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Illustrated story of Wilmington North Carolina, 1914

Date: 1914 | Identifier: F264.W6 I45 1914
Illustrated story of Wilmington North Carolina, 1914. [S.l.] : Southern Press, [1914?] 26 p. : ill., map ; 23 x 31 cm. Title from cover. more...
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Illustrated Story of
WILMINGTON
North Carolina
1914









City of Wilmington.
ILLUSTRATED-—1914.


[Illustration:

Harbor Scenes.
]

IT is very easy to make hopeful and glowing prophecies concerning the future of any city or town, but in many cases when these prophecies are subjected to the severe test of close analysis and comparison with actual facts we see how faulty they are. Not so with the City of Wilmington The more fully one is acquainted with the actual facts the more firmly is one convinced that at the present time, there is no city in the United States which gives more promise of steady and rapid development Wilmington has never been “exploited” or “boomed.” Its growth—in the very face of a tide of ill events which would literally have “swamped” the average city—has been carried on by faithful, painstaking, earnest methods, which called for no sensationalism in order to assure success; and although the growth of the city may have been faster had more “booming” tactics been adopted, yet it would not have been so firmly fixed upon such a secure foundation as it is now. It is through a combination of conservatism and enterprise that the best and most lasting results are attained, and the present standing and future prospects of the City of Wilmington afford conclusive proof
[Illustration:

Harbor Scenes.
]

that the efforts of Wilmington's representative business men have been and are today wisely directed.

Wilmington is the imperial city of North Carolina, and commercial metropolis of the South Atlantic Seaboard—an extensive cotton port, from which 500,000 bales are shipped annually, and in whose harbor the flags of all nations may be seen, the logical port to and from Panama headquarters for two great railroad
[Illustration:

Harbor Scenes.
]

systems, and a leading financial center, whose banks show in resources an increase of 365 per cent. in less than ten years.

Wilmington is a city of to-day and one of magic energy, truly modern in the fullest meaning of the word. Never in her long and eventful history, (extending over a period of a century and a half), has Wilmington enjoyed such a degree of prosperity, nor has the future looked so bright with promise, as at the present time.

No city in the South has progressed more substantially than has this city by the Sea; the port of North Carolina, the great distributing point for the larger part of both Carolinas—centre of one of the most productive sections of the world, with financial resources larger than any of her sister cities, magnificently paved streets, sewer and every modern municipal improvement, recently made at a cost of nearly a million, the fourth largest cotton exporting port in the world, a climate that has been pronounced the most delightful and salubrious on the Atlantic seaboard, and scores of other attractions that go toward making it an ideal city for business, investment and as a home, and as to some of the advantages of





the city, we submit the following prepared by the Chamber of Commerce and The Morning Star.

Wilmington has better freight rates than any city in the State. Surpasses all other North Carolina cities in distributing advantages for the manufacturer and wholesaler.

Wilmington has a belt line around the city, reaching many desirable manufacturing sites, which can be secured at reasonable cost.

Wilmington is located at the head of the Cape Fear ocean gateway, with 400 miles of inland navigation, and six railroads extending in all direction making this port one of the most desirable distributing points on the South Atlantic coast.

Wilmington's outlet by rail and water are the Atlantic Coast Line and Seaboard Air Line systems; the Wilmington, Brunswick & Southern Railway and the Clyde Steamship Line to New York. Twenty-eight passenger trains enter and leave Wilmington daily over six separate routes.

Wilmington's per capita revenue is $10.15 as compared with $11.58 for other cities of 30,000 in the United States, according to the United States census report.

Wilmington has one of the most efficient fire departments in the South, as shown from the fact that this is the only city in the State placed in first class by the underwriters. The fire loss in 1912 was only $28,063.00.

Wilmington is situated at the junction of two large rivers along which millions of feet of black, sweet and tupelo gum, pine and hardwoods grow. The wood is being used for furniture, columns, boxes, handles and other general purposes.

Wilmington is the largest commercial city in North Carolina with an annual business of $75,000,000.

As a Distributing Point.

Wilmington's supremacy as the great distributing point for a large portion of the Carolinas and parts of adjoining States, is, of course, due to its splendid transportation facilities, backed up by the enterprises and iniative of its business men. Its advantages both by rail and water are not to be compared to those of any other city in the two States, with the possible exception of Charleston, and it cannot be successfully denied that she has, during the past years, left her old time rival in the rear. Stretching out in all directions are the various branches of the Coast Line and Seaboard systems, completely covering a territory that is being more rapidly developed than any section in the country, while the steamers plying on the Cape Fear river and its tributaries, take in 400 miles of waterways in North and South Carolina. The Clyde Line connects the port with New York and Georgetown, S. C. Steamers from European, South American and other ports arrive frequently with fertilizer materials and other cargoes.

Coast Line a Great Factor.

When in 1900 the Atlantic Coast Line was organized it took over the Wilmington & Weldon Railroad, the Wilmington, Norfolk and Newbern, the Wilmington, Columbia and Augusta, subsequently the great Plant System and all their various branches, a new era in the prosperity of the city was inaugurated, and it became the headquarters of the new company. To it must be ascribed much of the remarkable development of this city and section. The system,
[Illustration:

Court House.
]

which comprises over a dozen Southern roads, places Wilmington in touch with an immense territory, and it has just completed the construction here of a handsome addition to its home at a cost of over $325,000. About 800 people are employed at the offices alone, and thousands along the line. Vast improvements in terminal facilities have been made during the last few years, including the erection of a dozen or more immense warehouses along the water front, where the company is the largest single owner of property, which is constantly being improved.

Inland Waterways.

That branch of the Coast Line connecting Wilmington to Newbern connects there with the series of sounds and canals which go to make up the inland waterway to Norfolk. This puts Wilmington in close touch with the proposed inland waterways along the Atlantic Seaboard to Baltimore, and from there to Philadelphia and New York. The government has already opened an improved canal connecting Newbern with the Albemarle Sound, giving continuous service from that city to Norfolk, which, of course, enables much larger tonnage from the East to Wilmington by water than heretofore, and also makes the transportation charges cheaper in that the dangers of the ocean are eliminated.

The Seaboard's Great Terminals.

The Seaboard Air Line also has important terminals here and in their improvement, has recently spent half a million dollars. This system owns among others, the Wilmington, Charlotte and Rutherford Railroad, and its branches which were chartered February 13th 1885, and built from Wilmington westward 103 miles. On March 4th, 1873, it was sold under mortgage foreclosure and re-organized as the Carolina Central Railway Company. That road was completed to Charlotte and Shelby in the latter part of 1874, making a total distance of 242 miles. It was again sold on May 1st, 1880, and on January 1st, 1899, was consolidated as part of the Seaboard Air Line.

Accessability of Coal Supply.

Among railroad developments recently made which promise to have marked effect upon the future growth and prosperity of Wilmington is the construction of the Carolina. Clinchfield and Ohio Railroad from the coal fields of Southwestern Virginia to Spartanburg, S. C. This road, making connection with the Seaboard Ait Line, gives Wilmington a direct line into coal territory, equal to any in the country, a fact that must be of great importance in determing the future of the city as a distributing center and as a site for inanufacturing enterprises. The great terminals recently secured by the Seaboard afford that road the facilities for taking care of a great coal tonnage, either for export or to meet local demands.

The Atlantic Coast Line and the Norfolk & Western railroads recently joined hands and built a road from Winston-Salem to Wadesboro, operated as the Winston-Salem Southbound, thus giving Wilmington another coaling connection of great importance. It is believed that this line will eventually handle a large quantity of both bunker and cargo coal to take ship here instead of farther north, the advantage pointed out being that many vessels would thus escape the dangers of Cape Hatteras.

Wilmington is the natural seaport not only for North Carolina and South Carolina, but through its railroad connections can reasonably be expected to become the shipping point of a large volume of business from the coal fields of Virginia and Kentucky, the iron beds of Alabama and Tennessee; and for many of the commercial and manufacturing centers of the country, such as Cincinnati, Chicago, Cleveland and St. Louis. The extension of the Carolina, Clinchfield and Ohio Railroad through to a connection with the lines of the Chesapeake & Ohio and the Baltimore & Ohio in the Elkhorn coal fields of Kentucky will give this city direct lines into some of the best sections of the Middle West, and some of the leading ports on the Great Lakes.

New Section Opened

Two years ago the road connecting Wilmington with the beautiful city of Southport and known as the Wilmington, Brunswick and Southern Railway, began operations and is contributing its share to the general prosperity of the vicinity. It extends for a distance through a country, which was among the first settled in the Carolinas, but has been little developed, although rich in lumber and naval stores, and with an abundance of land especially suitable for trucking. The road connects with one of the best and finest cities on the South Atlantic with the direct rail routes of the interior, and rapid development is confidently expected by its builders who are capitalists of this city and section.

In the matter of railroads Wilmington is well provided for, not because of the number of the different lines entering it, but because of the systems they represent and the connections they maintain with other lines, reaching into all the country's business centers.

The belt line operated by the Atlantic Coast Line around the city has been of unlimited value, serving as it does to make eligible a large number of sites for manufacturing purposes. Plants located on it have the advantage of easily reaching the various lines of railroad entering the city, and also the ships that come to the wharves, as well. It also has the effect of preventing factory sites from becoming too high in price by thus extending the limits of the favorable factory zone.

Export and Import Trade.

For many years Wilmington has been the fourth Southern port in exporting and it will be seen from the last annual report of Collector Keith, made January 1st, her position has been maintained. The enormous exportation of cotton, amounting last year in value to $27,077,000, has given the port prominence throughout England and Continental Europe, and vessels come here for cargoes for Germany, France, Great Britain, Italy, Portugal, Peru, Chili





and the West Indies. The largest single cotton exporting firm in the world is located here and steamers from this port carry anywhere from 10,000 to 18,000 bales of the staple across each trip. While cotton is by far the most valuable of the exports, there is a considerable trade in rosin, gum logs, lumber, cross-ties, pig iron and shingles. In 1912 there was exported 456,699 bales of cotton, valued at $27,077,000; 17,033 barrels of rosin, $111,581; gum logs to the value of $59,000; 1,441,000 feet of lumber, valued at $27,387; pig iron, $12,000, and miscellaneous making a total of $27,290,968.

Realize Its Importance.

The government at Washington has for years realized the importance of Wilmington as a port of entry and has been fairly generous with appropriations. It has constantly continued the work until, at the present time, there is a depth at low water from the bar to Wilmington of 26 feet with a channel varying from 150 to 300 feet wide. This gives a channel with a maximum depth at high tide of 30 1-2 feet? from the ocean to Wilmington, a distance of 30 miles by the river, and the work of widening the channel to 300 feet for the entire distance, is in progress. Under the policy adopted by the government for the improvement of rivers and harbors, the channel will be gradually deepened. Even as it is, however, vessels of the size that carry the greatest bulk of the world's commerce can come and go, without difficulty and leave the wharves carrying cargoes of 17,000 bales of cotton for Bremen, Harve and Liverpool. Vast improvements in terminal facilities to accommodate all classes of ocean traffic have been provided in the last five years, fully keeping pace with the construction of similar facilities to be utilized for the same purposes at other Southern ports, and at the opening of the Panama canal this city will undoubtedly share in the Pacific coast and Far East traffic. Steamers from European and South American ports arrive frequently with large cargoes of fertilizer constituents and a big percentage of this raw material is manufactured by the seven large concerns engaged in this business.

Ready for the Panama Trade.

That the opening of the Panama Canal will mean much to Wilmington no one can doubt who has given any intelligent thought to the matter and the merchants and other business men of the city are preparing to welcome this trade.

The position of this port gives it many advantages enjoyed by no other along the Atlantic Seaboard. These were no doubt in the minds of the Seaboard and Coast Line managements when the two great railroad companies built 11 immense water terminal storage warehouses during the last three years, and have still others in contemplation, having purchased some of the most valuable and available sites on the market.

The city already has a large trade with the west coast of South America, importing millions of pounds of fertilizer from Chili and Peru and these vessels should return loaded with merchandise of every kind manufactured here or in this section. We have the raw materials, especially cotton, and there is no reason why “Made in Wilmington” should not be pasted on hundreds of articles exported to the countries on the Pacific. Geographically, the city has splendid advantages. From Wilmington to Colon, Panama, by steamer is only 1,552 miles, 227 miles less that Norfolk and on the safe
[Illustration:

Wharf of the Clyde Steamship Company, Operating Passenger and Freight
Steamers between Wilmington and New York.

]

side of Hatteras. It is only 53 miles further than Galveston, Texas; 40 miles further than Savannah and 45 further than Charleston.

Especially valuable will the big canal be to Wilmington in case of the success of a plan now being urged for bringing the proposed in and waterway, being opened through the coastal country, to the city's door, so to speak. By this plan the inland canal, instead of being cut through to the Cape Fear river some distance below the city, as heretofore contemplated, would come through within or very near to the corporate limits. In case this plan is adopted the city will probably secure plenty of ground for docks and wharves to be held by the municipality, thus preventing anything in the way of a monopoly at any time in the future.

Largest Fertilizer Plants.

By far the largest single industry is that represented by the manufacture and shipping of fertilizers. This is one of the oldest industries of Wilmington, and located here is the premier plant of the South, organized in 1869. There are seven large manufacturers, and it is estimated that nearly a million pounds of fertilizer and fertilizer materials are shipped from Wilmington annually.

Superior Banking Facilities.

Strong financial institutions are most necessary and essential to the progress and prosperity of every community, and no city can hope for proper development unless it possesses banks conducted along liberal and progressive, yet safe lines. They are, as a matter of fact, an asset, the value of which it would be difficult to overestimate. Wilmington's combined banking resources are greater than those of any city of its size in the Carolinas. She has eight banks and trust companies, having a banking capital and surplus of $2,708,635.95; deposits of $11,289,146.79, and resources of $15,931,293.27.

For many years the banks of the city have constituted to a marked degree, the clearing point to the Carolinas. They have been, and are, used as an exchange centre through which the smaller banks of a large territory in the two States and larger institutions in the clearing centres of other States have largely centered as a clearing point for checks, collections on North and South Carolina. It is safe to say that at least 600 banks, small and large, located in other cities, towns, and villages maintain accounts with the Wilmington banks, and through them pass annually an enormous volume of business.

Real Estate and Building.

During the last decade there has been a truly wonderful development in Wilmington real estate, especially in the suburbs and values have advanced rapidly. Few cities in the country have such attractive suburbs as Wilmington, and ewer still where so many people own the houses in which they live. It has been estimated by a gentleman, who is in a position to know, that 70 per cent. of the people here own their houses, and have paid for them through their membership in the building and loan associations, of which there are over a dozen, all of them in a flourishing condition. The place is indeed a city of homes, and this fact speaks well for its future, for the family owning its own home is more apt than not to remain a permanent citizen and a good one. There is a chance for every man to own a house here, and this is also a splendid field for investment.

Wonderful Trucking Section.

Although the advantages of this region are many, and only partially developed, its greatest asset is undoubtedly the splendid trucking section of which Wilmington is the centre. Numerous as are the opportunities for manufacturing with profit, and for success in those lines of commerce, calling for good distributing facilities, it is upon the advantages for profitable agriculture presented by the surrounding country that the future growth and prosperity of the city, in great measure, must most largely depend. Agriculture forms the basis for all real, enduring prosperity, and it has been amply proven by results that Wilmington is well supplied with fundamental things. The soils about the city have been carefully examined and analyzed by experts in the employ of the government at Washington, and found to embrace types that cannot be surpassed for general agricultural purposes, and are especially adapted to intensive farming, truck growing and gardening. Scientific agriculturalists declare that in addition to soil types of the highest character, the amount and distribution of rain fall here is theoretically almost perfect.





Excellence of the Climate.

The climate, which is semi-tropical, is almost ideal for farming, with open Winters that permit of outside work practically every day in every year, and Summers not too hot, being made cool by the breezes sweeping in from the Atlantic ocean. The average Summer temperature, 78 degrees; and the average Winter tempeature, 48 degrees.

The normal rainfall is 51.05 inches, average annual clear days, 132. These excellent climatic conditions largely contribute to abundant crops, and the custom of growing two, three and even four crops a year on the same land is very general. Advantage is being taken of agricultural possibilities of this section by more and more people each year, and it is only a question of time, and that short, when hundreds of thousands of acres of land now lying idle, and unproductive, will be made highly profitable to its owners. Many large tracts have already been divided into small farms of 10 acres or more, and all about Wilmington are communities of prosperous farmers engaged in raising berries, vegetables and trucking crops generally for the markets of the Northern cities.

Farmers Make Immense Profits.

According to the report of the secretary and business agent of the East Carolina Truck & Fruit Growers’ Association, for a normal year, there is shipped from here strawberries at from $3.20 to $4.00 a erate, valued at over $1,000,000, and vegetables of nearly that amount.

After deducting half of this for expenses a million in profits is left in the hands of the farmer. This is for an average season, and applies only to early berries and vegetables shipped by refrigerator cars, and express. The figures are not fanciful, or merely speculative, but are compiled from detailed reports of the association, which has done a noble work in the development of the trucking resources of this section. About 1,800 car loads are shipped during a normal season. The strawberry is a very valuable crop to those who bestow industry and intelligence upon its cultivation, but probably lettuce stands at the top of the list in the matter of returns from a given acreage. A few years ago the record crop was made by a farmer near Wilmington who cut $12,000 worth of lettuce from 13 acres of land.

Great Grape Country.

From the time of the coming of the earliest colonists to this section grapes have been cultivated most successfully and also flourish abundantly in a wild state. There are many vineyards at good prices for all that can be produced right here in the city, where wine is made in large quantities. These vineyards are especially noticeable in the colonies near the city, in which are located a number of Italians, Hollanders and other immigrants, who have brought to the new country the knowledge of grape growing required in the old.

Some of these vineyards have proven very profitable to their owners, and the outlook is good for a still larger grape-growing business throughout this entire section.

Tar, Pitch and Turpentine.

While the business of handling naval stores has suffered a big decline with the disappearance of large tracts of timber, it is still a considerable
[Illustration:

Post Office.
]

industry, and a number of old established firms are engaged in it, but on nothing like the same scale as formerly. During the past year there was shipped from here 7,043 casks of spirits of turpentine; 5,900 casks of crude; 11,127 of tar and 32,231 of rosin.

Wilmington was once the world's greatest centre for the production and exportation of naval stores. The industry declined because the resources of the splendid long leaf pine forest were greatly impaired. The trees were tapped and almost destroyed without reforestation, no steps being taken to preserve a great source of wealth and prosperity. The sap, the gum, the leaf and even the odor of the long leaf pine act as a tonic and there are several plants here largely engaged in extracting them for medicinal purposes.

Historic Wilmington.

Although it is a modern city in all that the term implies, possessing every convenience and improvement, Wilmington is at the same time an old city, and around it hovers many interesting historical associations, that should not be forgotten in this era of progress, and constant change. Strolling along its well paved streets, brilliant at night with thousands of electric lights swinging across the main thoroughfare, jostled by crowds of people bent on business or pleasure, one occasionally passes an old building or tablet commemorating some great event or man. The houses where Lord Conwallis stopped, on his way to meet his fate at the hands of Washington at Yorktown, stands still on Market street, quaint and old-fashioned, but in an excellent state of preservation. Just across the way the residence where the Confederate officers made their headquarters during the Civil War is pointed out, and nearby is the bronze statue of George Davis, eminent lawyer and attorney general in the cabinet of President Jefferson Davis. Further up the street is a monument to the memory of Cornelius Harnett, one of the most prominent patriots of the Revolution, who sleeps the last sleep in St. James’ graveyard nearby. Along the wharves at the foot of Market street are planted at either corner two ancient cannons said to have seen service in both the war with Mexico and the “late unpleasantness” between brothers of the North and the South, and the visitor now and then meets a citizen who will tell him of the days when a score or more blockade runners could be seen moored along the water front waiting for cargoes of cotton to Naussa where, if they were lucky enough to escape the Federal blockading fleet outside the mouth of the Cape Fear, it would be exchanged for arms medical supplies and provisions for the armies in the field. If he would have a pleasant and an interesting trip, he will take the good steamer Wilmington, and have a look at the site of old Fort Fisher and Battery Buchanan, nothing but heaps of sand where one of the greatest battles of the war between the States was fought, resulting in the surrender of Wilmington. It has been said that the fall of Wilmington was the severest blow to the Confederate cause which it could receive from the loss of any port. It was far more injurious that the capture of Charleston, and but for the moral effect, even more hurtful than the evacuation of Richmond.

With the fall of Fort Fisher, the constant stream of supplies was effectually cut off, and the blockade made truly effective, not by the navy fleet, but by its capture on land.

First to Revolt.

Near the wharves is still standing on Market street the residence of Tyron, the Colonial Governor. He also had a residence down the river on land now a part of “Orton” the country residence of James Sprunt, who has written most delightfully of this section in his “Tales of Traditions of the Lower Cape Fear.” This place, says Mr. Sprunt, “was made memorable in the history of the United States as the spot upon which the first act of violence occured in the war of American independence, and nearly eight years before the Boston Tea incident, over which so much has been made in our country's history; while this Colonial spot, the veritable cradle of American liberty is probably unknown to nine-tenths of the people at the present day. This was the refusal of some of the citizens of Brunswick to observe the Stamp Act. There are hundreds of interesting





places along the river and at Smith's Island, commonly known among the inhabitants of that section as “Bald Head Island,” upon which stands two friendly lighthouses, was the rendezvous of the notorious pirate chiefs, Blackbeard, Steed Bonnett and Richard Worley.

Founding of Wilmington.

The first settlement on the Cape Fear river was made in the year 1664 by a colony from the Barbadoes, who settled at a point about six miles from the mouth of the river on the west bank. This colony was not, however, permanent on account of the hostility of the Indians and the failure of the Lords proprietors to carry out promises made and furnish sufficient support. In 1667 the colony moved to Charleston and established that city on the banks of the Ashley. No further attempt was made to settle on the Cape fear until the year 1725. Then Maurice Moore, of Edenton, N. C., located on the river, 16 miles south of Wilmington, and laid out a town called Brunswick. He was joined at that point by his brothers from South Carolina, and a number of his friends from Edenton. From that time on many settlers came and obtained warrants of land on both sides of the river, and in 1731 John Maultsby obtained a warrant of 640 acres of land on the east side of Cape Fear, just opposite the confluence of that stream, and the Northeast river, and John Watson also located on a warrant on the south tract. In the Spring of 1733 a town was laid out on Watson's tract, and called Newton, and later New Liverpool. This point soon became the rival of Brunswick in importance. There are two reasons assigned for the growth of the town and the failure of Brunswick to have grown, one which is, that on account of the open water, which was very rough, opposite the city of Brunswick, the smaller boats and flats on the upper waters, which brought products from the forests down to the forts, were unable to get to Brunswick, therefore, the merchants there were forced to meet them further up the river to exchange products. This naturally gave the merchants of Wilmington an advantage over their rivals. Brunswick gradually was depopulated and hardly a trace of it remains at this day. In 1754 there were but 20 families to 70 in Wilmington. From that time there was no record of Wilmington's population until 1830, when it was 3,000; 1840, 4,744; 1850, 7,264; 1860, 7,562; 1880, 17,350; 1890, 20,066; 1900, 20,967, and 1910, 25,378. At the present time the population is variously estimated at between 30,000 and 35,000 people, but on account of the great suburban development that is going on, it would require a house to house canvass to reach a satisfactory conclusion.


[Illustration:

Y. M. C. A.
]

HANOVER REALTY COMPANY.—Real Estate, Loans and Rental Agents. This business has now been successfully established for the past three years. Mr. L. J. Carter is president of the company. He is counted as one of the leading authorities on values of this city, and his office is the center of information pertaining to real estate. The company, of which he is president, handles property in New Hanover and adjoining counties. They also do a large business in rentals and negotiate loans. The general offices of this company are located at 14 Princess Street.

GORDON BROTHERS.—News Dealers and Stationers, 17 Princess Street. A visit to this shop will thoroughly convince one that it is the largest and most prominent news paper and magazine agency in the city of Wilmington. The proprietors of this firm are Messrs. J. E. & J. T. Gordon, natives of Wilmington, who have been established in business here for upwards of ten years. They have the exclusive agency for all the daily newspapers, magazines, periodicals, journals, and other publications of note. They also carry a complete line of stationery, post cards, and other novelties which properly belong to this line.

THE SOLOMON SHOE COMPANY. Wholesale Shoes and Proprietors of Solomon's Shoe Store.—This firm is located at 9 and 11 South Front Street, with ’phone connection 888. Wilmington can boast of being the home of the largest shoe store in the Carolinas. The enterprise to which we refer is that known as “Solomon's Shoe Store,” located at the above address, and where an immense assortment of high grade footwear is carried. The proprietors of this business are Messrs. I. W. Solomon and J. L. Solomon, who established the business some seventeen years ago. These gentlemen have made a thorough study of every detail of the shoe industry, and they handle the products of some of the best known manufacturers in the United States. Their wholesale trade covers the entire States of North and South Carolina.

W. J. BRADSHAW & COMPANY.—Among the well-known and worthy enterprises of the city is the large furniture house operated by W. J. Bradshaw & Company, located at 117 South Front Street, with ’phone 767. This is an old established business, having been in existence for some fifteen years, and has been operated under the present firm name for seven years. The individual members of this firm are Messrs. W. J. Bradshaw, who has been connected with the house for thirteen years, and Mr. C. H. Batson. Both gentlemen are well and favorably known, and have a high standing in the trade, they are conducting the business according to modern methods in trade, and have the most liberal inducement to offer their patrons. They are dealers in all kinds of fine furniture and house furnishing goods.

G. W. YATES & COMPANY.—Booksellers and Stationers, 117 Market Street. This is an old established and pioneer house, and holds the position of leadership in the trade of the Carolinas. The business is both wholesale and retail, and has been established ever since the year 1875. The individual members of the firm are Messrs C. W. Yates and DeWitt C. Love, both of whom are widely and favorably known, and stand high in business and social circles. They have at heart the best interests of the city, and do all they can for the good of the community. They specialize in the handling of the following firm products’ Globe-Wernigke Filing Cabinets and Book Cases, Art Metal Construction Co.’s Steel Furniture, Typewriter Ribbons and Carbons, The Dictophone, Edison's Mimeographs and Neostyles, Eastman's Kodaks and Films, Victor Talking Machines and Records. Agents for the Royal Typewriter.

J. T. BURKE, JEWELER & OPTOMETRIST.—This gentleman has been established in business for upwards of twenty years, and has long been counted as one of the very leaders in the business in Wilmington. He is located at 27 South Front Street. The store is nicely appointed, and the stock contained therein comprises diamonds, watches, clocks, jewelry, cutglass, and silver novelties. A specialty is made of repairing and adjusting fine watches. Mr. Burke handles goods of the finest and best quality, and has a high class trade.

W. J. KIRKHAM & COMPANY.—This is an old established house, and no firm in the city is any more widely known than W. J. Kirkham & Company, whose business is located at 104 South Front Street, and their general stock comprises everything in seeds and vegetables, fruits and produce of all kinds. A specialty is made of Maine Grown Seed Potatoes and all kinds of seeds. The proprietors of the firm are Messrs. W. J. Kirkham and J. M. Ferreido.


[Illustration:

Elks’ Club.
]






[Illustration:

Wrightsville Beach.
]

JAS. F. WOOLVIN.—Funeral Director and Embalmer. Office 225 Princess Street, phone 223, residence phone 315. Wilmington is to be congratulated on its many business establishments, but among them all there is none in, its special line that ranks with that of Jas. F. Woolvin. This is the oldest and most prominent enterprise of its character in Wilmington, and the business has borne the highest reputation ever since the business was established. It was founded by the father of the present proprietor, the late Mr. J. W. Woolvin, in 1868. Mr. Jas. F. Woolvin has been the sole proprietor since January 1890, and has been connected with the house since 1875. Every detail of the profession is promptly and perfectly attended to.

LANIER & OVERBY.—This firm was organized in July, 1913, and the individual members are Messrs. Hardy Lanier and J. W. Overby. Mr. Overby is the general manager of the business. He has had a lifetime experience, and has been located in Wilmington for some ten years. He is a native of Fayetteville, N. C. Mr. Overby has a reputation of being one of the most highly gifted experts in the harness business in Wilmington, and his firm operates the fine shop located at 216 Market Street. A general stock is carried, consisting of harness, saddles, whips, etc. Repairing is a specialty.

J. T. AND J. O. BROWN.—Manufacturers and Dealers in Carts, Wagons, Drays, Etc. Automobile Painting a Specialty. Phone 284, No. 13 North Third Street. The gentlemen who compose this firm are men of large experience in the industry. They are natives of North Carolina and have spent the greater part of their life in the trade. They give employment to a number of highly skilled workmen, while they personally look after the management of the business, and all work is executed under their direct supervision. They have a well fitted up shop, and execute perfect work.

PEOPLE'S SUPPLY COMPANY.—This business has been established for upwards of eight years, and has been a decided success. The location is at 206 North Front Street, and the office telephone numbers are 420-421. This is an incorporated concern, and the acting officers are Messrs. Cuthebert Martin, president-treasurer; J. Charles Haar, secretary-general manager. This is one of the city's best stores, and the stock carried is enormous, consisting of the best grades of groceries, delicacies and table goods, and in fact everything that is pure and good to eat.


[Illustration:

Corner Princess & Water Sts.
]

J. C. McCARTNEY AND SON.—This firm wass organized June 1, 1913, and it comprises in its membership Messrs. J. C. McCartney, who has about forty year's experience in the trade, and Mr. H. J. McCartney, who has had an experience of about ten years. They are expert plumbers and gas fitters and have complete facilities for operating every detail of the business. They carry a large stock of supplies, and cheerfully furnish estimates on any size contracts. They maintain general offices at 310 North Front Street at Meiers’ Marble and Granite Works, telephone number 1617-J.

WILMINGTON SLATE AND METAL ROOFING COMPANY.—This concern is located at 14 South Second Street, with phone 596. The general manager of the business is Mr. W. B. Klander, who has had eleven years’ experience in the trade. The above company has benn established for seven years, and the proprietors of the business are Messrs. W. B. Klander, and his father, J. D. H. Klander, Sr. They are doing a fine business, and give employment to an average of some eight skilled workmen. They are tin and slate roofers, sheet metal workers, skylight and cornice makers, roof painters, and installers of warm air furnaces.


[Illustration:

Third Street Corner of Dock.
]

D. T. PETERSON, Plumbing.—The office of this gentleman is now located at 14 South Second Street, with the Wilmington Slate and Metal Roofing Company. Mr. Peterson is an expert plumber and gas fitter, and does every character of work in this special line of industry, including sanitary heating, plumbing, and gas fitting. He has had many years of experience in the business, and personally looks after the execution of contracts. Only skilled workman are employed. Estimates cheerfully furnished on application.

W. T. CROOM.—Wholesale and Retail.—Fruits, Vegetables, Chickens, Eggs and Produce, and Manufacturer of the Celebrated “Croom” Brand of Pure Horse Radish. 11 Dock Street. This gentleman has been established in business in Wilmington for the past thrity years, and has made a fine success and built up the trade especially in horse radish, which he has broadly distributed throughout the Carolinas. The “Croom” Brand of Pure Horse Radish is the acme of perfection, absolutely pure, and is regarded as the standard brand used in this part of the country. It is on sale at all first-class grocery stores and served in leading hotels, and restaurants. He is also proprietor of the Croom Boarding House, on the corner of Front and Dock Streets.





JOHNSON & KEEN.—Baldwin Pianos 205 Princess Street. There is not so much difference in pianos as in the dealer who handles them, but unfortunately the buyer seldom ascertains this fact until after the transaction is completed, and he then has an experience that is of little use to him thereafter. The firm of Johnson & Keen, Piano Dealers in this city, is composed of men of large experience in the music industry, and is an ideal firm with which to deal. Mr. Geo. L. Johnson is a native of England, and has had thirty-five years of experience as a teacher of music, organist, and piano dealer. He has been in Wilmington for five years, and his influence has been greatly felt in musical circles of this city. Mr. Chas. H. Keen is a native of Wilmington, and has been closely associated with the handling of musical instruments all his life. He commenced when he was but twelve years of age. They carry a general stock of pianos, music, books, sheet music, and general musical merchandise. They also make a specialty of rebuilding and tuning pianos. They handle the famous Baldwin Pianos, which have a reputation second to none.

CITY GROCERY COMPANY.—Fancy Groceries, Hams, Poultry and all kinds of Country Produce, 205 and 207 Market Street. This is one of the largest and most modern grocery stores in Wilmington, and the business has been established for the last five years. Mr. W. D. Hall became connected with this business about a year ago, and since the 15th of January, 1914, purchased the entire business and since that time has been the sole proprietor. He is managing the affairs of the company with fine success, and has a magnificant business. Mr. Hall is a native of North Carolina, and has made Wilmington his home for the past twenty years. He has had many years experience in the business, and thoroughly understands its every detail. He employs polite clerks, and has several wagons in the delivery service.

J. W. H. FUCH'S DEPARTMENT STORE.—This store is located at 28 South Front Street, and has ’phone 272. It is one of the city's busiest stores, and the business has been established since 1891. Mr. Fuchs has been highly successful in business here from the very beginning down to the present time. His store is modern throughout, and the general stock includes high-class dry goods, clothing, ladies’ and gents’ furnishings ready-to-wear, silks, notions, and everything generally found in highclass enterprises of this character. Mr. Fuch's is one of the prominent merchants of Wilmington, and has at heart the best interests of the city.


[Illustration:

Front Street.
]

J. WEIL.—Dry Goods, 111 Market Street. This enterprise has been established for many years. In fact, Mr. Weil is one of the oldest merchants in Wilmington. He commenced business here in 1874, and has had remarkable success from beginning down to the present time. He carries a complete stock of every thing usually handled by first-class dry goods merchants, and has a large patronage among the best class of trade. He occupies a large four-story building in the very heart of the business district of Wilmington at the above address.

HERBERT L. FENTRESS.—Drugs, 621 N. Fourth Street. It may be said that the city of Wilmington is well supplied with first-class drug stores. In fact, no city in the country has a better representation of the pharmaceutical profession than Wilmington. One of the leaders engaged in this business here is Mr. Herbert L. Fentress, who has been established in business for a number of years, and enjoys a reputation second to none in the city. His store is up-to-date in every feature, and is stocked with the very purest of pure drugs and chemicals, and other goods usually found in first-class stores of this kind.

J. L. MEMORY.—Auto Repairs and Supplies. Nos. 7 and 9 Market Street. Phone 879. This business has been established since April 27, 1913. Mr. Memory has been in Wilmington, however, for the past four years, during which time he has become quite well known to the trade. Mr. Memory is a native of North Carolina and has had a number of years of practical experience in all branches of the industry. His former trade was that of Steam and Electric Engineering. He is a practical machinist, and has a natural talent for the trade. During the four years he has been exclusively identified with the Automobile Industry. He has become thoroughly familiar with all the makes of the cars, and has the best facilities for making repairs. This is a growing and substantial business, and Mr. Memory has a promising future.

DEILCATESSEN STORE-MAY BROTHERS—Proprietors. 130 Market Street, Phone 1322. The members of this firm are Messrs. B. May and D. May, both thoroughly experienced in the business. Mr. B. May established the store here two years ago, and previous to this time for two years conducted a similar business in New York City. He is thoroughly modern in his methods, and has given to Wilmington one of her much needed and highly valuable stores. It is perfectly clean and sanitary, and stocked with the finest imported and domestic goods of every variety and a full line of fancy groceries—all kinds of prepared meats, cheese and butter, pickles, salads, etc.—only the finest and and choicest goods are offered for sale. The business has grown and expanded so rapidly that it became necessary to increase the capital, stock, fixtures, and facilities to meet the demands of the trade, and for this reason Mr. D. May, late of New York City, was induced to take interest in the business the first of January and firm name changed to May Brothers.






[Illustration:

Belfast Land Company's Cape Fear Vineyards.
]

Belfast Land Company's Cape Fear Vineyards.
Five Acres in Scuppernong Grapes—Freedom and Plenty.

The Belfast Land Co. was organized under the laws of North Carolina for the purpose of developing a large tract of land and planting it in the famous Scuppernong grape. This grape is a native of North Carolina, and is considered the best grape in existence for the production of light wines.

The Land.

A glance at the accompanying map will show the location of the land. It lies 14 miles from Wilmington on the banke of the Cape Fear River. The river here is about five miles wide, and the Peninsula at this point is about 2 miles wide. The ocean is on the east and the Gulf Stream flows northward about 30 miles from the shore. So the land is bounded on one side by a broad expanse of river and on the other side by the current of the Gulf Stream. The presence of these vast bodies of water takes the cold out of the air so that frost rarely ever visits this section. The land is especially adapted to the growth of the Scuppernong grape, being a light, sandy soil with a clay subsoil.

Transportation.

A glance at the map will show that we have a wharf on the property and a railroad running diagonally through the property. The steamer Wilmington, running between Wilmington and Southport, lands at this wharf, and the railway leading from the wharf runs within easy distance of each vineyard. In addition to this the country is now engaged in constructing a macadamized road from Federal Point to Wilmington, running through the property.

The Scuppernong Grape.

This grape is an enormous bearer. Sometimes one vine will cover 1-4 of an acre and produce from 50 to 100 bushels in one season. Besides, it is a self pruner, and no insect or disease has ever been known to affect it in any way.

The Market.

The Belfast Land Co. has entered into a contract with Paul Garrett & Co., the largest and wealthiest wine manufacturers in the country, to take all the grapes that will be raised in these vineyards for a period of twenty-five years at 75 cents a bushel.

The Paul Garrett Co. sold 200,000 cases of light wine last year, and this company is operating a large winery in Wilmington, where the grapes from our vineyards will be converted into wines.

This contract assures a steady and sure market for the grapes.

Prices and Terms.

This tract, as will be seen by the map, is divided up into 5-acre tracts, and each five-acre tract will be sold for $3,000; $100 cash and $25.00 per month.

Guarantees.

The company in its bond for deed guarantees:

1. To pay the purchases 4 per cent. on his instalments while he is paying for his vineyard.

2. To clear the land, plant 400 vines to the acre, post and arbor the vineyard, maintain and superintend it up to the time the purchaser receives his deed.

3. To give the purchaser the proceeds from the sale of the grapes that may grow on the vines minus the cost of picking and shipping.

Estimating the production per vine as low as possible, the money returns on a five acre tract would be as follows:

400 vines to the acre would be 2,000 vines on five acres.

At the end of the third year at 75 cents a bushe the contract price—

Bushel.
2000 vines at one peck per vine500$375 00
Fourth Year.
2000 vines at 1-2 bushel per vine1000750 00
Fifth Year.
2000 vines at 1 bushel per vine2000$1500 00
Sixth Year.
2000 vines at 2 bushels per vine40003000 00
Seventh Year.
2000 vines at 2 1-2 bushels per ve50003750 00
Eighth Year.
2000 vines at 3 bushels per vine60004300 00
Ninth Year.
2000 vines at 4 bushels per vine80006000 00
Tenth Year.
2000 vines at 4 bushels per vine80006000 00
$25 875 00

In ten years the gross proceeds from the five acres would be $25,875.00, allowing a discount of say 20 per cent. for the cost of cultivating, superintendence, picking and freight, the net returns would be

$25,875,00

5,000.00

$20,875.00

The five acres would thus produce $20,875.00 $2087.50 a year on an investment of $3,000. The vines would not have reached their best in ten years, and would still continue to bear increasingly as the years rolled on.

Where can a man find an investment equal to this?

Every $100 he invests brings him in $70.00 per year, and he does not have to give it a thought even. Where can you purchase a farm for $3,000 on the easy terms we offer that will pay you within the limits of the time you are paying for it seven times as much as we ask for it, and you do not have to strike a lick of work or entertain an anxious thought.

The company also guarantees in its bond for deed if you should get so disabled by accident or disease that you could not pay any more, and you have paid one fifth of the purchase price, two fifths or three fifths or four fifths, to give you one, two, three or four acres in accordance with the amount you have paid.

In fact, if you pay two years the grapes grown in your vineyard the third, fourth and fifth years will bring in enough to pay the $3,000 we charge you.

Now is the time to act. Let us have your application at once, as we have only 201 vineyards for sale, and it is first come, first served.

Address—

BELFAST LAND COMPANY,

Room 75 - - - Atlantic Trust Bldg.,

Wilmington, N. C.





THE PAYNE DRUG CO.—The general manager of this business is Mr. Harry E. Payne, who is a pharmacist of long experience, and is thoroughly accomplished in every detail of the profession. He is conducting his store according to the higher ideas known to the trade, and is building up a magnificent business. This store is finely appointed and conducted according to modern ideas, and it is a pleasure to make purchases at this place. The business has been steadily growing every since it was established two years ago. The stock consists of everything in high-class drugs, pure drugs, chemicals, toilet articles, sundries, etc. The filling of prescriptions is a specialty. This store is located on the corner of Fifth and Red Cross Sts., and has phone connection 520.

WILLIAM H. GREEN & CO.—Druggists, 107 Maret Street. This is the oldest established business of its character in Wilmington. It was started in the year 1870 under the firm name of Green and Flanner, under which the business was conducted until 1885. Then the business was continued under the firm name of William H. Green until 1890, and since the death of the late Mr. W. H. Green, who died January 12, 1914, the business has been operated by his son, Charles F. Green, as sole proprietor. Mr. Charles F. Green is a young man of high standing in social and business circles, is clever and accommodating, and has had experience in the practise of pharmacy since 1895.

D. B. FUTRELL & BROTHER.—Wholesale and Retail Country Produce, Chickens and Eggs, North Carolina Hams, Hides, Furs, etc., 219 Market Street. This is an influential and prosperous firm, and the business has been established for the past five years, and has occupied its present location since October, 1912. They were formerly located in the City Market. The members of the firm are Messrs. D. B. Futrell and A. Futrell, both of whom have a wide acquaintance throughout Wilmington and vicinity, and understand the trade thoroughly. Their highest aim is to please and satisfy each customer.

L. W. DAVIS & COMPANY.—This is one of the city's biggest enterprises. They are wholesale dealers in clothing, hats, and caps, and occupy location at 32 South Front Street, and maintain New York Office at 716 Broadway. The wholesale business of this firm covers the States of North and South Carolina. They handle high-class clothing only, and ship direct from New York. This firm has been established for upwards of thirty years, and it has been highly influential in the development of the business of Wilmington.


[Illustration:

Princess Street from Corner of Front.
]

WILMINGTON HARDWARE COMPANY.—This is a growing and successful enterprise, and the business has been established since October, 1912. The business is devoted to that of handling all kinds of general hardware, stoves, ranges, tin and enamel ware, cutlery, etc. The location of this store is at 124 Market Street. Mr. J. N. Sweeney is the general manager of the business, and is ably directing its affairs. He is a young man, popular with the trade, and is deeply interested in the progress of the people of Wilmington.

JOHN F. McVEY.—Tiles and Marbles. Tiles for Bath Rooms, Vestibules, and Cabinet Mantels, Tile Mantels and Interior Marble Work. The office and show room of this enterprise is located at 210 South Front Street, and was established in October, 1913 and his residence is at 219 South Front St. A magnificent stock is carried. Mr. John F. McVey, who is the proprietor of the business, has had thirty years of practical experience. He was, for a period of twenty-one years, connected with the trade in Washington, D. C. He has been contracting for the past three years, and has made his influence greatly felt in the trade throughout this part of the country. All dealings with him are sure to result in entire satisfaction to the trade. Estimates are cheerfully furnished.

WILMINGTON GROCERY COMPANY.—This is an incorporated concern with Mr. A. M. Hall, president and Miss C. W. Newkirk, secretary and treasurer. The business has been in successful existence since July, 1913. It is one of the largest and most important grocery businesses in Wilmington, and the large trade transacted by the company necessitates the services of three wagons and one automobile in the delivery department, while twelve people are constantly employed in waiting on the trade. In this finely appointed store, the business is conducted according to modern and progressive ideas. Its location is in the heart of the city at 125 Market Street.

CLARK-LYNCH LUMBER CO., Inc.—Lumber, shingles and laths. The office of this concern is at 17 Princess Street, while the yards are located at 10th and Kidder Streets. This is an incorporated concern, and while it has only been established since March, 1913, the business is growing rapidly and daily increasing in volume. The plant is large and modern, and a large number of men are constantly employed in looking after the interests of the trade. The officers of this company are Messrs. Collin E. Clark, President, and Herbert A. Lynch, Secretary and Treasurer. These gentlemen are favorably known to the trade, and have at heart the very best interest of the city.

HANOVER GROCERY COMPANY.—It may be truthfully said that no store in Wilmington is more widely known than that of the Hanover Grocery Company, dealers in staple and fancy groceries, fruits and vegetables, and everything that is good and palatable to eat. A specialty is made of Fox River Butter and Pan Dandy Bread. This store is located at 909 North Fourth Street, and has telephone connection 236. Mr. J. H. Haskett is now the proprietor of this business, which he has owned since November 11, 1913, having purchased same from the late proprietor, Mr. S. W. Sanders. Mr. Haskett is not new to the trade, however, as he is well and favorably known, having been connected with this store for the past fifteen years.

S. SEIGLER, THE FURNITURE MAN.—No. 11 Market Street. To this house we can not hope to add anything to its already finely established reputation, as Mr. Seigler has been in business in Wilmington for the past twenty years, which makes him one of the oldest dealers here. He carries a good stock of all kinds of furniture and house furnishing goods. He has the very best terms of investment to offer to the trade as well as at lowest cash prices or on credit.





ALEXANDER SPRUNT & SON—Cotton Exporters.—Wilmington ranks as the fourth largest cotton exporting port in the world, and the handling of this, the most important product of the South, is one of the city's greatest industries as it has been for years past. With the various improvements of the channel of the Cape Fear River, the lagest ships in the trade can be accommodated at its wharves, and largely through the enterprise and initiative of the great cotton exporting firm of Alexander Sprunt & Son, it has facilities for handling its cotton exporting business that are not surpassed by any other city on the seaboard. Some idea of the business done by this leading concern of the Carolinas may be gathered from the statement that over 500,000 bales of cotton were handled last year and fifty steamers were chartered to transport it to the great markets of Liverpool, Havre and Bremen, where branch offices are maintained. The business of this firm was started in 1866.

J. H. BOATWRIGHT & SON.—Insurance. Office 17 Princess Street. The insurance interests of Wilmington have no more reliable representatives than the firm of Messrs. J. H. Boatwright & Son. This place has been established since 1869, and during all this time has been a solid bulwark of protection to the commercial and industrial development of the city. Mr. Swift M. Boatwright is now sole proprietor of the business, and is in active charge of its affairs. He maintains membership in the National Association Local Fire Insurance Agents, North Carolina Fire Underwriters Association, and Local Board of Fire Underwriters. This firm represents only substantial and ably managed insurance corporations that afford every possible safeguard to policy holders and that invariably meet all just claims for losses with promptness.

R. W. HODGES COMPANY — Electrical Contractors.—This concern occupies location at 218 Market Street, and has phone 194. The buisness has been established for the past three years. Mr. R. W. Hodges is at the head of the concern. He is an electrician of a number of years’ experience, and thoroughly understands every detail of the business. He is prepared to undertake all kinds of contracts from wiring to the complete installation of electrical plants. All work is fully guaranteed. He carries a large stock of electical fixtures and other goods usually handled by first-class electrical houses. Because this firm does the best work is one reason their prices are the highest. Have them give you an estimate.

J. W. MURCHISON & CO.—Wholesale Hardware.—Located at corner of Chestnut and Water Streets, we find one of the largest hardware houses in the South, owned by the above firm. The building contains 40,000 square feet floor space and modern in construction. The concern is a distinct credit to the city. An immense stock of builders and shelf hardware, agricultural implements and machinery is carried. The firm represents some of the largest manufacturers of the world. The trade covers the Carolinas. The business has steadily grown ever since the day it was established in the year, 1873.


[Illustration:

Market Street.
]

THE A. H. MORRIS COMPANY.—Importers and Wholesale Dealers in China, Crockery, Glass Ware, Dairy Supplies, Tin and Enameled Ware. This is one of the old commercial landmarks of Wilmington, having been established many years ago by the late Mr. A. H. Morris. They are located at 103, 107, and 109 Dock Street, also have a large warehouse in the rear. The stock carried is very complete as regards quality, extent and variety, and the prices are reasonable on all articles. This is a substantial concern, and its influence is greatly felt in the trade.

LITTLE BILLIE'S ELECTRIC STUDIO OF PHOTOGRAPHY.—Mr. W. H. Dyer is proprietor of this fine studio, which he has been operating since April 1, 1913. He has had unusual success and today enjoys a fine and lucrative patronage. He does all kinds of high grade portrature, making photos day or night. He also makes a specialty of kodak finishing. The price for this work is extremely reasonable. This studio is located at 10 1-2 North Front Street. Mr. Dyer has had sixteen years of practical experience in photography. He is pleasant, accommodating, and popular with the trade. Mr. Dyer is a native of Virginia.

CAROLINA PRODUCE COMPANY.—Wholesale Produce Commission Merchants, No. 5 Market Street, phone 834. The wholesale and commission trade of Wilmington is one of the city's leading lines of industry, and many prominent men devote their time exclusively to the business. The Carolina Produce Company is quite an important concern, and has been established for about four years. The proprietors are Messrs. S. F. Craig and W. J. Mallard. They personally look after the management of affairs, and are giving complete satisfaction to patrons.

PREASE BROTHERS COMPANY. Incorporated.—Tinning, Plumbing, Steam and Hot Water Fitting, Warm Air Furnaces and Blow Pipe System Installed. Office phone 1329, residence phone 1768, 215 Market Street. This business has now been established for the past five years, and is incorporated. Mr. T. B. Prease in the president, and Mr. D. J. Prease, general manager. They are of North Carolina and well known and popular citizens of Wilmington. They have built up an immense business covering both the Carolinas and parts of adjoining States. The Prease Brothers are thoroughly experienced in all branches of the industry, and hold a prominent position in the trade. They give employment to many highly skilled workmen and have facilities with which to promptly execute all contracts whether they be large or small. Estimates cheerfully furnished.

C. H. BORNEMANN'S DEPARTMENT STORE—This business has now been established for twelve years, and is claimed to be the largest concern in this part of Wilmington. The stock carried is enormous, consisting of everything that can be mentioned from a toothpick up. It is known as “The store that sells everything.” The stock comprises groceries, hardware, dry goods, and drugs, and all of the specialties and notions which properly belong to these lines. This store is located at the corner of Seventh and Orange Streets, and has ’phone No 853. Mr. Bornemann is a native of this city, and is regarded as one of Wilmington's most progressive and most successful business men. He keeps fully abreast of the times, and his store is a credit to the city.

RICE & JONES.—This is a newly established, prosperous, and growing business. The firm was organized and started business the 10th Jan., 1914. The individual members are Messrs. C. C. Rice, and Sol Jones. Mr. Jones is a native of this city, and for many years has been in the trucking and merchantile business. Mr. Rice is a native of North Carolina, and has made Wilmington his home for nineteen years. He was formerly engaged in the furniture business for a number of years. The store is located at the South East corner of Ninth and Dock Streets, and has phone connection 1538-W. They carry select family groceries, fresh meats, cigars, tobacco, fruits, vegetables, country produce, chickens, eggs, grain, and notions. They are operating on a strictly cash basis, and therefore sell at prices lower than the lowest, while the delivery is made promptly.





EVERGLADE CAFE.—Run by Americans. Open day and night. There are places without number that hang out the sign as first-class restaurants, which are by no means entitled to the name, where the viands served are either inferior in quality or so badly cooked as to disgust anyone accustomed to only ordinary living. The Everglade is an establishment par excellence, and one of the largest and most modern in Wilmington. The proprietors are the Shepard Brothers, the individual members of the firm being Messrs. T. A. Shepard and F. S. Shepard. Mr. T. A. Shepard has had considerable experience in the hotel business, having formerly been connected with some of the leading hotels in the South. Mr. C. T. McKeithan is the manager of the cafe, and has had twelve years of experience. They make a specialty of short orders and regular meals, club sandwiches, etc. All sea foods carried in season, and every delicacy nameable. The cafe is most centrally located at 113 Princess Street, near the street ear junction.

HOLMES & ATKINSON.—This house is known as the “Quality Grocers,” and occupies location at 22 South Front Street. The business has been established for upwards of thirty years. It was established by the late Mr. A. H. Holmes, and for three years was conducted by his son, under the firm name of “E. H. Holmes, Agent.” Since the 15th of February, 1913, the present firm of Holmes & Atkinson has been in existence. The individual members of the firm are Messrs. E. H. Holmes and W. M. Atkinson, both of whom have a wide acquaintance throughout the city, and are gentlemen of most excellent standing. They have built up a magnificent business; give employment to eight clerks, and have three wagons in the delivery service. Their store is perfectly sanitary throughout, and the stock consists of the very highest quality of goods.

J. O. BROCK, Electrical Engineer and Contractor.—No. 123 Market Street. Phone 573 Mr. Brock enjoys the distinction of being the oldest established electric contractor in the city of Wilmington. He has built up a magnificent business, and his work can be seen on many of the prominent business houses, homes and factories throughout this city. Mr. Brock is a gifted and thoroughly experienced electrical engineer, and keeps fully abreast of the times in the operation of his affairs, and gives employment to several skilled workmen. Estimates cheerfully given. He has a fine show room, and carries an immense stock of electrical fixtures and equipment in general.

THE IMPERIAL MANUFACTURING CO.—J. & J. Abelovitz, Proprietors.—Manufacturers of Coat Suits, Dresses, and Skirts. This business is now located at 111 South Front Street, and the proprietors are Messrs. J. & J. Abelovitz, who came to Wilmington from New York City. They are both young men, but have had many years of practical experience in this line of trade. They have given to Wilmington one of the most modern enterprises of this kind to be found anywhere in the Southern States. They carry an immense stock of goods, and employ the most reliable and highly skilled tailors. They are making a specialty of manufacturing and wholesaling skirts throughout the South. This enterprise is established on a solid basis, and the business is steadily growing.


[Illustration:

New Union Passenger Station.
]

L. B. SASSER, Pharmacist.—No line of commercial or professional endeavor is prosecuted on a better or more prosperous basis than that of pharmacy, and Wilmington has a number of first-class stores of this kind, among which is the Mission Pharmacy, located at number 5 North Front Street, and Sasser's Pharmacy at the corner of Eighth and Market Streets. Mr. Sasser has been established in the drug business for some twenty years. He is one of the most prominent citizens in Wilmington, and occupies a leading place in the business life of the city. Mr. Sasser takes great interest in the development of the agricultural resources surrounding Wilmington, and last year offered $100.00 in gold to the farmers in this section making the greatest yield of corn per acre. He is the man who inaugurated the “corn show” held in the city last fall and which has been responsible for already having caused 170 families to move into this section. The farmer who won the highest prize raised 137 bushels of corn to the acre. This year Mr. Sasser has increased his premiums and offering prizes amounting to $300.00 for the greatest yield of corn per acre in the counties of New Hanover, Columbus and Burnswick, Pender, Onslow, Duplin, and Bladen, and the prospects are now very bright for the great corn exhibition that is to be held in Wilmington this coming November.

ROBERT C. DeROSSET.—32 North Front Street. As an establishment of the highest standing the house of Mr. Robert C. DeRosset is entitled to more than ordinary mention in this publication of Wilmington. Mr. DeRosset established this business some sixteen years ago, and has since catered to the trade and public favor in a most satisfactory manner. His store is nicely equipped throughout and thoroughly stocked with a large assortment of everything in the line of commercial and social stationery, books, periodicals, magazines, etc. Mr. DeRosset enjoys a high reputation for honorable dealings, and requires no comment from the writer. His house is in all respects a thoroughly representative one, worthy of the patronage of the community.

BOYLAND & HANCOCK.—Leading Dealers in Stylish Footwear. No. 7 North Front Street. Of all the branches of business connected with the mercantile interest of Wilmington there are none more important than the shoe trade, and none that require more ability, close study, or a more thorough preparation. The house of Boyland & Hancock is one of the recognized leaders in the trade, and the business has been successfully established for the past six years. The proprietors are Messrs. D. D. Boyland and E. T. Hancock. These gentlemen are thoroughly experienced in the shoe business, and conduct one of the city's most magnificent stores. They handle high grade and stylish footwear only, being the sole agents for such famous makes as Edwin C. Clapp, Howard & Foster's and “Fellowcraft” Shoes.

HANOVER PRIVISION CO.—This is a flourishing and successful wholesale enterprise, located at 114 North Water Street, and is incorporated with a capital stock of $10,000. Mr. W. E. Ethridge is the secretary-treasurer and general manager of the business. He came to this State from Norfolk, Virginia, and has been closely associated with the trade of Wilmington for the past four years. The Hanover Provision Company has been established for one year, and the volume of business is increasing daily. They specialize in cheese, butter, eggs and sardines, and are agents for John B. Frey Company's Produce, Rochester, N. Y., and are car distributors of apples, cabbage, potatoes and onions. Headquarters for rice. Orders receive prompt attention Phone number 262.






[Illustration:

Atlantic Trust & Banking Co.
]

ATLANTIC TRUST AND BANKING COMPANY.—This is one of the highly prosperous and solidly established financial institutions of Wilmington. This business was organized in 1902, and it has had a steady growth from the very beginning down to the present time. It is today one of the most popular institutions of its kind in the city, and according to the last statement issued January 13, 1914, the deposits amounted to $674,705.32 and total resources $854,913.56. A general savings and trust business is transacted. Four per cent. interest paid on all savings accounts. Trusts of all kinds executed. The bank building, which has just recently been completed by the company, is one of the handsomest structures of its kind in the South, and would be a credit to any metropolitan city in the United States. The building is eight stories high, constucted of steel, re-enforced concrete, terra cotta, granite and marble. The banking rooms are modern as regards the furnishings, fittings and equipment.. The fixtures and steel lined vaults are the latest approved type of constuction, and embody the best principles of protection. This structure is a great addition to Wilmington. It is located in the very heart of the city at the corner of Front and Market Streets, and presents an imposing appearance. The officers of this company are Messrs. Chas. N. Evans, President; J. G. L. Gieschen, Vice-President, and Milton Calder, Cashier; and the board of directors is composed of the following prominent men of affairs: Messrs. Chas. N. Evans, B. Solomon, C. W. Yates, C. M. Patterson, Jurgen Haar, J. G. L. Gieschen, John H. Kuck and Eduard Ahrens.

JAMES OWEN REILLY.—Real Estate and Fire Insurance. Mr. Reilly is one of the wide awake young men of this city who knows the real estate business from the ground up, as he has been engaged in this line in one way and another ever since he was old enough to enter the business world. The business, which has been owned by him since 1903, was established by Major Daniel O'Connor in the year 1869, and Mr. Reilly has ceen bonnected with this business since 1893. He has kept up the old establishment's high reputation, and enjoys a very influential elientage. Mr. Reilly is a native of this city, and a gentleman of most excellent standing.

D. QUINLIVAN—Shoe Forge.—Among the leaders enjoying this trade is the old established house of D. Quinlivan located at 106 North Second Street, between Princess and Chestnut, with phone connection 780. This business was established by the late Mr. D. Quinlivan in the year 1870, and since his death ten years ago, the business has been successfully carried on by his son. This shop is magnificently equipped and a number of skilled borse shoers are employed. Thomas B. Carroll, V. S., is the general manager, and has been connected with the house for a number of years. He is a Veterinary Surgeon of distinction, and is a member of the North Carolina Veterinary Medical Association.

HODGES BROTHERS, Bicycles and Bicycle Sundries.—This prosperous and progressive firm is located at 132 Market Street, with ’phone 1065-J. The house has been established for some ten years, and has occupied the present location for two years past. Mr. W. M. Hodges is the proprietor of the business, and is ably managing same. He has one of the largest and most successful houses of the kind located in the State. A specialty is made of repairing, and skilled workmen only are employed. They are agents for Pope, Excelsior and Henderson Motorcycles, and Ardmore Arch, Flying Merkle, Lenawee, Hudson, Racycle and Velox Bicycles.

WILMINGTON GRAIN & PROVISION COMPANY.—Although this is comparatively a new enterprise, the business is growing very rapidly, and it is today counted as one of the worthy and substabntial enterprise of Wilmington. The location is at 119 South Front Street, with phone 641. The business was established July 4, 1913, and two wagons are now used in the delivery service. Orders receive prompt attention. They are dealers in hay, grain, mixed feed, flour, rice, poultry, eggs, butter, etc. Mr. Ernest F. Peschau is the General Manager of the business; he is a young man, a native of this city, well known, and highly highly popular.

W. MONROE & COMPANY—Furniture, Carpets, Bedding, Etc.—This old established house is located at 15 South Front Street, where a large two-story orick building is occupied. The individual members of this firm are Messrs. Geo. S. Boyland and W. B. Munroe. These gentlemen are both favorably known to the trade, and have built up a magnificent business. The general stock comprises fine and medium grade furniture of the very latest styles, and the firm has the most liberal terms to offer to patrons. This house is a distinct credit to the city, and is worthy of the patronage of the very best classes.

W. W. DURANT, Jeweler.—Of the many first class and successful jewelers of this city, the name of Mr. W. W. Durant comes favorably to mind as one of the leading experts. He has been established in this business in Wilmington for the past four years, occupying location at 605 North Fourth St., and handles a full line of Jewelry, Watches, Clocks, Silverware, Cut Glass, etc. He makes a specialty of repairing and adjusting fine watches, and all work is guaranteed. Mr. Durant is a young man, clever and accomplished. He is popular with the trade, and has had ten years of experience as a jeweler.

H. W. KONIG, Groceries and General Merchandise.—This gentleman is located at 901 North Fourth Street, and has ’phone 1373. He has been established here since 1889, and operates one of the best stores in this part of Wilmington. He has built up A No. 1 reputation as a high-class merchant, and has a high-class trade. There is nothing short of a genuine pleasure to make purchases at his store. Mr. Konig personally looks after the management of the business, and his highest aim is to please and satisfy every customer.






[Illustration:

New Building of Merchison National Bank.
]

THE MURCHISON NATIONAL BANK.—This is one of the most solid and successful banking institutions in the South and its influence has been greatly felt in financial circles. The institution was first organized in 1893 as a private bank, and became nationalized in March, 1899. The last statement, issued January 13, 1914, shows deposits $5,825,678.78, capital and surplus $1,549,643.32, and total resources $8,210,322.10. The whole history of this bank is one of growth and prosperity. At the present time it has under construction a modern ten-story re-enforced fire proof building which will contain two hundred offices. This building will be completed and ready for occupancy October 1, 1914. The officers of this bank are Messrs. H. C. McQueen, President; J. V. Grainger, Vice-President; J. W. Yates, Vice-President; C. S. Grainger, Cashier; M. F. Allen, Assistant Cashier, and W. F. Johnson, Assistant Cashier.

THE WILMINGTON FURNITURE CO.—Located in the Garrell Building, Princess and Second Streets, is admitted to be the leading furniture and house furnishing establishment in this part of the State. They have been in business in Wilmington more than eight years, have never changed hands nor management, have always maintained the policy of right first, last and all the time, have guarded their character and reputation as zealously and jealously as a good woman guards hers, and today the name, “The Wilmington Furniture Co.,” is synonymous with absolute reliability. This company stands for all that is high, honorable, fair and square in modern merchandising, and enjoys the implicit confidence of the entire community and are generally referred to in business circles as “The Old Reliable Furniture Store.” They carry in stock Bernstein sanitary three-piece beds, Bloch baby carriages, Sealy mattresses, the Ostermoor mattresses, White House and McDougall kitchen cabinets, Englander couch beds, Derby desks, Taylor nursery beds, Ideal cribs, Jewell ranges, New Perfection cook and heating stoves, automatic refrigerators; in fact, all goods carried are of established merit. Mr. Henderson Cole is in charge of the business, with Mr. John B. Ives as assistant manager and Messrs. J. Thomas Williams, E. C. Lewis, F. W. Ortman, R. B. Ives, J. A. Rouse and H. Cole, Jr., comprising the selling force.

TUCKER'S WILMINGTON GRANITE AND MARBLE WORKS.—Among the worthy and successful industries of this city is that named above, located at 519 North Second Street, between Red Cross and A. C L. railroad. Mr. R. D. Tucker is sole proprietor, and has been established in the trade in Wilmington for the past twenty-five years. He enjoys a reputation second to none, and has a large patronage. A specialty is made of all kinds of granite and marble works, mausoleums, monuments, headstones, Iron Fencing, and all kinds of general cemetery work. His office telephone number is 1974-J and residence ’phone 702. Orders are promptly filled, correspondence invited, and catalogs furnished on application.

BIG IKE ELECTRIC SHOE REPAIR CO.—This concern is located at 114 Princess Street, and has phone number 1095. Mr. Sam Houston is the proprietor, and a gentleman of long experience in the shoe business. He is fully prepared and equipped to do all kinds of shoe repairing to the entire satisfaction and delight of patrons. As “a stitch in time saves nine,” take him your work and he can save you money Do not neglect shoes that can be made to give splendid service after they have left his shop. Give him a trial order, and you will be pleased with the work and price.

W. P. WOODCOCK, Grocer.—This gentleman is a native of North Carolina, and has been established in business in the city of Wilmington for eighteen years. He is located at 1108 North Fourth Street. Mr. Woodcock is a dealer in strictly high-class goods, including staple and fancy groceries, fruits, confections, cigars and tobaccos, fancy notions, as well as a full line of fresh country produce always on hand.

W. N. THORPE AND COMPANY.—This is an incorporated concern, Mr. W. B. Thorpe being the president and treasurer, and who is personally directing the general management of the affairs. This business has been established for the past ten years, and so great is the trade transacted that the service of fifteen people are constantly required in looking after the interest of the patrons. They are dealers in coal, shingles, lime, cement, plaster, etc. The office is located at the foot of Ann Street, and has phone number 789. No order is too large for this company to handle successfully, and none too small to receive personal attention.

WILMINGTON FRUIT EXCHANGE. Inc.—Wholesale Fruit and Produce, 110 North Water Street, phone 980. The importance of Wilmington as a leading center of trade and commerce is pointedly demonstrated by a review of many of the numerous concerns which are located here, and in this connection it might be stated that the Wilmington Fruit Exchange, Incorporated, has been building up a fine business since August, 1913, when it was established. Mr. C. W. Nixon, who is president of the corporation, and in active charge of its affairs, is a native of Wilmington and a gentleman of high standing in business and social circles. The concern now handles a large trade throughout North and South Carolina.

C. F. HOWELL & CO.—Lumber, Brick, Slate, corner Water and Chestnut Streets. This firm has had its full share in attracting attention to Wilmington as a desirable wholesale and retail center. The business has been established about three years, and is steadily growing. A very large stock is carried, including all kinds of brick, slate, long and short leaf and rough and dressed shingles, laths, hardwood flooring, etc. No order is too large for this company to handle, and the concern has the very best facilities both by rail and water for shipping. Mr. C. F. Howell, who is at the head of the business, is a native of Virginia, and has been in Wilmington for the past eight years.





THE LITTLE ART SHOP.—Fancy Work, Souvenirs and Favors, Baby Articles. Stamping a specialty. It is with pleasure that we devote a portion of our space of this publication on Wilmington to the newly established business known as The Little Art Shop at the corner of Market and Third Streets. Although this business has only been established since February 3, 1914, it gives fair evidence of becoming one of our prominent and growing places of business. Miss M. R. Grant, late of Asheville, North Carolina, is the proprietress. She has had large experience in this work, and there is no doubt that there is a great field open for her in Wilmington. We receive her with open arms, and wish her a bright future. It may be interesting to note that she is located in the building now famous in the history of Wilmington as being the headquarters of General Whiting in his visit here during the civil war, and used as a hospital by Lord Cornwallis during the Revolutionary war.


[Illustration:

Market Street from the Corner of Third Street.
]

LAMB & PINNER PLUMBING CO.—This concern is located at 26 South Second Street. The members of the company are Messrs. W. H. Lamb and I. K. Pinner, who are thoroughly experienced in the plumbing business and regarded as highly gifted in the trade. They have complete equipment and do all kinds of plumbing, gas and steam heating, and cheerfully furnish estimates, guarantee that all contracts will be executed in strict accordance to agreement.

SCHLOSS BEAR & DAVIS COMPANY, Inc. Livery, Sale, Boarding, and Exchange Stables.—Horses, Mules, Buggies, Carriages, Wagons, and Harness for Sale or Hire. Strict attention paid to boarding horses. 210 Market Street. It gives us pleasure to make prominent mention of this leading and highly prosperous enterprise. This corporation has been in existence since February 1, 1910, representing the consolidation of Mr. Nathan Schloss, who operated a business for a period of some twenty years on Dock Street, and Mr. S. J. Davis, who conducted a business on Market Street since 1896. They also took over the business of the City Livery Company in May, 1913. They have one of the largest and most successful enterprises of the kind in the State, and have a magnificent equipment for handling every feature of the business.

T. D. PINER.—Vulcanizing and Tire Repair Station. This is a favorably known enterprise, which is located at 113 North Second Street. Mr. T. D. Piner has been established in this business for the past two and one-half years. He is a young man, well and favorably known, and was reared in the city of Wilmington. This shop has the reputation of being one of the largest of the State, and is well equipped to take care of any work in this line, and no job is too difficult to be handled successfully.

S. W. SANDERS.—Retail Dealer in High-Grade Groceries and Fine Table Delicacies, Coffee Fresh Roasted every day, pulverized or ground by electricity, Country Produce received on Consignment. 223 Market Street. This is a highly regarded enterprise, and has been closely identified with the trade for the past thirty-five years. The trade mark and name of the store is “Siwasa,” and everything that comes from this place can be depended upon for its absolute purity and choice excellence. An immense business transacted necessitating the service of twelve people, while five wagons are used in the delivery service. Mr. F. M. Ross has been the active manager of the business for the past eight years.

R. E. BLAKE.—Wholesale and Retail Dealer in Stoves, Tinware, Guns, Cutlery, House Furnishing Goods, Etc. All kinds of stove repairs and fixtures. No. 10 Market Street. Mr. Blake is an old established merchant having been engaged in business here for a number of years. He has built up a fine trade, and stands among the very leaders as regards his absolute reliability. He carries the very best stock that is obtainable, and always has the best inducement and prices to offer to the trade.

C. S. BURNETT.—AUTOS FOR HIRE DAY OR NIGHT. Phone 45. No. 14 North Second Street. Our book would be very incomplete without prominent notice of this highly important and prosperous business, which is successfully operated by Mr. C. S. Burnett. This gentleman is one of the best known business men and citizen of Wilmington. He was for many years prominently connected with the Police force of Wilmington, and perhaps no man with the Police force of Wilmington, and perhaps no man in the city enjoys a wider acquaintance or is more popular. He operates a very modern garage, having a number of leading makes of automobiles for hire, all calls being answered promptly day or night. Mr. Burnett employs the most careful and experienced drivers, who are thoroughly familiar and posted as regards all the points of interests in and about Wilmington, and the drives which reach out in all directions.

H. LAND—Jeweler. 108 Market Street. This gentleman has been established in business here for a number of years, and is well and favorably known. He occupies the very attractive store at the above address. The building is three stories, and fully stocked with high grade jewelry, watches, diamonds, optical goods, clothing, trunks, shoes, sporting goods, musical instruments, cutlery, tools, etc. Mr. Land is a successful merchant, and very reliable in his business.





L. W. MOORE.—Real Estate, Rents Collected, Notary Public. 123 Princess Street, Agent for the Equitable Life Assurance Society of the United States. Money invested in Wilmington's real estate will bring profitable returns to those who are fortunate enough to recognize the present time as their opportunity, as conditions are constantly changing, and property values are steadily increasing. A gentleman who is thoroughly conversant with every detail of the real conditions of this city, and can be of inestimable value to you in this particular is Mr. L. W. Moore. Mr. Moore has had thorough experience in all branches of real estate, and is an authotiry on property values throughout this part of the Carolinas. He handles all classes of city and surbuban property and farm lands.

G. C. SIMMONS, LOCK AND GUNSMITH.—The enterprise conducted by Mr. G. C. Simmons is one of Wilmington's old commercial landmarks. The business has been established for upwards of half a century; and Mr. Simmons has been the sole proprietor for the past fifteen years. Mr. Simmons is widely and favorably known to the trade, and is regarded as the most gifted expert in gun and locksmith work. He makes a specialty of repairing locks and guns, stoves, typewriters, cash registers, sewing machines, and all kinds of light machine work. Keys are fitted to all locks. Mr. Simmons has an unusual talent, and enjoys a reputation second to none in the trade. He is prominently known throughout all parts of the Carolinas.

G. J. SIMON, Merchant Tailor.—Among the worthy and accomplished merchant tailors of this city is Mr. G. J. Simon. He is located at 28 North Second Street, and has phone number 1456-J. Mr. Simon has been established since 1906, but has had twenty-six years of experience as a cutter and fitter, and turns out beautiful and perfect work. He has a magnificently equipped place, and all tailoring is done on the premises. His patronage is among the best dressed men of this city. A very large and complete stock of sutings of latest weaves is carried. Prices reasonable.

CENTRAL WOOD YARD, C. F. Bell, Proprietor.—Oak and Pine Wood. Office and Yard Water Street, Southside Market House. Phone 1147-J. This business has been established since August, 1913, being owned and operated by Mr. C. F. Bell. Mr. Bell is an old resident of this city, having been born and reared in Wilmington. He was formerly engaged in the lumber business for a period of thirty-five years. Mr. Bell has a large business, and keeps five wagons busy making deliveries throughout the city.

W. J. DAVIS & COMPNAY.—Dealers in all kinds of Second-hand Furniture and House Furnishing Goods, 17 South Second Street. This firm has been established for some thirteen years, and Mr. W. J. Davis is the sole proprietor of the business. He is a resident of Wilmington, having made this city his home for the past thirty-two years. He knows the trade well, and is favorably known as a reliable merchant. He carries a good stock, and his store is headquarters for genuine bargains in this line.


[Illustration:

Front Street.
]

NEWMAN'S CAFE, Successors to JUNCTION RESTAURANT.—J. T. Newman, Proprietor, 105 Princess Street.—This is one of the best cafes in Wilmington. It has always enjoyed a reputation of the very highest character for its service and cuisine, the bill of fare containing everything in season. Regular dinners are served for the modest sum of 35 cents between the hours of 12 and 2:30. Mr. J. T. Newman, who is the proprietor of this business is a native of Petersburg, Virginia, and came to Wilmington in 1907. Since taking charge of the business he has greatly improved the service, and just recently has made very extensive improvements, remodling and finelty decorating the place throughout. It is most centrally located, and has a large patronage among the best classes. The place contains a handsome soda fountain and all the popular drinks of the season are served. The cigar department contains some of the leading brands of choice cigars.

THE SPRINGER COAL COMPANY.—Whole sale and Retail Dealers in Coal, Wood and Shingles. Shipments by railroad a specialty. The coal trade of Wilmington is an important factor in the city's commerce, and engages the capital and energy of some of our most prominent men. The Springer Coal Company is one of the largest in the South engaged in this business, conducting its operation on an enormous scale. The house is pre-eminently at the head as regards experience, facilities and resources. The business has been established since 1873, and was incorporated in 1905. The officers are Messrs. J. A. Springer, president; Daniel H. Penton, vice - president and secretary, and Samuel J. Springer, treasurer.

THE STONE COMPANY.—Wholesale Grocers and Distributors. This concern has been highly instrumental in the development of the wholesale trade of Wilmington. The business has been established for the past eighteen years, and has been a decided success from beginning down to the present time. The company is incorporated, and the officers are Messrs. Robt. R. Stone, president, secretary and treasurer, and J. Herbert Stone, vice-president. They have very complete facilities for operating this business on an extensive scale. The general store and offices occupied are located at 5, 7 and 9 South Water Sytreet, and storage warehouses at 8, 10 and 12 South Water Street.

J. S. FUNCHESS & CO.—Wholesale Cleaner and Graders of Hand Picked Virginia Peanuts and North Carolina and Spanish Seed Peanuts. This is one of the most reliable and progressive wholesale houses located in Wilmington, and a distinct leader in the industry of handling peanuts. The business has been successfully established since Oct. 1904, and is also successor to Wilmington Peanut Company and A. W. King Company. Mr. J. S. Funchess, who is the proprietor and owner of the business, is one of Wilmington's prominent men of affairs, and has at heart the very best interest of the city.






[Illustration:

M. W. Divine & Co.
]

M. W. DIVINE & Co.—Among other distinctions, Wilmington can beast of the largest Paint Depot in the State. The premises consist of 10350 feet of floor space. This business has been successfully established since 1867. It is located at 23 Market Street, and the products of the company are broadly distributed throughout North and South Carolina. Mr. George V. Harrell, who is the active manager of the business, has been connected with the house for the past seventeen years. The firm handles all kinds of ready mixed paints, white lead, linseed oil, varnishes, enamels, brushes, lubricating oils, sash, doors, blinds, plate and window glass, roofing and sheathing paper, builders’ hardware, and are sole agents for the celebrated paints of The Sherwin-Williams Company, and distributing agents for the American Linseed Company's pure linseed oil.

WILMINGTON PEPSI-COLA BOTTLING COMPANY.—The business has been established for a number of years and is growing by leaps and bounds, getting bigger and better every day. The company at this point controls all the business within one hundred miles radius of the city. The business, under the present management, has been operated for the past eighteen months, the incorporated members of the company including J. W. Brooks, President; E. L. Matthews, Vice-President, and J. C. Wagner, Jr., Manager. They are now bottlers of the now famous and delicious and healthful drink known as Pepsi-Cola. This is a very refreshing and invigorating beverage, and is guaranteed to be perfectly pure and healthful. This plant is perfectly sanitary throughout, and the equipment is modern including automatic machinery, while pure artesian water is used. Many people are employed in this plant while several wagons and an electric automobile truck of 3,000 lb. capacity are used in the delivery service. The location of the plant is 14-16 Market Street.

BAGGETT BROTHERS.—This is a splendid and successful concern, and the business has been established for upwards of twelve years. The members of this firm are Messrs. I. Baggett and G. C. Baggett. They are men of large experience in the mercantile business, and are meeting with fine success in directing the affairs of their magnificent store, which is located at 113 South Front Street. They operate both a wholesale and retail business, and deal in highclass family groceries, tobacco, country produce, fruits, teas and coffees, and everything that is good to eat. Several wagons are used in the delivery service, and this firm enjoys a magnificent patronage. The Messrs. Baggett are popular and progressive business men, and have at heart the very best interests of Wilmington.


[Illustration:

Geo. W. Huggins.
]

GOE. W. HUGGINS Jeweler.—105 Market Street. It can truthfully be said that no name identified with the jewelry trade of the Carolinas carries with it more weight than Geo. W. Huggins, who has been established in the business since 1870. He has one of the handsomest establishments devoted to the jewelry trade in the South. This is a magnificent three story building located at the above address, and finely appointed throughout. It is the largest enterprise of this character in Wilmington, and one of the largest in the South. A fine stock is carried including watches, jewelry, sterling silver, cut glass, diamonds, etc. Mr. Huggins is the Official Watch Inspector for all the railroad lines entering Wilmington, including the Atlantic Coast Line, Seaboard Air Line, Brunswick and Southern. He has in his employ a number of the best watch makers in the South.

C. R. PAPE.—Fancy Imported and Domestic Groceries and Delicatessen. Corner of Seventh and Chestnut Streets, with phone 1038-J. It may be said that Mr. Pape has one of the very best stores in Wuillmington, it being well equipped according to modern ideas, and fully stocked with a first-class line of the purest and best brands of groceries and table luxuries and delicatessen, as well as fresh country produce of all kinds. Prompt attention given to orders. This is a good store at which to make your headquarters for good things to eat.

THE SOUTHERN SIGN SHOP.—J. M. SATCHWELL, PROPRIETOR—PLAIN AND PICTORIAL ADVERTISING SIGNS.—Up Stairs Opposite Court House. The city of Wilmington possesses many leading and influential concerns which do an enormous business and have a reputation extending throughout all parts of the South. In this connection we desire to mention the Southern Sign Shop, located at the above address, and owned by Mr. J. M. Satchwell. The proprietor, a gentleman of some twenty years’ experience, is connected with the production of artistic signs throughout the Southern States. He has a magnificent business, and maintains a reputation second to none in the art.

UNCLE CHARLES’ PAWN SHOP.—This high-class brokerage office is one of the leaders in the city, and the business has been established for some six years. Mr. Chas. Finkelstein is the proprietor. He is a young man, and a gentleman well and favorably known throughout the city. A magnificent stock is carried. Liberal advances are made on diamonds, watches, jewelry, and all kinds of personal property. Business strictly confidential. Mr. Finkelstein has recently moved into his own building at No. 6 South Front Street. He has just spent a large sum of money on the improvement of this place, making it one of the most modern stores in the city.






[Illustration:

Davis & Hintze—Market.
]

DAVIS AND HINTZE. Proprietors of Wilmington's Finest Meat and Vegetable Market.—This firm commenced business September 1, 1913, and has had remarkable success from the very beginning down to the present time. The proprietors are Mr. E. Y. Davis and Mr. J. H. Hintze, both of whom have had many years of experience in the business. Mr. Davis has been in the business for seventeen years, and Mr. Hintze for twenty years. They are both young men, favorably known to the trade, and are highly popular. They have one of the finest and most sanitary markets to be found anywhere in the Southern States. It is strictly modern, clean and sanitary and compares favorably with the fine markets found in the large cities of the North. This market is a distinct credit to the city and it is nothing short of a delight to deal with the firm. They are located in the Front Street Market, and do a wholesale and retail business in choice and select beef, veal, mutton, pork, poultry, and eggs, also a full line of vegetables.

E. V. McKENZIE.—The name of E. V. McKenzie is well and favorably known throughout all parts of Wilmington and vicinity. He is a native of this city, and has spent twenty-seven years of his life engaged in his trade; that of Cabinet and Model Making and Restorer of Antique Furniture and Maker of Special Pieces. Mr. McKenzie is located at 804 Dock Street, with ’phone 1761, and operates a substantial business in this city. He has a natural talent in this line, enjoys a good reputation and sells to numbers in the industry.

HENRY T. DULS.—This gentleman is a dealer in all kinds of fancy Groceries, Cigars, and Tobacco, and in everything that is good to eat. Mr. Duls is located at the corner of Chestnut and McRae Sts., and has phone connection 305. Mr. Duls has been established in business here since 1890. He is a native of Germany, but has resided in Wilmington since the year 1884. He is a gentleman of excellent standing, and is delighted with the city of Wilmington, and thinks this is a fine place in which to do business, and does all he can for the up-building of the community.

BROWN & BROWN, Successors to J. E. G. Brown.—The location of this concern is at 112 South Second Street, and the present firm has been in existence for the past six months. The members of the firm are Messrs. J. E. G. Brown, who has been established for some fifteen years, and Mr. J. D. Brown, who lately became a member. They are both men of experience, and have a thorough knowledge of every detail of the business. They do all kinds of carriage manufacturing and repairing, black smithing, painting, trimming, and horse shoeing. Only reliable and skilled men are employed, and the work done is done in the very best manner possible.

SOUTHERN FURNITURE COMPANY.—The headquarters of this house are at 110 Dock Street, where a magnificent stock of all kinds of furniture is carried, including fine and medium grade furniture of latest styles, and general house furnishing goods of every character. This Company makes a specialty of completely furnishing homes from top to bottom, and have the most liberal terms to offer, goods being sold either for cash or on the credit plan. This business has been successfully established for the past year, and is steadily growing. You are cordially invited to visit this place and inspect the stock before buying. The proprietors are Messrs. C. E. Parker and J. S. Parker, both young men favorably known to the trade, and have made Wilmington their home for a number of years.


[Illustration:

New High School.
]

THE GEM STUDIO.—This studio is headquarters for high grade portraiture. Its location is at 114 Market Street, and the business has been established for some two years. The management is making extensive improvements throughout, and it is their purpose to make it one of the most handsomely appointed places in Wilmington. It is a very popular resort for visitors to the city, as a specialty is made of amateur finishing. The proprietors are Mr. and Mrs. G. T. Grotgen, both of whom are favorably known throughout Wilmington. It may be said that Mrs. Grotgen is a lady of eleven years of practical experience in the photograph profession, and is highly accomplished in the art. This is the place to go for high grade portraits. They use the best materials, and are reasonable in their charges.

NEW YORK RESTAURANT.—“The Best of Everything.” Among the well appointed and popular restaurants of the city is the New York Restaurant, of which Mr. John G. Pestoles is proprietor. This restaurant is liberally patronized by both ladies and gentlemen. The prices are popular, in fact, they are among the lowest in the city. The bills of fare contain everything in season. The place is clean, is nicely appointed, and presents a very inviting appearance. It is conveniently located 202 Princess Street. Mr. Prestoles is ably conducting his business, and keeps fully abreast of the times, and extends every courtesy to the trade.






[Illustration:

New Cape Fear Club.
]

W. P. BROCK, Electrical Contractor.—Among the popular and leading electrical contractors of Wilmington, the name of Mr. W. P. Brock is favorably known. He is located at 27 North Second Street, just around the corner from Princess Street. He has a well fitted up place, and carries a well selected stock of electrical supplies of all kinds. The office has ’phone connection 941-W, and all calls receive prompt attention. Mr. Brock makes a specialty of motor repairing, and house wiring. It may be said that no contract is too large for him to handle successfully, and none too small to receive his undivided attention. Mr. Brock is a gentleman of large experience in electrical work, and keeps fully abreast of the times as to the latest developments in the industry.

J. W. BROOKS.—Wholesale Grocer and Commission Merchant. It may be truthfully said that no city in the South may boast of stronger or more solidly established business houses than the city of Wilmington. This city has a number of flourishing and old established houses located here of which we desire to mention that of Mr. J. W. Brooks, occupying extensive quarters at the corner of Water and Dock Streets. This business has been established for the past fifteen years. It is exclusively wholesale, and the handlings of the firm include that of all kinds of groceries, cotton and naval stores, molasses, hay, fish, etc. The business of this firm is broadly distributed throughout North and South Carolina, and Mr. Brooks operates three passenger and freight steamers and several schooners on the Cape Fear and other rivers in this section.

CAPE FEAR TOBACCO COMPANY.—305 North Front Street. Although this business has but recently been established, it is becoming a prominent house, and the company is becoming more and more important every day. This place is headquarters for the leading brands of cigars and tobaccos, soda water, smokers’ sundries and all kinds of goods usually handled by concerns of this kind. A first class pool parlor is run in connection. The proprietors are Messrs. C. A. McClamb and W. F. Johnson. Mr. Johnson is a native of New York State, and recently came to Wilmington. He has been in the South for about twelve years, and was located in Washington, North Carolina, for two years. Mr. McClamb is a resident of Wilmington, and a gentleman of excellent standing, well known by the public.


[Illustration:

City Hall.
]

NATIONAL WOOLEN MILLS AND PEOPLE'S PRESSING CLUB.—This business is well established and is one of the most successful enterprises in the city. The store is located at 301 North Front Street, and a specialty is being made of all wool suits from $15.00 to $25.00. A magnificent stock is carried. Especial attention is given to cleaning and pressing and satisfaction guaranteed. Office has telephone number 891. Mr. E. C. Register is general manager of the business. He is a young man, well known, and highly popular with the general public.

SAMUEL BEAR, SR., & SONS.—Wholesale Grocers, Cigars and Tobacco, Coffees, Hides, Furs, Wool, Wax, Deer Tongue. 311 N. Front Street. Some of Wilmington's business establishments are splendid examples of industry, and in this connection it may be stated that none are more representative of the times than the great modern house of Samuel Bear, Sr., & Sons. This is a very old establishment, business having been in existence since 1858, and the trade of the house is broadly distributed throughout North and South Carolina. A number of travelling men represent the interest of the house on the road. The premises now occupied consist of a magnificent three strory building 66 × 100 feet in dimension. The gentlemen at the head of this business are prominent men of affairs, and have at heart the best interest of Wilmington.

W. B. McCLELLAN & SON.—Sales Stables.—116 Dock Street. This is a well established enterprise, having opened January 26, 1914. A magnificent two-story brick building is occupied at the above address. It is the aim of the management of this house to make it one of the largest sales stables in the South. The proprietors maintain very prominent connection with the trade, Mr. W. B. McClellan having been engaged in this business for many years, and is one of the largest stock holders in the Southern Live Stock Company, Richmond, Virginia. Mr. McClellan also owns a large stock farm just east of the city of Wilmington. His son, Mr. Oscar McClellan, is the other member of the firm. He is one of the most popular young business men in Wilmington, and has many friends. They make a specialty of horses, mules, and all hinds of live stock.

J. HICKS BUNTING DRUG COMPANY.—Wholesale and Retail Druggists. 237-239 North Front, Corner Grace Street. The importance of Wilmington as a center of trade and commerce is abundantly demonstrated by the review of the representative establishments that are permanently located here. Unquestionably the most magnificently appointed drug store is that operated by J. Hicks Bunting Drug Company. This business has been established for the past twenty-two years, and has had decided success from the beginning down to the present time. The store enjoys the reputation of the highest for the absolute purity of its stock, and the reasonable prices which prevail. Mr. J. H. Bunting, who is proprietor of the business, is one of the city's prominent merchants, and is conducting his business according to the highest ethics known to the profession.





WILLIAM E. SPRINGER & COMPANY.—Importers and Jobbers Hardware, Tinware and Crockery. 14 North Front Street. This house for many years constituted one of the leading features of the commercial interests of the city of Wilmington. The business has been established ever since the year 1876, having been started by Mr. W. E. Springer and conducted by him under his own name until twenty-eight years ago, when his brother became interested in the business, and the firm's name was changed to William E. Springer and Company. It is one of the largest and most important houses of the city, having both a wholesale and retail trade. The trade covers North and South Carolina. The premises consist of several immense warehouses, and the stock carried is enormous. A number of clerks are employed, while several traveling men look after the interest of the house on the road.

SHRIER & SOLOMON.—Clothiers, Haberdashers and Custom Tailors. South west corner Front and Princess Streets. This house has been established for many years, and is today regarded as one of the old commercial landmarks of Wilmington. It was originally established some forty years ago by the late Mr. A. Shrier, and the present name of Shrier & Solomon was adopted about three years ago when Mr. A. Solomon became a member. He is now the acting manager of the business, and is conducting the affairs of the house according to the most modern and advanced ideas, and has a patronage among the best classes of trade. Mr. Solomon, although a young man, has had twenty years of practical experience in the clothing business, and has been associated with this house for the past nine years.

THE A. DAVID COMAPNY.—Tailors, Clothiers and Furnishers. We cannot say too much about this concern. It is one of the oldest and largest mercantile businesses of Wilmington, and holds a prominent position in the trade circle. The house is located at 212 North Front Street, where a large three-story building is occupied. This house is in every way a distinct credit to the city. The stock carried is enormous, and many salesmen and experienced tailors are employed in looking after the interest of the trade. This business has been established for upwards of forty years, having been founded by Mr. A. David, who is president of the company, which was incorporated in 1901. His son, Mr. E. E. Davis, is vice-president, and Mr. L. Stein, who has been connected with the house for some twenty-two years, is secretary and treasurer.


[Illustration:

Carolina Appartments.
]

STRUTHERS CIGAR CO., R. F. Warren, Successor.—No. 114 North Front Street. Phone 395. This business is located in the very heart of the business district of Wilmington, next to the Post Office and opposite the Orton Hotel. It is beyond the question of a doubt one of the most popular headquarters for the first-class trade of this city. The place is handsomely appointed throughout, containing a magnificent soda fountain, where all the favorite beverages of the season are served. The cigar and tobacco department is stocked with all the most popular high grade brands. The pool parlor in connection has the finest equipment, and in every sense of the word this is a high class establishment for gentlemen.

L. RIORDAN, Tailor.—221 North Front Street. The city of Wilmington is the home of a number of first class and well known tailoring establishments, and among the oldest is Mr. L. Riordan, who has been in Wilmington for the past fourteen years, and has been established in business of his own for two years. He has over thirty years of practical experience, and is regarded as a highly skilled tailor. He closely follows the latest styles, and guarantees a perfect fit. Mr. Riodran wants your patronage, and does work at popular prices.


[Illustration:

Armory, Wilmington Light Infrantry.
]

THE NORTHERN FRUIT COMPANY.—Wholesale Dealers and Shippers of Fruits. Bananas a specialty. 108 North Water Street. Phone 280. This concern has been established for four years, and a big business is transacted throughout Wilmington and vicinity. They make a specialty of bananas as well as other fruits, and obtain their stock from Florida, California, Cuba, and South America. The proprietors are Messrs. N. D. Kares and J. G. Kares, who are thoroughly familiar with the trade, and always have the best prices to offer at the lowest quotations.

PETERSON AND RULFS.—Shoe Dealers. This is one of the most prominent firms of shoe dealers in the city of Wilmington. The location of the House is at 202 North Front Street, and the business has been established ever since the year 1894. A three-story building is occupied, which was erected in 1906. The patronage of this firm comes from the leading families of the city. The individual members are Messrs. W. C. Patterson and J. F. Rulfs, who are among the city's most prominent merchants, and take an active interest in all improvements for the advancement of the community. As leading shoe dealers it may be stated that they carry an enormous stock of many well known brands, a specialty being made of Stetson's, Queen Quality, Walk-Over and Red Cross.

THE BLUETHENTHAL COMPANY.—Wholesale Dry Goods and Notions.—Among the leading wholesale houses of Wilmington none enjoy a more flatering reputation than that known as The Bluethenthal Company, Successor to the Rheinstein Dry Goods Company, the business having been established for upwards of fifty years. A large four-story building of spacious dimensions is occupied, located at 216-218 North Front Street. The business of this house is broadly distributed throughout North and South Carolina, and nine traveling salesmen look out for the interests of the house on the road. The officers of the company include the following prominent men of affairs: L. Bluethenthal, president; W. C. Via, vice-president; H Bluethenthal, secretary-treasurer.

CITY LAUNDRY COMPANY.—This enterprise is located at 22 North Second Street, and has been operated under the present efficient management for the past six years. It is one of the best equipped plants in the State, and has a reputation second to none for the superior quality of the work turned out. Many employees are given work in the plant, while a number of wagons are used in the collection and delivery of orders. The officers of the company are Messrs. J. H. Hinton, president; J. O. Hinton, manager, and C. G. Carter, superintendent.





G. DANNENBAUM.—Importer & Jobber of Laces, Embroideries and Trimmings, Ladies’ and Children's Ready to Wear Goods, Muslen Underwear. The influence of Wilmington as a wholesale and distributing center has brought to this city a number of representative firms, among these is that of G. Dannenbaum, occupying extensive quarters at 221 North Front Street, Mr. Dannenbaum has had a long esxperience in connection with the trade and understands it throoughly. He is located in one of the best departments in the South, and as a a result, is enabled to supply the trade with goods of the most desirable quality and style on the same basis as do the firms of Baltimore and New York. He is successfully meeting all competition, and is making his “Gee Dee” Brand the most famous in this part of the South. He has nine travelling salesmen looking after the interest of the trade throughout North and South Carolina. Mr. Dannenbaum also has buyers stationed in New York, St. Paul and Nottingham.

WALKER TAYLOR, Insurance.—Office Peoples Saving Bank. Front and Princess Streets. Phone 62. The business of underwriting has always afforded a wide field for the operations of some of America's foremost business men, and in every city we find gentlemen of reputation and high standing engaged in the business of insurance. In fact, to be successful as an underwriter demands ability of the highest order and strict integrity, and it is the possession of these attributes that has gained for Colonel Walker Taylor his eminent success. His agency has been established since 1865, and a very large annual volume of business is transacted. Colonel Taylor is an authority on insurance, and represents more than a score of the strongest, oldest and most reliable fire insurance corporations of the world.

A. D. BROWN.—Dry Goods and Carpets. No. 29 North Front Street. Mr. A. D. Brown enjoys the distinction of being one of Wilmington's oldest established merchants. He has been established in business here since October 1, 1867, and has one of the largest stores in the city, located at the above address. It is an immense three-story building, well stocked with high class dry goods, ready to wear suits and skirts, and in fact, everything usually found in a high class dry goods establishment suitable for the best class of trade. Mr. Brown keeps fully abreast of the times in conducting his business, and aside from his own affairs, has always taken a deep interest in movements for the development of the city.

WILMINGTON SHOE COMPANY, L. W. Wessell, Manager.—217 North Front Street. It may be stated that Wilmington is one of the largest shoe centers in the entire South, and a number of flourishing wholesale and retail houses are in successful operation here. One of the best established is that known as the Wilmington Shoe Company, under the able management of Mr. L.W. Wessell. Mr. Wessell is a native of this city, and has had about ten years’ experience in associating with the shoe trade. This company has been established about four years, and a fine business is transacted.


[Illustration:

First Presbyterian
]


[Illustration:

Baptist.
]

SMITH'S DRUG STORE.—Among the reliable drug stores in the city of Wilmington is that known as “SMITH'S”, located at 914 North Fourth Street, with phone connection 1330. Dr. J. A. Smith, M. D. & Phg., who is in charge of the business, is highly educated and a graduate of both professions of medicine and pharmacy. He graduated in medicine in the year 1899, and has been practicing pharmacy since 1889. Dr. Smith is a native of this city, and is a gentleman of high standing in professional and business circles. He is conducting the store according to the highest ethics known to the service. This is also Sub Post Office Station No. 2.

WATSON AND APPLEWHITE.—Real Estate Agents.—210 Princess Street. A conspicuous feature of the business interest of Wilmington is that of handling real estate, and a number of influential and leading business men are engaged in the service. One of the influential firms is that of Watson & Applewhite, the individual members of which are Messrs T. A. Watson, Jr., and George B. Applewhite. They handle all classes of city and suburban property, lots, improved property, farm lands, truck gardens, etc. They also have a large list of rental properties. This is a strictly reliable firm, and has a standing of the best.


[Illustration:

Lutheran.
]

CHAS. M. STIEFF.—Manufacturer of Grand, Upright and Player Pianos. Wilmington Branch located at 213 Princess Street and under the able management of Mr. Thos. K. Woody. There are many reasons why you should buy a Stieff piano, because it is best in tone, workmanship, durability, and is especially adapted to this climate. It has stood the test for more than seventy years, the house of Stieff having been established in Baltimore, Maryland, since the year 1842. The Wilmington Branch House has been established for some twenty years, and Mr. Thos. K. Woody, the manager, has been connected with the business at this point for the past three years.

A. G. WARREN ICE CREAM COMPANY.—Manufacturers of Plain and Fancy Ice Creams for all occasions, 20 North Third Street, Phone 485. In this industrial review of the town trade of Wilmington it may be stated that our book would not be complete without further notice of the business as operated by the A. G. Warren Ice Cream Company. Mr. A. G. Warren is one of the city's oldest merchants, having been established in business for thirty-seven years. For the past two years he has been devoting his time exclusively to the manufacture of high grade ice creams at the above address. He operates an immense business, shipping extensively throughout the principal parts of North and South Carolina, and has the largest patronage of any exclusive dealer in Wilmington. His plant is one of the most modern in the State, perfectly clean and sanitary throughout, and so inviting and attractive that it must be seen to be fully appreciated.

THOMAS QUINLIVAN & SON.—Practical Horse Shoers.—This shop is most centrally located at 208 Princess Street, and has office phone 887. Mr. Thomas Quinlivan has been established in this business for the past thirty-five years and his son Mr. T. J. Quinlivan has been a member of the firm for fifteen years. Both of these gentlemen are thoroughly experienced in this business, and do shoeing according to the most scientific methods. They are thoroughly familiar with the anatomy of the horse's foot. They give special attention to shoeing lame horses, over-reaching and faulty action corrected. Messrs. Quinlivan and Son are popular business men and do all they can for the good of Wilmington.

DELICATESSEN STORE, May Brothers, Proprietors.—130 Market Street, ’phone 1322. The members of this firm are Messrs B. May and D. May, both thoroughly experienced in the business. Mr. B. May established the store here two years ago, and previous tothis time for two years conducted a similar business. He in New York City. He is throoughly modern in his methods, and has given to Wilmington one of her much needed and highly valuable stores. It is perfectly clean and sanitary, and stocked with the finest imported and domestic goods of every variety and a full line of fancy groceries—all kinds of prepared meats, cheese and butter, pickles, salads, etc.





W. J. MEREDITH.—General Commission Merchant and Dealer in All Kinds of Country Produce, number 6 Princess Street, phone 330. Mr. Meredith is a native of North Carolina, and came to Wilmington seventeen years ago, since which time he has been closely identified with the wholesale trade of the city. He personally looks after his business, and insures complete satisfaction to the trade, and as a result he has a patronage of many well known merchants throughout all parts of Wilmington and vicinity. Mr. Meredith has many friends, and enjoys a high standing in trade circles. He is thoroughly reliable in his dealings, and has a reputation second to none in the trade. He deservedly enjoys a liberal, influential and prominent patronage. He makes a specialty of handling the choicest of products, and quotes the lowest market prices.

J. E. HATCH.—House Painting, Sign Painting, Fresco Painting, Wall Papering and High Class Decorating, 107 North Third Street, phone 808. It may be stated that this gentleman occupies the foremost and very conspicuous position in the high class decorating trade of Wilmington. His work may be seen on many of the first homes, hotels and business establishments throughout Wilmington and every city of North and South Carolina. Mr. Hatch is regarded as an authority on this industry in Wilmington, and gives the very best references as to his reliability. He is an accomplished workman, and keeps fully abreast of the times in the conducting of his affairs. Employment is given to a number of skilled workmen, and promptly executes all contracts. Mr. Hatch uses for his trade-mark “BETTER BE SAFE THAN SORRY,” therefore have him give you an estimate.

ELVINGTON'S PHARMACY, D. Adrian Elvington & Co., Proprietors.—Prescription Druggists, Garrell Building, corner Second and Princess Street. We find in all the leading cities of the United States a marked improvement in the science of pharmacy, and in Wilmington the drug stores are presided over and owned by highly educated and thoroughly reliable pharmacists. That known as Elvington's Pharmacy ranks high in the esteem of the trade. Mr. Elvington, who is at the head of the business, is a native of this city, and has had eleven years of practical training in the profession. He has owned the above business since April 1, 1913. The store is handsomely appointed, and the business is conducted according to the most modern ideas.

ROBBINS GROCERY COMPANY.—Wholesale and Retail Grocers and Commission Merchants.—At number 15 Market Street, we find one of the fastest growing wholesale houses in Wilmington. The business was started December, 1912, by Mr. M. B. Robbins, who is sole proprietor of the enterprise. Mr. Robbins is a native of Brunswick County, and has had fifteen years’ practical experience in the trade. He is a young man, and has made many friends and customers throughout. Wilmington and this part of North Carolina. His business has grown rapidly, and he has a bright future ahead of him. He handles all kinds of groceries, produce, fruits, cigars, tobacco, etc.


[Illustration:

Jewish Synagogue.
]


[Illustration:

Methodist.
]

GEO. S. NEVENS.—“The Little Cash Store.”—Shoes and Gents’ Furnishings, 121 Market Street. Telephone 668. While this is known as the Little Cash Store, it is by no means the least important. The proprietor is Mr. Geo. S. Nevens, and has been established since June, 1910, and has built up a magnificent trade. Mr. Nevens has had a lifetime experience in this industry. He is a native of Portland, Maine, and entered a shoe factory in 1889, February the 13th, then for several years he travelled on the road as a salesman, and since that time for many years he has been identified with the retail trade. He has the experience, handles a first class stock, and is fast building up his business.

W. R. HARTSFIELD—Watchmaker.—Fine Watch and Jewelry Repairing, 121 Market Street. The City of Wilmington is well supplied with a number of prominent watch makers and jewelers. One of the most prominent men in this line is Mr. W. R. Hartsfield. He has had a number of years’ experience, and is favorably known throughout Wilmington and vicinity. He is a native of North Carolina. Before engaging in business for himself he was with the the old established and prominent house of George W. Huggins for several years. Mr. Hartsfield personally looks after all work, which is a guarantee of complete satisfaction, and his prices are reasonable.


[Illustration:

Christian.
]

JARMAN & MINTZ, Druggists. 107 Princess Street. Among the popular and progressive stores of this character in the city that of Jarman & Mintz is worthy of special notice. It is most centrally located in the heart of the business district of Wilmington at 107 Princess Street, where all the street cars meet. This store is operated according to modern ideas, contains a handsome soda fountain, where all the popular drinks of the season are served. This firm keeps a full stock of drugs, cigars, and in fact, everything carried in a first class drug store. A specialty is made of filling prescriptions. The members of the firm are Messrs. J. F. Jarman and M. B. Mintz, both of whom are highly educated and skilled pharmacists.

SOUTHERLAND & WEAVER.—Fine Tailoring and Gents’ Furnishings, 121 Princess Street, phone No. 718-W. There are few cities in the South of its size that have more wealth and beauty than Wilmington, where wealth is concentrated refinement and culture predominate, and, of course, the rounds of social gayety must compete with it. This city is no exception, and strangers have often remarked that there are few cities of this size have more modern and progressive stores, or more sytlishly dressed men and women. One of the leading centers of the high class fashionable trade of this city is at the handsome store of Southerland & Weaver, located at the above address. They carry a magnificent stock suitable for the very best class of trade. The members of the firm are Messrs. C. S. Southerland and Edward Weaver, who have been established here for about four years, and who stand high in business and social circles. Their highest aim is to please and satisfy each customer. They especially invite all lovers of fine dress to call on them.

R. H. PICKETT & CO.—Merchandise Brokers and Manufacturers’ Agents. 116 North Water Street. The city of Wilmington has for many years enjoyed the distinction of being one of the best and most desirable wholesale centers in the entire South, and in upholding this trade a number of prominent men are engaged in the brokerage business. One of the oldest and best known firms is that of R. H. Pickett and Company. This business was established in 1884 by Mr. R. H. Pickett, who operated same under his own name until two years ago, when the name of the firm was changed to that of R. H. Pickett and Company, Mr. T. S. James becoming a member. Both of these gentlemen are prominently known in business and social circles, and have a standing of the highest. They represent a number of worthy concerns, and do an enormous business.

THE PLAIN PRICE STORE.—J. H. Brunjes, proprietor, 923 North Fourth Street. Mr. Brunjes deals in a general line of dry goods, shoes, notions, etc. He carries a big stock, and sells at the very lowest prices, all goods being marked in plain figures. It is a well-known fact that no advantage is ever taken of a customer at this store. Every courtesy and consideration is extended the trade, and it is nothing short of a genuine pleasure to purchase goods at this store. Mr. Brunjes has been handling this line of goods for the past one and one-half years, but he is quite a well-known merchant, however, having formerly been in the grocery business in Wilmington since 1895.






[Illustration:

Oakdale Cemetery.
]

BRUNSWICK GROCERY COMPANY.—Wholesale and Retail Grocers and Commission Merchants. 17 Market Street, Phone 256. This is an old and well known business house, and the members of the firm are Messrs. W. W. Galloway, who started the business thirteen years ago, and his son, Mr. G. R. Galloway, who has been a member of the firm for two years. This company has become regarded as one of the most reliable and trustworthy wholesale houses in Wilmington, and the trade is steadily growing. The management is active and aggressive, having at heart the very best interest of customers. They handle goods of the highest quality including groceries, produce, vegetables, poultry, eggs, etc.

S. M. JONES, Hardware and Novelties.—Mr. S. M. Jones commenced this business November 1, 1913. His location is at 911 North Fourth Street, and the general stock consists of all kinds of hardware, stoves and ranges, cutlery, tinware, household specialties, guns, ammunition, and sporting goods, and general novelties which belong to this line of trade. Mr. Jones is an old and well-known resident of this city, having been for a period of some twenty years engaged in the contracting and building business. This is a large store, and has a bright future before it.

SAVAGE & SAVAGE, Lunch Room and Restaurant.—Mr. George Savage is the manager of this business, which is located at No. 5 Princess Street. This is a liberally patronized place, and the bill of fare contains everything in its season. The prices are popular, and the dishes are all nicely and properly prepared and served to the delight and satisfaction of customers. A trial meal is all that is necessary to convince as to the high quality of the service. A specialty is made of the midday lunch from 12 to 3 for 35 cents.


[Illustration:

Memorial Hospital.
]

FORD AUTO COMPANY.—This is the agency for the famous Ford automobile which has such a wide reputation throughout all parts of the civilized world. The Ford is beyond question the greatest car on the market, and more of these cars are in use than any other make. The Ford always gives satisfaction, and every owner of a Ford car is an enthusiastic booster and advocate of its principles. At the Ford Auto Company's garage in Wilmington a complete stock of Ford Cars is handled, including accessories, supplies and repairs. Mr. R. F. Johnson is the manager of the business, and is ably directing its affairs.

W. D. BORNEMANN.—South-east corner of Seventh and Ann Streets, phone No. 755. This is recognized as one of the best stores in this part of Wilmington, and the patronage is among the best class of trade. The store is well stocked with the very best of pure food goods, including staple and fancy groceries, meats, cigars, tobacco, fruits, vegetables, country produce, chickens, eggs, grain and notions. The business has been established for about 40 years. It was started by the father of the present proprietor, and Mr. W. D. Bornemann has owned the business since October 1913. He is a native of this city, a young man, and popular with the trade.

D. F. SIDBURY.—This gentleman has been established in business for one year, and is located at the South-west corner of Eighth and Dock Streets, with phone No. 977-J. He deals in staple and fancy groceries, cigars, tobacco, country produce, fruits, vegetables, chickens, eggs, etc. Mr. Sidbury is a native of Pender County. He is well pleased with the success that he already has made in the business, and is still steadily growing. This is a good store at which to make your headquarters for good things to eat.

GOLD PRIZE STEAM PRESSING WORKS.—Who presses best in Wilmington? This question can be satisfactorily answered by calling at 19 Princess Street which is the headquarters of the Gold Prize Steam Pressing Works. This enterprise is well established, and is owned and operated by Messrs. M. H. Kelly and D. H. Willard. These gentlemen are quite well known throughout the city. Their highest aim is to please and satisfy each and every customer. Their cleaning and pressing department is thoroughly modern, it being equipped with the latest style steam pressing machine. They also give special attention to French Dry Cleaning. Their prices are reasonable, and all work is guaranteed satisfactory. The office is located at 19 Princess Street. Phone 855, and all calls and deliveries are promptly made.

COSTER THE CLEANSER, FRENCH DRY CLEANING AND DYE WORKS.—122 Market Street. Phone 148. We cannot say too much about this highly prosperous and successful concern. It is one of the leaders engaged in the trade in this part of the State and Mr. C. G. Coster is the proprietor. He is a gentleman of some twenty years of experience in the cleaning and dyeing industry, and much of his time has been spent in the largest and most successful plants in the largest cities of the United States. Therefore, he came to Wilmington with a big reputation behind him, and has made his influence greatly felt in the high class trade of this city. He does beautiful and superior work, which is absoultely unsurpassed. At Coster's you are certain of getting the very best work at popular prices.

THE PHOTO SHOP.—Front and Princes Sts., phone 864. Here will be found a studio, where the best photos are made, Mr. E. H. Hodges, the artist, is a practical photographer in every sense of the word, and his love for Art in portraiture exhibits itself in each and every portrait made in his studio. He is especially favorable with the children, having acquired that peculiar knack of making the little ones feel at home and with special equipment for this important part of the work has made some excellent portraits that are true to childlife. Mr. Hodges is a native of Wilmington, but has had several years of experience in one of the leading studios of Norfolk, Va. He returned to Wilmington about two years ago, and is meeting with every success in the above named studio, where by close application and good work he is acquiring a liberal and influential patronage among the best classes.

R. L. BURTON.—This gentleman handles a general line of groceries and country produce, dry goods, notions, and general merchandise. He is located at the corner of Sixth and Nixon Streets, with ’phone 495. Mr. Burton has been established in business for two years. He has been a resident of Wilmington for some ten years, and is well and favorably known. He is a native of North Carolina, was reared on the farm—where all the great men of the world come from—and was formerly engaged in the saw-mill business. Mr. Burton is thoroughly honorable in his dealings, and has built up a good reputation, and a good credit with wholesalers throughout the country from New York to Florida.


[Illustration:

January Mid-winter Scene in Wilmington.
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MRS. C. W. LEIGHTON.—High Class Milliner, 128 Princess Street. Mrs. Leighton has been operating this business in Wilmington for the past two years. She came to Wilmington from Richmond, Virginia, and has had some fifteen years of practical experience connected with the high class millinery trade in some of the leading establishments of the South. She has made her store one of the leading and popular centers of trade in Wilmington. Mrs. Leighton is a good buyer, handles the very latest styles in millinery and most popular novelties, and believes firmly in reasonable prices. Her store is attractive, and must be seen to be fully appreciated. Mrs. Leighton is an accomplished milliner, and is very popular with the trade.

W. D. MacMILLAN, JR., Motor Cars. Agent for the Packard and Studebaker. This thoroughly modern garage is located at 109 and 111 South Third Street. It is owned and conducted by Mr. W. D. MacMillan, Jr., who is well established in the trade and having the agency for two of the most famous and popular motor cars—the Packard and the Studebaker,—is doing a large business. These cars, as regards their high quality, durability and general excellence, are unsurpassed, as anyone who is familiar with the industry knows. Tourists and automobilists are invited to make this garage their headquarters, where they will find well equipped repair shops, expert machinists, supplies and accommodating service.

CRUMPLER & SCOTT, Quick Lunch.—This is one of the popular and well established cafes of the city. It is located at 115 South Front Street, and the proprietors invite you to make this cafe your headquarters while in Wilmington. The individual members of the firm are Messrs. W. B. Crumpler and I. J. Scott. They opened this cafe on the 11th of December, 1912, and have made a fine success of the business from the very beginning down to the present time. It is headquarters for quick lunch and good service, and the foods are properly and nicely prepared, and prices are reasonable.

JOHN OLSEN, Shoe Repairing.—This gentleman is one of the highly skilled, practical and expert shoe repairers in the city of Wilmington. His shop is located at 28 South Second Street. It is well fitted up with the latest type of machinery, while Mr. Olsen uses hand methods when necessary, and, as a result, his work is unsurpassed. He uses the very best materials only. Satisfaction fully guaranteed. His prices are reasonable, and work is promptly executed.


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St. James Episcopal.
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THE SOUTHERN GROCERY COMPANY.—Mr. C. E. Collins, the proprietor, has been engaged in business in Wilmington for the past thirty years, and is one of the city's best-known merchants. He has been operating the above company for the past two years. Mr. Collins is a native of this county and is exceedingly well-known. His store is located at 134 South Front Street, and he has phone 590. He makes a specialty of dealing in high grade fresh New River oysters, country produce, and fruits, as well as a general stock of groceries.

THOMAS GROCERY COMPANY, Incorporated.—This is an old established business, having been founded in the year 1889 by Mr. J. H. Thomas, who is now president of the company, which was incorporated in November, 1912. Mr. J. G. Carroll is the secretary and treasurer of the corporation, and has been for a period of five years engaged with this store as a clerk. These gentlemen are well and favorably known and highly popular with the trade. They have a magnificent business, and keep two wagons in the delivery service. The business for a number of years was conducted under the firm name of Thomas & Co. The location of this store is at 525 North Fourth Street, and has ’phone 294. They are commission merchants and handle all kinds of good things to eat, including fancy groceries and country produce, also hardware.


[Illustration:

St. Mary's Cathedral.
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W. J. KIRKHAM PRODUCE COMPANY.—Among the substantial and growing enterprises of the city, that of the W. J. Kirkham Produce Company is worthy of special notice. This concern is located at 23 South Front Street, and has ’phone connection 418-J. The business has been successfully established for the past three years. They are dealers in all kinds of country produce, imported and domestic fruits, etc. They have the very best facilities for operating the business; they solicit consignments, and have an immense wholesale trade. The members of this company are Messrs. W. J. Kirkham and T. C. Pickett, both of whom are favorably known throughout this city.

R. A. MONTGOMERY.—It may be said that this gentleman operates one of the finest and best stores in the city of Wilmington. It is clean and up-to-date, and the stock is good and pure and the best that it is possible to obtain. Mr. R. A. Montgomery has been established in business for the past fifteen years, and has made a fine success from beginning down to the present time. His location is at the corner of Eighth and Princess Streets, and has phones No. 461 and 462. Mr. Montgomery is favorably known to the trade of the city, and is highly popular with the public. He is doing all he can for the upbuilding of the community. The stock includes groceries, meats, sausages, vegetables, etc., and oysters in season.

W. M. SNEEDEN.—This gentleman is a dealer in fish, oysters, country produce, game, and escallops. He also makes a specialty of game in season, and has the reputation of being the biggest dealer in game of all kinds in Wilmington. Mr. Sneeden is a native of this city, and is a gentleman well and favorably known. He has been established in business for the past twenty-three years, and is located in Front Street Market, 120 South Front Street, with phone 374. Mr. Sneeden also owns an extensive farm on the Sound, and raises all kinds of truck.

CAPE FEAR CASH GROCERY COMPANY.—This is a very flourishing enterprise, and the business has grown by leaps and bounds from the very first day that the store was opened to the trade—November 1, 1913. Several wagons are used in making deliveries, but the immense trade that is transacted at times necessitates the hiring of other special wagons in order to maintain the high class service as to deliveries. This is a fast growing enterprise, and it is destined to be one of the greatest concerns of Wilmington. The business is conducted on a strictly cash basis, which is beyond question the best method to operate a successful business, for both the buyer, as well as the dealer. This store is located at 109 South Front Street, and has ’phone 672. Mr. Dan R. Ruark is the manager, and a gentleman of long experience in merchandising. He is reliable in his dealings, handles the best class of goods, and sells at prices lower than the lowest.






[Illustration:

Southern Shorthand & Business University
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THE SOUTHERN SHORTHAND & BUSINESS UNIVERSITY is a positive force in its special department of education and a recognized factor among prominent institutions of learning in the Carolinas. Established since 1898, it has been in existence long enough to prove that its course of study and methods of discipline are especially adapted for the needs of young men and women in thoroughly preparing them to enter business life; and many of its earlier graduates are today holding high salaried positions of trust and responsibility. This school affords a training that is broad thorough, comprehensive, and in full touch with modern ideas. The faculty headed by President E. C. Bowersock, is strong and able, and every one connected with the school is full of hope, energy, pluck and determination; just the kind of personality one needs to come in contact with and at the same time have the advantage of culture and refinement. The discipline is rigid and students must account for every moment of time, and all graduates are assisted in securing good positions. President Bowersock is constantly receiving applications from bankers, railroad officials and business men generally asking him to furnish them with his graduates, in fact, he receives more of these applications than he can possibly fill. We cannot say too much about the advantages of a business training, for this is the age of speed, short methods, quick turns and big things; and employers have no time to waste giving instructions to incompetent help. We earnestly advise all young people to prepare themselves for the positions higher up, where there is endless possibility and boundless opportunity. BE A GRADUATE OF THE SOUTHERN SHORTHAND AND BUSINESS UNIVERSITY.









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