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Hoke County golden jubilee : Raeford, North Carolina

Date: 1961 | Identifier: F262.H7 H65 1961
Hoke County golden jubilee : Raeford, North Carolina / assembled and prepared by a Committee of Hoke County Golden Jubilee. [Raeford, N.C. : Hoke County Golden Jubilee, 1961] 40 p. : ill. ; 28 cm. Cover title. Souvenir program ... containing a history of Hoke County, North Carolina. more...
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HOKE COUNTY GOLDEN JUBILEE
Raeford, North Carolina


[Illustration:


Photos of houses and scenes of Hoke County]

HISTORICAL SPECTACLE
"HOKE'S HERITAGE"
8:15 p.m.
Mon. thru Fri.--May 15-19
ARMORY PARK

SOUVENIR PROGRAM
(PRICE FIFTY CENTS)
Containing A History Of Hoke County, North Carolina





Congratulations
to
HOKE COUNTY
on its
Fifty Years of Growth

We believe in this County and her wonderful citizens.

We have been serving this county since her birth with safe, sound and adequate banking facilities.

Being a home owned and home operated bank we are naturally concerned with the growth and well being of our county. And it is our desire to see Hoke County grow and prosper. Anything we can do to help is a step toward that goal.

OUR OFFICERS ARE

H. L. Gatlin, Chm. of the Board.J. L. McNeill, Vice President.
R. B. Lewis, President.Miss Jessie B. Ferguson, Cashier.
F. B. Sexton, Vice President.A. W. Wood, Jr., Ass't Cashier.

OUR DIRECTORS ARE

H. L. Gatlin.T. B. Uuchurch.H. L. Gatlin, Jr.
F. B. Sexton.J. L. McNeill.Tom U. Cameron.
J. B. Thomas.A. K. Stevens.W. L. Howell, Jr.
R. B. Lewis.C. L. Thomas.T. F. McBryde.

THE BANK of RAEFORD

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation

“HELPFUL BANKING SINCE 1903”

Main Street and Sunset Hills

Raeford, N. C.





Hoke County Officials

THEN . . .


[Illustration:

Pictured on the courthouse steps about 1912 are, front row, left to right, H. A. Cameron,
W. B. McQueen, W. J. McCraney; back row, B. J. Justice, Arch McNair, Edgar
Hall, D. J. Kinlaw, John M. McNair

]

AND NOW . . .


[Illustration:

Pictured on the same steps in May of 1961 are front row, Lacy McNeill, C C. Conoly,
Julius F. Jordan, R. A. Smoak, J. H. Blue; back row, T. B. Lester, Jr., M. D. Yates,
Archie M. Byrne, D. H. Hodgin, J. E. Gulledge, W. T. Gibson, Jr.

]

— THIS PROGRAM —

The material for this historical program was assembled and prepared by a committee of Hoke County Golden Jubilee which had Miss Josephine Hall, Hoke County Home Ecomonics Agent and daughter of the county's first sheriff, as chairman. Assisting Miss Hall in the preparation of the history were Mrs. D. B. McFadyen, Mrs. Luke Bethune and Rear Admiral A. M. Patterson, USN, Ret. Admiral Patterson is a Hoke County native and now works with the N. C. Department of Archives and History.





McPHAUL - WILLIAMS
OFFICE EQUIPMENT COMPANY

205 N. MAIN STREET

RAEFORD, N. C.

OFFICE MACHINES — SYSTEMS

PRINTING — OFFICE FURNITURE

Complete Office Decorating Service

JOHN W. “BUCK” McPHAUL, Mgr.

PHONE 875-3751

RAEFORD PUTT-PUTT GOLF COURSE

BILL McPHAUL, Mgr.

COLLEGE DRIVE

RAEFORD, N. C.

RECREATION — RELAXATION

FOR

THE ENTIRE FAMILY

JOHN W. McPHAUL

205 N. MAIN STREET

RAEFORD, N. C.

PHONE 875-3751

AMPTO AND THERMAFAX PHOTO COPIES — MIMEOGRAPHING





Hoke County's History

As a county, Hoke is young and vigorous — having been organized in 1911 a good 248 years after the State's first county, Albemarle, was created by the Lords Proprietors.

But while the county is “young,” the land is old and rich with the accumulated legends of fact and fancy, history and myth.

It is appropriate, then, that as we celebrate the Jubilee year of the county's organization, we look back to an earlier time when our sturdy forebears — white, Indian and Negro — carved out the shape of the land that we know so well today.

INDIAN BEGINNINGS

The two main tribes that lived in this section were the Choctaws and the Tuscaroras. There are a number of places in Hoke County where evidence of Indian villages have been found, although the Indian population here was not large. At several places around Montrose and in and near the Fort Bragg Reservation, pieces of pottery, arrowheads, tomahawks, and corn stones have been unearthed. A road running from the Raeford-Vass road to Highway 401, that cuts through June Johnson's farm, was said by old people years ago to be an Indian path. Mrs. W. B. McLauchlin says her grandfather told her Daniel Boone came through on the path. The Yadkin road, coming from the Cross Creek country (now Fayetteville) and going through Hoke County to Pinehurst and to the west was one of the great buffalo trails. The Indian trails were practically identical with the buffalo trails and the settlers followed the Indian trails.

The Indians living in Hoke County today, some contend, descended from Sir Walter Raleigh's Lost Colony. What happened to the Lost Colony is an unanswerable question but some believe they mingled with the natives and that the present-day Lumbee Indians are their descendants.

A permanent influence of the Indians has been the preservation of place names such as Lumbee and Quewhiffle. Old deeds belonging to Lacy McFadyen of Montrose show that Quewhiffle used to be called Inquewhiffle. The name came from a creek by that name and in Indian language means crooked spoon.

FIRST SETTLERS

Lending some credence to the theory that survivors of the Lost Colony drifted up-state in this direction is the fact that when the first white people came to the area between Big and Little Raft Swamp, the vicinity of the present Antioch community, they found a settlement there. While these natives possessed Indian characteristics, they spoke English and practiced many of the arts of civilization. Land was held in-common among them until it became necessary to obtain grants from the King

Pledging . . .

ANOTHER HALF CENTURY OF

. . . Progress

Raeford-Hoke Chamber of Commerce

“Building a Better Community”

P. O. BOX 96

RAEFORD, N. C.






[Illustration:

Looking North on Raeford's Main Street, around 1911
]

Dundarrach
Trading Company

GENERAL MERCHANDISE

FERTILIZER — FARM IMPLEMENTS

FEEDS — INSECTICIDES

DUNDARRACH, N. C.

P.O. RFD 1, SHANNON, N. C.

Hoke Drug Co.

SERVING HOKE COUNTY

DURING ITS ENTIRE EXISTENCE

LET US SERVE YOU

DURING THE COMING YEARS

PHARMACIST ON

DUTY AT ALL TIMES

PHONE 875-3720





of England. A grant from George II to William Fort in 1748 was deeded to Henry O'Berry of White's Lost Colony.

Even from the present-day names in Hoke County, it is evident that the early settlers were Scotch. It is not known when the first Scotch settled in the Cape Fear section but some were there when the province was separated into North and South Carolina in 1729. In 1736, when Alexander Clark came over with a shipload of immigrants he reported a good many Scotch already settled in Cumberland County. But the greatest emigration if the Scotch to Carolina followed their defeat at Culloden in 1746 in their effort to throw off the English yoke. Many who were homeless were pardoned on condition they come to America after taking the oath of allegiance to His Majesty, King George II.

This oath, the fact they lost everything they had been fighting for in favor of Prince Charles against Prince George and that they borrowed money for their passage to America, made Tories out of some of them and neutrals out of more. They first located in the territory now included in Hoke, Bladen, Cumberland, Sampson, Moore, Robeson, Richmond, Anson, Montgomery, Harnett, Lee, and Scotland Counties.

McPHAUL'S MILL

Years before the Revolutionary War, McPhaul's Mill was the chief meeting place in what is now southern Hoke County. Almost until the War Between the States, it was known within a radius of thirty of forty miles and was in direct contact with all important towns in this state and in upper South Carolina. The Mill was the polling place for the area. Horse racing became a favorite sport and a good track was built. Shinny, a game similar to golf or hockey, was played there.

McPhaul's Mill was owned by John McPhaul, Sometime prior to 1761 he and his son, Neil, came to this country from one of the Hebrides Islands. They first stopped at Cross Creek, now Fayetteville. Later they followed high ground southward and managed to effect a crossing of the Raft Swamp in the vicinity of what is now Antioch community. Here, they found a tiny settlement around a tavern kept by a widow named Perkins and her two daughters, Anne and Mary. In time, Anne became the wife of John McPhaul and she and John acquired land on which they started a grist mill. John had been a miller and had brought millstones from the old country.

Among distinguished guests of Perkin's Tavern were Governor Burke and Gen. LaFayette, Governor Burke when he was a prisoner of the Tories and Gen. LaFayette when he toured the country he had helped gain freedom and independence.

A historical marker at a site about a mile south of Antioch Church on the Maxton road indicates where the Whigs and Tories fought the Battle of McPhaul's Mill during the Revolutionary War. The people in the upper Cape Fear Region appealed to Governor Burke for help for the Whigs. Col. Thomas Wade, the Continental Commander, called on the Montgomery and Richmond Militia for help and, after a small battle, drove the Tories away. Col. David Fanning was in charge of the Tory troops.

Later, Wade and Fanning had another encounter at McPhaul's Mill. Fanning took fifty-four prisoners, killed about twenty-five, carried a number to Wilmington, and let the rest go. Fanning climaxed his terrorism in this section by capturing Governor Burke. Fanning was wounded in the affair and had to hide until he could move. He finally left the country. Perhaps the years toward the end of the Revolution, and right after, were the darkest days

Congratulations

TO OUR HOKE COUNTY FRIENDS

R. D. McMillan, Inc.

RED SPRINGS

PONTIAC

INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER





ever experienced in this section. Even after peace was declared, the people who had fought against each other remained as residents and antagonism continued for a long time.

Another Revolutionary battle was fought at Piney Bottom. Piney Bottom Creek, now in the Fort Bragg Reservation, is a small stream which runs into Rockfish Creek a few miles north of Montrose. During the Cornwallis campaign, lawless Whigs and Tories roamed the country plundering, murdering, robbing, and paying no attention to any authority but their own. Hill, in his History of North Carolina, tells of the massacre of Piney Bottom. After the British general Cornwallis had been driven back toward Fayetteville, Col. Wade of Anson County and a party conveying their wagons homeward camped at the head of Piney Bottom Creek. While they were asleep, a band of Tories who had followed them, surprised and killed a half dozen of the rebels. When Wade reached home, he gathered together a party of friends. They rode back into Piney Bottom and killed many of the Tories who had made the attack.

AFTER THE REVOLUTION

The old Nelson Inn, located about two hundred yards south of Sandy Grove Church and four miles east of Dundarrach on the old Wire Road was, a stage coach stop in colonial days. Mr. and Mrs. Nelson came from Scotland. They traveled up the Cape Fear River to Fayetteville and crossed a huckleberry swamp to where Highsmith Hospital now stands. Later they moved to the area that is now Hoke County and operated the Inn which was well known as an overnight stop for travelers going to or from Fayetteville. It was here that LaFayette spent the night during his second trip to America as he traveled from Columbia,

Howell
REXALL
Drug Company

REGISTERED DRUGGISTS

PRESCRIPTIONS

COSMETICS

CANDIES

FOUNTAIN

PHONE 875-3365

RAEFORD


[Illustration:

Home of Dr. and Mrs. A. P. Dickson south of Raeford,
Built about 1880.

]

South Carolina. In his room that night, he wrote on the wall, “Fool's names are like their faces, always seen in public places,” and signed his name. The board is in the possession of a member of the family living in New York.

During the Revolutionary War, Nelson dressed as a woman and hid in the loft of his barn to avoid military service. The story is told that he was also a very heavy

Home Food
Super Market

GROCERIES

MEATS

SEA FOODS

Telephone 875-3375





drinker. Nelson met an untimely end when he drove a rather wild horse to Rockfish Station. On the way home, this horse ran away with him at a point near Davis’ Bridge. Nelson was thrown from the carriage and his neck was broken. The horse continued home and Nelson was found the next morning.

One of the first phases of the “good roads” movement in the state was found in the plank road experiments. It was the last stand of the toll road in the state's transportation system. The plank roads were often called the “farmers railroads.” They were built by private companies. Advocates of the roads said a horse could draw from two to three times the load he could draw on an ordinary road.

In building the plank roads the right-of-way was first cut and smoothed off. Then trenches were dug for the six by eight inch hewn pine stringers, four of which were used running parallel with the road. Four-foot planks eight inches wide and three inches thick were buried under the stringers to keep the ends from eating into the soil. The outside stringers were placed slightly lower than the inside row and the boards were laid across them and were not nailed. They were cut eight feet long of eight by three inch fat pine and the ends were laid one inch over the outside stringers. A shoulder of dirt was built up against each end of the board which held it in place and kept it from moving about under traffic. Sand was sprinkled on the boards so it would wear in and prolong the life of the board.

The toll was one cent a mile for horseback riders, 1 1-2 cents for one-horse wagons, 2 cents a mile for two-horse wagons, 2 1-2 cents for three-horse trams, and 3 cents a mile for four-horse trams. Land values went up along the roads.

After being prosperous for a number of years, the plank roads began to decline because of depreciation. The planks wore out and decayed rapidly. The plank roads had practically disappeared from the local scene by 1860 although some roads were still called such for many years. The Centre Plank Road which extended from Fayetteville through Richmond, Montgomery, and Stanly Counties was the Hoke County Boundary for part of the eastern side of the county north of Rockfish.

Two forms of amusement were outstanding among the Scots. One was the old Scotch Fair and the other was the tournament. The latter must have been spectacular with the brawny Highlanders mounted on swift horses armed with lances. Old arenas could be pointed out near Longstreet Church less than fifty years ago.

THE EARLY CHURCHES

Within a few years after their arrival, the settlers picked out their meeting places for worship and later organized their churches. All of the pioneer churches in the county were Presbyterians.

Longstreet Church was started in 1758. The Yadkin Road, established before 1756 and located near Longstreet Church, was an old buffalo trail. It is said that buffalo traveled east to spend the winter and west to spend the summer each year. When the Rev. Hugh McAden, Longstreet's first minister, came to the area, the people had not had a minister for twenty years.

Longstreet has had three houses of worship. It is now in the section of Hoke County acquired by Fort Bragg and is no longer active. It is perpetuated through a scholarship fund for ministerial students at Davidson College.

Bethel Presbyterian Church is the oldest active church in the county. It was organized in 1776. It has had three buildings. During the Rev. Hector McNeill's pastorate, General W. T. Sherman and his troops camped on the church grounds March 9-11, 1865.

Upchurch Milling Company

MANUFACTURERS OF

Live - At - Home Feeds

One Of Hoke County's Oldest Industries —

— Continuous Operation Since 1919





Antioch Presbyterian Church was organized March 10 1833. When the first church was built, a gallery was constructed for the more than thirty slaves who were communicants of the church. The church grew and a second structure was dedicated February 19, 1882 and is still in use. It is in a splendid state of preservation and is considered one of the most beautiful churches in this area.

Sandy Grove Church was an outgrowth of Longstreet. It was organized in 1855. Its early mementoes were destroyed by Sherman's raiders during the Civil War. Sandy Gove was discontinued after its property was taken by the United States Govenment for the Fort Bragg Reservation. Most of the members moved to Raeford, many of them to be near a school.

CIVIL WAR

Of course, it really was a “civil war,” though Hoke folks like to stand by the traditional Southern designation of the conflict as “The War Between the States.”

Call it what you will, many of our people lost their lives while countless others were “wiped out” as the yankee army commanded by General W. T. Sherman moved north, laying waste to the land in one of the very first examples of “total” war.

Eleven battles and 73 skirmishes were fought on Tar Heel soil, including one battle here in Hoke, which took place at the tail-end of the war as the aforementioned Sherman marched north.

This battle took place at what was known as the Green Spring Monroe Place at “first light” on the morning of March 10, 1865. The battleground is in the Fort Bragg reservation approximately eight miles north of Raeford. The late Mrs. J. W. McLauchlin wrote an account of the battle in which she, in turn, acknowledged her indebtedness to Mrs. John T. Sinclair and Neil S. Blue. This account

The Johnson Company

FERTILIZER — SEED

INSURANCE

COTTON GINNING

RAEFORD—PHONE 875-3550


[Illustration:

Off on an automobile trip to the North Carolina mountains
about 1914. Left to right, William Covington, Mrs. W. T.
(Margaret Neal) Covington, Robert Covington, Pelham
Covington. The trip began at daybreak on Monday and
ended at Marion, N. C. about midnight Tuesday.

]

is from that source.

The Monroe Place was on the Morganton Road, a few miles west of Longstreet Church. Mr. Neil Monroe was the only occupant of the dwelling while Aunt Hannah, an old colored woman lived in a log house in the yard. The division of Sherman's army under the command of Gen. Kilpatrick, mostly cavalry soldiers, was encamped there. The houses were used as headquarters for the officers. Furnishings to make them comfortable were brought from the home of Mr. N. McK. Blue two and a half miles away.

Raeford Auto Company

FORD

FALCON

THUNDERBIRD

MERCURY

SALES — SERVICE





The Confederates, led by Generals Butler, Wheeler, and Hampton, captured the Union pickets on guard before daylight and were enabled to surprise the sleeping army. It was reported that when the firing began, Kilpatrick barely made his escape in his night apparel and Neil Monroe lost no time in making for the swamp. The surprise was so complete that 140 Confederate prisoners escaped, one of whom was Captain John C. McLauchlin of Wadesboro, formerly of Longstreet. After the battle had progressed for a while, dead horses were used for breast-works.

N. S. Blue, then a boy of sixteen, remembered counting 320 dead horses. Mrs. Sinclair stated that the Yankee soldiers returned to her father's house in a rage, even cursing some of their comrades, who at the sound of guns, had gone in the other direction. However, the Federals later recovered and the Confederates withdrew and marched on into Fayetteville.

During the battle, a Yankee gun drawn by six mules was wrecked by a shell. One mule, terrified, lunged and fell into the Monroe well and the gun fell in on top of the mule. The Monroes were compelled to fill up the well and used water thereafter from a spring some distance from the house.

About ten days after the battle, Blue said he and others went to investigate the rumors afloat among the colored people about an unburied Confederate in the woods nearby. They found his body in a good state of preservation beside a small stream called Persimmon Creek. A small testament and furlough papers in his pocket showed him to be a commissioned officer named William S. Sewell of the Fifth Georgia Cavalry. His horse remained by his side for more than a week. Officer Sewell was buried on Sunday morning, March 19, and was later moved to Longstreet along with the bodies of some thirty unknown Confederate soldiers who fell in the Monroe battle. A small marble shaft in the cemetery bears the simple inscription “Confederate Soldiers.”

Sherman's forces crossed into North Carolina from the south on a broad belt covering most of Hoke, Scotland, southern Moore, Richmond, and northwest Robeson, converging at Fayetteville. Their trail was marked by desolation as the 62,000 marauders moved forward. They broke down fences and small buildings for fuel, took food, plundered and ruined anything in their path. They picked up horses, cattle, wagons, and anything that could be used to transport supplies.

Mrs. Margaret McPhaul of Antioch, who was a small girl of about nine or ten at the time, several years ago told how they killed her father's hogs, cows, and chickens, and even used bayonets to locate things hidden in the ground.

Sherman's tent was at the McPhaul's front gate. The army took from 10 a.m. Wednesday until Saturday morning passing in that vicinity. It rained most of that time and the roads became almost impassable. As the Yankees left the McPhaul place on Saturday morning, the band, which was the last group to leave, played “Let the world wag as it will, I'll be gay and happy still.”

But time wipes out the bitterness of want and prejudice and as the years went by, the area which is now Hoke County, with its proud and great past, gradually prospered and peace eventually settled over the land. Today, the burdens and the duties of the country are borne and discharged by all.

IT IS A PLEASURE TO EXTEND

CONGRATULATIONS TO THE PEOPLE OF HOKE COUNTY

ON THE OCCASION OF THEIR GOLDEN JUBILEE

Page & Shamburger, Inc.

DISTRIBUTOR

GULF OIL PRODUCTS

ABERDEEN, N. C.





Western Auto
Associate Store

Home Owned and Operated By

HOMER McGUINN

215 N. MAIN ST. —0— PHONE 875-2061

RAEFORD

The Family Store

COBLE
Dairy Products

FAYETTEVILLE, N. C.

Graham's Service Station

A. A. GRAHAM

COMPLIMENTS OF

Dr. R. L. Murray

Auto Inn

R. L. CARTER

Webb's Radio & TV Ser.

C. P. Kinlaw, Jeweler

Farmer's Furnishing Co.





‘AS YOU LOVE YOUR STATE’

Along with the rest of the State and the entire South. the Hoke area went through the grim, post-war period known as Reconstruction. But Hoke citizens claim a signal honor in leading North Carolina out of this particular morass.

In the election of 1874, the Democrats had a majority in both branches of the Legislature but were hampered by a constitution enacted by the Republican Legislature in 1868. A bitter campaign followed with results so close that even one or two votes might tip the scale. Finally, it became clear that the fate of the election rested on Robeson County.

On August 3, 1875, General Cox, State Democratic Chairman, sent his famous telegram to Col. French, Robeson County Chairman: “As you love your State, hold Robeson.” The danger point seemed to be in Blue Springs Township, now lower Hoke County. Township leaders spent a busy twenty-four hour stand at the polls. History does not record the methods used by those valiant politicians, but is does record that the Democrats won, though by a slim majority. Thus the honor for having held Robeson and saved the state goes to Hoke County. The present Blue Springs, Antioch and Allendale townships in Hoke County are the areas involved in this incident.

DISSATISFACTION . . . AND CREATION

For a number of years just after the turn of the century there was much unrest in Robeson County. People in the northern and southern sections resented the power and influence wielded by the politicians around Lumberton and in the center of the county. There was some agitation for splitting Robeson into three new counties: Robeson, Upper Robeson, and Rowland.

While HOKE COUNTY celebrates its “Golden Jubilee” (50th year), WESTINGHOUSE is celebrating its “Diamond Jubilee” (75th year)

WE ARE AUTHORIZED DEALERS FOR Westinghouse Refrigerators, Ranges( Built-in Ovens and Cooking Tops, Washers, Dryers, Dish Washers, Freezers, Water Heaters, Air Conditioners, etc.

TELEVISION, RADIOS, SMALL APPLIANCES, LAMPS, FURNITURE and BEDDING.

RELIABLE QUALITY, RIGHT PRICES

EASY TERMS, GOOD SERVICE!

You are cordially invited to visit us often.

J. A. BAUCOM CO.

123 W. Elwood Avenue

PHONE 875-2167

RAEFORD, N. C.

1913 - 1961

WE'VE GROWN WITH HOKE COUNTY

IN OUR 48 YEARS

Hoke Oil & Fertilizer Company

“HOKE'S OLDEST INDUSTRIAL PLANT”

— MANUFACTURERS OF —

Cottonseed and Soybean Products — Cotton Ginning — Seed Cleaning

Hoke Concrete Works

Solite Concrete Products — Precast Lintels

PHONE 875-3721

220 WILMOUTH STREET

RAEFORD, N. C.






[Illustration:

Hoke Auto Company
]

Hoke Auto Company

SALES


[Illustration:


Chevrolet Motor Company Logo]

SERVICE

PHONE 875-3363

217 N. MAIN STREET

RAEFORD

Dealer License No. 1283

Ed Fleishman & Bros.

IS HAPPY TO SEND

GOLDEN ANNIVERSARY GREETINGS

TO HOKE COUNTY

WE HAVE BEEN PRIVILEGED TO PARTICIPATE IN ITS GROWTH SINCE 1911.

AND TO SERVE ITS CITIZENS WITH AMERICA'S FINEST

MEN'S WEAR

Ed Fleishman and Bros.

FAYETTEVILLE, N. C.

Raeford Hardware Co.

Bluemont Beauty Shoppe

Mrs. Kate McPhaul, Owner

The Fashion Shop

St. Pauls, N. C.

Raeford Floral Co.

Theresa's

Mac's Welding Shop





People in what is now Hoke County were much dissatisfied with the situation. Roads were unbelievably poor and the horse was still the primary means of transportation. They complained of the distances and the almost impassable roads to the county seats at Fayetteville and Lumberton. In some of the remote areas, the trip required as much as two days each way.

Not only did the people in “Hoke-to-be” complain about the roads and distances, but they felt they were being discriminated against because available tax monies were spent for schools, roads, and other improvements in more populous areas of the county.

Finally, leaders demanded action. Gradually the proposed boundaries of a new county began to take shape, and citizens were urged to campaign for its establishment. Proponents of the new county saw their chance when J. W. McLauchlin, distinguished statesman and Confederate veteran, was elected State Senator from Cumberland County. He had been one of the prime movers for a new county. Sen. McLauchlin introduced bills for the formation of the new county in both the 1907 and 1909 sessions. On February 11, 1909, about 400 advocates of the county went to Raleigh to be present at a joint hearing before the Legislature, which was not enthusiastic.

At that time, advocates of the new county planned to name it Glenn, but Governor Glenn declined the honor and suggested instead that it be named for Confederate general Robert F. Hoke.

Finally, when the 1911 Legislative session began, McLauchlin, armed with petitions from the vast majority of the people in the area concerned, introduced Senate Bill 33 on January 7 for the creation of a new county to be named after Major General Robert F. Hoke, a native of Lincoln County and one of the most distinguished North


[Illustration:

State Senator John W. McLauchlin
]


[Illustration:


United States Rubber Company Logo]

United States Rubber Co.

Raeford Lastex Plant

Makers Of The New Ultra-fine Lastex

With Vyrene Core





Raeford Oil Co., Inc.

Raeford, N. C.


[Illustration:


Esso Fuel Products Logo]

Distributors Of

ESSO PRODUCTS

Compliments

Cooper's


[Illustration:


IGA Super Markets Logo]

Super Markets

RAEFORD

Thad Marks, Mgr. — Jake Thornhill, Mkt. Mgr.

Clark's Gulf Service

Sanders Grocery

Raeford

Cleaners & Laundry

Air Brake & Electric Co.

At Big Star Truck Stop

Raeford Rest Home

Ideal For the Aged & Infirm

Crumpler & Parker

Funeral Home





Carolinians to wear the uniform of the Confederacy. Under McLauchlin's skillful leadership, it passed both houses. The Senate first passed the bill and on the evening of February 14, the House assumed a Valentine spirit and by a vote of 56 to 30 endorsed the action of the Senate and gave the state her 99th county. The bill was enacted into law on February 17, to be effective April 3, 1911.

April 3 was a big day for the citizens of Hoke County. Thousands swarmed around Raeford in celebration of the new county.

The Act described in general the boundaries of the county. It provided that the Governor should appoint county officials until an election could be held. It appointed Jeptha Peele and W. T. Covington as Commissioners to meet with the County Commissioners of Cumberland and Robeson, primarily to lay-off the boundaries of the new county. It provided that Hoke should assume its per-capita share of the public indebtedness of the parent counties and that pending court cases should be transferred to the new county. It designated Raeford as the county seat.

Settlement of problems with Cumberland County before and after Hoke was establishd seems to have proceeded amicably, but not so with Robeson. Some of the citizens of the North Robeson area introduced considerable controversy over the boundary. They claimed also, that the Robeson sector was the only part of the proposed county of any value; that the northern two-thirds was non-productive, and the southern area would have to pay practically all of the taxes and support the rest of the county.

The new officers were to have been appointed by the Governor, but he refused to do so until a Primary was held in order to find out who the people wanted. The first county officials were.

1. Clerk of Court—W. B. McQueen.

2. Register of Deeds—J. Hector Smith.

3. Sheriff—Edgar Hall.

4. Treasurer—W. J. McRaney.

5. County Commissioneds: J. W. Johnson, Chairman; S. J. Cameron; and J. A. McPhaul.

(Continued on page 24)


[Illustration:

Johnson home at Puppy Creek. Formerly Lamont home,
it is over 175 years old.

]


[Illustration:


Liberty Manufacturing Company Logo]

MANUFACTURING CO.

RED SPRINGS, NORTH CAROLINA

Now in our 55th year of service to the farm families of this area.





SEE

J. H. Austin

Insurance Agency

For

INSURANCE

of all kinds

STORE YOUR COTTON WITH

Hoke Cotton Warehouse & Storage Company

Raeford, N. C.

A Government Bonded Warehouse

— SPRINKLER SYSTEM —

N. C. License No. 2-700

Telephone 875-3391

Mar-La Beauty Shop

Jack's Auto Service

New and Used Parts

Used Cars & Trucks

Tanglewood Motor Court

Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Smith

Recommended AAA

7 MILES NORTH ON U. S. 401

Conoly's Esso

Servicenter

Carolina Club Sales

Quality Mail Order Products

807 N. MAIN ST.

Raeford
Plumbing & Heating Co.

PHONE 875-2258






[Illustration:

1924 Raeford High School Football Team
]

Front row, Duncan McFayden, Glenn Peele, H. L. Gatlin, Jr., Arrhie “Bud” McKeithan, Walter Culbreth, Lewis Up-, church, Devoe Austin; Second row, Robert Gatlin, Neill A. McDonald, Bill Sessoms, Clarence Brown, Younger Snead, Robert Covington, Graham Culbreth; Back row, Coach J. M. Stackhouse, Jonah Brown, Crawford Thomas, Ernest “Worm” McGill, Kenneth Hampton, Alex Snead and Henry Rogers. This team lost to Wilmington in the quarter finals of the Eastern Championship, 7-6. Absent from photo, “Big Boy” Wright, fullback.

1902 - 1961

McLauchlin Company, Inc

General Merchandise

HARDWARE

FERTILIZER





Congratulations

From

The Country Squire's
Turkey
A Tender Young Hen, Ready to Cook
With Giblets
Keep Under Refrigeration
Net Weight Total Price
LBS.
OZS.
[Illustration:


Man driving horse and carriage Country Squire Logo]

Priebe Poultry Co.

Raeford





Hoke County Golden Jubilee Corporation

proudly presents

“HOKE'S HERITAGE”

A JOHN B. ROGERS PROD. CO. PRODUCTION

STAGED BY

Robert E. Carson

Associate Director: Anthony Mockus

GREETINGS TO YOU AS WE PRESENT THE THRILLING STORY OF THE FOUNDING, GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT OF HOKE COUNTY.

ARMORY PARK

Raeford, N. C.

MAY 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 1961

8:15 P.M.

Narrators

Mrs. Sam HomewoodDr. David Whitehead
Mrs. Charles HostetlerMr. Harold Gillis





Episode 1: “The Queen's Court”

The young womanhood of Hoke County assemble in the Queen's Court to await the arrival of her Royal Highness.

TRUMPETERS: Vivian Warner, Susan McBryde, Cynthia Lee, Diane Upchurch, Theresa Langdon, Cathy Schell.

CADETS: Jenny Crissman, Ellen Conoly, Diane Parker, Kate McMillan, Dorothy Clyde McGougan, Ann McLean, Barbara McDiarmid, Marie McFadyen, Susan Neeley, Beth Hagler, Joyce Sams, Delia Sellars.

STATES: Kay Brady, Anne Shankle, Mary Lewis, Bunnie Dark, Connie Culbreth, Anne Byrne, Nancy Bray, Linda Fitzimmons.

SAILORETTES: Annie Autry, Helen Hobson, Gayle Kelly, Shirley Johnson, Lynda Morgan, Carol Lizotte, Mary Heyward, Rosemary Cameron, Diane English, Pauline Davis, Eve Jones, Louise Currie, Sue Gibson, Shirley McPhaul, Anne Livingston, Rosa Anne Graham.

COLOR GUARD: Paul Biddix, Robert L. Davis, Robert Conoly, Homer Tuttle, William L. Monroe.

NATIONS QUEENS: Wanda Williamson, Jean Brock, Linda Andrews, Lynda Scarborough, Edith Brock, Juline Bishop.

TRAINBEARERS: Cathy Newton, Jenny Monroe.

Episode 2: “The Old-Timer”

Good evenin’, neighbors, this here's just an old-timer biddin’ you welcome.

OLD TIMER: Eli Shankle.

Episode 3: “The Hoke County Story”

It was pioneers such as these who opened to all men the frontiers of America and built our own HOKE COUNTY!

PIONEER FAMILIES: Mr. and Mrs. D. R. Huff, Jr., Ralph Huff, Gayle Vanhoy, Mr. and Mrs. James Nixon, The Nixon Children, Mr. and Mrs. Satterwhite, Ronnie Huff, Joy Crissman.

Episode 4: “Sons Of The Forest”

Long before the coming of the white man, the Chaw Tawks and the Tuscaroras possessed this beautiful country.

INDIAN PRINCESS: Linda Gayle Maxwell.

INDIAN SQUAWS: Grace Daramus, Annie Mae Hendrix, Julis Webb, Treva Koonce, Katherine Harrell, Thelma Byrne, Margaret Davis, Bertha Hendrix, Mary McInnis, Virginia Ward, Margaret Gainey, Charlotte Posey.

INDIAN BRAVES: Billy Parham, Robert Barefoot, Bobby Wiggins, Leroy Williamson, Bobby Bayles, Larry Holt, Donald Hales, Colin Lovette, Eddie Baker, Lawrence Fields.

INDIAN BOYS: David Upchurch, Ken Koonce, Don Williamson, Tom Howell.

INDIAN GIRLS: Anne Howell, Pattie Schell, Julia Ann Gibson, Linda McGuinn.

Episode 5: “An American Vignette”

The days of powder wigs and three cornered hats. The days of men like Washington and Lafayette.

REVOLUTIONARY WAR SOLDIERS: Brown Hendrix, Charles Baker, Wayne Ashburn, Fred Johnson, Crawford Thomas, Jimmy Jones.

HECTOR McNEIL: B. F. Boyles.

DUNCAN RAY: Bobby Cox.

MR. NELSON: J. T. Leslie.

MRS. NELSON: Mrs. J. T. Leslie.

LAFAYETTE: Bruce Conoly.

ATTENDANTS TO LAFAYETTE: Buddy Willis, Worth Graham, Daniel Wright, Doris Floyd, Ola Rae Tucker, Peggy Calloway, Charlotte Posey, Rowena Cherry.

Episode 6: “Wagons West”

A small band of early settlers headed west settles down for a night's rest.

PIONEER COUPLES: Mr. and Mrs. James Nixon, Mr. and Mrs. D. R. Huff, Jr., Mr. and Mrs. Woodrow Bobbitt, Mr. and Mrs. Harold Thompson, Mr. and Mrs. Glenn Crissman, Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Vanhoy, Mr. and Mrs. N. F. Sinclair, Mr. and Mrs. Cy Israel, Mr. and Mrs. Pat Satterwhite, Jr., Mr. and Mrs. Tommie Roberts.

PIONEER CHILDREN: Jim Crissman, John Crissman, Joy Crissman, Ronnie Huff, Ralph Huff, Debbie Vanhoy, Gerry Vanhoy, Gayle Vanhoy.

Episode 7: “Church In The Dale”

Lest us return to an early church service of a day long ago.

PREACHER: Ed Smith.

CHURCH COUPLES: Mr. and Mrs. Jim McBryde, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Tapp, Mr. and Mrs. John Henry Haire, Mr. and Mrs. Smith McInnis, Mr. and Mrs. Dan McInnis, Mr. and Mrs. Donald Yates, Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Webb, Mr. and Mrs. Chandler Roberts, Mr. and Mrs. Tom McBryde, Mr. and Mrs. Hinton McPhaul, Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Blue, Mr. Vander Gillis, Mrs. Doreen Cothran, Mr. and Mrs. Chester Williford.

Episode 8: “The Three R's”

Schools were one of the first institutions in Hoke County of which history leaves an account.

TEACHER: Mrs. L. W. Turner.

BAD BOY: John Morris.

SCHOOL GIRLS: Beverly Ann Woodson, Deborah Ann Esterland, Beth Ivey, Cathy Davis, Toni-Lynn McDiarmid.

SCHOOL BOYS: Dony Smith, Barry Davenport, Bob Chadwick, Ronnie Collins, Anderson Hostetler, Clyde Wood.

BAD BOY'S FATHER: Daniel McInnis





Episode 9: “Volume In Black”

Our nation was clouded by the rumblings of dissent as a great land became divided by a terrible civil war.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN: Charlie Morrison.

CIVIL WAR SOLDIERS: Lamont Cranston, Steve Hedgepeth, Basil White, Ken Wheeler, Harold Gatlin, David Lindsay, Hubert Wooten.

and Church People.

Episode 10: “Birth Of Our County”

In 1911, Hoke became number ninety-nine in the sisterhood of North Carolina counties.

MR. McLAUCHLIN: Daniel McInnis.

THE OPPONENT: J. A. Webb.

Episode 11: “Picnic In The Park”

A gay and happy new era. And everyone turned out for the Fourth of July picinic.

GAY 90's COUPLES: Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Warlick, Mr. and Mrs. Neil Senter, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Birch, Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Austin, Dr. and Mrs. Julius Jordan, Mr. and Mrs. Ken McNeill, Mrs. Louise Parker, Mr. and Mrs. John Campbell, Mr. and Mrs. T. B. Lester, Mr. and Mrs. Willie Prince, Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Clifton, Mr. Sam Homewood, Mrs. Truman Austin, Mrs. Connie Posey.

BRIDE & GROOM: Sam Homewood and Mrs. Austin.

GAY 90's MAYOR: T. B. Lester.

GAY 90's COP: John Parker.

GAY 90's GIRLS: Karen Clifton, Donna Clifton, Anna Jordan, Kelly Jordan, Sally Austin, Betsy Tom Homewood.

GAY 90's BOYS: Bill Senter, Sam Homewood, Tony Austin, Franklin Jordan.

MEDICINE MAN: Ralph G. Plummer.

CAN-CAN GIRLS: Kay McNeill, Anne Dickson, Jackie Floyd, Carol English, Linda Hiser, Myrle Jo Burnett.

BATHING BEAUTIES: Edith Newton, Louise Plummer, Connie Posey, Joyce Monroe, Vera Mae Attaway, Mary Lee Matherly.

Episode 12: “In Memoriam”

In 1917, America took up the torch for demoracy and Hoke County shouldered her share of the burden of sacrifice.

WORLD WAR I SOLDIERS: Harold Gatlin, Brown Hendrix.

Episode 13: “The Roaring 20's”

The age of flappers, bobbed hair, and the Charleston and the Floradora girls.

CHARLESTON DANCERS: Mr. and Mrs. Willie Prince, John Parker, Mrs. Edwin Matherly, Margaret Davis, Eli Shankle.

FLORADORA GIRLS: Janice McInnis, Jean Teal, Joyce Thompson, Carolyn Jenkins, Beulah Polston, Pat Perley.

Episode 14: “The American Spirit”

This is the spirit that is America.

IWO JIMA: Paul Biddix, Robert L. Davis. Robert Conoly, Homer Tuttle, W. L. Monroe.

Episode 15: “The Atomic Age”

Is this the beginning or the end?

Episode 16: “Salute To Hoke County”

Proudly we hail the HOKE COUNTY JUBILEE!

—THE END—

Hoke County Golden Jubilee Committee Chairmen

R. B. LEWIS, General Chairman

Executive Committee: J. W. McPhaul, Younger Snead, W. T. Gibson, Jr. Steering Committee: W. L. Moses, Clyde Upchurch, Jr., J. L. McNeill, Harold Gillis, with division chairmen. Headquarters manager, Marion H. Gatlin.

Revenue Division: Harvey Warlick, chairman, with Josephine Hall, Kenneth McNeill, Hugh Gardner, Wade Blackwell.

Participation Division: Mrs. Sam Homewood and Alfred Cole, chairmen, with Neill Senter, Mrs. J. L. McNeill, Israel Mann, Theresa McBryde, Archie Byrne, H. A. Greene.

Spectacle Ticket Division: T. B. Lester, Jr., chairman, with J. S. Poole, Mrs. Truman Austin, Roger Dixon, I. W. Kinlaw.

Spectacle Division: W. T. Gibson, Jr., with Mrs. A. D. Gore, Robert Gatlin, Mrs. J. C.. McLean, Horace Walters, W. P. Phillips, Alfred Leach, Floyd Wilson, Mrs. June Johnson, Martin Webb.

Publicity Division: T. B. Upchurch, John Campbell, chairmen, with Mrs. Charles Hostetler, Harold Gillis, F. O. Clark, M. D. Yates, Tom Cameron.

Hospitality Division: K. A. MacDonald and Mrs. Ralph Barnhart, chairmen, with Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Thomas, W. L. Poole, J. E. Dupree, Mrs. M. R. Smith, Bernard Bray.

Special Events Division: Paul Dickson, Jr., chairman, with W. C. Phillips, Major Dan Jennings, Mrs. N. A. McNeill, Mrs. A. B. Dickson, Mrs. Paul Dickson.

Special Days, Dewey Huggins, chairman, with the Rev. W. B. Heyward, Sam C. Morris, Clyde Upchurch, Jr., D. B. McFadyen, John Balfour.





RAEFORD, NORTH CAROLINA

Hoke County Golden Jubilee

MAY 14 THRU MAY 19, 1961

Schedule Of Events

SUNDAY, MAY 14: “FAITH OF OUR FATHERS”
Morning:Observance in all churches of Hoke County's Progress.
Evening:County-wide Worship Services
8:15 P.M. — Armory Park
Dr. Mark Depp, Pastor
Centenary Methodist Church
Winston-Salem, North Carolina

MONDAY, MAY 15: “GOVERNOR'S DAY”
Morning:Registration of Pioneers and Visitors of Jubilee Headquarters
Viewing of Historical Windows
Informal tours of town and community
12:00 Noon:Bombs announcing opening of celebration.
2:30 - 4:30 P.M.:Parade Featuring Bands, Floats and Army Marching Units along Main Street. Reviewed by Governor Terry Sanford and guests of honor
7:00 P.M.:Opening Ceremonies, Armory Park
Address by Governor Terry Sanford
Crowning of Jubilee Queen by Governor Sanford
8:15 P.M.:Historical Pageant “HOKE'S HERITAGE” at Armory Park. Cast of 250 local people.

TUESDAY, MAY 16: “YOUNG AMERICA DAY”
Morning:Registration of Jubilee Headquarters
Viewing of Historical “Then and Now” window displays
Informal tours of town and community
4:00 - 6:00 P.M.:Record Hop for Teen-Agers of Elementary Gymnasium
5:00 - 6:00 P.M.:Children's Parade on Main Street featuring Pets, Decorated Bicycles, Wagons, Cub Scouts and Brownies.
8:15 P.M.:Historical Pageant “HOKE'S HERITAGE” at Armory Park

WEDNESDAY, MAY 17: “PIONEER AND HOMECOMING DAY”
Morning:Registration of Pioneers and Visitors at Jubilee Headquarters
Viewing of Historical “Then and Now” Window Displays
11:00 A.M. - 3:00 P.M.:Guided tours of town and county; “Open House” in Churches of County.
5:00 P.M. - 7:00 P.M.:County-wide Reunion and Dutch Supper in Park behind J. W. McLouchlin School.
J. Robert Covington, Master of Ceremonies
8:15 P.M.:Historical Pageant “HOKE'S HERITAGE” at Armory Park

THURSDAY, MAY 18: “FARMER'S DAY”
Morning:Registration at Jubilee Headquarters
Viewing of Historical “Then and Now” Window Displays
10:00 A.M. - 6:00 P.M.Form Equipment Show along entire Main Street.
3:30 P.M.:4-H Club Stock Sale, Main Street
4:30 P.M.:Beard Judging Contest, Main Street
7:30 P.M.:Presentation of Beards Awards, Armory Park
8:15 P.M.:Historical Pageant “HOKE'S HERITAGE” at Armory Park

FRIDAY, MAY 19: “LADIES DAY”
Morning:Registration at Jubilee Headquarters
Viewing of Historical “Then and Now” Window Displays
Informal tours of town and community.
4:00 P.M.:Roeford Elementary School Auditorium
Jubilee Belle Fashion Show and Teo.
7:30 P.M.:Awards for Style Show, Armory Park
Shaving Contest, Brothers of the Brush
8:15 P.M.:Historical Pageant “HOKE'S HERITAGE” of Armory Park

Spectacular Fireworks Display Featuring Simulated Atomic Blast, Every Night At Close Of Pageant

HOSPITALITY CENTER, RAEFORD METHODIST CHURCH, OPEN DAILY





CONGRATULATIONS to HOKE COUNTY on its GOLDEN ANNIVERSARY


[Illustration:

Pictured above is one of the LaFayette series of homes. Come in and let us show you other models. We have a house to suit your needs.
]

FOR A HOME OF YOUR OWN

SEE

SERVICE INSURANCE & REALTY CO.

Sales Agent

107 N. MAIN STREET

Telephone 875-2481

RAEFORD, N. C.

HAROLD L. GILLIS

LUMBER RIVER REAL

ESTATE COMPANY

BUILDERS — DEVELOPERS

Corner 3rd & Pine Street

Phone RE 9-3335

LUMBERTON, N. C.

WILL LENNON

LUTHER DEW






[Illustration:

Rear Admiral A. M. Patterson, USN, Retired
Native of Hoke County

]

VISIT


[Illustration:

Belk Hensdale
Belk Department Store Logo]

“Your Home of Better Values”

IN RAEFORD

During

“JUBILEE WEEK”

PHONE 875-2759

6. Coroner—Dr. A. P. Dickson.

7. Surveyor—J. L. McFadyen.

8. Superintendent of Education—Professor J. A. McGoogan.

9. Board of Education: N. A. McDonald, John A. Hodgin and Neil McKinnon.

10. County attorney—J. W. Currie.

11. State Senator (1914)—J. W. Johnson.

12. State Representative (1914)—Thomas McBryde.

Offices were rented for the county officers at first as it was a year before the Courthouse was completed. The three first terms of court were held in the Raeford Institute Auditorium. The county was divided into eight townships.

When the county was formed, it contained 268,000 acres. The population was about 10,000. There were no paved roads. It was a strictly cotton economy. The only high school in the county was Raeford Institute. There were approximately a dozen little one-room, one-teacher school houses open four to six months a year. Later, a high school was built at Antioch.

Old Raeford was located near what is known as the swimming hole on Rockfish Creek. John McRae and A. A. Williford operated a turpentine distillery and general store there. These gentlemen wanted a post office in their store for the convenience of the people in the neighborhood. They had to have a name for the post office so each contributed a syllable from his name, and the post office was called Raeford.

At Dunlap's Crossing On 401

Dunlap's Store

GAS—OIL—GROCERIES

Congratulations to Hoke County on 50 years of Progress.

Israel Mann

Raeford Barber Shop

— Serving Hoke County For 50 Years —





EARLY RAEFORD

Where Raeford, the county seat, now stands was a cotton field in 1898. The Aberdeen and Rockfish Railroad, which had been started by John Blue in 1889, was extended to this point in 1898 and the present town was started. Old timers say the first day the train came down the track, the teachers let the students from the Institute walk through the woods to the train.

The nucleus around which Raeford grew was the Raeford Institute, a high school which Dr. and Mrs. A. P. Dickson conceived the idea for and carried to a happy consummation through the assistance of J. W. Lauchlin and other good people who knew a sensible thing when they saw it. Dr. and Mrs. Dickson were interested in educating their thirteen children. To help build the school, each person was asked to give $ 20. The McRae family donated four acres of land. The school was founded in 1895. In the summer of that year, two frame buildings were erected, a two story structure and a one story buldiing. Marcus W. Dew and J. P. Smith had charge of the construction.

In the Fall of 1903, the main building burned and the school was moved into the Presbyterian Church. Four months later, a handsome new building was completed. Later, the number of buildings increased to nine. In 1910, the school had an enrollment of 325 students. The catalog stated that the school was in a Scotch and Scotch-Irish settlement and the people were noted for their thrift, integrity, intelligence, and high-toned Christian character. The town, which was chartered in 1901, was composed almost exclusively of people who moved here for the purpose of educating their children.


[Illustration:

Hoke County Courthouse, Completed 1912.
]


[Illustration:

Proudly Serving Hoke County
]

ABERDEEN


[Illustration:


Coca-Cola Classic Logo]

BOTTLING CO.

ABERDEEN, N. C.





One of the first things that impresses a person about Raeford is the width of its principal business street. It is eighty feet wide from curb to curb. Old timers say the early citizens wanted it that way so they could turn a two-horse wagon and team around in the street. A well was located for many years in the center of South Main Street between the A. & R. Depot and the hotel corner. Thre were also hitching posts and troughs for the care of horses and mules.The first mayor of Raeford was B. F. Moore.

The Bank of Raeford was organized on May 12, 1903. It furnishes an efficient financial service to the people of Raeford and Hoke County. It is an institution of strngth and resourcefulness. When President Roosevelt declared a holiday for all banks in the country in 1933, the Bank of Raeford was the third one in the state to open its doors for business after the holiday.

The North Carolina Sanatorium at McCain was founded in 1907 and opened for patients in late 1908 or early 1909. The site was chosen in the Sandhills because the section was fairly central in the state and was fast becoming known as a health and winter resort, particularly because of the dry climate, sandy soil, and pine trees. It was the first hospital in the state devoted to the diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis and is the third oldest hospital of this type in America. Dr. J. E. Brooks, of Greensboro, was the hospital's first superintendent. The tragic death of Dr. P. P. McCain, Superintendent in 1956, occurre on November 25 of that year. In 1947, the State Medical Society presented a portrait of Dr. McCain to the Sanatorium, and Sanatorium, N. C., by Congressional action, became McCain, N. C. It is the only tubercular sanatorium in the state that admits children.

CALL ME

Robert Ellis

Distributor

Wright St. Raeford

PHONE

875-2294


[Illustration:

ROBERT ELLIS
]

TO START DELIVERY 7 DAYS A WEEK

The Fayetteville Observer

Delivered to your home in Raeford every afternoon and Sunday morning only ..........

$ 175 MONTH

Electric lights, with power coming from Lakeview, North Carolina, were first turned on in Raeford January 26, 1910.

HOKE SCHOOLS

The education of our children has always been a primary concern in Hoke County. As mentioned previously, the county seat of Raeford grew up around the Raeford Institute, an early high school.


[Illustration:

Raeford group at Jamestown Exposition 1907. Front Row, Christian McKeithan Davis, Mary Gillis McLauchlin; back, Bess Blue Clark, Lendo Sexton, Beatrice Sinclair.
]

FOR HOKE COUNTY

An Even Greater NEXT Fifty Years.

Aberdeen Packing Co.

Beef

Pork

Veal


[Illustration:


Sandhill Brand Meat Products Logo]

Smoked Meats

Sausage

Frankfurters

Processors and Manufacturers of “Sandhill Brand” Quality Meat Products Sold to your Independent Merchants only.

Aberdeen, N. C.

Ph WI 4-2321





Local support for improved educational opportunities has continued down to the present day, as exemplified by the fact that Hoke gave its support three times to Governor Terry Sanford who was running on a platform of “quality education.”

About one-half mile south of Raeford, near the new Hoke County High School, is the site of Edinborough Medical College, the first or second medical college in the state. It was founded by Dr. Hector McLean who converted his ten room brick house into a hospital. Although not chartered until 1867, it is believed to have opened its doors around 1850. The School flourished for fifteen years and graduated several famous physicians. Dr. McLean, a Scotsman by birth, was Head and only professor of the college. During the Civil War, the yankees stole the valuable instruments used by the students. One building connected with the school still stands at the rear of a tenant house.

When Hoke County was formed, the only high school in the county was Raeford Institute, a private high school. The Legislature of 1911 provided for the establishment of a high school at Antioch which began operation during the 1911-1912 school year. Raeford Public High School opened in 1912-13. The trustees of Raeford Institute turned the property of that school over to the trustees of the public high school and it was used until 1917 when the new high school was built. There were perhaps a dozen little one-room, one-teacher schools in the county in 1911. School records show that at a meeting of the Board of Education January 1, 1912, they apportioned funds so that each school in the county would have a four month's term. On January 7, 1913, the Board set up a four-months compulsory attendance period for all children between the ages of eight and twelve years.

The first school at Rockfish, a one-room school with one teacher, operated in 1905-06. Miss Mary Smith, of Scotland County, now Mrs. A. A. McInnis, was the teacher.

The Mildouson School, now consolidated with the Raeford Schools, was built in 1922. Mildouson was named for the three young men in the community who were killed in World War 1. Mill was taken from Grover McMillan's name, Dou from Charlie McDougald's and Son from Carson Chason's name.


[Illustration:

Bethel School float in parade for
“County Commencement” about 1912.

]

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Phone 875-2475





Spring Branch school was in Blue Springs township. In 1924, the high school students there were sent to Raeford High School and the grammar grades to the Bethel School. Later, the Bethel School was discontinued. The Montrose school district was created in 1911. The school in that section was discontinued in 1960 and the pupils now attend the schools in Raeford.

In 1927, four additional rooms were added to the Raeford High School building so that all high school students in the county could attend the Raeford School. The Hoke High School on West Prospect Avenue, now Raeford Elementary School, was built in 1934. In 1936, Hoke High School became the second county high school in the state to introduce the twelfth grade. It was the first high school in the state to introduce a course in North Carolina history.

Prior to 1960, there were four graded schools and one high school for white pupils in the county. The new Hoke County High School, south of Raeford, near Highway 401, opened in September for the 1960-61 school year. At that time, Ashemont and Mildouson pupils were brought to Raeford where there are two schools, the J. W. McLauchlin school for grades 1-5 and the Raeford Elementary school for grades 6-8. The Rockfish Elementary School continued through the 1960-61 session. One Indian High School, Hawkeye, serves the Indian race. There is one high school for Negro students in the county, Upchurch High, and three elementary schools for Negro children, besides the elementary school at Upchurch.

MORE WAR, AND BRAGG

Hoke County was only three years old when World

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[Illustration:

Aberdeen & Rockfish Railroad crewmen in 1905 were Ed Bethune, left, Dan McKeithan and Herbert Blue. Max Foley, now of Carthage, was the road's first engineer, Herbert Blue the second.
]

War One began, and six years old when the United States entered the war in 1917. Four hundred men from the county went into the armed services. Most of them were in the 81st or Wildcat Division and the 30th or Rainbow Division. Four men from the county paid the supreme sacrifice in that memorable struggle.

In 1918, the Chief of Field Artillery, Major General William J. Snow, instigated a survey of the areas which might be appropriate for the establishment of artillery firing centers. Col. E. P. King and others made a search in the eastern part of the United States, and one of the areas visited was the watershed north of lower Little

Hoke Exchange
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RAEFORD





River. Then they examined the present site of Fort Bragg and liked it so well they went no farther.

The area selected began at a point about ten miles northwest of Fayetteville and extended westward for about twenty-four miles to the vicinity of Southern Pines. Averaging 8 miles in width, the Reservation, which comes to within 4.4 miles of Raeford, contains 120,000 acres. Ninety two thousand acres were taken from Hoke County.

The Reservation, then called Camp Bragg, was a military necessity, a fact no one in the community tried to disprove, but this action worked a real hardship on the people living in the area. Homes that represented a lifetime of toil had to be left behind and new homes found. Appraisers were sent to the county to value the property.

Edgar Hall, who was then Sheriff told of families coming to his office, many with tears in their eyes, to discuss the hardships imposed upon them. A few had to be moved by force. Camp Bragg was developed between 1918 and 1923. Known as Fort Bragg today, it is the largest artillery post in the world.

In 1952, Hoke County citizens again heard the distressing news that the army had plans to acquire 49,000 acres of Hoke County land, move 432 families from their homes, and consequently wreck the political structure of the county and the economy of the town, Raeford. A committee composed of J. Lawrence McNeill, Chairman, C. L. Thomas, H. A. Greene, Robert H. Gatlin, N. H. G. Balfour, and Paul Dickson, was appointed to try to stop the acquisition. The area was referred to as “The Fort Bragg-Camp Mackall Corridor.” Assisted by Congressman C. B. Deane and General Kenneth Royal, former Secretary of War, the attempt was successful and on October 28, 1953, the army announced that it was abandoning

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plans to acquire the Hoke County land, but would take approximately 2,781 acres in Cumberland County. Needless to say, the people of Hoke County uttered a prayer of Thanksgiving that their land, as well as county, had been spared.

THE HUM OF INDUSTRY

The first industry in Hoke County was the distillation of turpentine, a by-product of the vast pine forests that covered the area. Later, the woods were cut for timber, and the land was used for farming. In 1896, W. J. Upchurch and T. B. Upchurch, Sr. operated the first sawmill in the county. With the help of the “Tram” road, built by the Aberdeen and Rockfish Railroad, they transported lumber. These gentlemen introduced another industry in 1907, the Raeford Cotton Mill. They also built a power plant, near Rockfish, to furnish power for the cotton mill. The mill building was torn down in the summer of 1960. In 1912, outside interests came in and started the oil mill. The flour mill, known as Upchurch Milling Co., was first located at the cotton mill. In 1916, it moved to its present site on Main Street.

In 1910, the father of T. C. Scarborough started the Raeford Lumber Company, now owned by Tom McBryde.

The Hoke County Development Corporation was organized in 1948 to induce more industry to come to Hoke County. It was responsible for bringing American Wringer which sold out to Para Thread. The U. S. Rubber Company later bought Para-Thread.

In 1951, J. L. McNeill, C. L. Thomas, and others were responsible for Robbins Mill coming to Raeford. This company was sold to Textron Corporation who later sold to Pacific Mills, a subsidiary of Burlington Industries.

1961 finds Hoke County with the following industries:

T. C. Scarborough

Salvage Company





MODERN

HOMES . . .


[Illustration:


Photo of Woman on Phone]


[Illustration:


Photo of Man on Phone]

. . . Have

Handy

Phones


[Illustration:

Carolina Telephone
Carolina Telephone Company Logo]

CONGRATULATIONS

HOKE COUNTY


[Illustration:

The Capitol of Fayetteville Since 1912 One of Carolinas' Great Stores
The Capitol of Fayetteville Department Store Logo]

Your . . .

FRIENDLY FAYETTEVILLE STORE

City Cleaners

Nivens Esso Service

McNair's Cleaners

COMPLIMENTS OF

M. D. Yates

CLERK SUPERIOR COURT

Smith's
RADIO & HI-FI SERVICE

SERVING THIS AREA SINCE 1924

Wood's Grocery





three cotton gins, Upchurch Milling Co., Hoke Concrete Works, Hoke Oil and Fertilizer Company, Raeford Lumber Company, F. P. Johnson's Corn Mill, Burlington Industries, United States Rubber Company, and Priebe Poultry. We are very proud of our Hoke County industries, some of whose products are known internationally. The Raeford Plant of Pacific Mills is the largest worsted manufacturing plant in the world.

OUR NUMBER ONE ‘INDUSTRY’

No discussion of Hoke's economy would be complete without reference to our number one “industry,” farming — with the principal crops being cotton and tobacco. Hoke County has always been an outstanding county agriculturally. Several years ago, the county had the distinction of producing the largest yield of cotton per acre in the state. In 1944, the county received a large silver loving cup presented by the Atlantic Cotton Association for outstanding results in cotton improvement in 1943. The southern and eastern sections of the county have black, loamy soil adapted to raising many crops and vegetables. The western part of the county is made up mostly of sandhills. A great deal of timber is planted in this section, and several peach orchards are growing there. In the past few years, small grain and hog and cattle raising have started to come into prominence. A soil testing survey shows there are eleven different classifications of soil in the county. The soil testing program brought national recognition to the county. Community Development groups have been organized in all of the rural communities and are doing much to improve them.

Home demonstration clubs were organized in 1936 and

Raeford Lumber Co.

EVERYTHING

IN BUILDING SUPPLIES

today are active in every part of the county. The clubs have been responsible for developing much leadership among the rural women who meet once a month in their local clubs for an educational demonstration on some phase of homemaking and take part in many activities to improve their homes and communities.

Four-H Clubs and Boy and Girl Scouts are the two youth organizations covering the county.


[Illustration:

Graduating Class, Raeford High School, 1917
]

First row, Dwight Niven, Daniel Jones, J. H. Blue; Second row, Emma Hinshaw, Mary Blue, Mary Poole; Third row, Lona Hinshaw, Katie Barnard, Anna McDonald, Helen Dickson, Bennie Lee Upchurch, G. D. Oxner, teacher.

Thomas Brothers

Operators Of

Raeford Gin

WHERE YOU GET

THE BEST COTTON GRADES






[Illustration:

Miss Jane Pratt of Hoke County
Former Representative in Congress from the
Eighth District of North Carolina.

]

R. L. Long Grocery

SERVING HOKE COUNTY

1942 - 1961

THANKS TO OUR CUSTOMERS

— and —

CONGRATULATIONS TO HOKE COUNTY

ON ITS GOLDEN JUBILEE

HOKE MISCELLANY

The new Hoke County Health Center was dedicated on May 19, 1957 to John A. McGoogan, who served the county as first Superintendent of Schools and as County Auditor.

The first newspaper to be published in the county was “Facts and Figures.” It was published from March 1905 to early 1911 by D. S. Poole. In 1911, F. P. Johnson bought the paper and published it until September 1913. He changed the name to the Hoke County Journal. On September 3, 1913, J. W. Johnson and other interested citizens organized and incorporated the Raeford Publishing Company with Bion H. Butler as Editor. About the first of January, 1915, D. S. Poole rented the machinery and again became Editor of the paper he continued to call the Hoke County Journal. He remained in this capacity until after the first of 1929. Paul Dickson, Sr., now deceased, started another paper, the Hoke County News, in 1928. He operated this as such until 1929 when he bought out D. S. Poole's interest in the Hoke County Journal and consolidated the two papers as The News-Journal, Paul Dickson, Jr. is the Publisher of the News-Journal and Peter B. Young is Editor.

In 1925, a disastrous fire destroyed several buildings in the heart of Raeford. The voluntary fire department was organized soon afterwards and members take a keen inteest in its operation.


[Illustration:


A&P Supermarkets Logo]

CASH SAVINGS ARE BEST!






[Illustration:

Raeford's Baseball Team of 1909
]

In the picture are front row, Cam Blue and Raymond McLean; second row, Frank Blue, Dan McKeithan, W. L. Poole, M. L. McKeithan and Martin McKeithan; back row, Scott Currie, Zeb Holler, Raeford Institute Professor and Coach Eli Cole, Jim Poole and Jim Blue.

Kermit L. Wood

Kermit L. Wood, Jr.

Wood Furniture Store

NEW AND USED HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE

BOUGHT and SOLD

SYLVANIA TV

KELVINATOR APPLIANCES

LUCAS PAINTS

FLOOR COVERING

Service Loan Co.

Incorporated

107 N. MAIN ST.

RAEFORD





COLLINS
Department Stores

NORTH AND SOUTH CAROLINA

Your Family Fashion Center

PHONE 875-3547—RAEFORD

BIG STAR
TRUCK STOP

“Complete Truckers Service”

Hwy. 401 N. — In Hoke County

C. P. LONG
Bait & Tackle Shop

SERVING THE PUBLIC

FOR 15 YEARS

CONGRATULATIONS

TO HOKE COUNTY

PCA Loans


[Illustration:


Man on Tractor Pulling Plow Drawing]

for Machinery

Money is available when you need it to purchase machinery. Loans made for a period of 3 to 5 years. Repayment is made when you have income from livestock or crops. And, when you deal with us, you become a part-owner of the Association. So, come in and talk over a planned credit program TODAY.

Laurinburg Production Credit Association





At one time, Raeford was the smallest town in the United States with two military organizations. They were units of the 252d Regiment of Coast Artillery National Guard They entered the service of the nation full strength, 165 men and 10 officers in World War II. Hoke County, being near Fort Bragg, Camp Mackall, and the Maxton-Laurinburg Air Base, was well populated with army personnel during the war. Many army families lived here and much entertainment was furnished the soldiers.

Little River township, located in the northern part of Hoke County, was separated in 1918 from the remainder of the county by the Fort Bragg Reservation. Many times the citizens of Little River could not come through the Reservation to Raeford to transact business in the county seat. They had to go by way of Aberdeen and Southern Pines which practically doubled the distance they had to travel. Another problem arose over the schooling for

Gertrude's Beauty Shop

McNeill & Willis
Motor Company

GENERAL REPAIRS ON

ALL MAKES AND MODELS

CARS-TRUCKS-TRACTORS

Registered

BRIGGS & STRATTON Dealer

PHONE 875-3681

RAEFORD, N. C.

their children who had been going to school in Moore County. The Moore County schools were getting crowded. Taxes from Little River were going to Hoke County. When Moore County suggested that Hoke County pay for the privilege of letting their children go to school at Vass-Lakeview, it was decided by the citizens of Little River and the Hoke County officials it would be best that Little River township of 20,000 acres, become a part of Moore County. This took place by an act of the Legislature in January 1958.

Into this North Carolina county, which five hundred years ago was unknown and unsettled, came the High land Scotch, those idealists of freedom of thought and action. They secured their holdings of land. Here they built their homes, churches, and schools. Here they established themselves where they might grow as a prosperous people. They possessed the attributes on which to build and made a place for themselves in the nation. Today, may the consciousness of our heritage be awakened to appreciation and pride!

Parks Grocery

Johnson Cotton Co.

Of Raeford, Inc.


[Illustration:

Nathane Your Guarantee of Satisfaction
Nathane Gas and Appliances Logo]

Complete Farm & Home Suppliers

NATHANE GAS & APPLIANCES, TV

JOHN DEERE TRACTORS & EQUIPMENT

“CASH IF YOU HAVE IT

CREDIT IF YOU NEED IT”






[Illustration:

Gulf Solar Heat Heating Oil
Gulf Fuel Oil company Logo]

Teal Oil Company

Distributors

GULF FUEL OIL & PRODUCTS

- FLORENCE MAYO TOBACCO CURERS

We Give “S & H” Green Stamps

RAEFORD

PHONE 875-2596

On Aberdeen Highway

Raeford Super Market

Groceries, Fresh Meats, Frozen Foods

Produce, Dairy Products

Quality Merchandise

— Competitive Prices

PHONE 875-3377

“FARMERS HEADQUARTERS”

Cole's Feed & Seed Store

Groceries - Feed - Seed

Fish - Insecticides

Quality Parts &
Equipment Co., Inc.

Wholesale Auto Parts —

Supplies and Equipment

LAURINBURG, N. C.

107 Railroad St.

Laurinburg

439 West Russell St.

Fayetteville





Raeford's First Football Team - 1915

First row, Roy Reaves, Forrest Lockey, Ben Hassell, Dwight Niven; second row, David Wright, McNair Smith, Neill Cole, Love Heins, Graham Dickson, Walter Baker, Herbert Seagrove; standing, Lewis McBrayer, Buck Blue, John McKay Blue, and Coach H. W. B. Whitley.

Bobby Carter's
Recapping Service

B. F. GOODRICH - PENNSYLVANIA

ATLAS TIRES

Expert Recapping

Wheel Balancing

One-Day Service

Phone 875-2170 - Raeford

Proudly Recording

Hoke County's

Birth and Growth

The News-Journal

1905-1961





William L. Poole

Insurance

Agency

Congratulations

TO OUR MANY HOKE COUNTY FRIENDS

FOR 50 YEARS OF PROGRESS

- FROM A -

CLOSE AND FRIENDLY NEIGHBOR

Graham's DEPARTMENT STORE, Inc.

RED SPRINGS

Home Furniture Co.

OF RAEFORD, INC.

Your GE DEALER

- All Kinds Of -

HOME FURNISHINGS

WE SERVICE WHAT WE SELL

Ida's Dress Shop

LADIES WEAR THAT LADIES WEAR

ST. PAULS, N. C.

SMART APPAREL, SPORTSWEAR






[Illustration:

Looking South on Raeford's Main Street - About 1923
]

Interstate
Equipment Company

CONSTRUCTION-MUNICIPAL-INDUSTRIAL

EQUIPMENT and SUPPLIES

Statesville, N. C.

2500 Salisbury Rd.

Phone TR 3-9048

Raleigh, N. C.

1014 S. Saunders St.

Phone TE 3-1946

T. B. Upchurch, Inc.

FARMLANDS, QUALITY SEED

HEREFORD CATTLE-TIMBER

Raeford, North Carolina





WE SALUTE . . . .

HOKE COUNTY GOLDEN JUBILEE

WE'RE PROUD OF THE PROGRESS OF RAEFORD AND HOKE COUNTY DURING THE PAST 50 YEARS.

And the part we have played in its upbuilding over these five decades . . . years which have seen the County grow and develop into one of the finest and most progressive areas in North Carolina , , , growth in industry, agriculture and education. It has been our pleasure to have contributed to that development, to feel that our cross ties, our rails, our diesel motors, and our personnel have had something to offer in the achievement.


[Illustration:


Photo of Aberdeen and Rockfish Railroad Company Train]

ABERDEEN and ROCKFISH RAILROAD COMPANY

“THE ROAD OF PERSONAL SERVICE”

It is not just a slogan . . . it is an accomplishment . . . attested to by shippers we've had the pleasure of serving since 1892. Personal service in handling freight in this fine area of North Carolina . . . through rates and fast service . . . with attention to safety and speed of delivery. We're proud of this 68 year record.

TELEPHONE US FOR RATES AND ROUTES FOR YOUR SHIPMENTS

Raeford: 875-3509General OfficeFayetteville: HE 33011
Aberdeen: WI 4-2341






[Illustration:

. . . home of Raeford 2/80's — world's lightest, coolest 2-ply tropical — and
other fine fabrics.

]

Raeford Worsted Plant

— A UNIT OF —

Burlington Industries, Inc.
"Woven into the Life of America"
[Illustration:

Burlington Quality
Burlington Company Logo]

Executive Offices: Greensboro, N. C.






[Illustration:

Hoke County, N.C. Established 1911 Seal
Hoke County Seal]

1911

1961

County Officials During Hoke's First Half Century

Sheriffs

Edgar Hall, David H. Hodgin

Clerks of Court

W. B. McQueen, William L. Poole, Edgar Hall, John B. Cameron, M. D. Yates.

Registers of Deeds

J. Hector Smith, John M. McNair, R. L. Bethune D. K. Blue, W. W. Roberts, Eloise M. Roberts, J. E. Gulledge

Treasurers

W. J. McCraney, Herbert McKeithan

Commissioners

J. W. Johnson, S. J. Cameron, J. A. McPhaul, Louis Parker, J. G. McGoogan, J. C. Thomas, Jesse Gibson, A. D. McLauchlin, E. B. McNeill, H. F. Currie, M. G. Ray, D. G. McMillan, J. W. Smith, W. B. McNeill, Thomas A. Hall, R. F. Stewart, John A. McDiarmid, Archie McGill, N. H. G. Balfour, J. D. Tapp, N. P. Watson, F. F. McPhaul, J. F. Ray, H. A. Cameron, D. C. Newton, T. B. Lester, A. K.Stevens, W. L. Gibson, Hector B. McNeill, E. R. Pickler, F. Knox Watson, F. A. Monroe, N. B. Sinclair, W. M. Thomas, J. F. McMillan, J. H. Wright, Marshall Newton, W. M. Monroe, T. Douglas McPhaul, Douglas Monroe, Bernice Williamson, E. G. Smith, Jr., Julius F. Jordan, J. H. Blue, Charles C. Conoly, Lacy McNeill, J. A. Webb, R. A. Smoak.

Senators

J. W. Johnson, W. B. McQueen, Ryan McBryde, J. Benton Thomas.

Representatives

Thomas McBryde, W. T. Covington, J. A. Hodgin, Oscar Leach, D. S. Poole, Laurie McEachern, E. B. McNeill, Dr. G. W. Brown, Harry A. Greene, Charles L. Hostetler, Neill L. McFayden.

Recorder's Court Judges

Arthur D. Gore, Paul Dickson, W. B. McQueen, Henry McDiarmid, T. O. Moses, H. A. Greene.

Recorder's Court Solicitors

J. M. Andrews, N. McNair Smith, A. D. Gore, G. Graham Dickson, G. B. Rowland.

Coroners

Dr. A. P. Dickson, Dr. D. H. Swengel, Dr. G. W. Brown, Dr. R. B. Wilkons, W. B. McLauchlin, S. A. Snead, Dr. R. A. Matheson,, W. L. Roper, James C. Lentz, Dr. Williom Barry, Franklin Crumpler.

Accountants

J. A. McGoogan, John W. McPhaul, T. B. Lester, Jr.

Superintendents of Education

J. A. McGoogan, J. A. McRae, J. T. Jerome, F. L. Foust, G. O. Rogers, W. P. Hawfield, K. A. MacDonald, W. T. Gibson, Jr.

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