SUPPER CLUB

INCLUDING A LARGE PRIVATE DINING ROOM ON NEW BERN HIGHWAY—TWO MILES FROM MOREHEAD CITY

FAMOUS FOR ITS FOOD

CHOICE SEAFOODS FROM MAINE LOBSTER TO FLORIDA FROGLEGS WESTERN STEAKS—SOUTHERN FRIED CHICKEN

DINE AND DANCE IN COMFORT IN LUXURIOUS ATMOSPHERE

PHONE 9106 OR 5188

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C.

CRUSHED STONE, SAND AND GRAVEL FOR THE MARINE BASE AT CAMP LEJEUNE

WERE FURNISHED BY

The Superior Stone Company

RALEIGH, N. C.






[Illustration:

Jefferson Hotel
]

Jefferson Hotel

HEADQUARTERS OF PERSONNEL AT CHERRY POINT AND CAMP LEJEUNE

FAMED FOR HOSPITALITY AND FOOD

FACING BOGUE SOUND

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C.

HILL'S

KNOWN FOR GOOD CLOTHES

NEW BERN

MOREHEAD CITY

GREENVILLE

HARVEY'S MEN SHOP, KINSTON

ALSO OPERATED BY HILL'S

Sanitary Fish Market

Best Seafood on the Coast

SHORE DINNERS

ON THE WATERFRONT

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C.

H. A. KULJIAN & CO.

ENGINEERS AND CONSTRUCTORS

PUBLIC UTILITIES

PUBLIC WORKS

INDUSTRIALS

1518 WALNUT STREET

PHILADELPHIA 2, PA.

WASHINGTON—LOS ANGELES—NEW YORK






[Illustration:


A&P Food Stores Company Logo]

Food Stores

COMPLIMENTS

OF

MAXWELL

COMPANY

WHOLESALE MERCHANTS

NEW BERN, N. C.

CLARK'S

DRUG STORES

BROAD & MIDDLE STS. NEW BERN, N. C. DIAL PHONE 2188

We have it, can get it, or it isn't made.

WELCOME MARINES

BAXTER'S

NEW BERN, N. C.

LARGEST JEWELERS IN EASTERN NORTH CAROLINA

“Where Every Deal is a Square Deal”





TELEPHONE 2191

Gay Distributing Company

FINE ALE AND BEER

PABST—BALLANTINE—KRUEGER—RUPPERT

NEW BERN. NORTH CAROLINA

New Bern Building Supply Co.

BUILDING MATERIALS

110 CRAVEN STREET

PHONE 3143

NEW BERN, N. C.

North Carolina Equipment Company

CONSTRUCTION, INDUSTRIAL AND LOGGING EQUIPMENT CONTRACTORS’ SUPPLIES, ETC.

RALEIGH, N. C.

3101 Hillsboro St.

Phone 8836

CHARLOTTE, N. C.

2 Mi. South—Rt. 21

Phone 44661

ASHEVILLE, N. C.

Sweeten Creek Road

Phone 789

“INTERNATIONAL INDUSTRIAL POWER”

Parsons

NEW BERN N.C.

• APPAREL FOR GENTLEWOMEN •





COMPLIMENTS OF

Baugh & Sons Company

G. ALLEN IVES, MANAGER

106 CRAVEN STREET

NEW BERN, N. C.

AGRICULTURAL CHEMICALS AND COMMERCIAL FERTILIZERS

NEIGHBORLY NEW BERN

SENDS GREETINGS

MATCHLESS KELLY-SPRINGFIELD TIRES

AT

Coastal Tire Company

NEW BERN, N. C.

J. H. PARKER

E. W. SUMMERELL

Hawk Radio and Appliance Company

BOODY HAWK, MANAGER

NEW BERN, N. C.

KELVINATOR

ELECTRIC REFRIGRATION

RANGES

PHILCO-RCA

RADIOS

PARTS AND TUBES

DUO-THERM

OIL BURNING

APPLICANCES

THOR

WASHING

MACHINES

SMALL HOME APPLIANCES

FREEZING CHESTS FOR HOME USE


[Illustration:

HOTEL TRYON
]

HOTEL TRYON

620 HANCOCK STREET

NEW BERN, N. C.

REASONABLE RATES

DAY OR WEEK

HOMELIKE ATMOSPHERE





DINE AND DANCE COPA CABANA CLUB

PHONE 781

JACKSONVILLE, N. C.

STEAKS, CHICKEN OCEAN FRESH SEAFOODS

FINEST WINES AND CHAMPAGNE

PHONE 370

JOHNSON'S DRUG STORE

PRESCRIPTION DRUGGISTS

JACKSONVILLE, N. C.

THE TAYLORS

DEANE C. TAYLOR, Manager PEGGY TAYLOR, Asst. Mgr.

GIFTS

JACKSONVILLE, N. C. AND MIDWAY PARK, N. C.

D. B. WADE AND SON

Will Soon Be in Their New Theatre

ALSO DISTRIBUTORS FOR

GENERAL ELECTRIC APPLIANCES SWANSBORO, N. C.

STANDARD CAB CO. DIAL 777

At All Times Ready To Serve You

WARREN'S SERVICE STATION JACKSONVILLE, N. C.

R. W. WARREN, Manager

HOTEL WALMORE

ON NEW YORK TO FLORIDA HIGHWAY

JACKSONVILLE, N. C.

RATES $2.00 UP

CLEAN—CHEERFUL—QUIET

FREE PARKING

Plan to see Camp Lejeune, U. S. Marine Corps’ Largest Permanent Base

J. B. PETTEWAY & SON

GROCERIES, FRESH MEATS, VEGETABLES AND COUNTRY PRODUCE

DIAL 432

JACKSONVILLE, N. C.

MCCULLOCH'S JEWELERS

JAMES L. MCCULLOCH, OWNER DEALERS IN

WATCHES, CLOCKS, DIAMONDS, JEWELRY, CHINA AND SILVERWARE

PHONE 408

JACKSONVILLE, N. C.

CASPER MARINE SERVICE

Marine & Automobile Parts & Accessories

Westinghouse Electrical Appliances

SALES AND SERVICE DIAL 35-2

SWANSBORO, N. C.

COMPLIMENTS


[Illustration:


Royal Crown Cola Best by taste-test
Royal Crown Bottling Company
Wilmington, N. C.]





Quinn & Miller Company

FURNITURE OF QUALITY

JACKSONVILLE, N. C.

KINSTON, N. C.

Builders Supplies Company

BUILDING MATERIAL, SAND AND GRAVEL SEWER PIPE—PAINTS AND ROCK WOOL

GOLDSBORO, N. C.

PHONE 390

JACKSONVILLE, N. C.

PHONE 241

COMPLIMENTS OF

George W. Kane

GENERAL BUILDING CONTRACTOR

ROXBORO — DURHAM — GREENSBORO

NORTH CAROLINA

Ketchum Drug Company

JACKSONVILLE AND MIDWAY PARK, N. C.

TWO STORES FOR BETTER SERVICE

PRESCRIPTIONS A SPECIALTY—SODA FOUNTAIN

THE BEST IN MEN AND WOMEN TOILETRIES





“THE OIL WELL” CAFE

418 BROAD ST.—NEXT TO THE FIRE STATION

NEW BERN, N. C.

HOME COOKING—SOUTHERN STYLE

MEALS SERVED CONTINUOUSLY FROM 6 A. M. TO MIDNIGHT EXCEPT MONDAYS

COMPLIMENTS OF

CITY COAL AND TIRE COMPANY

NEW BERN, N. C.

CRAVEN FOUNDRY AND MACHINE COMPANY

MILL AND AUTOMOTIVE SUPPLIES

206 CRAVEN STREET

NEW BERN, N. C.

J. C. WHITTY & COMPANY

FARM MACHINERY AND FEEDS

132 CRAVEN STREET

NEW BERN, N. C.

THE S. B. PARKER COMPANY

“EVERYTHING IN SHEET METAL”

LENNOX AIRE-FLO HEATING—COMBUSTIONEER STOKERS

215-17 CRAVEN ST.

NEW BERN, N. C.

PHONE 3397

THERE'S A FORD IN YOUR FUTURE

COMPLETE FORD SERVICE

USED CARS

W. C. HAGOOD

225 CRAVEN ST.

PHONE 3351

NEW BERN, N. C.

NEW BERN BUILDING & LOAN ASSOCIATION

ESTABLISHED 1887

“THE HOME BUILDERS”

Save the Building and Loan Way—Your Neighbor Does

STITH & TAYLOR, INC.

FIRE, AUTOMOBILE AND ALL OTHER FORMS OF INSURANCE

OFFICE PHONE 2963

RESIDENCE PHONE 4278

NEW BERN, N. C.

LUCAS & LEWIS, INC.

For 57 Years a Leading WHOLESALE GROCERY Carrying Nationally-Advertised Brands

SOUTH FRONT AND MIDDLE STREETS

PHONE 3900

NEW BERN, N. C.

FIVE POINTS ESSO STATION

TOMMY DAVIS, PROP.

PHONE 2250

NEW BERN, N. C.

HAPPY—SNAPPY—RELIABLE SERVICE

THE FLAT TIRE DOCTOR AND THE BATTERY KING

WASHING, POLISHING AND LUBRICATION

FUEL OIL—KEROSENE





HAVE YOUR TIRES RECAPPED AT

NEW BERN TIRE RECAPPING COMPANY

FOOT OF METCALF STREET

NEW BERN, N. C.

NEW BERN OIL & FERTILIZER CO.

Manufacturers of Cotton Seed Products and High Grade Feeds and Fertilizers

JOE K. WILLIS COMPANY

NEW BERN, N. C.

COMPLETE FUNERAL SERVICE—AMBULANCE SERVICE

226 BROAD STREET

PHONE 3210

COMPLIMENTS OF

NEW BERN LOAN AND JEWELLERS

JEWELRY, LUGGAGE, GIFTS

215 MIDDLE STREET

NEW BERN, N. C.

BENDIX AUTOMATIC HOME LAUNDRY

ESTATE HEATROLAS—GAS AND ELECTRIC RANGES

NEW BERN TRACTOR & EQUIPMENT COMPANY

417 SOUTH FRONT STREET

NEW BERN, N. C.

QUALITY FURNITURE

TURNER-TOLSON FURNITURE COMPANY

ENTRANCES ON BROAD AND MIDDLE STREETS

PHONE 2772

NEW BERN, N. C.

LUPTON FISH & OYSTER CO.

OYSTERS OUR SPECIALTY

LUPTON'S SUPREME-PAC CANNED FOODS

FROZEN FOOD LOCKER PLANT

NEW BERN, N. C.


[Illustration:

Flowers-By-Wire Authorized Florists Telegraph Delivery Shop
Florists Telegraph Delivery Logo]

WE WIRE FLOWERS

CARPENTER'S FLORIST

419 BROAD ST.

PHONE 2546

NEW BERN, N. C.

CUT FLOWERS—CORSAGES—FUNERAL DESIGNS

C. C. C. SERVICE STATION

DEALER IN TEXACO PRODUCTS

WASHING AND GREASING A SPECIALTY

GOODYEAR AND FIRESTONE TIRES

OPPOSITE COURT HOUSE

NEW BERN, N. C.

DIAL PHONE 9714

W. E. SWAIN, PROPRIETOR

THE BOYD FURNITURE STORE

222 MIDDLE STREET

NEW BERN, N. C.

We Are Proud of the Marine Base at Camp Lejeune. We Thank the Leathernecks and Their Families for Their Past Patronage and Assure Them They Are Always Welcome at Our Store





THIS IS

WHIT

NEW BERN'S VOICE OF THE COAST

WOOTTEN-MOULTON

PHOTOGRAPHS

OF ALL KINDS

NEW BERN, N. C.

DOWDY FURNITURE COMPANY

“New Bern's Largest and Best Furniture Store”

NEW BERN, N. C.

H. K. LAND & SON

205-206 ELKS TEMPLE

NEW BERN, N. C.

PHONE 4251

REAL ESTATE


[Illustration:

THE MORRIS PLAN
New Bern Morris Plan Company Logo]

“THE BANK FOR THE INDIVIDUAL”

THE NEW BERN MORRIS PLAN COMPANY

313 POLLOCK STREET

ENJOY

Pepsi-Cola

COMPLIMENTS OF

MONTGOMERY WARD

NEW BERN, N. C.

MCLELLAN STORES CO.

ALL NEEDS FILLED AT LOWEST PRICES

MIDDLE AND POLLOCK STREETS

NEW BERN, N. C.

SAM LIPMAN AND SON

NEW BERN'S BIGGEST AND BEST DEPARTMENT STORE

HARDY MOORE CLEANERS

HOME OF MONITE

MOTH-PROOF CLEANING

315 MIDDLE STREET

PHONE 2134

NEW BERN, N. C.





THE DINNER BELL

HOME COOKED FOOD

413 BROAD STREET

NEW BERN, N. C.

THE PARISIAN

230 MIDDLE STREET

NEW BERN, N. C.

WHERE FASHION IS FOREMOST

ONLY THE BEST

IN LADIES’ WEARING APPAREL

NEHI BOTTLING COMPANY

PAR-T-PAK

AND

ROYAL CROWN COLA

NEW BERN, N. C.

W. C. CHADWICK

GENERAL INSURANCE

214 MOHN BUILDING

PHONE 3146

NEW BERN, N. C.

ANYTHING YOU NEED IN LAUNDRY OR DRY CLEANING

You'll Make No Mistake in Sending to

BRADDY'S

PHONE 2159

323 SOUTH FRONT STREET

NEW BERN, N. C.

BEST WISHES

TO CAMP LEJEUNE AND ITS MARINES

FROM A FRIEND IN NEW BERN

STALLINGS BROTHERS

PLUMBING and HEATING

1905-1946

243 CRAVEN STREET

PHONE 2977

NEW BERN, N. C.

E. C. ETHERIDGE

BUILDING CONTRACTOR

203½ SOUTH FRONT ST.

PHONE 2307

NEW BERN, N. C.

TAYLOR MOTOR COMPANY

OLDSMOBILE DEALER OLDS AND CADILLACS

SALES AND SERVICE

NEW BERN, N. C.

LILIAN WILKINSON BOSCHEN BESS HYMAN GUION

WISH TO REMIND YOU THAT AT ALL TIMES YOU WILL FIND

A CAREFULLY SELECTED COLLECTION OF

AMERICAN ANTIQUES

PLUS A SOUTHERN CORDIALITY FOR YOU ALL

528 EAST FRONT STREET

NEW BERN, N. C.





WELCOME TO WILLIAMS CAFE

MIDDLE STREET AT BROAD

PHONE 2897

NEW BERN, N. C.

WE SERVE CHOICE STEAKS AND SEAFOOD PLATTERS

NOTHING BUT THE BEST

GOOD FOOD MAKES GOOD FRIENDS

ASKEW'S CLEANERS

1109 POLLOCK ST.

PHONE 4312

NEW BERN, N. C.

NEW BERN'S LARGEST

HOME OF BETTER CLEANING

COMPLIMENTS OF

C. O. KERSEY, JR.,

INCORPORATED

PACKINGHOUSE PRODUCTS

NEW BERN, N. C.

ORRINGER PICKLE COMPANY

NEW BERN, N. C.

MANUFACTURERS OF

CAROLINA MAID PICKLES

AND PICKLE PRODUCTS

K. R. JONES

303 GEORGE STREET

PHONE 2127

NEW BERN, N. C.

AMOCO GAS

FISK TIRES AND TUBES

BYNUM'S DRUG STORE

PHONE 3123

240 MIDDLE ST.

NEW BERN, N. C.

THE JEWEL BOX

AND THE JEWEL BOX

GIFT SHOP

NEW BERN'S DIAMOND STORE

CENTRAL CAFE

ELKS CORNER

NEW BERN, N. C.

“THE CAFE THE GOOD FOOD BUILT”

THE SMART SHOP

LADIES’ READY-TO-WEAR AND MILLINERY

EXCLUSIVE BUT POPULAR PRICED

NEW BERN, N. C.

TRAVELERS’ REST

TOURIST HOME AND CABINS SHOWERS AND HEAT

OFFICE—418 BROAD STREET NEXT TO FIRE STATION

NEW BERN, N. C.





COMPLIMENTS OF

ORANGE CRUSH

___AND___

NUGRAPE

INSURE WITH

THE DUNN AGENCY

313 POLLOCK STREET

PHONE 3847

NEW BERN, N. C.

SMAW-HARRIS FUNERAL HOMES AMBULANCE SERVICE

NEW BERN

BAYBORO

PHONE 2067—NEW BERN

DR. WM. I. GAUSE

CHIROPRACTIC PHYSICIAN

210-12 ELKS TEMPLE

PHONE 2909

NEW BERN, N. C.

BRANCH OFFICE—922 ARENDELL ST. MOREHEAD CITY, N. C.

MASONIC THEATRE

NEW BERN, N. C.

ESTABLISHED 1805

OLDEST THEATRE OPERATING IN AMERICA

FIVE PICTURE SHOWS DAILY FOUR ON SUNDAYS

THE GREEN DOOR

Home Cooking

“WHAT FOOD THESE MORSELS BE”

BROAD AND MIDDLE

HIGHWAY 17

NEW BERN, N. C.

RITCHY'S

CLEANERS—HATTERS—DYERS

SPECIAL ATTENTION TO MARINES

209 MIDDLE STREET

PHONE 3965

NEW BERN, N. C.

J. R. CHADWICK

MERCHANT TAILOR

NEW BERN, N. C.

UNIFORMS MADE TO MEASURE

DUFFY'S

BEST IN DRUG STORE GOODS AND SERVICE

SINCE 1835

SPECIAL ATTENTION TO MAIL ORDERS

DIAL PHONE 4138

NEW BERN, N. C.

FOR OVER 33 YEARS THE SYMBOL OF SAVINGS


[Illustration:


Chevrolet Motor Company Logo]

CHEVROLETS AND BUICKS COMPLETE SERVICE

CRAVEN MOTOR CO.

225 CRAVEN ST.

PHONE 4106

NEW BERN, N. C.





POLLOCK'S ESSO STATION

CORNER BROAD AND MIDDLE

NEW BERN, N. C.

COMPLIMENTS OF

KEHOE AND COLONIAL THEATRES

NEW BERN, N. C.

ZAYTOUN NEWS AGENCY

Wholesale and Retail

145 MIDDLE STREET

222½ MIDDLE STREET

NEW BERN, N. C.

BOWL AT

HILL'S BOWLING ALLEY

421-23 BROAD STREET

NEW BERN, N. C.

SARDESON'S

CENTER OF FASHIONS

254 MIDDLE STREET

NEW BERN, N. C.

EMMIE'S FLOWER SHOP

FLOWERS FOR ALL OCCASIONS

333 MIDDLE STREET

PHONE 3768

NEW BERN, N. C.

JOE LIPMAN

FURNITURE

223 MIDDLE STREET

NEW BERN, N. C.

HAMMOND ELECTRIC CO.

SELLS AND SERVES

EVERYTHING ELECTRICAL

315 POLLOCK ST.

PHONE 2397

NEW BERN, N. C.

RIVERSIDE IRON WORKS

MACHINISTS, BOILERMAKERS, BLACKSMITHS

IRON AND BRASS FOUNDRY

1112 NORTH CRAVEN STREET

NEW BERN, N. C.

SASSER CLOTHING CO.

331 MIDDLE STREET

NEW BERN, N. C.

WE CARRY COMPLETE LINES OF LADIES’ AND GENTLEMEN'S READY-TO-WEAR AT REASONABLE PRICES

JACOBS SHOPPE

SMOKES, DRINKS, SWEETS,

PAPERS AND MAGAZINES

MIDDLE AND POLLOCK STREETS

NEW BERN, N. C.

MERIT SHOE CO.

SHOES AND HOSIERY

319 MIDDLE STREET

NEW BERN, N. C.

NEW BERN SALES CO.

CHRYSLER AND PLYMOUTH

SALES AND SERVICE

LOUIS’ PLACE

BEER AND SANDWICHES

207 MIDDLE STREET

NEW BERN, N. C.

J. S. JONES

DEALER IN

GOOD FURNITURE

SEE US BEFORE BUYING

NEW BERN, N. C.

STOP AT

KAFER'S BAKERY

427 BROAD ST.

PHONE 2243

NEW BERN, N. C.

S. M. JONES & CO.

BROKERS AND DISTRIBUTORS FRUITS AND PRODUCE

SPECIALIZING IN CAROLINA AND FLORIDA VEGETABLES

NEW BERN, N. C.

HAGOOD REALTY CO.

ALL KINDS REAL ESTATE AND FIRE INSURANCE

207-9 ELKS TEMPLE

NEW BERN, N. C.

HUGH HINNANT

Plumbing Contractor

Standard Fixtures—Home Water Systems

513 GEORGE ST.

PHONE 4333

NEW BERN, N. C.

PARROTT'S FOOD STORE

SELF-SERVICE

Groceries, Meats and Vegetables

626 HANCOCK ST.

PHONE 2536

NEW BERN, N. C.





GUEST HOME

MRS. J. A. MCKENZIE

219 POLLOCK ST.—PHONE 3894

NEW BERN, N. C.

One Block from U. S. Highways 17 and 70 Off the Highway—Away from the Noise Heat and Hot Water—Free Garages

HOWARD'S

NEW BERN'S GREATEST CLOTHES VALUES

N. E. MOHN & CO.

HAY—STRAW—GRAIN

NEW BERN, N. C.

PINNIX DRUG STORE

OPPOSITE UNION STATION

PHONE 2746

NEW BERN, N. C.

“IF YOU DON'T TRADE WITH US WE BOTH LOSE MONEY”

DR. E. F. MENIUS

OPTOMETRIST

ELKS TEMPLE

NEW BERN, N. C.

THE BOOTERY

QUALITY FOOTWEAR

252 MIDDLE ST.

PHONE 4120

NEW BERN, N. C.

FIVE POINTS MILLING CO.

W. B. SMITH

HAY, GRAIN, FEED, SEED

FIVE POINTS

NEW BERN, N. C.

FAGAN ELECTRIC CO.

Admiral Refrigerators, Radios and Other Electrical Apparatus

321 MIDDLE STREET

NEW BERN, N. C.

BROAD STREET GROCERY CO.

R. W. IPOCK, PROP.

Groceries, Meats, Country Produce

PHONES 3181-3182 417 BROAD ST.

NEW BERN, N. C.

THE CORSET SHOP

MRS. VIVIAN BELL

411 POLLOCK ST.

PHONE 2719

NEW BERN, N. C.

GOSSARD PRODUCTS

LINGERIE AND SURGICAL GARMENTS

HIBBARD'S

GIFT SHOP

NEW BERN, N. C.

COMPLIMENTS OF

GRAPETTE BOTTLING CO.

NEW BERN, N. C.

NEW BERN MONUMENTAL WORKS

MONUMENTS AND TOMBSTONES

NEW BERN, N. C.

ROYAL JEWELERS

The Store of Satisfaction

238 MIDDLE STREET

NEW BERN, N. C.

OLD RELIABLE SHOE SHOP

330 MIDDLE STREET

NEW BERN, N. C.

SHOE SERVICE OF ALL KINDS

FULLER'S MUSIC HOUSE

216½ MIDDLE STREET

NEW BERN, N. C.

Pianos and Radios

DARNELL'S SERVICE CENTER

GULF PRODUCTS

BROAD AND HANCOCK STREETS

NEW BERN, N. C.

WARRINGTON'S GROCERY

47 BIDDLE STREET

PHONE 4178

NEW BERN, N. C.

See Me For Your Needs

SHRIVER'S FLOWER SHOP

325 SOUTH FRONT ST.

NEW BERN, N. C.

PHONES: DAY 2380—NITE 2822

“We Telegraph Flowers”

JOE ANDERSON'S DRUG STORE

901 BROAD STREET

PHONE 4201

NEW BERN, N. C.

VISIT US AND SEE OUR COLLECTION OF ANTIQUE GUNS





THE CITY OF KINSTON

“THE WORLD'S FOREMOST TOBACCO CENTER”

___AND___

“THE KEY CITY OF EASTERN NORTH CAROLINA”

FEELS HONORED AND PROUD TO HAVE AS ITS NEIGHBOR

CAMP LEJEUNE, THE MARINE CORPS’ LARGEST ALL-PURPOSE BASE

And Extends to the Camp Lejeune Leathernecks a Cordial Invitation to Shop and Relax in Our Progressive City, Far Famed for Its Southern Hospitality to Service Men, Their Families and Friends.

VISIT KINSTON OFTEN

BOARD OF ALDERMEN

CITY OF KINSTON

KINSTON, N. C.

GUY ELLIOTT, Mayor

J. E. HOOD & COMPANY

PRESCRIPTION DRUGGISTS

DIAL 4116

KINSTON, N. C.

YOUR REXALL DRUG STORE

1871

HARVEY'S

1946

75 YEARS OF BRINGING YOU THE FINEST IN MERCHANDISE

KINSTON, N. C.

Enjoy HINES ICE CREAM

HARDWARE

GIFTS

D. V. DIXON AND SON

KINSTON, N. C.

LEJEUNE'S MARINES ARE ALWAYS WELCOME AT

BELK-TYLER'S

“KINSTON'S LEADING DEPARTMENT STORE”

KINSTON, N. C.





E. L. SCOTT

ROOFING AND SHEET METAL WORK

VENTILATORS, RADIATOR REPAIRING, WINTER AND SUMMER AIR CONDITIONING

AUTHORIZED LENNOX FURNACE DEALERS

514 EAST VERNON AVENUE

DIAL 2110

KINSTON, N. C.

ONE OF THE FIRST SUB-CONTRACTORS TO START WORK AT CAMP LEJEUNE, AND STILL A SUB-CONTRACTOR FOR ROOFING AND SHEET METAL WORK

Our Firm is Proud of its Roofing and Sheet Metal Work at Camp Lejeune—at the Naval Hospital, Family Hospital, Naval Warehouse, Naval Laundry, Naval Boathouse; Camp Dispensaries, Infirmaries, Mess Halls and Theatres; 160 Officers’ Homes, Bachelor Officer Quarters, Officers’ Clubhouse, Golf Club Building, Hostess House; Bus Station, Commissary, Cold Storage Building, Heating Plant, Laundry, Water Treatment Plant, Paint and Repair Shop, Ordnance and Signal Supply Warehouses; Pumping and Well Station Building, Guard House, Industrial Area Buildings; Tractor Shed Buildings; Midway Housing Project and Shopping Center; Tent City Improvements; Rifle Range Buildings; Court House Bay Improvements; and Onslow Beach Buildings.

We Are Proud to Have Had a Part in the Construction of CAMP LEJEUNE, Including All Tile and Marble Work for the Naval Hospital, Family Hospital, all Officers’ Quarters, Theatres, Dispensaries, Bachelor Officer Quarters, Infirmaries, etc.

G. W. Carter Tile Company

CONTRACTORS

502 EAST VERNON AVENUE

PHONES: 3587 AND 2501

KINSTON, N. C.

TILE, MARBLE, TERRAZZO, RESILIENT FLOORS, MEDICINE CABINETS, BATHROOM ACCESSORIES, MANTELS AND FIREPLACE EQUIPMENT





Richlands Welcomes Camp Lejeune Marines

RICHLANDS THEATER

YOUR LOCAL MOVIE FOR REAL

ENTERTAINMENT

RICHLANDS, N. C.

H. W. MARSHBURN

MEATS AND GROCERIES

RICHLANDS, N. C.

RICHLANDS BARBER SHOP

RICHLANDS, N. C.

MILLS & BROWN SUPPLY CO.

DEALERS IN GROCERIES, FEEDS, SEEDS, FERTILIZERS HARDWARE, BUILDING MATERIALS

RICHLANDS, N. C.

RICHLANDS SUPPLY CO.

FERTILIZER AND FARM IMPLEMENTS

RICHLANDS, N. C.

THOMPSON'S GROCERY

Self-Service

GROCERIES, MEATS AND VEGETABLES

PHONE 246

RICHLANDS, N. C.

E. T. HOWARD

BLACKSMITH SHOP

CART WHEELS, BODIES, GENERAL REPAIR

RICHLANDS, N. C.

GUY C. WIGGINS & SONS

HARDWARE

FARM SUPPLIES—BUILDING SUPPLIES ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES

RICHLANDS, N. C.

RICHLANDS FOOD MARKET

GROCERIES, MEATS, FRESH FRUITS AND VEGETABLES FEEDS AND SEEDS—FULL LINE OF PAINTS

ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES—GENERAL ELECTRIC, ZENITH RADIOS

PHONE 383

RICHLANDS, N. C.

J. F. Mohn Mercantile Co.

FERTILIZER, FEEDS, SEED AND FARMING IMPLEMENTS DRY GOODS, NOTIONS—MEATS AND GROCERIES COAL—MULES

PHONE 260

RICHLANDS, N. C.

WE TAKE PRIDE IN HAVING SERVED SO MANY THOUSANDS OF CAMP LEJEUNE PERSONNEL DURING THE WAR YEARS—A HEARTY WELCOME AWAITS YOU NOW

—AT—

HOOD'S

IN RICHLANDS

“COMPLETE DRUG SERVICE”





COTTLE'S ESSO SERVICE

Experienced Mechanics in Garage

AUTO ACCESSORIES

PHONE 363

RICHLANDS, N. C.

MORTON'S GARAGE

AUTO PARTS

SALES AND SERVICE

BODY AND FENDER REPAIR WORK ELECTRICAL & ACETYLENE WELDING

RICHLANDS, N. C.

WOODROW'S POOL ROOM

POOL FOR YOUR PLEASURE

WHEN IN RICHLANDS

VISIT US

RICHLANDS, N. C.

HUMPHREY BROTHERS SERVICE STATION

MEATS AND GROCERIES

DIAL 452

FOUR MILES SOUTH OF RICHLANDS ON HIGHWAY 24


[Illustration:


Ford Motor Company Logo]

FORD TRACTORS

C. R. V. MOTOR COMPANY, INC.


[Illustration:


Ford Motor Company Logo]

FERGUSON EQUIPMENT

AUTHORIZED SALES AND SERVICE

TELEPHONE 457

RICHLANDS, N. C.

Telephone Communications

Local and Long Distance Telephone Service for Marine Corps personnel, both official and personal, is provided through this Company. Both Public and Attended Pay Station Service is available on the Station.

CAROLINA TELEPHONE & TELEGRAPH COMPANY

LOW—since opening our first store, every day, we've concerned ourselves with thrift—and with our unswerving, dollar-stretching Lower Price Policy. We never were more concerned than now.

Our object is to keep prices down within reach of your pocketbook, to be sure that every dollar you spend at MOTHER AND DAUGHTER is stretched as far as it will go. For today—like you—we believe that it's not only smart to be thirfty—it's imperative. Shop and save at MOTHER AND DAUGHTER!

Mother and Daughter

FASHIONS

STORES IN

RALEIGH — WINSTON-SALEM — WILSON





AMAN'S ESSO SERVICE

ATLAS Tires, Tubes


[Illustration:


Esso Fuel Products Logo]

And Accessories

DIAL 441

JACKSONVILLE, N. C.

COMPLIMENTS OF

JEAN'S 5 & 10

JACKSONVILLE, N. C.

QUINN MCGOWEN FUNERAL HOME

24-Hour Ambulance Service

DIAL 330

JACKSONVILLE, N. C.

SWANSBORO ICE PLANT

S. F. MILSTED, Owner

SWANSBORO, N. C.

CRUMPLER'S GARAGE

2 MILES ACROSS BRIDGE FROM SWANSBORO, N. C.

GENERAL AUTO REPAIR

“Repair Any Make or Model”

H. L. CRUMPLER

MILLS MOTOR COMPANY


[Illustration:


Chevrolet Motor Company Logo]

SALES AND SERVICE

MAYSVILLE, N. C.

PHONE 32.4

COMPLIMENTS

OF

S. FLEISHMAN & SON

JACKSONVILLE, N. C.

T. J. CAPPS & SONS

P. V. CAPPS, SOLE OWNER

WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTORS

We Tru To Please

JACKSONVILLE, N. C.

“SHOP AND SAVE AT CHARLES”


[Illustration:

CHARLES Stores Company, Inc.
]

VICTORY BEAUTY SHOP

JACKSONVILLE, N. C.

PHONE 405

MODERN BEAUTY SHOP

RICHLANDS, N. C.

PHONE 433

MRS. ADA BANKS

SEAFARE CAFE

407 MARINE BLVD.

JACKSONVILLE, N. C.

Delicious Seafood & Chicken Dinners

DEAL RADIO SERVICE

NEW BRIDGE STREET AT HUERTH

PHILCO RADIO SALES & SERVICE

PHONE 351

JACKSONVILLE, N. C.

HARTSFIELD JEWELRY CO., INC.

ROBERT H. KALET

Keepsake Diamonds—Longine Watches Jewelry—Repairing

PHONE 382—P. O. BOX 605

JACKSONVILLE, N. C.

COMPLIMENTS

JULIAN K. TAYLOR

GOOD CLOTHES

WILMINGTON, N. C.

JOHN R. TAYLOR

ASSISTANT MANAGER

THE MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY OF NEW YORK

HUGHES BUILDING

TELEPHONE 3866

NEW BERN, N. C.

COMPLIMENTS

FROM

ADLER'S CASH STORE

EVERYTHING FOR THE FAMILY

BUTLER FURNITURE CO.

HOME FURNISHINGS

KINSTON, N. C.

THE “WRIGHT” DO-NUTS

AND

POTATO CHIPS

331 SOUTH FRONT STREET

NEW BERN, N. C.





Midway Park Food Center

ONSLOW COUNTY'S NEWEST, LARGEST AND FINEST FOOD STORE

LOCATED IN THE NEW MIDWAY PARK SHOPPING CENTER

MIDWAY PARK, CAMP LEJEUNE, N. C.

FEATURING

ARMOUR'S

Star AA Grade Beef

Quality A Grade Beef

Also—Cheaper Grades

Fine Selection of Seafoods Delicatessen Items Fresh Fruits and Vegetables


[Illustration:


Photo of Midway Park Food Center interior]

I have served the people of Midway Park and the Trailer Park for the past 5 years with the best meats, groceries and fresh vegetables that the market offered. I am happy to have the pleasure to continue to serve them in the most modern and best equipped food store in Eastern North Carolina.

I appreciate the fine business given me in the past, and look forward to your continued fine patronage.

C. W. CONKLING

WE SELL ONLY U. S. FEDERAL INSPECTED GOVERNMENT GRADED MEATS

WE HAVE THE LARGEST VARIETY AND FEATURE NATIONALLY ADVERTISED STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES, MEATS, FRESH FRUITS AND VEGETABLES

STORE OPEN TO THE PUBLIC 9:00 A. M. TO 6:00 P. M.

MIDWAY PARK FOOD CENTER

C. W. CONKLING, OWNER AND MANAGER

PHONE 5547

PHONE 5547





Onslow Music School

JACKSONVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA


[Illustration:


Photo of Onslow Music School]

OPPOSITE RAILROAD STATION

CLASSES DAY OR EVENING

CERTIFIED MUSIC TEACHERS

INSTRUMENT SHOP—SCHOOL—DORMITORY

HELEN J. MCGRAW, DIRECTOR

PRIVATE OR CLASS INSTRUCTION—CERTIFIED TEACHERS

WRITE FOR PAMPHLET AND DETAILS









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