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Flora Macdonald College catalogue 1920-21

Date: 1920 | Identifier: LD7251.F56 A2 1920-21
Flora Macdonald College catalogue 1920-21. Red Springs, N.C.: Flora Macdonald College. Title varies slightly. more...
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FLORA MACDONALD COLLEGE
1920-1921

RED SPRINGS, N.C.









ANNUAL CATALOGUE
OF
FLORA MACDONALD
COLLEGE
RED SPRINGS, N. C.
1920-1921

TWENTY-FIFTH COLLEGIATE YEAR
ENDING MAY 26, 1921

ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR
1921-19221921QUEEN CITY PRINTING COMPANYCHARLOTTE, N. C.




Foreword

IF you are seeking a college for your daughter, we ask you to consider our aim—the CAREFULLY DEVELOPED and THOROUGHLY EDUCATED CHRISTIAN WOMAN—prepared to do her life work successfully, in the home, the schoolroom or wherever duty may call her.

For this purpose we offer you: A most healthful location and mild climate; commodious brick buildings, with all modern conveniences; a comprehensive and well-planned course of study; a Faculty selected not only for their ability and success as teachers, but for their gracious womanhood and decided Christian character.





TABLE OF CONTENTS

PAGE
Board of Trustees4
Calendar for 1921-192213
College Directory12
Committee of Faculty10
CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC—
Courses Required50
Certificates and Diplomas56
Description of Courses51
Entrance Requirements49
Commercial Department61
Department of Home Economics, Course of Study46
Entertainments11
Expenses per Term or Half Year58
Faculty of College6
Faculty of College of Liberal Arts14
Faculty of Conservatory of Music48
Faculty of Department of Home Economics45
FLORA MACDONALD COLLEGE—
Admission of Students21
Character Development17
Conditioned Students25
Contract19
Course of Study32
Entrance Requirements, Degrees and Certificates23
Entrance Requirements in Detail27
General Information18
Health15
Special Students25
Officers, 1920-19215
Orchestra78
Roll of Students, 1920-192163
Scholarships60
Self-Help59





BOARD OF TRUSTEES

A. W. MCLEAN, ChairmanJ. HARVEY WHITE, Vice-Chairman
DR. J. L. MCMILLAN, Secretary

ELECTED BY FAYETTEVILLE PRESBYTERY

EXIT 1923
A. L. BULLOCKRowland, N. C.
REV. A. R. MCQUEENDunn, N. C.
JNO. W. MCLAUCHLINRaeford, N. C.
S. B. MCLEANMaxton,N. C.
EXIT 1922
A. B. PEARSALLRed Springs, N. C.
W. J. JOHNSONRed Springs, N. C.
E. H. WILLIAMSONFayetteville, N. C.
A. R. MCEACHERNSt. Pauls, N. C.
EXIT 1921
DR. J. L. MCMILLANRed Springs, N. C.
A. T. MCCALLUMRed Springs, N. C.
A. W. MCLEANLumberton, N. C.
REV. J. K. HALLParkton, N. C.
AT LARGE 1921
DR. JAS. A. MACDONALDToronto, Canada

ELECTED BY ORANGE PRESBYTERY

EXIT 1923
REV. R. M. WILLIAMSGreensboro, N. C.
REV. C. E. HODGINGreensboro, N. C.
A. M. SCALESGreensboro, N. C.
S. STRUDWICKHillsboro, N. C.
EXIT 1922
REV. S. M. RANKINGreensboro, N. C.
J. R. FINLEYNorth Wilkesboro, N. C.
R. G. VAUGHNGreensboro, N. C.
T. B. FULLERDurham, N. C.
EXIT 1921
REV. D. MCIVERBurlington, N. C.
REV. C. P. COBLEHigh Point, N. C.
J. H. WHITEGraham, N. C.
REV. DAVID H. SCANLON, D.D.Durham, N. C.
AT LARGE 1921
WALTER SCOTTNew York, N. Y.
J. GORDON GRAYPhiladelphia, Pa.

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

A. W. MCLEAN, ChairmanS. B. MCLEANA. T. MCCALLUM
REV. A. R. MCQUEENJ. HARVEY WHITEA. M. SCALES

INVESTMENT COMMITTEE

A. W. MCLEAN, ChairmanR. G. VAUGHNJNO. W. MCLAUCHLIN





OFFICERS, 1920-1921

REV. C. G. VARDELL, D.D.

President

REV. H. M. DIXON

Vice-President

MISS MARY JOHNSTON

Dean

MISS MARY ELLEN STEELE

Secretary to the President Registrar

MR. GEORGE R. DUPUY

Bursar

MR. R. H. RICE

Secretary of Publicity and Promotion

MISS NETTIE MCLEAN

Stenographer

MISS A. L. ALEXANDER

Stenographer

MR. J. L. HARRISON

Steward

MISS MITTIE COBB

Housekeeper

DR. J. L. MCMILLAN

Physician

DR. T. MARSHALL WEST

(Cumberland General Hospital, Fayetteville, N. C.) Consulting Physician

MISS ELLEN L. FICKETT

Registered Nurse

MR. G. C. LANG

Superintendent of Grounds





FACULTY OF
FLORA MACDONALD COLLEGE
in order of length of service

CHARLES GRAVES VARDELL, D.D.

President

A. B., Davidson College, 1888; Princeton Seminary, 1891.

MRS. LINDA L. VARDELL

Graduate of New England Conservatory of Music.

MISS MARY JOHNSTON

Dean of the College

MISS PATTY B. WATKINS

Dean

Wellesley College, 1881; Student Cornell University, Summer Session; Student University of Tennessee, Summer Session; Head of Department of History and English, Stuart Hall, 1883-1891; Head of Department of Mathematics, Agnes Scott College (then Institute), 1891-1897; City Mission Work, Richmond, Va., 1902-1904; Professor of Mathematics, Flora Macdonald College, 1904-1911; Dean, Ibid, 1911—

MISS ETTIE BROWN

Salem Female Academy, 1891; Taught Salem Female Academy, 1892-1896; Studied Berlitz School of Language, New York City, 1896-1897; Taught Salem Academy and College, 1897-1898; Chair of French Language and Literature, Flora Macdonald College, 1898-1903; Dumarthery School of Language, Paris, France, 1903-1904; Professor of French Language and Literature, Flora Macdonald College, 1904—

REV. H. M. DIXON

Davidson College, 1884; Princeton Theological Seminary, 1888; Professor of Bible and Psychology, Flora Macdonald College, 1906—

MISS ANNA SPENCER DANIEL

Graduate State Normal of Virginia, 1898; Student University of Virginia, 1910; Student Teachers’ College, Columbia University, 1909, 1911, 1912, 1914; Student Peabody, Summer Session, 1915; Teachers’ College, 1919; Taught Miller Manual School, 1907-1908; Clothing and Textiles, Flora Macdonald College, 1908—

MISS ELIZABETH FAIN, A. B.

A. B., University of Tennessee, 1901; Student University of Cincinnati, 1906-1907; University of Tennessee, 1910-1911; Summer Sessions of Columbia University, 1913, 1916; Professor of History and Sociology, Flora Macdonald College, 1911—

MISS ELEANOR SAMPLE, A. B.

A. B., Normal and Collegiate Institute, Asheville, N. C., 1897; Student Flora Macdonald College, 1901-1904; Summer Session, University of Tennessee, 1917; Instructor Flora Macdonald College, 1904—





MISS ALICE STRONG, A. B., A. M.

A. B., Chicora College, 1905; A. M., University of South Carolina, 1913; A. M., Columbia University, 1919; Instructor Chicora College, 1905-1906; Flora Macdonald College, 1907-1908; Teacher, High School, Walhalla, S. C., 1909-1912; Teacher, Pedagogy and English, Woman's College, Due West, S. C., 1913-1915; Professor of English, Flora Macdonald College, 1915—

MISS HARRIET N. MORRISON, A. B.

A. B., Flora Macdonald College, 1905; Postgraduate work, Flora Macdonald College, 1905-1906; Student, University of Virginia, Columbia University, Summer Sessions; Teacher of Latin, Flora Macdonald College 1909-1910 and 1915-1917; Teacher of Mathematics, Ibid., 1910-1914, 1918-1919; Professor of Latin, 1919—

MISS MARY MCEACHERN, MUS. B.

Mus. B., Flora Macdonald College, 1906; Taught in Cheraw, S. C., 1906-1908; Flora Macdonald College, 1909-1910; Private Piano class in Red Springs, 1912-1915; Flora Macdonald College, 1915—

MRS. MARY LOGAN SANDERSON, A. B., A. M.

A. B., Central University of Kentucky, 1888; M. A., Columbia University, 1911; Summer quarter of 1908, University of Chicago, teaching of English and Latin; 1909-1912, Columbia University, New York City, M.A. (in English); Principal of Elementary School, Stillman Institute, Clinton, La.; Kentucky State Normal at Richmond; Preceptress of Model School, teacher of English and Latin, Model High School, and teacher of Rhetoric in Normal; Head of Department of English, Lincoln Memorial University, Harrogate, Tenn.; Principal The Tutoring School, Middlesboro, Ky.; Head of Department of English, Crescent College, Eureka Springs, Ark.; Professor of Pedagogy and English, Flora Macdonald College, 1917—

MRS. CHRISTINE WISSNER EWING

Teachers’ Diploma, Leipzig Conservatory, Germany; Student, Berlitz School of Languages, Leipzig, Germany; Head of Modern Language Department and Instructor in Piano, Hardin College, Mexico, Mo., 1893-1902; Director of Music, Lewisburg Seminary, Lewisburg, W. Va., 1903-1908; Head of German Department and Instructor in Piano, Columbia College, Columbia, S. C., 1909-1913; Chair of German Language and Literature, Ibid., 1913-1918; Professor of Spanish Language and Literature, and Instructor in Piano, Flora Macdonald College, 1918—

MISS MARY FORMAN

Graduate Cincinnati Conservatory of Music, 1904; Pupil of Mme. Hanna Mara, Berlin, Germany, 1908-1909; Teacher of Voice, Lewisburg Seminary, W. Va., 1896-1903; Flora Macdonald College, 1905-1908; College for Women, Charlotte, N. C. 1909-1911; Blackstone Institute, Va., 1911-1912; Greensboro College for Women, Greensboro, N. C., 1912-1913; Belhaven College, Miss., 1913-1918; Head Voice Department, Flora Macdonald College, 1918—

MISS SALLIE MCLEAN

Vanderbilt University; Harvard and Chicago; Professor of History, Flora Macdonald College, 1919—

MISS MARY MACLEAN CONOLY, A. B.

A. B., Flora Macdonald College, 1918; Summer School, Normal and Collegiate Institute, Asheville, N. C., 1919; Student, Summer Session, Columbia University, 1920: Instructor in Mathematics, Flora Macdonald College, 1919—





MISS ELIZABETH G. DABBS, A. B.

A. B., Winthrop Normal and Industrial College, 1918; Instructor in Science, Claiborne County High School, Tazewell, Tenn., 1918-1919; Professor of Biology and Agriculture, Flora Macdonald College, 1919—

G. T. PACE, A. B., B. D.

Southwestern Presbyterian University, 1896; Union Seminary, 1899; Chair of Bible, Flora Macdonald College, 1906-1908; Substitute in Chair of Bible, 1916-1917; Natural Science, 1917-1918; Professor of Natural Science, 1919—

CHARLES GILDERSLEEVE VARDELL, A. B.

A. B., Princeton University, 1914; Graduate Piano Course, Institute of Musical Art, New York, 1915; Graduate Artists’ and Teachers’ Courses, Institute of Musical Art, 1916; Director of The Conservatory of Music, Flora Macdonald College, 1919—

MISS LOTTIE VERA COVINGTON

Blackstone College for Girls, Blackstone, Va.; Massey Business College, Richmond, Va.; Teachers’ Diploma, Gregg School of New York; Teachers’ Certificate, Gregg School of Chicago; Principal of Commercial Department, Littleton College, Littleton, N. C., 1915-1916; Clifton Forge Business College, Clifton Forge, Va., 1916-1917; Fort Loudoun Seminary, Winchester, Va., 1917-1919; Commercial Department Flora Macdonald College, 1919—

MISS HELEN SAYLES, B. L. I.

Graduate Emerson College of Oratory, Boston, 1919; Bachelor Literary Interpretation, Emerson College of Oratory, Summer, 1920; Dramatic Director, Bright Vacation School, Waltham, Mass., Summer, 1918; Instructor in Expression, College of Industrial Arts, Denton, Texas, Summer, 1919; Student Harvard University, Summer Session, 1920; Instructor in Expression, Flora Macdonald College, 1919—

MISS KATE MCNEILL, A. B.

A. B., Lebanon College for Young Ladies, Lebanon, Tenn., 1890; Preceptress and Teacher of Mathematics, Ibid., 1892-1896; Teacher of Mathematics, Science, Bible, Texas Fairemont Seminary, Weatherford, Tex., 1901-1907; Ibid., 1910-1914; Principal Bell Institute, Walnut, N. C., 1907-1910; Student University of Tennessee, 1914-1915; Principal Morrison Industrial School and Maxwell Farm School, Franklin, N. C., 1915-1919; Teacher of Mathematics, High School, Middlesboro, Ky., 1919-1920; Professor of Mathematics, Flora Macdonald College, 1920—

MISS NANCY E. PEARSON, A. B.

A. B., Masonian Institute; Peace Institute; University of Virginia, Summer School, 1911, 1913, 1914, 1915; Student Teachers’ College, Columbia University, 1919-1920; Department of Foods and Cookery, Flora Macdonald College, 1920—

MISS MARIBEL POWELL

Student Flora Macdonald College, 1917-18; Instructor in French, Ibid., 1920—

MISS MARGARET E. MCNEILL, B. M., M. M.

Graduate Texas Fairemont Seminary and Conservatory of Music, 1904; Postgraduate, Ibid., 1905; Teacher of Piano, Ibid., 1905-1907; 1910-1911; Teacher of Piano, Bell Institute, Walnut, N. C., 1907-1909; Piano Classes, Huntingdon, Tenn., 1909-1910; Dalhart, Texas, 1911-1913; Teachers’ Certificate, College of Music of Cincinnati, 1914, Summer Courses, 1912, 1918, 1920; Head of Music Department, City Schools, La Fayette, Ala., 1914-1915; Ibid., Livingston Alabama State Normal and City Schools, 1915-1919; Teacher Piano, Violin, Piano Pedagogy, South-Western State Normal, Okla., 1919-1920; Co-director, Piano Department, Flora Macdonald College, 1920—





MISS ELIZABETH STRIBLING, A. B.

A. B., Winthrop College, 1915; Graduate New Haven Normal School of Gymnastics, New Haven, Conn., 1919; Instructor in Gymnastics and Swimming, City Y. W. C. A., Lynchburg, Va., 1919-1920; Director of Physical Training, Flora Macdonald College, 1920—

MISS JANE DICKSON VARDELL, B. M.

B. M., Flora Macdonald College, 1917; Student Institute of Musical Art, New York, 1917-1918; Instructor in Violin and Piano, Stonewall Jackson College, Abingdon, Va., 1918-1920; Instructor in Violin and Piano, Flora Macdonald College, 1920—

MISS MAMIE ETHEL BITNER

Graduate Tusculum College, Tenn., 1913; Student New York School of Music and Arts, New York City, 1914-1915; Teachers’ Certificate in Piano, Summer Session, New York School of Music, 1917; Pupil of Arthur Freidheim, New York City, 1919-1920; Teacher of Piano and Organ, Synodical College, Fulton, Mo., 1917-1919; Flora Macdonald College, 1920—

MISS MAY MEADOWS

Louisiana Polytechnics, 1909; Student Cincinnati Conservatory of Music, Summer Sessions, 1911 and 1914; Student Cincinnati Conservatory of Music, 1917-1919; Instructor in Piano, Dubach College, 1909-1911; Instructor in Piano and Public School Music, Ruston High School, 1911-1917; Instructor in Piano and Theory, Flora Macdonald College, 1920—

MISS OLGA WILLIAMS

Sweetwater Preparatory College, Sweetwater, Tenn.; Columbia Institute, Columbia, Tenn.; Crescent College and Conservatory, Eurcka Springs, Ark.; Pupil of Mary Collier Forbes of New York; Ida Jolly Crawley; L. McBeizh of Paris, France; Imogene Coulter, Shorter College, Rome, Ga.; Instructor Norman Institute, Norman Park, Ga., 1917-1918; Private Class, Sweetwater, Tenn.; Hot Springs, Ark., 1919-1920; Instructor, Flora Macdonald College, 1920—





COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY

Course of Study—Dr. Vardell, Miss Watkins, Miss Strong, Mr. Vardell.

Government—Dr. Vardell, Miss Johnston, Miss McLean, Miss Fain.

Religious Activities—Miss Watkins, Miss Sample, Miss Kate McNeill, Mrs. Ewing.

Social—Miss Johnston, Miss Morrison, Mrs. Ewing, Miss Dabbs, Miss Stribling.

Library—Mrs. Sanderson, Miss Daniel, Miss McLean, Miss Conoly, Miss Fain.

Lecture—Miss Johnston, Miss Forman, Miss Sayles, Miss Dabbs, Mr. Vardell, Mr. Rice.

Classification—Miss Watkins, Miss Strong, Miss Morrison.

Buildings and Grounds—Dr. Vardell, Miss Steele, Miss Dabbs, Mr. Lang.

Extension Committee — Miss Watkins, Miss Bitner, Miss Sayles, Mr. Vardell, Mr. Rice.





ENTERTAINMENTS, 1920-1921

SEPTEMBER

Y. W. C. A. Reception to Faculty and Students.

Stunt Night.

Receptions of the Epsilon Chi and Zetesian Literary Societies.

Concert by Tar Baby Quartette.

OCTOBER

Moving Pictures.

Faculty Recital by Dean Vardell.

Address by Josephus Daniels, Secretary of the Navy.

Moving Pictures.

NOVEMBER

Lecture by Dr. F. H. Koch—“Hamlet.”

Concert by Cecil Fanning, Baritone; H. B. Turpin at the Piano.

Moving Pictures—Scientific Night.

Concert by Davidson College R. O. T. C. Band.

Lecture by Col. John Temple Graves—“Armageddon.”

DECEMBER

Pageant by Epsilon Chi and Zetesian Literary Societies in celebration of the “Tercentenary of the Landing of the Pilgrim.”

Quarterly Concert by Pupils of Conservatory of Music.

Moving Pictures—“Evangeline.”

JANUARY

Moving Pictures.

“Variety Show,” by Staff of the Annual.

Address—“The New Citizenship,” by Dr. Hamilton of University of North Carolina.

Concert by Thelma Given, Violinist.

FEFRUARY

Moving Pictures.

Community Sing.

Moving Pictures.

Quarterly Concert by Pupils of Conservatory of Music.

Y. W. C. A. Reception.

MARCH

Faculty Recital by Miss Margaret McNeill, Piano; Miss Helen Sayles, Reader.

Concert by Helen Pugh, Child Pianist.

Graduates’ Recital by Miss Mary Poole, Piano; Miss Fannie Foy, Voice.

Three Plays given by The Devereux Dramatic Company.

The Senior-Junior Reception.

APRIL

Recital by Miss Mary Kenna Walker, Graduate in Piano; Miss Margaret Brown, Certificate in Expression.

Debate by the Epsilon Chi and Zestesian Literary Societies.

Moving Pictures.

MAY

May Day.

Moving Pictures.





COLLEGE DIRECTORY

SENIOR CLASS

Lottie Hand, president; Fannie Foy, vice-president; Mary Poole, secretary; Mary Kenna Walker, treasurer.

JUNIOR CLASS

Mamie Lemmond, president; Myrtle Wyatt, vice-president; Mary Mooney, secretary; Elizabeth Clark, treasurer.

SOPHOMORE CLASS

Vera Coe, president; Willie Mae Whiteside, vice-president; Lillian Sample, secretary; Ellen Black, treasurer.

FRESHMAN CLASS

Mary Lee McNair, president, Gonia Scott, vice-president; Evelyn Carson, secretary; Marie Nash, treasurer.

Y. W. C. A.

Mary Kenna Walker, president; Elizabeth Irwin, vice-president; Lottie Hand, secretary; Elizabeth Clark, treasurer. Cabinet members: Eliabeth Orr, Sarah Barnhardt, Eliza Whitted, Mary Poole, Myrtle Wyatt, Jane Evans.

EPSILON CHI SOCIETY

Edith Averitt, president; Sarah Barnhardt, first vice-president; Sara Dixon, second vice-president; Viola Hart, recording secretary; Zelda Wood, corresponding secretary; Kate Barnes, treasurer; Elsie Johnson, censor; Ruth Odom, chaplain; Mary Kenna Walker, critic.

ZETESIAN SOCIETY

Pattie Britt, president; Fannie Foy, first vice-president; Mary Poole, second vice-president; Mary Mooney, recording secretary; Caroline Gibson, corresponding secretary; Jane Evans, treasurer; Margaret Dupuy, censor; Kate Latimer, chaplain; Kate Cumming, critic.

ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION

Mildred Brogden, president; Esther Faires, vice-president; Virginia Frank, secretary; Ellen Black, treasurer.





CALENDAR

1921

September 13th, Tuesday, Registration for admission into the College.

September 14th, Wednesday, Recitations begin.

Recess from December 15th, Thursday, to January 3rd, Tuesday.

1922

January 18th, Wednesday, Second Term Begins.

First Tuesday in May, May Day.

May 21st, Sunday, Baccalaureate Sermon.

May 22nd, Monday, 8:00 p. m., Senior Class Exercises.

May 23rd, Tuesday, 11:00 a. m., Meeting of the Board of Trustees.

May 23rd, Tuesday, 4:00 p. m., Reception and Art Exhibit.

May 23rd, Tuesday, 8:00 p. m., Annual Concert.

May 24th, Wednesday, Commencement.





FACULTY OF COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS

REV. C. G. VARDELL, D. D., A. B.

President

MISS PATTY WATKINS

Dean of the Faculty Bible

ETTIE BROWN

Professor of French

HARRIET N. MORRISON, A. B.

Professor of Latin

REV. H. M. DIXON

Professor of Bible, Psychology

MRS. MARY L. SANDERSON, A. B., A. M.

Professor of English, Pedagogy

ALICE STRONG, A. B., A. M.

Professor of English

SALLIE MCLEAN

Professor of History

(James A. Macdonald Professorship)

ELIZABETH FAIN, A. B.

Professor of History, Sociology

MRS. C. W. EWING

Professor of Spanish

ELIZABETH DABBS, A. B.

Professor of Biology, Agriculture

G. T. PACE, A. B., B. D.

Professor of Chemistry, Physics

KATE MCNEILL, A. B.

Professor of Mathematics

ELEANOR SAMPLE, A. B.

Instructor in English

MARY MACLEAN CONOLY, A. B.

Instructor in Mathematics

MARIBEL POWELL

Instructor in French

HELEN SAYLES

Instructor in Expression

ELIZABETH STRIBLING, A. B.

Physical Director

CHARLES GILDERSLEEVE VARDELL, A. B.

Dean of Conservatory of Music





Flora Macdonald College

THIS institution was founded by the Scotch Presbyterians for the purpose of offering to young women the best educational advantages, coupled with positive Christian instruction and training. In addition to this, the settled policy of the institution is to offer these advantages at a cost that will place them within the reach of persons of limited means. This effort has been richly blessed by God, and has achieved a remarkable success.

The following pages will show that great care is being exercised in the development of the work, and that every precaution has been taken to carry out the high purpose of the institution.

In choosing a school home for their children, four points merit the careful attention of parents—health, character development, the curriculum, the faculty.

HEALTH
[note]

The College is located in Red Springs, Robeson County, North Carolina, a town on the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad. Red Springs, so called from the red sulphur water of its famous springs, is in the longleaf pine section of the State, and the climate is the same as that of Southern Pines and Pinehurst, twenty-five miles distant. The town is composed of people who have gathered together largely on account of the social and intellectual advantages afforded by the College, and who desire a thorough education for their children. It is an exceptionally clean town, both physically and morally.

[note]

We place health first because a sound body is an indispensable factor in pleasant and efficient living. The location of the College in a well-known health resort, in a climate that knows no excess of heat or cold, and where there is free access to the mineral springs that have been celebrated for generations





for their medicinal merits, largely accounts for the remarkable health record of the school. It is eminently the place of which the famous North Carolina toast is true:

  • “Here's to the Land of the Long-leaf Pine,
  • The Summer Land where the sun doth shine;
  • Where the weak grow strong, and the strong grow great,
  • Here's to ‘down home’—the Old North State.”

[note]

Every care has been taken to profit by the natural healthfulness of the place. The elevation and sandy nature of the soil gave an opportunity for the perfect system of drainage and sewerage which has been installed. All the water used by the College comes from deep bored wells.

The climate and location permit a large amount of outdoor exercise, so necessary to successful physical development. Daily walking is required and outdoor sports encouraged. Four tennis courts, three basket-ball fields, two bowling alleys, a baseball diamond and a volley-ball outfit are provided. The institution has a trained director of Physical Culture, who uses the most improved methods for physical development.

[note]

No locality, however favored, is exempt from sickness. A large Infirmary, with private bath room, hospital beds, and every convenience for the care of the sick, is under the supervision of a graduate trained nurse who gives her entire time to this work. Dr. J. L. McMillan, the physician in charge, visits the College regularly, and exercises a general oversight of health and sanitation.

A physical examination of each pupil is made by the various specialists connected with the Cumberland General Hospital of Fayetteville, North Carolina, with a view to correcting physical weakness or defect.

[note]

The buildings which constitute the plant are Administration Hall, containing library, reading room, parlor, teachers’ and students’ sitting rooms, society halls, art room, chemical laboratory and work-rooms (practice kitchen, demonstration dining-room, sewing-room, etc.), for the department of Household Arts; East and





West Hall give us twelve well-lighted and commodious recitation rooms and fifty-six bedrooms; Morgan Hall, given by Mr. Mark Morgan, of Scotland County, contains the dining-room, measuring 108 × 48 feet, a serving-room and dish pantry 19 × 48, a fireproof kitchen, and forty bedrooms. Vardell Hall contains forty-two bedrooms, two recitation rooms, offices and gymnasium. All bedrooms are designed to accommodate two students, and only two are allowed in a room. Each room is heated by steam, lighted by electricity, and is well ventilated; it is also equipped with stationary washstand, running water, and two closets. All rooms are comfortably furnished with single iron bedsteads, bureaus, tables and chairs.

The Auditorium and Conservatory building measures 125 × 53 feet. The first floor gives thirty-one piano rooms, with a large hall for ensemble practice. The Auditorium is furnished with opera chairs, and seats 1,000 people comfortably.

[note]

The College owns and operates a complete system of heating and lighting. This consists of two boilers, located in a brick building separated from the main buildings, and supplies steam for heating purposes and power for the electric light plant and steam laundry.

[note]

For fire protection and bathroom purposes there is a steel tower fifty feet high, supporting a tank of fifteen thousand gallons capacity, filled by a steam pump. An artesian well, 110 feet deep, flowing seventy-five gallons per minute, furnishes water for the College.

The College employs a private watchman, whose duty it is to make an inspection of the buildings and grounds once each hour during the night.

CHARACTER DEVELOPMENT

The development of Christian character is the chief aim of our College, and the faculty is selected not only for superior scholarship, but specially for sympathetic co-operation in the carrying out of this purpose.

The Bible is a text-book and its study is required. Morning and evening, faculty and students assemble for worship.





The College has an organized Sunday School, attendance upon which is also voluntary. The classes are taught by members of the faculty, and nearly the whole school is enrolled.

The Young Women's Christian Association, composed of 239 members, is an important factor in the spiritual development of the students.

As essential to spiritual growth and preparation for efficient service in the Church, the Association places emphasis on the necessity of systematic devotional study of the Bible, a life of prayer, social and personal service, and intelligent study of missions and proportionate and systematic giving.

Earnest and efficient officers, assisted by an advisory committee of the faculty, direct the work of the Association. A missionary meeting is held once a month and special prayer meetings on Sundays and Wednesday evenings.

Contributions are made to the causes of the Church, Y. W. C. A. work, and the various benevolent and helpful activities of the world.

The Association has its own library which is enlarged each year by contributions from students.

GENERAL INFORMATION
[note]

Social instincts should be gratified. Students are taught to recognize claims and obligations in social life, and the principles regulating that life. Every young woman should be able to undertake and carry through successfully certain social functions, and with this end in view a number of receptions and teas are arranged by the faculty and students. The annual receptions are given by the Sophomores to the Freshmen in February; Juniors to Seniors in April, and Seniors to Juniors in November. The two Literary Societies and the Social Committee of the Y. W. C. A. are valuable aids in the general social life of the students.

[note]

School life means far more than books and classes. Wisdom is greater than mere knowledge. A large part of the student's education consists in learning self-control, self-direction, and due regard for the comforts and rights of others. These valuable lessons





come largely through the discipline of the school, which maintains such regulations and requirements as are necessary for the orderly conduct of the household, and instruction in the duties we owe to those around us.

In the discipline of the College the President is assisted by the Faculty, the Dean giving to it her special supervision. The class officers are also of great assistance to the President.

A step toward student government has been the organization of a Student Council, composed of the presidents and vice-presidents of the Junior and Senior classes, and the presidents of the Societies.

Our aim is to produce courteous, self-reliant, thoughtful young women, who recognize that it is the duty of every individual to consider carefully the rights of others and her obligations to known duty. In this we have been largely successful, but that new students may realize just what we stand for, each student, upon her entrance, is required to sign the following contract:

CONTRACT

I do hereby contract with the Flora Macdonald College that so long as I shall remain a student of the College, I will comply with all of its rules and regulations in all particulars. In case I break any of the said rules and regulations I agree on my honor to report the same to the Dean at such time as may be fixed for such report. I further agree not to deface or injure, by writing or otherwise, any furniture, books, or other property, and, if I should accidentally do damage to any property of the College, I hereby agree to report it promptly to the Dean in order that I may be properly assessed and pay for the same.

[note]

The two Literary Societies, Zetesian and Epsilon Chi, are a strong educational and social factor in the college life. The members are required to present carefully prepared papers and to take part in the discussion of questions of general interest. The members realize that it requires tact, skill and unfailing courtesy to preside and take part in these meetings in a proper manner. The work of the Societies helps to cultivate these





characteristics, inspires confidence in their own abilities and fosters literary judgment. Each society gives one public program and reception during the year.

The College Magazine, the Pine and Thistle, is published quarterly by the Societies, and is helpful in the intellectual growth and training of the students.

[note]

The Library contains over four thousand volumes, chosen with reference to the various departments. It is being added to in a systematic way, and contributions of books will be appreciated.

[note]

A course of good lectures, concerts and readings is offered, and this provides, at small cost to the students, entertainment and instruction along the most approved lines. The concert-lecture fee is included in the regular expenses, and a season ticket is issued to each student upon arrival.

Parents are earnestly requested to co-operate with the authorities of the school in securing simplicity and appropriateness in the dress of the students.

[note]

Expensive and elaborate dressing will not be allowed. For all public occasions white dresses are worn, and no other evening dresses are needed. For general wear, any simple dress appropriate to the season may be worn.

Visits and visitors are subject to request of parents and guardians.

Parents are requested not to give general permissions, as they will not be received.

Permissions conflicting with the regulations of the institution will not be granted.

Visitors are not admitted to the private apartments of students unless by special permission. Calls are not allowed to interfere with College duties. Visitors are not allowed in the dining room without permission of the Dean.

Visitors will be received in the College parlors, and not during study hours.

NO VISITORS RECEIVED ON THE SABBATH.





Each room will be allowed one electric light bulb each half year. Extra ones must be paid for by occupants of room.

Pupils are required to care for their own rooms and to keep them neat and open for inspection.

A student desiring a room alone may secure same by paying 50% additional above regular College rates.

All laundry work will be done by the steam laundry of the College, each person being allowed eighteen pieces. All over this number are charged for at regular laundry rates. For sanitary reasons, all laundry must be done in the College laundry.

Parents need not infer that their daughters are seriously ill when sent to the Infirmary, as they are required to remain there when not well enough to attend classes. In any case of serious illness the parents will be promptly notified.

If the service of a special nurse is required the student will pay for this nurse.

No student is permitted to spend the night out of the College building except in company of parents.

ADMISSION OF STUDENTS

All correspondence in reference to admission of students should be addressed to the Flora Macdonald College.

All applications must be made upon blanks furnished for the purpose.

Certificates of honorable dismissal from the last school attended must be presented.

Each student must be provided with an umbrella, a pair of overshoes and a raincoat.

All baggage must be plainly marked with the owner's name.

Each teacher and pupil must provide her own towels, napkins, sheets, blankets, pillow cases, counterpanes suitable for single bed, one teaspoon and tumbler for use in her room.

Parents are requested to have their daughter's eyes examined before sending her to school. This is important, and much valuable time may be saved by so doing.

Dentistry and dressmaking must be attended to before leaving home.





All students are required to furnish evidence of vaccination whose potency includes the year of matriculation.

Students who are not pursuing a regular course in the College or Conservatory will be required to take at least fifteen hours of work per week.

Students pursuing the regular A. B. Course, and desiring to elect music, will not be allowed to take more than one hour practice per day, and will not be required to do concert work.

A registration fee of $5 must accompany each application. One-half of this amount will be credited on expenses for the first term, the other half on the second term, but the amount will not be refunded if the student fails to matriculate.





ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS, DEGREES
AND CERTIFICATES

Flora Macdonald College offers five courses of instruction leading to degrees.

Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Literature, Bachelor of Science, and Bachelor of Science Home Economics in the School of Liberal Arts.

Bachelor of Music in the School of Fine Arts.

The required courses for graduation are in the Liberal Arts and have been so arranged as to give the students a broad and well-balanced education. The elective courses provide an opportunity for the student to acquire both the science and practice of the Fine Arts, so necessary to a cultured and well-rounded womanhood.

The list of subjects accepted for entrance and their value in units is as follows:

English3
History4
Mathematics2.5
Latin4
French2
Spanish2
Botany.5
Zoology.5
Chemistry1
Physics1
Civics.5
Physiography.5
Physiology.5
Bible1
Sunday School Pedagogy.5
Foods and Cookery1
Clothing and Textiles1

While any of the foregoing subjects may be presented for entrance to the College, a candidate who desires to pursue any one of the regular courses leading to a degree must make her selection from this list of accepted subjects accord with the courses to be pursued after entrance. Thus a candidate for





admission to the Freshman Class must present 14 units as follows:

Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Literature Courses

Required, 11.5 units.Elective, 2.5 units.
English3Latin1
Latin3French1
Mathematics2.5Spanish1
French or Spanish1Science1
History1History1
Science1Civics.5
Bible1
Clothing and Textiles1
Foods and Cookery1

Bachelor of Science Course

Required, 10.5 units.Elective, 3.5 units.
English3Latin3
Modern Language1Modern Language1
Mathematics2.5Science2
Science1History1
History3Bible1
Civics.5
Clothing and Textiles1
Foods and Cookery1

We quote the following from the catalogue of the University of North Carolina:

“It will be noticed that each subject has a valuation by units. A unit means a definite amount of a subject satisfactorily completed in a reasonable length of time. For example: one unit in History means the satisfactory completion of a standard text-book in English or United States History in a period of study continuing through an entire High School session; one-half unit in Solid Geometry means the completion of the four books of Solid Geometry in about one-half a session; the fourteen units mentioned below correspond to the four years of work in a good High School.”





CONDITIONED STUDENTS

In the A. B., B. L. and B. S. Courses a candidate is allowed two conditions valued one unit each, provided these two conditions be made up by the beginning of the Junior year.

These conditional units may be selected either from the required or elective group.

CONSERVATORY STUDENTS

Students may enter the Conservatory of Music with little or no preparation, but candidates for the Freshman Class who desire the Bachelor of Music Course must present 12 units of literary work.

Required, 7.5 units.Elective, 4.5 units.
English3Mathematics1
Mathematics1.5French2
Science1Spanish2
History2Latin3
History2
Science2
Civics.5
Clothing and Textiles1
Foods and Cookery1
Bible1

ACCREDITED SCHOOLS

The College will accept certificates of work done from preparatory and high schools accepted by the North Carolina State Normal and Industrial College or from such schools in other States as are accredited by the University of that State. All certificate students, however, are admitted on probation. Those whose work proves unsatisfactory within the first month will be advised to take the next lower course.

Students desiring admission to the Freshman class must send a record of their High School work filled out by the principal or some member of the faculty of their High School. Blanks for this purpose will be furnished by Flora Macdonald College, and must be returned to the College by the Principal or member of the faculty and not by the pupil applying for admission.









COLLEGE ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS IN DETAIL
English
(3 UNITS)

The requirement in English is based on that recommended by the National Conference on Uniform Entrance Requirements in English for 1920-1922.

Grammar, Rhetoric, and Composition, 1½ units.

Literature, 1½ units.

The study of English in school has two main objects, which should be considered of equal importance: (1) command of correct and clear English, spoken and written; (2) ability to read with accuracy, intelligence, and appreciation, and the development of the habit of reading good literature with enjoyment.

Grammar and Composition

The first object requires instruction in grammar and composition. English grammar should ordinarily be reviewed in the secondary school; and correct spelling and grammatical accuracy should be rigorously exacted in connection with all written work during the four years. The principles of English composition governing punctuation, the use of words, sentences, and paragraphs, should be thoroughly mastered; and practice in composition, oral as well as written, should extend throughout the secondary school period. Written exercises may well comprise letter-writing, narration, description, and easy exposition and argument. It is advisable that subjects for this work be taken from the student's personal experience, general knowledge, and studies other than English, as well as from his reading in literature. Finally, special instruction in language and composition should be accompanied by concerted effort of teachers in all branches to cultivate in the student the habit of using good English in his recitations and various exercises, whether oral or written.

Literature

The second object is sought by means of the reading and study of a number of books from which may be framed a





progressive course in literature. The student should be trained in reading aloud and should be encouraged to commit to memory notable passages both in verse and in prose. As an aid to literary appreciation, he is further advised to acquaint himself with the most important facts in the lives of the authors whose works he reads and with their place in literary history. He should read the books carefully, but his attention should not be so fixed upon details that he fails to appreciate the main purpose and charm of what he reads.

A few of these books should be read with special care, greater stress being laid upon form and style, the exact meaning of words and phrases, and the understanding of allusions.

Thorough study in class of at least five works of standard literature of different types. Thoughtful reading of at least ten others.

For the convenience of pupils preparing for admission, the following list from which selections may be made is recommended, but equivalents will be accepted. Because American literature is studied in the Freshman class, few American writings are included in this list.

A. FOR STUDY
(Select Five)

GROUP I—Drama

Julius Cæsar. Macbeth. Hamlet.

GROUP II—Poetry

Tennyson's Idylls of the King (Three or four). Milton's L'Allegro, Il Penseroso, Comus. Scott's Marmion. Selections from Wordsworth, Keats, and Shelley in Book IV of Palgrave's Golden Treasury. Selections from Dryden, Collins, Gray, Cowper, and Burns in Books II and III of Palgrave's Golden Treasury.

GROUP III—Fiction

Scott's Ivanhoe. George Eliot's Silas Marner. Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress. Cooper's Novels: any one. Collection of short stories by various standard writers.

GROUP IV—Essays

Macaulay: any one. Lowell: any one. Emerson: any one. Ruskin's Sesame and Lilies. Carlyle's Essay on Burns. Selections from the Sir Roger de Coverley Papers. Selections from Irving's Sketch Book.

GROUP V—Oratory

Washington's Farewell Address. Webster's First Bunker Hill Oration. Lincoln's Gettysburg Speech, Address at Cooper Union, Inaugurals. Selections from any collection of present-day addresses on public questions.





B. FOR READING AND PRACTICE
(Select Ten)

GROUP I—Drama

As You Like It. Romeo and Juliet. The Merchant of Venice. Midsummer Night's Dream. Twelfth Night. The Tempest.

GROUP II—Poetry

Macaulay's Lays of Ancient Rome. Scott's Lady of the Lake. Coleridge's Ancient Mariner. Arnold's Sohrab and Rustum. Collection of English and Scottish Popular Ballads.

GROUP III—Fiction

Scott's Novels: any one. George Eliot's Mill on the Floss. Dickens's Novels: any one. Kingsley's Westward Ho. Defoe's Robinson Crusoe. Blackmore's Lorna Doone. Stevenson's Treasure Island. Collection of Short Stories. The Odyssey in English translation, with the exception, if desired, of Books I, II, III, IV, V, XV, XVI, XVIII. The Iliad in English translation, with the omission, if desired, of Books XI, XIII, XIV, XV, XVII, XXI. The Æneid in English translation.

GROUP IV—Essays, Biographies, Etc.

Selections from Lamb's Essays of Elia. Stevenson's Inland Voyage and Travels with a Donkey. Parkman's Oregon Trail. Wade's Light Bringers and Wonder Workers. Life of Alice Freeman Palmer. Franklin's Autobiography.

Latin
(3 UNITS)

The minimum requirement for unconditional admission to the A. B. or B. L. Course is three units, A, B and C outlined below. Students are urged, however, to offer if possible three and a half or four units.

A. Latin Grammar (1 unit).—Any good First Year Book entirely completed and reviewed.

B. Cæsar (1 unit).—Gallic War I-IV or full equivalent. Grammar and Latin composition.

C. Cicero (1 unit).—Seven orations, or six if the Manilian Law be one. Grammar and Latin composition.

Grammar and Composition. Those who receive credit for B and C should have a thorough knowledge of all regular inflections, all common irregular forms, and the ordinary syntax and vocabulary of the prose authors read, with ability to use this knowledge in writing simple Latin prose. To secure this ability, one period a week throughout each year should be devoted to prose.

*D. Vergil (1 unit).—Æneid, Book I required for entrance; Books II-VI, elective for entrance. Prosody, mythology and Latin prose composition.

NOTE—Candidates for the B. L. degree, entering with four units of Latin, even from accredited schools, are required to continue Latin one year in college, or to pass an examination on the fourth entrance unit (D).

To students applying for advanced standing, no credit can be given in Latin unless it is continued in College, or an examination is passed covering the last Latin read and the entrance requirement in Latin prose composition.

[note]



Spanish
(2 UNITS)

A. (1 unit.) A thorough knowledge of rudiments of an elementary Spanish grammar. Careful drill in pronunciation and practice in conversation. Reading from 100 to 150 pages.

B. (1 unit.) Continued drill upon rudiments of grammar. Regular and irregular verbs. Simple prose composition. Reading from 150 to 200 pages.

French
(2 UNITS

A. (1 unit.) Rudiments of Grammar. Memorizing of songs. Ability to pronounce correctly, to understand, speak, and write simple French.

B. (1 unit.) Grammar. Study of present, perfect and future of regular and irregular verbs, particular stress being laid on the rules governing the past participle. Dialogues and other selections memorized. Writing of letters and compositions begun. Reading. Dictation.

French is the language of the class room.

Mathematics
(2½ UNITS)

A. Algebra (1½ units). The whole of any standard high school algebra.

At least two years should be given to the study of Algebra with recitations four or five times a week and periods forty minutes in length or more.

B. Plane Geometry (1 unit.) This subject includes five books of Plane Geometry, as presented in any good text-book. Numerous numerical and original exercises are required.

Plane Geometry should be given one year, with recitations at least four times a week and periods forty minutes or more in length.

History
(1 UNIT)

Students must offer one unit for admission to the A. B. Course. They are urged to offer, if possible, two units.

A. Ancient History (1 unit).

B. Mediæval and Modern History (1 unit).

C. English History (1 unit).

D. American History (1 unit).

E. Civics (½ unit).

Work based on any standard text-book is accepted. Every student is urged to offer Ancient History and either English or American History.

Science
(1 UNIT)

A. Botany (½ unit). A course such as is contained in any standard book as Berger's or Bailey's Botany; laboratory work.

B. Zoology (½ unit). A course such as is contained in Colton's or Herrick's text.





C. Physiology (½ unit). A course such as is contained in Ritchie's, Coleman's or other recent text.

D. Physical Geography (½ unit). A course such as is contained in Davis's or Tarr's Physical Geography.

E. Chemistry (1 unit.) A course such as is contained in any standard text-book, such as Williams's or Newell's; laboratory work.

F. Physics (1 unit). A course such as is contained in Millikan and Gale's Physics or Chute's High School Physics; laboratory work such as is outlined in Millikan and Gale's Physics Laboratory Manual.

Bible
(1 UNIT)

History of God's chosen people, as given in the Old Testament. The pupil must indicate an accurate knowledge of events in chronological order. The same accuracy in knowledge of the lives of Christ and St. Paul must be indicated.

Sunday School Pedagogy
(½ UNIT)

Courses which are offered in Sunday schools of evangelical churches. The instructor's certificate must be given, also name of text-book used.





THE COLLEGE

We submit for consideration the course of study. You will find it broad, practical, and complete. By State charter we have the right to confer such literary and honorary degrees and diplomas as are usually granted or conferred by colleges or seminaries in the United States. That the work may be done thoroughly we have a large corps of teachers, each of whom has had successful experience in her special line of work.

COURSES LEADING TO DEGREES
Course 1—Bachelor of Arts

FRESHMAN
RequiredElective (two periods permitted)
3—Latin2—Music
3—English1—Theory
3—Geometry and Algebra2—Expression
2—Bible3—Foods and Cookery
1—Civics2—Clothing and Textiles
3—Modern Language2—Physiology
2—History

SOPHOMORE
RequiredElective (three periods permitted)
3—Latin2—Music
3—English1—Theory
3—Modern Language2—Expression
2—Biology3—Clothing and Textiles
2—Bible3—Foods and Cookery
3—Mathematics2—History

JUNIOR
RequiredElective (three periods required)
3—English2—Music
3—History1—Harmony
2—Chemistry2—Expression
2—Latin2—Analytical Geometry
2—Bible3—Foods and Cookery
3—Clothing and Textiles
2—Modern Language
3—Mathematics
1—Drawing
1—Reading





SENIOR
RequiredElective (three periods required)
3—Physics2—Music
2—Psychology1—Harmony
3—History1—Musical History
2—Sociology2—Expression
2—Pedagogy3—Foods and Cookery
3—Clothing and Textiles
2—Latin
2—Modern Language
2—English
2—Bible
1—History of Art
2—Household Chemistry

Course 2—Bachelor of Literature

FRESHMAN
RequiredElective (two periods permitted)
3—Latin2—Music
3—English1—Theory
3—Modern Language2—Expression
3—Geometry and Algebra2—Clothing and Textiles
2—Bible3—Foods and Cookery
1—Civics2—Physiology
2—History

SOPHOMORE
RequiredElective (three periods required)
3—English2—Music
3—Modern Language1—Theory
2—Biology2—Expression
2—History3—Foods and Cookery
2—Bible3—Clothing and Textiles
3—Latin
3—Mathematics

JUNIOR
RequiredElective (two periods required)
3—English2—Music
3—History1—Harmony
2—Chemistry2—Expression
3—Modern Language3—Clothing and Textiles
2—Bible3—Foods and Cookery
2—Latin
3—Mathematics
1—Drawing
1—Reading





SENIOR
RequiredElective (three periods required)
3—Physics2—Music
2—Psychology1—Harmony
3—History2—Expression
2—Pedagogy2—Sociology
2—Modern Language3—Clothing and Textiles
3—Foods and Cookery
2—English
1—Musical History
1—History of Art
2—Latin (Teachers’ Course)
3—Mathematics
2—Bible

Course 3—Bachelor of Science

FRESHMAN
RequiredElective (two to three periods permitted)
2—Bible
3—English3—Latin
3—Mathematics2—Music
3—Modern Language2—Expression
2—Biology (Physiology and Hygiene3—Foods and Cookery
2—Clothing and Textiles
2—History

SOPHOMORE
RequiredElective (two to three periods permitted)
2—Bible
3—English3—Latin
2—Mathematics2—Music
3—Modern Language2—Expression
2—General Chemistry2—Foods and Cookery
2—Agriculture2—Clothing and Textiles
2—Expression
2—History

JUNIOR
RequiredElective (two to three periods required)
2—Bible
2—Household Chemistry3—Modern Language
3—Mathematics2—Music
2—General Biology2—Expression
2—Sociology3—Clothing and Textiles
3—Foods and Cookery
3—Latin
3—English





SENIOR
RequiredElective (two to three periods required)
3—Physics
2—Astronomy2—Bible
2—Pedagogy2—Latin
3—History3—Modern Language
2—Psychology2—Expression
2—Music
3—Foods and Cookery
3—Clothing and Textiles
2—Rural Sociology
2—English
3—Mathematics

Bachelor of Science (Home Economics)

FRESHMAN
RequiredElective (three periods permitted)
3—English2—History
3—Modern Language2—Music
2—Bible2—Expression
3—Mathematics3—Latin
3—Foods and Cookery2—Physiology and Hygiene
2—Clothing and Textiles

SOPHOMORE
RequiredElective (three periods permitted)
3—English3—Mathematics
3—Modern Language2—Expression
2—Bible3—Latin
3—Foods and Cookery2—History
3—Clothing and Textiles2—Music
2—Chemistry2—Agriculture

JUNIOR
RequiredElective (three periods permitted)
2—Household Chemistry3—English
3—Clothing and Textiles3—Modern Language
3—Foods and Cookery3—Latin
3—English History2—Music
2—Biology2—Expression
2—Bible3—Mathematics
2—Sociology





SENIOR
RequiredElective (three periods permitted)
2—Physics of the Household3—English
2—Rural Sociology2—Modern Language
3—Foods and Cookery2—Latin
3—Clothing and Textiles2—Music
3—History2—Expression
2—Psychology2—Astronomy
2—Bible
3—Mathematics
2—Pedagogy





COURSES OF STUDIES IN DETAIL
ENGLISH
MRS. SANDERSON MISS STRONG

*Freshman—Three hours a week.

Primarily a course in composition, with supplementary work in literature.

A. Composition and Rhetoric. Study of the principles of rhetoric, with emphasis upon narration and exposition. Correction of common errors in speaking and writing. Themes, exercises, note books.

B. Literature. Selections for reading and study are taken from American prose and poetry, including magazines, but no attempt is made to give a course in American literature. Oral and written reports on assigned readings.

Sophomore—Three hours a week.

A. A general survey course in English Literature from Beowulf to the present time. Lectures, weekly reports, and note books.

Text-books: Century Readings in English Literature; Students Hand-book of the Facts of English Literature, Pyre, Dickenson, and Young.

B. Oral English Drill in formation of speech habits. Exercises in demonstration of the rhetorical principles of narration, description, exposition, and argumentation.

Text-book: Brewer's Oral English.

Junior—Three hours a week.

A. English Prose Fiction, including the novel and short story.

Text-books: A Manual of the Art of Fiction by Clayton Hamilton; The Development of the Novel by Cross.

A well selected course of English fiction is read and reported on in both oral and written discussions.

B. Advanced Composition.

Text-book: Hill's Rhetoric.

Senior—Two hours a week.

The study of Nineteenth Century poetry. Text-book: British Poets of the Nineteenth Century, Page; Lectures, Essays, and note books.

Collateral Reading in history of English literature, biography, and literary criticism.

LATIN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE
MISS MORRISON

Freshman—Three hours a week.

Vergil, Books II-VI; Prosody, translation at sight, mythology, prose composition.

[note]



Sophomore—Three hours a week.

Horace, Odes and selections from Epodes; selections from Catullus and Vergil's Eclogs; History of the Augustan Age; the Life and Personality of Horace; metres and literary style; prose composition.

Junior—Two hours a week, (A) or (B) required in A. B. Course.

(A) Livy, Book XXI entire, and Book XXII, chapters 41-53, inclusive; prose composition.

(B) Cicero's Letters (Abbott) as a basis for the study of Roman life and thought, and of the political conditions which attended the delivery of the Catilinarian Orations and those which gave rise to the appointment of Cæsar as governor of Gaul; prose composition.

Senior—Two hours a week.

(A) Tacitus, Agricola or Germania; Horace, selections from Satires and Epistles; “History of Latin Literature” (Mackail).

(B) Teachers’ Training Course—Theoretical consideration of Latin forms, the principles of syntax, origin and development of syntactical usages; practical exercises, from a pedagogical standpoint, in the study of Grammar, Composition, Cæsar, Cicero, and Vergil; discussion of problems connected with the teaching of Latin in secondary schools, books and other helps serviceable to teachers, methods of presentation, points for emphasis in elementary instructions, etc.; prose composition.

Two hours a week, open to Seniors and to others who are sufficiently well prepared. Students who are likely to teach Latin in secondary schools are urged to consult the teacher as to election of this course.

FRENCH
MISS ETTIE BROWN

Freshman—Three hours a week.

Conversation, exercises. Rapid increase in vocabulary. Grammar. Study of the present, past and future of regular and irregular verbs. Special stress being laid on rules regarding the use of the past participle. Dictation. Dialogues memorized. Writing of letters and compositions begun. Reading and translation.

Text-book: Second part of Berlitz's First Book.

Sophomore—Three hours a week.

Conversation, exercises. Grammar. Memorizing of common idioms and expressions of everyday life. Original composition. Places of historic interest in Paris carefully studied. Reading and translation.

Text-book: Second Berlitz Book.

Required Reading: Halevy's L'Abbe Constantin.

Junior—Two hours a week.

Reading, exercises, grammar. Study of all forms of verbs and their use. Study of the lives and selections from the writings of authors of the Nineteenth Century; Theuriet, Rostand, Daudet, Guy de Maupassant, Hugo, Musset, Dumas, etc. Outline of the History of France from the reign of Francis I to the present time.

Text-books: Second Berlitz Book, Litterature Francaise, Berlitz. Grammaire Pratique, Berlitz.

Required Reading: Hernani, Hugo; La Tulipe Noire, Dumas.

Senior—Two hours a week.

Review of Grammar. Study of the Eighteenth Century authors: Voltaire, Rousseau, Beaumarchais, etc. Study of authors of the Classic





Period: Corneille, Moliere, Racine, La Fontaine, Boileau; Pascal, etc. Memorizing of passages and quotations.

History of France.

Text-books: Litterature Française, Berlitz; Litterature Française, Petit de Julleville; Histoire de la Litterature Française, Demogeot; Histoire de France; Ducoudray Grammaire, Larive et Fleury.

Reading Required: Les Precieuses Ridicules, Moliere; Le Cid, Corneille; Athalie, Racine.

SPANISH
MRS. EWING

Freshman—Three hours a week. Grammar, composition, translation, sight reading, conversation.

Text-books: Marion y Des Garennes's Introduccion a la Lengua Castellana. Worman's First and Second Spanish books. R. Henry's Spanish Plays.

Sophomore—Three hours a week. Grammar, composition, translating, conversation, sight reading, letter writing.

Text-books: Devitis's Spanish Grammar, Part I. Devitis's Spanish Reader. Altamirano's La Navidad en las Montañas. Selected Plays.

Junior—Three hours a week. Advanced work in Grammar, composition, translation, conversation, sight reading, letter writing.

Text-books: Devitis's Spanish Grammar Part II. Isaacs's Maria, Alarcón's El Capitan Veneno, Selected Plays.

Senior—Two hours a week. More advanced work in Grammar, composition, translation, conversation. Special study of idioms. Study of Nineteenth Century literature.

Text-books: Coester Spanish Grammar, Umphey's Prose Composition. Becker and Mora's Spanish Idioms. Cervantes's Don Quixote (selection). Galdos's Dona Perfecta. Selected Plays.

HISTORY
MISS McLEAN MISS FAIN

Freshman—Two hours a week. This course includes a brief survey of the political and social conditions, the art and architecture of the more ancient nations, and a more careful study of Greek and Roman History. Especial attention is given to the Greek and Roman contributions to civilization in government, law, art, and literature. Training is given in historical geography, in note book work, and in the proper use of the library. Oral and written reports on assigned topics are required.

Text-books: First term, Morey's Outlines of Greek History; second term, Morey's Outlines of Roman History.

Sophomore—Two hours a week. European History from the Germanic Invasions to 1870. The course is designed to give the student a knowledge of the most important events and characteristic institutions of this period. Especial attention is given to the Empire of Charlemagne, Feudalism, the Organization and Power of the Church, the Struggle of the Popes and the Emperors, the Crusades, the Growth of the Towns, the Renaissance, the Reformation, and the French Revolution. Oral and written reports based on parallel reading are required.

Text-book: Robinson's History of Western Europe.





Junior—Three hours a week. English History. This course offers a survey of English History, with a careful study of the social political, and industrial history, and of the development of the English Constitution. Instruction is supplemented by parallel reading and written reports.

Text-book: Cross's History of England and Greater Britain.

Senior—Three hours a week.

First Term: A study of Europe in the Nineteenth Century. It is the purpose of this course to trace some of the leading movements of the century, as the Political Revolutions, the Growth of Nationality, and the Unification of Germany and of Italy.

Text-book: Hazen's Europe since 1815.

Second Term: United States History. A review of Colonial History. A special study of the Constitutional History of the United States. The development of our government is traced through the study of such topics as the Confederation, the Constitution, National Parties, States’ Rights and Secession.

SOCIOLOGY AND CIVIL GOVERNMENT
MISS FAIN

Freshman—One hour a week.

American Government—A brief introductory study of the origin, function and forms of government. Developments in American government are traced from the Colonial period through the framing and adoption of the Federal Constitution. A careful study is made of the organization and administration of the national, state, and local governments.

Senior or Junior—Two hours a week.

Sociology—First Term: An elementary study of the fundamental principles underlying society, and the development of social organization.

Second Term: A consideration from the sociological standpoint of such practical problems as immigration, poverty, its causes and prevention, charity organizations, the causes and punishment of crime, prison reform methods, and the prevention of crime.

Text-books: Gidding's Elements of Sociology. Ellwood's Sociology and Modern Social Problems.

Senior or Junior—Two hours a week.

Rural Sociology—A presentation of some of the vital and practical problems of country life, with especial emphasis upon social problems. The purpose is to give students a sympathetic attitude towards these problems, a keener appreciation of the possibilities of country life and a conception of the opportunities for the uplift of the community through such agencies as clubs, betterment associations, the schools and the school and community libraries.

Text-books: Gillette's Constructive Rural Sociology; Cubberley's Rural Life and Education.

MATHEMATICS
MISS McNEILL

Freshman—Three hours a week.

Solid Geometry. This course covers the usual theorems and exercises of good text-books, including the properties of straight lines and





planes, of dihedral and polyhedral angles, and the properties and measurements of polyhedrons, cylinders, cones and spheres.

Many numerical exercises and original propositions are required.

Text: Wells's New Solid Geometry.

Algebra: A review of the most important subjects of high school Algebra after Geometry is completed.

Sophomore—Three hours a week.

First Term: Advanced Algebra. This course includes mathematical induction, variation, progressions, complex numbers, theory of equations, logarithms, limits, infinite series, undetermined coefficients, permutations and combinations, probability and determinants.

Text: Rietz and Crathorne's College Algebra.

Second Term: Plane Trigonometry. This elementary course includes the study of the six trigonometric functions as ratios and lines, circular measurement of angles, most important formulæ and their proofs, the solution of right triangles by the use of both natural and logarithmic functions, solution of oblique triangles and practical applications.

Text: Wentworth and Smith's Plane Trigonometry.

Junior—Three hours a week.

Spherical Trigonometry. This course includes the topics covered in standard texts on the subject.

Text: Wentworth and Smith's Spherical Trigonometry.

Plane Analytic Geometry. This course includes the study of co-ordinate systems, loci and equations, the straight line, circle, parabola, ellipse, etc.

Text: Smith and Gale's Introduction to Analytic Geometry.

Senior—Three hours a week.

This course includes the study of functions, theory of limits, differentiation, maxima and minima, integration and applications.

Text: Granville's Elements of the Differential and Integral Calculus.

Arithmetic. A general review of the fundamental principles and processes of Arithmetic followed by business applications.

Text: Smith's Advanced Arithmetic.

NATURAL SCIENCE
MR. PACE MISS DABBS

Freshman—Physiology. Two hours a week throughout the year.

First Term: Anatomy and Physiology of the human body.

Second Term: Hygienic conditions of living and home sanitation are considered.

Text-book: Hough and Sedgwick's Human Mechanism.

Sophomore or Junior—General Biology. Three hours a week. The time is divided between laboratory work and recitations. A carefully prepared note-book is an important part of the work. The purpose of this course is not only to give the student a greater appreciation of all nature, but especially to stress the practical side of Biology. The following are few of the important points studied and discussed:

Relation of plant and animal life; relation of insects, protozoa, and bacteria to disease; private and public hygiene; importance of Biology in relation to man's progress, etc.

Text-book: Hunter's Essential of Biology; and Sharp's Laboratory Manual of Biology.





Biology fee, $2.00.

Agriculture. Two hours a week given to lectures and recitations, and two to laboratory work. The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with the general field of agriculture. It combines the descriptive and the experimental. It includes a consideration of working and the fertilizing of the soil; the planting of seeds; the cultivation of crops; the rotation of crops; descriptions of different varieties and breeds of domestic plants and animals; plant propagation and culture; combating insects, fungus, and weed enemies of the garden; corn judging; elementary stock judging; the home garden; elementary questions of farm economy; the location of barns, stock pens, etc. The work includes lectures, reading of references, observation and experiments in the laboratory and out-doors. Special attention is given to teachers. Making a collection for school use and outlining the teaching of agriculture under ordinary school conditions, receive careful consideration.

Text-book: To be selected.

Sophomore or Junior—General Chemistry. Two hours a week given to lectures and recitations, and two to laboratory work. A general course in theoretical and practical elementary college Chemistry. It aims to give the student an appreciation of the chemistry of daily life, and the wide application of this science in the commercial world. The essential features of the fundamental laws of chemical reactions are taught. This is not primarily to lay a foundation for an advance course in the subject, but rather to give as broad and general view of the science as possible. Note-books required.

Text-books: Alexander Smith's Elementary Chemistry. A Laboratory Outline of Elementary Chemistry, Alexander Smith.

Laboratory Fee, $5.00.

Junior—Household Chemistry. Two hours a week given to lectures and recitation, and two to laboratory work. This includes a study of such chemistry as finds application to every day life. The analysis of textiles, soils, plant food, water, milk, and food of all types; the testing of food preservation, paints and oils, and other topics of practical interest.

Note-books required.

Text-book: To be selected.

Laboratory Fee, $5.00.

Senior—General Physics: A general culture course, intended not only to meet the needs of those who desire to know the general principles of the subject, but also to afford a preparation for advanced work. The course includes text-book work, lectures and recitations, demonstrations and individual experiments. Each important principle is introduced by means of some well known experiment; it is then carefully explained, and larger applications are sought. Individual experimentation is required from the class, but the problem to be worked out is always a practical one. Note book required.

Text-book: Millikan and Gale. Laboratory Physics, Millikan, Gale and Bishop.

Laboratory Fee, $5.00.

Senior—Household Physics. The course reviews certain portions of the subject of Physics from the standpoint of the home. It is intended to acquaint the student with the physics involved in the common household appliances, and to enable her to use effectively the machines, the heating, ventilation, lighting, sanitary, and electric devices of the modern home. Note-books required.





Text-book: Lynd's Physics of the Household. Laboratory Course in Physics of the Household, Lynd.

Laboratory Fee, $5.00.

Senior—Astronomy. Two hours per week. A general course with occasional meetings at night for observation. Illustrated by globes, charts and lantern slides, cultural in character, and especial interest laid upon astrophysics.

Text-book: Young's Manual of Astronomy; Upton's Star Atlas.

PEDAGOGY
MRS. SANDERSON

Senior—Two hours a week.

A. Child Psychology: Text-book, Fundamentals of Child Study, by Kirkpatrick. Lectures, written and oral reports. First Term.

B. A study of the recitation and school administration: Text-book: A Brief Course in the Teaching Process, by Strayer. Contemporary educational theories and organization are discussed and the School Laws of the State are studied. Lesson plans for subjects in the curriculum of the elementary school and of the high school are submitted for class discussion and criticism. A thesis required on some phase of education selected by the student.

Collateral Reading: Prof. James's Talks to Teachers; Schools of Tomorrow, by John Dewey and Evelyn Dewey; Class-room Management, by Bagley; The Method of the Recitation, by McMurry; Method in Education, by Roark; Adolescence, by Stanley Hall; Education of the Central Nervous System, by Halleck; Readings in Monroe's Cyclopedia of Education; Froebel, Pestalozzi, Herbart, Rousseau, Montessori.

Reading of government educational bulletins on contemporary pedagogical theory and practice, and a survey of several educational periodicals. Second Term.

NOTE—A course in Education will be offered to students of 1922-23.

SCHOOL OF THE BIBLE
REV. H. M. DIXON

Freshman—Two hours a week.

A connected review of the history of the Jews. Special attention is given to Geography and attention to the Archaeology. The Ceremonial Institutions are carefully considered.

Text-books: The Bible; Preparing to Teach the Bible; Old Testament History, Blakeslee.

Sophomore—Two hours a week.

First Term: The New Testament; The Life of Christ from the standpoint of the purpose of His ministry and the means He took to accomplish it at different times.

Text-books: The Bible; Gospel History, Blakeslee.

Second Term: A study of the progress of Church History during the Apostolic days.

Text-books: The Bible; Gospel History, Blakeslee.

Junior—Two hours a week.

Study of the doctrines of the Bible, with a review of Christian Evidences.

Text-books: The Bible; Study of Doctrines, A. R. Shaw. Caldwell's New Testament Studies.

Senior—Two hours a week.

Exegetical study of selected portions of Old and New Testaments, Ezekial, Revelations. Some of the doctrinal epistles of New Testament.





PSYCHOLOGY AND ETHICS
MR. DIXON

First Term—Two hours a week. Required. The purpose of this course is to give a thorough knowledge of the phenomena of mental life, and to encourage students to interpret their own mental activities.

Text-book: Elements of Psychology. Davis.

Second Term—Two hours a week. Required.

Philosophy of the Will and Conscience. The true theory of morals, together with a study of ethical questions.

Text-book: Ethics, Davis.

EXPRESSION
MISS SAYLES

Two private lessons a week.

The first aim of the expression work is to develop a vital appreciation of literature, and the personal ability to awaken a similar appreciation in the minds of hearers.

In technique emphasis is placed upon voice work. Exercises are taken to strengthen and enrich the tone qualities of the speaking voice. Special drill is given for clear enunciation and pure English diction.

The pupil's repertoire is composed of selected readings from standard classics and modern writers. The fortnightly recitals furnish an opportunity for the advanced pupils to give readings. All members of the Expression Department are expected to take part in the May Day Festival and at least one play.

In addition to private lessons, there are reading classes and “A Story Tellers League,” for which no charge is made. These classes are especially recommended to all those who expect to teach.

PHYSICAL TRAINING
MISS STRIBLING

All students are required to take physical training, unless excused by a physician. A physical examination is made by the College physician and by specialist connected with the Cumberland General Hospital Fayetteville, N. C., with a view to correcting any physical weakness or defect.

Practical work. This course includes:

First, Gymnastic Tactics and Swedish Gymnastics, which are fundamentally corrective in aim, securing good postures, muscular control, etc.

Second, Rhythmic work, including Folk Dancing, and Free Hand Gymnastics.

Third, special emphasis is laid upon Athletics; team work is encouraged, and every afternoon the students must take part in some of the outdoor sports, viz.: tennis, basket-ball, baseball, volley-ball, and other organized games.

Match games and tournaments are held at the end of each season.

Fourth, a Normal course in gymnasium and playground work is given to the Juniors and Seniors, in which instruction is given in how to plan and conduct lessons, the latter part of the course being given to practice teaching.





HOME ECONOMICS FACULTY

REV. C. G. VARDELL

President

ANNA SPENCER DANIEL

Clothing and Textiles

NANCY E. PEARSON

Foods and Cookery

G. T. PACE

Household Chemistry

ELIZABETH DABBS

Biology and Physiology

OLGA WILLIAMS

Painting, Drawing, Household Decoration





DEPARTMENT OF HOME
ECONOMICS

The study of Home Economics includes those subjects which have a direct bearing on the life and administration of the home. The work of the department is arranged under two distinct heads, known as Foods and Cookery, Clothing and Textiles.

FOODS AND COOKERY
MISS PEARSON

I. Elementary Cookery—One hour theory and two hours laboratory.

General principles of Cookery and their application to the more common foods; the study of foods; production, manufacture, general composition and nutritive value.

II. Cookery—One hour theory, and two hours laboratory.

Study of Food Principles continued. Advanced cookery, including canning, jelly-making and the preparation of more elaborate dishes.

III. Advanced Cookery, Menu-making and Serving—One hour theory and two hours laboratory.

Menus are made and meals are cooked and served with special reference to simplicity in preparation, daintiness in serving and limited cost. In the serving of meals the student assumes at different times the duties of hostess, guest and waitress.

IV. Dietetics—One hour theory and two hours laboratory.

Aim is to present the fundamental principles of nutrition and their application in the feeding of individuals and families under various conditions.

Each student is required to wear plain, washable clothes in the laboratory.

Each student is required to have three white aprons.

Laboratory Fee for materials used, $3.75 per quarter in each course.

V. Household Chemistry—Two hours a week given to recitation and two to laboratory. About three months are spent in the study of fundamental ideas and principles as chemical changes; acid, bases, and salts; weight relations; chemical nomenclature. The remainder of the time is spent in the study of the Chemistry of Foods and Textiles and other topics of practical interest.

CLOTHING AND TEXTILES
MISS DANIEL

I. Hand Sewing—Fundamental principles of sewing applied to simple garments, household linen, and a dress. Elementary study of materials with a view to correct and economic use. Mending and darning.

A Laboratory Fee of $1.00 per year.





II. Garment Making—Hand and machine sewing. Making of a set of fine lingerie and several types of dress of cotton or linen. Care and use of sewing machines. Summer Hats.

A Laboratory Fee of $1.50 per year.

III. Dressmaking. Drafting—Draping and modeling on form in paper and crinoline. Dress trimming. Theory of color. Costume design. Suitability to type, age, occupation, income and position emphasized. Making of a wool and a silk dress. Spring Hats.

A Laboratory Fee of $2.00 per year.

IV. Advanced Dressmaking and Tailoring—This course includes a more advanced study of dressmaking than III. In the Fall a tailormade suit or long coat is made. Pockets, buttonholes and other tailormade finishes are considered. History of costume is studied for its practical aid in designing garments to suit the needs and modes of the day. Remodeling and renovating. Shop methods of work.

A Laboratory Fee of $2.00 per year.

V. Children's Clothes—The child's wardrobe is considered from appropriate hygienic and economic standpoints. Each student makes two or more garments for child under eight years of age.

VI. Study of the textile fibers from source to consumer. Identification of the cotton fabrics of commerce as to weave, cost, width and use. Looms; Weaving; Sweatshops; Consumers League; Hygiene and care of clothes; Removal of stains.

VII. A more thorough study of textiles than VI. Economic and commercial importance of cotton, linen, silk and wool. Other fibers of commerce. Simple tests such as can be made in the home to detect adulterations. Dyeing.

VIII. Home Decoration. Economic and Aesthetic buying of household textiles emphasized. Floor and table covering. Draperies. Appropriate coverings. Arrangement of furniture.

Assigned readings and class discussion form a part of the work of each week.

NOTE—A fee of $6.50 per quarter will be charged day pupils who do not take at least a partial literary course. All such pupils should register at the beginning of the session.





FACULTY OF
CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC

REV. C. G. VARDELL

President

CHARLES GILDERSLEEVE VARDELL

Dean

Piano, Organ, Ear Training, Conductor of Orchestra

MRS. LINDA L. VARDELL

Piano, Piano Pedagogy

MISS MARGARET E. MCNEILL

Co-Director, Piano, Harmony

MISS MAY MEADOWS

Piano, Theory

MISS MARY FORMAN

Voice Culture, Choral Director

MRS. C. W. EWING

Piano, Musical History

MISS JANE DICKSON VARDELL

Violin, Piano

MISS MARY MCEACHERN

Piano

MISS MAMIE E. BITNER

Piano

MISS JESSIE WOMBLE

Registrar and Supervisor of Music Study Hour





THE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC

The Conservatory of Music offers instruction in Piano, Pipe Organ, Violin, ’Cello, Viola, all of which instruments are in the Orchestra; Voice Culture, Sight Singing; Theory, including Harmony, Counterpoint, History of Music, Ear Training, Musical Form, and Appreciation; Ensemble Playing, and Choral work.

The courses in this department are broad and thorough, and are carried through the highest grades. They are designed to cultivate an intelligent appreciation of the art of Music in its various forms, to widen acquaintance with its literature and to develop the powers of execution and interpretation.

Students’ and teachers’ recitals, vocal and instrumental, and lecture recitals, by both resident artists and those from abroad, are of frequent occurence during the term, and afford a culture and breadth to be acquired only by hearing the best in the various departments of Music. A lecture and concert course is thus maintained at a nominal cost to the students, and all are required to attend.

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS

Students may enter the Conservatory of Music with little or no preparation, but candidates for the Freshman Class who desire the Bachelor of Music Course or candidates for Certificates in Music must present 12 units of literary work.

Required, 7.5 units.Elective, 4.5 units.
English3French2
Mathematics1.5Spanish2
Science1Latin2
History1History2
Latin1Science1
FrenchCivics.5
SpanishClothing and Textiles1
Foods and Cookery1
Bible1





The aim of this Institution is the symmetrical development of its students. We therefore offer the pupils of the Conservatory an opportunity to pursue courses in the College.

These courses are open to all students, but candidates for a Certificate in Music must complete the literary and theoretical work through the Sophomore year, and candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Music must complete the full four years as follows:

Literary and Theoretical Courses Required for Certificate of
Graduation in the Conservatory of Music

FRESHMAN
3—English2—Bible
1—Theory, 2nd Year2—Physiology
3—Modern Language

SOPHOMORE
3—English3—Modern Language
2—Harmony, 1st Year2—Bible

JUNIOR
3—English3—Modern Language
2—Harmony, 2nd Year2—Bible
1—Ear Training, 1st Year

SENIOR
2—English3—Modern Language
1—Musical History2—Bible (Elective)
2—Psychology
1—Ear Training, 2nd Year

CONCERTS AND RECITALS

There is a course of Afternoon Fortnightly (sometimes weekly) Recitals, at which all pupils in the Conservatory are expected to play.

The Quarterly Concerts are given on Monday evenings. Only those in and above the Freshman year are required to do solo work, but the grades are often represented in ensemble work.

The Graduates’ Recitals are given during the spring term, and all pupils working for certificates or diplomas in any of the departments are required to give a recital, presenting works by the standard composers, both classic and modern.

The Conservatory Faculty gives a series of recitals, in which all the lines of practical work are represented. All music pupils are required to attend these and all other concerts.





PIANOFORTE

MR. VARDELL

MRS. VARDELL

MISS McNEILL

MISS MEADOWS

MISS VARDELL

MISS McEACHERN

MISS BITNER

MRS. EWING

In this course an easy and natural position of the hand is taught. A thorough course of technique is insisted upon.

Grade First—(a) Preliminary Studies, Mrs. Crosby Adams; a correct position of the hand, independent finger action, and a perfect legato touch. (b) Mrs. Crosby Adams, Graded Studies, Book I; Kullak's Five Finger Exercises; Scales in simple forms.

Grade Second—(a) Adams, Graded Studies, Book II; Bertini's Etudes, op. 100; (b) Loeschorn's Etudes, op. 65; Dennee's Progressive Technique, Scales and Arpeggios; Williams’ Wrist Studies.

Grade Third—(a) Bertini's Etudes, op. 29; Preparatory Octaves. (b) Bach's Little Preludes; Berens’ Etudes, op. 61, Book I; Sontinas by Clementi, Kuhlau, and others; Scales and Arpeggios.

Grade Fourth—(a) Heller's Studies, op. 46; Scales and Arpeggios in all forms; Bach's Little Preludes and Inventions; Selections from Mendelssohn's Songs Without Words. (b) Döring, Octave Studies; Studies by Hasert, Le Couppey, the easier Sonatas of Mozart, Haydn, and First Year Theory.

NOTE—These grades each represent a year's work, at the very least. All are advised to “hasten slowly,” and to remember the advice of Shakespeare: “To climb steep hills requires slow pace at first.”

Freshman Year—Selections from Czerny's Etudes, op. 299, and Cramer's Fifty Progressive Studies; Accented Scales and Arpeggios in all forms; Turner's Ten Octave Studies; Bach's Two Part Inventions, Musical History, or one branch of the Theoretical Course.

Sophomore Year—Cramer Studies continued, and Kullak's Octave Studies; Czerny's Art Finger Dexterity, op. 740; Sonatas by Beethoven, Mozart, etc. First Year Harmony.

Junior Year—Clementi's Gradus ad Parnassum; Bach's Three Part Inventions; Arpeggios, Double Thirds, and Kullak's Octave Studies continued; Larger Sonatas by classical writers; Lectures on Music Pedagogy. Second Year Harmony. First Year Ear Training.

*Senior Year—Moscheles's Studies, op. 70, Part II; Tausig's Daily Studies; Selections from Chopin's Etudes and Bach's Well Tempered Clavichord; difficult work from both Classic and Romantic Schools. Advanced Octave and Wrist Technique, and Theory. Practice teaching required. Second Year Ear Training.

Postgraduate—Bach's Well Tempered Clavichord continued; Henselt's Etudes Characteristiques; Etudes by Liszt, Rubinstein, Schumann, and Chopin; Concertos by Beethoven, Rubinstein, and other classic and modern writers. Musical form and counterpoint.

[note]



VOICE CULTURE
MISS FORMAN

Freshman—Lessons in Breathing and Production of Tone; Randegger's Exercises; Concone Studies; Lamperti Daily Exercises. Simple English Songs and Ballads. Songs of Franz Schubert, Schumann, Abt, Nava, MacDowell, and other modern composers. Sacred Music, Musical History. First Year Theory.

Sophomore—Study of Major and Minor Scales; Studies in Staccato and Accentuation. More difficult studies of Lütgen, Concone, Marchesi, and Vaccai. English and Italian Songs. More difficult selections of Church Music. First Year Harmony.

Junior—Exercises in Syncopated Notes, Triplets, Arpeggi, Volate, and Scales. Trill Studies with major and minor seconds. Spicker, Bordogni, Marzo, More difficult French and German Songs of Classic Writers; Grieg, Jensen, Lassen, Franz, Ries, Brahms, Rubinstein; Arias and Cavatinas from French, Italian, and German Operas. Second Year Harmony. First Year Ear Training.

Senior—Selected studies. Continuation of the study of classic writers. Operas of the various schools, Study of Oratorio. Advanced Theory. Second Year Ear Training.

VIOLIN
MISS VARDELL

Applicants for diploma in Violin must, as in other branches, present two parallel courses, viz.: a special course for technique and repertoire, and a general course in Harmony, Theory, Ensemble work, Pianoforte (secondary course), and the required literary course. All students are required to join the Ensemble Classes, and a nominal fee is charged to pay for the music, which will be retained in the Conservatory library and used from year to year.

Grade I—Hermann, op. 20; Hofmann, op. 25, Book I; Scales and Intervals; Pleyel duos, op. 8; Pieces by Bloch, Klassert, Hermann, Dancla, etc.

Grade II—Kayser, op. 20, Book I; Hermann, op. 25, Book II; Scales and Arpeggios; Pleyel duos, op. 24; Pieces by Dancla, Eichhorn, Huber, Hofmann, Hauser, Klassert, Reinecke.

Grade III—Kayser, op. 20, Book II; Dont, op. 37; Hermann, op. 20, Book II; Ries, op 28; Scales and Arpeggios; Sevcik, op. 7; Trill Studies; Mazas, op 86; Boccherini, Menuett; Brahms, Cradle Song; Donizetti, Sextet from “Lucia”; Gounod, Berceuse; Dancla, op. 86; Hauser, Cradle Song; Pierne, Serenade; Saint-Saens, The Swan.

Grade IV—Kayser, op. 20, Book III; Alard, op. 16; Dont, op. 38; Sitt, op. 32; Hofmann, op. 51; Scales and Arpeggios; Thirds, Sixths; d'Ambrosio, Little Song; Becker, Gavotte; Gossec, Gavotte; Beethoven, Minuett; Pieces by Drdla, Handel, Godard, Ries, Simonetti, Moffat, etc.





Freshman—Kreutzer, 42 Caprices; Kayser, op. 67; Mazas, op. 36, Book II; Double Trills, Scales and Arpeggios; Sevcik, op. 8; Solos by Bach, Brahms, C. Cui, Drdla, Keller-Bela, Gounod, Mendelssohn, Grieg, Saint-Saens, Wilhelmj, Thome, etc. First Year Theory.

Sophomore—Kreutzer 42 Caprices; Dont, op. 54; Spohr, Twelve Etudes; Scales and Arpeggios; Double notes, etc.; Sevcik, op. 7 and 8; Solos by Gartiné, Bach, Beethoven, Brahms, Vieuxtemps, Hubay, Ries, Hauser, Drdla, d'Ambrosio. Second Year Theory.

Junior—Rode, 24 Caprices; Fiorillo, 36 Studies; Bowing Technic, Sevcik, op. 2; Harmonics; Sevcik, op. 1, Technic; Sonatas by Handel, Haydn, Mozart; Selected Solos for Repertoire. First Year Harmony. History of Music. Lectures on Music Pedagogy. First Year Ear Training.

Senior—Rode Caprices; Sauret, op. 36, Book IV; Sevcik, op. 1; Scales and Arpeggios in harmonics and double notes; Selections from Bach's Sonatas for Violin alone; Concertos by Viotti, Mozart, Mendelssohn, Vieuxtemps, Bruch; Concert Solos by Bach, Brahms, Wieniawski, Vieuxtemps, Hubay, Kreisler, Sarasate; Sonatas by Beethoven, Grieg, Cesar Franck, etc. Second Year Harmony. Second Year Ear Training.

ORGAN
MR. VARDELL

In order to rank as Freshman in Organ, the pupil must have completed the second grade in Piano. The study of the Organ may, however, be taken up before that time. The history and construction of the organ are taught, and the entire Theoretical Course is required for graduation.

Freshman Year—Stainer's The Organ; Rinck's Organ School. Nilson Pedal Studies. Elements of organ playing, touch, etc. Study of organ registers, chorals, easy preludes and trios are given for the cultivation of independence in manual and pedal. Hymn playing. Theory and Musical History.

Sophomore Year—Rinck's Organ School, continued. Nilson Pedal Studies. Major and minor scales (pedals); Bach's Little Preludes and Fugues; Mendelssohn's Preludes and Fugues; solo compositions of moderate difficulty of the classic and modern school. First Year Harmony.

Junior Year—Buck's Studies in Pedal Phrasing; Sonatas from Mendelssohn, Rheinberger, and the larger works of Bach, Guilmant, and others. Second Year Harmony. First Year Ear Training.

Senior Year—Continued study of the classics. Accompaniments of sacred songs and oratorio. Advanced Theory. Second Year Ear Training.

The technical demands of modern organ playing, steadiness and smoothness of style, together with taste in registration, are the objective aims throughout this course. Pupils have an opportunity of playing for chapel service, thus obtaining valuable experience.





THEORETICAL COURSE
MISS McNEILL MISS MEADOWS MRS. EWING

This course comprises Music Primer, Theory of Music, History of Music, Harmony, Musical Form, and Counterpoint. All music pupils are urged to take this course, a thorough knowledge of theory being essential to an intelligent understanding of practical music work. The full course is required of each applicant for a diploma in Piano, Violin, Voice, or Organ.

The text-books in use are Gibbon's Catechism of Music, Elson's Theory of Music, Essentials in Music, History of Music, by Smith, and in Harmony and Musical Form, Heacox and Lehmann, Richter, Elson, and Matthews are used.

EAR TRAINING
MR. VARDELL

In addition to the theoretical course, a course in Ear Training is offered, which covers a period of two years. The full course is required of all candidates for Diploma in Music. One year is required of all candidates for Certificate in Music.

First Year—Melodic dictation, intervals, simple rhythms, sight singing. Harmonic dictation, the recognition of the fundamental chord relations by the ear.

Second Year—Advanced melodic dictation, more difficult work in intervals and rhythms, sight singing. Harmonic dictation, the recognition of chromatically altered harmonies, modulation.

MUSIC PEDAGOGY
MRS. VARDELL

It is the policy of our Conservatory to develop, not only brilliant players and well-rounded musicians, but also that they shall be capable teachers.

Theoretical knowledge with practical experience is the object of our Normal Course.

Normal students must be, at least, members of the Junior Grades and have satisfactorily finished the necessary theoretical work required before these grades. The pupils must attend a course of lectures on Music Pedagogy and related subjects,





taking notes and passing examinations on the same. Also, a class is held, when the work for the following week is planned and the results of last week's work discussed. Essays on subjects directly connected with the work are to be read and commented on.

Not less than two hours per week should be given to this work in the Senior year.

Normal students will attend some of the teacher's classes, take notes and report on this. They must also help in the actual teaching of the department in which they are working. This will be assigned and arranged by the instructor. An instructor will assist by occasionally hearing the lessons given, making suggestions and giving criticisms as needed.

Lectures on such subjects as the following:

First lessons and what they should include.

Finger technique and a pure legato.

Notation.

Rhythm and how to teach it.

Teaching material in the lower grades.

Wrist technique and octave preparation.

Scale building.

Arpeggios, the when and how, etc.

Special children's work.

The adult beginner.

How to teach the use of the pedal.

CHORAL ASSOCIATION

This course is open without extra cost to all College and Conservatory students, who pass a merely nominal examination. The best works are studied and rendered at the various concerts, and a familiarity with such music is calculated to develop and broaden the taste. It is particularly helpful to those who expect to teach. The equivalent of two lesson periods per week is devoted to this very essential branch of musical instruction. Sacred, as well as secular songs and cantatas, or parts of cantatas, are studied.

In connection with the choral work, there will be a Glee Club, in which folk songs and other popular selections will be





rendered, with a small orchestra of the lighter instruments. This organization as well as the Choral Association will be under the care of and trained by one of the voice instructors.

COLLEGE ORCHESTRA

An effective Orchestra has gradually been developed, consistings of violins, viola, violoncello, bass violin, harp, cornets, triangle, trombone, cymbals, drums, piano and organ.

Under the leadership of the instructor of the “strings,” some first-class ensemble music is given, and the organization even renders very creditably some of the most classical numbers.

Thus, the audiences have the privilege of hearing many of the best known of the Symphonic and Operatic selections.

Orchestra Fee, $1.00 per year.

POSTGRADUATE COURSE

As in the ascent of a mountain, the higher one goes the more the view broadens, so in music, the more one learns the more one realizes the broad fields of knowledge unattained. To meet this need we have designed a Postgraduate Course for those who have completed the work required for graduation in Piano. The students completing this course, together with the study of Counterpoint, advanced work in Musical Form and Interpretation, with two years’ practical work in teaching, will receive the degree of Master of Music. This usually requires two years.

CERTIFICATES AND DIPLOMAS

A Certificate of Proficiency will be given to any student completing the Senior year in Piano, Voice, Organ or Violin, with one year each of Theory, Harmony, History of Music, and Ear Training, together with the Freshman and Sophomore years of the literary course for music pupils.

For Certificates in Voice or Violin, one grade in Piano; for Certificate in Organ, two grades in Piano.

A diploma, with the degree of Bachelor of Music, will be given to any student completing the Senior year in Piano,





Voice, Organ or Violin, with the Theoretical Course, Comprising two years each of Theory, Harmony, and Ear Training; one year each in History of Music and Musical Form, and the Course in Musical Pedagogy, together with the four years’ literary course for Music pupils.

Students in Voice, Violin or Organ must have completed two grades in Piano in order to receive a diploma.

An essay on some musical or allied subject must be presented by each applicant for a diploma.





EXPENSES PER TERM OR HALF YEAR
FOR BOARDING PUPILS

Board, including heat and light$ 97.00
Tuition, including all studies in the Course, Physical Culture and use of the Reading Room35.00
Laundry by the College Laundry8.00
Medical Fee3.00
Contingent Fee3.00
Concert and Lecture Fee2.00
Library Fee (to be paid in entrance)2.00
Total expenses for half school year$150.00

Diploma Fee, $4.00; Certificate Fee, $2.50.

FOR DAY PUPILS

Tuition$35.00

SCHOOL OF MUSIC

Piano, under Director$ 40.00
Piano, under Co-Director33.00
Piano, under Associates30.00
Voice Lessons30.00
Violin Lessons30.00
Pipe Organ, under Director40.00
Use of Pipe Organ one hour daily11.00
Use of Piano one hour daily3.50
Each additional hour3.50
Lessons in Harmony or Theory in classes7.50
Private Lessons in Harmony and Theory30.00
History of Music7.50
Music Pedagogy7.50
Ear Training7.50

SCHOOL OF EXPRESSION

Class Expression$ 15.00
Private Lessons in Expression30.00

Ministers’ daughters are allowed tuition in the literary department. This amounts to $70.00 per year.

Two terms, ending January and May, constitute the college year.

No pupil will be received for less than the entire year, except by special arrangement. The matriculation of any student will be considered as a contract on the part of parents or guardians (who will be held responsible for the payment of all bills) for the entire year.

For the convenience of payment, the year has been divided into four quarters, beginning September 14th, November 16th, January 18th and March 22nd. All bills are rendered quarterly





and must be paid on or before the first day of each quarter. First Quarter dues must be paid upon registration of student.

Accounts unsettled within thirty days after they are due will be subject to an additional charge of ten per cent of the amount due.

Young women should learn to conduct their own business. All bills will be presented to, and must be settled by, the students themselves.

Money for music, books, or personal expenses will not be advanced. A deposit of $10.00 for books may be made at the first of the year and an account of the same will be rendered.

No reduction will be made for absence during the first four or last six weeks of the year, nor for absence or withdrawal during the year, except in case of protracted sickness, when the loss will be divided equally between student and College.

In cases of severe illness, when it is necessary to employ a special nurse, the expense of such nurse must be defrayed by the student.

SELF-HELP

A limited number of students, by working one and a half to two hours per day, can reduce the cost of a term to $115.00. The work is not heavy and does not interfere with the studies. The President will be glad to correspond with any who desire further information on this point.

All working students must be on the grounds Monday before college opens; if not, the position will be forfeited unless satisfactory explanation is offered.





SCHOLARSHIPS

Mark Morgan Scholarship—This scholarship pays all expenses, except Medical, Contingent, Library and Lecture Fees. It is the gift of Mr. Mark Morgan, of Laurel Hill, N. C.

The Dr. David McBryde Scholarship—Established by his daughters, Misses Harriet A. and Sallie McBryde, income of which scholarship amounts to $100.00 per year. Designed to aid in the education of a daughter of a foreign missionary. Applications for this scholarship should be made to the President of the College.

D. P. McKinnon Scholarship—Income yields $60.00 a year and is for the benefit of pupils who come to the College from the Orphans Home at Barium Springs.

The John D. Malloy Scholarship—Founded by his sons, D. G. and J. H. Malloy, in honor of their father. The interest to be applied to the expenses of a student.

The Eliza J. McFarland Scholarship—Founded by B. F. Bullard, Savannah, Ga., in memory of his faithful teacher. The interest to be applied to the expenses of a student.

The Annie Ray Memorial—Founded by Mrs. Laura P. Ray, of Fayetteville, N. C. The interest to be applied to the expenses of daughters of Confederate soldiers.

The Order of Scottish Clans Scholarship—Value, $2,000. Founded by Col. Water Scott of New York. The interest to be applied to the expenses of students selected by Colonel Scott or by the President of the College.

The St. Andrew's Society Scholarship — Value, $1,000. Founded by The St. Andrew's Society of Charleston, S. C. The interest to be applied to the expenses of students selected by the St. Andrew's Society of Charleston, S. C., or by the President of the College.

The Pauline Judson Stamps Memorial—Established by her father, Dr. Thomas Stamps, Lumber Bridge, N. C. The interest to be applied to the expenses, preferably, of a daughter of a foreign missionary.





COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT
MISS COVINGTON

Shorthand, Touch Typewriting, Manifolding, Tabulating, Multigraphing, Business Correspondence, English, Spelling, Filing.

Shorthand

The Gregg System is taught. A study of shorthand trains the mind to be quick, alert, and exact. Many who do not intend to make it their profession take this course as a means toward helping them to get a college education. It is well for any girl to have some knowledge of business, and it is necessary for her to be trained in the proper way, if she expects to be a business woman.

An average speed of one hundred words per minute on new material correctly written and read back is required in shorthand, and an average of twenty-five words per minute in transcribing, and thirty-five words per minute in copying is required on the typewriter.

Typewriting

The Touch System is taught. In this system the student is required to memorize the position of the keys, so that necessity for removing her eyes from the copy is entirely done away with, thereby gaining one-third speed. Special attention is paid to accuracy, neatness, vocabulary, spelling, punctuation, and paragraphing.

For use of typewriter a fee of $10.00 per year is charged.

Entrance requirements: Students must have completed tenth grade of High School work.

Bookkeeping

Massey's Modern Bookkeeping System is taught, single and double entry, with the forms of business such as checks, orders, receipts, drafts, bills of sale, bills of exchange, notes, bonds, contracts, etc.

Certificate

A Certificate of Graduation will be given to those who complete the following course:

English (Freshman)3Shorthand5
Bible2Typewriting5
Commercial Arithmetic3Spelling









ROLL OF COLLEGE STUDENTS, 1920-1921

Alexander, EthelNorth Carolina
Alexander, FrancesSouth Carolina
Arnold, LydaNorth Carolina
Averitt, EdithNorth Carolina
Bain, ElizabethNorth Carolina
Bain, EllenNorth Carolina
Bain, LillianNorth Carolina
Baker, Mary JaneSouth Carolina
Barnes, KateNorth Carolina
Barnhardt, SarahNorth Carolina
Barr, MamieFlorida
Beard, Mary LouNorth Carolina
Black EllenNorth Carolina
Blue, MargaretNorth Carolina
Blount, AlmaNorth Carolina
Boyd, Mary AliceNorth Carolina
Bradley, BessieSouth Carolina
Bradley, LillianSouth Carolina
Britt, EstherGeorgia
Britt, RuthGeorgia
Brogden, MildredNorth Carolina
Brown, Alice LeeNorth Carolina
Brown, AmandaNorth Carolina
Brown, MargaretNorth Carolina
Buchanan, JanieJapan
Buie, HelenNorth Carolina
Bulla, BonnieNorth Carolina
Burgess, AlmaSouth Carolina
Bustard, AgnesVirginia
Caddell, Anna MaeNorth Carolina
Campbell, MargieNorth Carolina
Carmichael, OraNorth Carolina
Carson, EvelynGeorgia
Cassels, Mary AnnaGeorgia
Clarke, ElizabethVirginia
Cleveland, Annie LeeFlorida
Coe, VeraSouth Carolina
Cole, EstelleNorth Carolina
Cooper, LouiseNorth Carolina
Council, JaneNorth Carolina
Covington, Mary KateNorth Carolina
Covington, PrattNorth Carolina
Cox, RuthNorth Carolina
Cumming, KateNorth Carolina
Currie, BerthaNorth Carolina
Currie, KateNorth Carolina
Currie, LauraNorth Carolina
Currie, MarionNorth Carolina
Currie, SarahNorth Carolina
Dalton, ElizabethGeorgia
Davis, AnnaVirginia
Davis, PearlNorth Carolina





Deaton, CatherineNorth Carolina
Dickson, HelenNorth Carolina
Dixon, SarahNorth Carolina
Dupuy, MargaretNorth Carolina
Erwin, Onie RuthGeorgia
Evans, JaneSouth Carolina
Evans, SadieNorth Carolina
Faires, EstherNorth Carolina
Fischer, SadieSouth Carolina
Finley, KateNorth Carolina
Foy, FannieNorth Carolina
Fraley, ThelmaNorth Carolina
Funk, Annie LeeSouth Carolina
Funk, FlorenceSouth Carolina
Garth, CharlotteNorth Carolina
Gibson, CarolineSouth Carolina
Glasure, RuthGeorgia
Goodman, CatherineNorth Carolina
Goodman, GraceNorth Carolina
Griffin, Eddie ClareNorth Carolina
Hale, Mary PortisNorth Carolina
Hall, LillianNorth Carolina
Hall, MargaretNorth Carolina
Hall, SarahNorth Carolina
Hall, VirginiaNorth Carolina
Hand, LottieNorth Carolina
Hardaway, MadgeKentucky
Hart, ViolaNorth Carolina
Harrell, HannahSouth Carolina
Harrison, MiriamGeorgia
Helms, ChristineNorth Carolina
Holland, RuthNorth Carolina
Hope, HazelSouth Carolina
Hoyle, MaryNorth Carolina
Hunsucker, LucyNorth Carolina
Huntley, MarjorieSouth Carolina
Irwin, ElizabethVirginia
Ivey, WinnieFlorida
Johnson, ElsieNorth Carolina
Johnson, MildredNorth Carolina
Jones, AlmaNorth Carolina
Jones JeanetteNorth Carolina
Jones, Martha MillerNorth Carolina
Kiser, CarrieNorth Carolina
Koon, AnnieNorth Carolina
Koon, MaryNorth Carolina
Koon, PearlNorth Carolina
Langston, DozierNorth Carolina
Lathan, GladysNorth Carolina
Latimer, KateSouth Carolina
Lemmond, EllenNorth Carolina





Lemmond, MamieNorth Carolina
Lewis, HazelNorth Carolina
Lewis, RuthNorth Carolina
Lisk, KathleenNorth Carolina
Lore, KittyNorth Carolina
Lyon, RuthNorth Carolina
McAlpine, LouiseGeorgia
McAulay, MildredNorth Carolina
McCormick, Cora BelleNorth Carolina
McCullers, Hattie LeighNorth Carolina
McCulloch, JuliaNorth Carolina
McCulloch, MaryNorth Carolina
McCutchen, JennieSouth Carolina
McDaniels, May OlgaNorth Carolina
MacDonald, ElizabethNorth Carolina
McDonald, FloraNorth Carolina
McFadyen, Mary ElizaNorth Carolina
McGirt, FrancesGeorgia
McGirt, MargaretNorth Carolina
McGoogan, LouiseNorth Carolina
McInnis, Emma KateSouth Carolina
MacIntosh, Lily MayGeorgia
McIntyre, FloraNorth Carolina
McIntyre, KatherineNorth Carolina
McIntyre, LucileNorth Carolina
McIver, JuliaNorth Carolina
McKinnon, KatherineNorth Carolina
McKnight, WillieSouth Carolina
McLean, MaudeNorth Carolina
McLean, PearlNorth Carolina
McLeod, AdaSouth Carolina
McLeod, Katie BlueNorth Carolina
McLeod, MargaretNorth Carolina
MacLeod, MaryNorth Carolina
McMillan, AnnieGeorgia
McMillan, KatherineNorth Carolina
McMillan, MyrtleNorth Carolina
McMillan, RubyNorth Carolina
McNair, Mary LeeVirginia
McNeill, HannahNorth Carolina
McPhaul, ArchieNorth Carolina
McPhaul, LillianNorth Carolina
MacRackan, AdaNorth Carolina
Mallard, JennieNorth Carolina
Mallard, Mary LouiseNorth Carolina
Mandeville, LouiseGeorgia
Manning, MarionSouth Carolina
Marlette, AltaNorth Carolina
Maynard, ClaudiaNorth Carolina
Monroe, BelleNorth Carolina
Monroe, BessieNorth Carolina
Moody, EvelynSouth Carolina
Moody, GraceSouth Carolina
Mooney, MaryGeorgia
Morton, ElizabethNorth Carolina





Morton, MargaretNorth Carolina
Murray, MildredMississippi
Nash, MarieSouth Carolina
Neely, MaeNorth Carolina
Niven, LouiseNorth Carolina
Nowell, RuthNorth Carolina
Oates, LouiseNorth Carolina
Odum, RuthNorth Carolina
Orr, ElizabethNorth Carolina
Overcash, EstelleNorth Carolina
Plexico, LucilleSouth Carolina
Plexico, Nannie MaySouth Carolina
Poole, MaryNorth Carolina
Pope, HelenNorth Carolina
Price, EvelynNorth Carolina
Ramsey, JuliaNorth Carolina
Ray, EvelynNorth Carolina
Ray, LillianNorth Carolina
Revell, SadieNorth Carolina
Rogers, JanieSouth Carolina
Ruggles, OliveGeorgia
Sample, BessieNorth Carolina
Sample, LillianNorth Carolina
Saum, EmilyVirginia
Scott, ElizabethNorth Carolina
Scott, GoniaArkansas
Shaw, AlmaFlorida
Shaw, Mary StampsNorth Carolina
Smith, ChristineNorth Carolina
Southerland, EleanorNorth Carolina
Spratt, Clare MaeNorth Carolina
Stenhouse, ElizabethSouth Carolina
Stenhouse, JeanSouth Carolina
Stewart, LottieNorth Carolina
Street, HelenNorth Carolina
Street, LillianNorth Carolina
Street, IdaNorth Carolina
Tatum, LulaSouth Carolina
Templeton, LyndaNorth Carolina
Thomasson, NellieNorth Carolina
Tomlinson, GeorgiaNorth Carolina
Tomlinson, LossieNorth Carolina
Turner, RubyNorth Carolina
Wade, LaviniaSouth Carolina
Wadley, EmilyNorth Carolina
Wakefield, PhoebeNorth Carolina
Walker, Mary KennaNorth Carolina
Ward, RubyNorth Carolina
West, MildredNorth Carolina
Whiteside, Willie MaeNorth Carolina
Whitted, ElizaNorth Carolina
Wilder, Mary PageNorth Carolina





Wilkinson, LoisNorth Carolina
Wilson, Carrie DellSouth Carolina
Wood, ZeldaNorth Carolina
Woodruff, ElizabethNorth Carolina
Wyatt, MyrtleGeorgia

PREPARATORY SCHOOL

Bain, Nellie MaeNorth Carolina
Barnes, EmmaNorth Carolina
Barnes, MaryNorth Carolina
Beard, PocahontasNorth Carolina
Beatty, KateNorth Carolina
Bigger, EuniceSouth Carolina
Bracey, InaNorth Carolina
Brown, EstherNorth Carolina
Carraway, MattieNorth Carolina
Clyburn, KathleenSouth Carolina
Collison, MarjorySouth Carolina
Costen, MaryNorth Carolina
Danredge, NelleVirginia
Davis, LulaVirginia
Dew, Joe AnnaFlorida
Faircloth, HazelSouth Carolina
Fountain, AvisNorth Carolina
Frank, VirginiaSouth Carolina
Gué, HelenSouth Carolina
Gué, RhodaSouth Carolina
Harry, Addie SueNorth Carolina
Hubbard, Emma WalkerNorth Carolina
Huie, GladysGeorgia
Hughes, MargaretNorth Carolina
Inman, PaulineNorth Carolina
Jackson, MaggieNorth Carolina
McCall, RubyNorth Carolina
McColl, MyrtleNorth Carolina
McCormick, VirginiaNorth Carolina
McCuthchen, ElmaSouth Carolina
McElveen, MaycieSouth Carolina
McIlwinen, MaryNorth Carolina
McInnis, MaudSouth Carolina
McIntyre, LouiseSouth Carolina
MacLaurin, PearleSouth Carolina
McLellan, SadieSouth Carolina
McPherson, MaryNorth Carolina
Midyett, EthelNorth Carolina
Montgomery, LenaSouth Carolina
Moore, KatherineSouth Carolina
Moore, MargaretNorth Carolina
Nordan, MarthaNorth Carolina





Pratt, VirginiaSouth Carolina
Price, RebeccaSouth Carolina
Sardinas, AngelicaCuba
Saunders, ElizabethGeorgia
Scott, SallieVirginia
Smith, BerniceFlorida
Smith, LeoticeNorth Carolina
Smith, MiriamNorth Carolina
Smith, SueSouth Carolina
Springs, MargaretNorth Carolina
Stevenson, MabelNorth Carolina
Street, RuthNorth Carolina
Tillman, EuniceNorth Carolina
Vardell, Mary LyndaNorth Carolina
White, IsabelleNorth Carolina
Williamson, FrancesNorth Carolina
Young, CarolineNorth Carolina

CLOTHING AND TEXTILES

Alexander, EthelNorth Carolina
Alexander, FrancesSouth Carolina
Arnold, LydaNorth Carolina
Bain, LillianNorth Carolina
Baker, Mary JaneSouth Carolina
Beard, Mary LouNorth Carolina
Beatty, KateNorth Carolina
Boyd, Mary AliceNorth Carolina
Bradley, BessieSouth Carolina
Bradley, LillianSouth Carolina
Brown, Alice LeeNorth Carolina
Buie, HelenNorth Carolina
Burgess, AlmaSouth Carolina
Caddell, Anna MaeNorth Carolina
Campbell, MargieNorth Carolina
Carmichael, OraNorth Carolina
Carraway, MattieNorth Carolina
Cole, EstherNorth Carolina
Cooper, LouiseNorth Carolina
Covington, Mary KateNorth Carolina
Covington, PrattNorth Carolina
Coxe, MarieNorth Carolina
Cox, RuthNorth Carolina
Currie, LauraNorth Carolina
Currie, LouiseNorth Carolina
Davis, AnnaVirginia
Davis, LulaVirginia
Glasure, RuthGeorgia
Faires, EstherNorth Carolina





Funk, FlorenceSouth Carolina
Harrel, HannahSouth Carolina
Hubbard, Emma WalkerNorth Carolina
Hughes, MargaretNorth Carolina
Inman, PaulineNorth Carolina
Jones, Martha MillerNorth Carolina
Johnson, MildredNorth Carolina
Koon, MaryNorth Carolina
Koon, PearlNorth Carolina
Lewis, RuthNorth Carolina
Lisk, KathleenNorth Carolina
Lyon, RuthNorth Carolina
McCulloch, JuliaNorth Carolina
McCulloch, MaryNorth Carolina
McCutchen, ElmaSouth Carolina
MacDonald, ElizabethNorth Carolina
McDonald, FloraNorth Carolina
McFayden, Mary ElizaNorth Carolina
McGirt, MargaretNorth Carolina
McElveen, MaycieSouth Carolina
McInnis, MaudNorth Carolina
McIver, JuliaNorth Carolina
McKinnon, KatherineNorth Carolina
McLean, MaudeNorth Carolina
McLean, PearlNorth Carolina
McLellan, SadieSouth Carolina
McLeod, AdaSouth Carolina
McMillan, AnnieGeorgia
McMillan, MyrtleNorth Carolina
McPhaul, ArchieNorth Carolina
McPherson, MaryNorth Carolina
Mallard, Mary LouiseNorth Carolina
Marlette, AltaNorth Carolina
Maynard, ClaudiaNorth Carolina
Midyett, EthelNorth Carolina
Monroe, BessieNorth Carolina
Mooney, MaryGeorgia
Moore, KatherineSouth Carolina
Morton, ElizabethNorth Carolina
Morton, MargaretNorth Carolina
Neely, MaeNorth Carolina
Niven, LouiseNorth Carolina
Oates, LouiseNorth Carolina
Odum, RuthNorth Carolina
Orr, ElizabethNorth Carolina
Ramsey, JuliaNorth Carolina
Ray, EvelynNorth Carolina
Ray, LillianNorth Carolina





Saunders, ElizabethGeorgia
Scott, ElizabethNorth Carolina
Scott, GoniaArkansas
Smith, BerniceFlorida
Smith, ChristineNorth Carolina
Smith, LeoticeNorth Carolina
Smith, SueSouth Carolina
Spratt, Clara MaeNorth Carolina
Stewart, LottieNorth Carolina
Street, HelenNorth Carolina
Street, IdaNorth Carolina
Thomasson, NellieNorth Carolina
Ward, RubyNorth Carolina
White, IsabelleNorth Carolina
Whiteside, Willie MayNorth Carolina
Wood, ZeldaNorth Carolina

FOODS AND COOKERY

Alexander, EthelNorth Carolina
Alexander, FrancesNorth Carolina
Arnold, LydaNorth Carolina
Averitt, EdithNorth Carolina
Bain, LillianNorth Carolina
Barr, MamieFlorida
Beard, Mary LouNorth Carolina
Beard, PocahontasNorth Carolina
Bradley, BessieSouth Carolina
Bradley, LillianSouth Carolina
Brown, Alice LeeNorth Carolina
Burgess, AlmaSouth Carolina
Campbell, MargieNorth Carolina
Carraway, MattieNorth Carolina
Carmichael, OraNorth Carolina
Cole, EstelleNorth Carolina
Cooper, LouiseNorth Carolina
Covington, Mary KateNorth Carolina
Covington, PrattNorth Carolina
Cox, RuthNorth Carolina
Coxe, MarieNorth Carolina
Currie, LauraNorth Carolina
Davis, AnnaVirginia
Davis, LulaVirginia
Dickson, HelenNorth Carolina
Evans, JaneSouth Carolina
Faircloth, HazelSouth Carolina
Faires, EstherNorth Carolina
Glasure, RuthGeorgia
Griffin, Eddie ClareNorth Carolina





Harry, Addie SueNorth Carolina
Inman, PaulineNorth Carolina
Jones, Martha MillerNorth Carolina
Johnson, MildredNorth Carolina
Koon, MaryNorth Carolina
Koon, PearlNorth Carolina
Lewis, RuthNorth Carolina
Lisk, KathleenNorth Carolina
Lyon, RuthNorth Carolina
Mallard, Mary LouiseNorth Carolina
Maynard, ClaudiaNorth Carolina
Marlette, AltaNorth Carolina
Montgomery, LenaSouth Carolina
Mooney, MaryGeorgia
Moore, KatherineSouth Carolina
Morton, ElizabethNorth Carolina
Morton, MargaretNorth Carolina
McAlpine, LouiseGeorgia
McAulay, MildredNorth Carolina
McCall, RubyNorth Carolina
McColl, MyrtleNorth Carolina
McCulloch, JuliaNorth Carolina
McCulloch, MaryNorth Carolina
McCormick, VirginiaNorth Carolina
MacDonald, ElizabethNorth Carolina
McDonald, FloraNorth Carolina
McFadyen, Mary ElizaNorth Carolina
McGirt, MargaretNorth Carolina
McInnis, MaudSouth Carolina
McIver, JuliaNorth Carolina
McKinnon, KatherineNorth Carolina
McLean, MaudNorth Carolina
McLean, PearlNorth Carolina
McLeod, AdaSouth Carolina
McMillan, AnnieGeorgia
McMillan, MyrtleNorth Carolina
McPhaul, ArchieNorth Carolina
McPherson, MaryNorth Carolina
Neely, MaeNorth Carolina
Oates, LouiseNorth Carolina
Odum, RuthNorth Carolina
Orr, ElizabethNorth Carolina
Powell, MaribelNorth Carolina
Ray, EvelynNorth Carolina
Ray, LillianNorth Carolina
Saunders, ElizabethGeorgia
Scott, ElizabethNorth Carolina
Scott, GoniaArkansas
Smith, ChristineNorth Carolina





Smith, LeoticeNorth Carolina
Spratt, Clare MaeNorth Carolina
Stenhouse, JeanSouth Carolina
Stewart, LottieNorth Carolina
Street, IdaNorth Carolina
Thomasson, NellieNorth Carolina
Wilder, Mary PageNorth Carolina
Wood, ZeldaNorth Carolina

PIANO

Alexander, EthelNorth Carolina
Alexander, LouiseVirginia
Bain, ElizabethNorth Carolina
Bain, Nellie MaeNorth Carolina
Barnes, KateNorth Carolina
Barnhardt, SarahNorth Carolina
Beard, PocahontasNorth Carolina
Beatty, KateNorth Carolina
Blue, MargaretNorth Carolina
Boyd, Mary AliceNorth Carolina
Bracey, InaNorth Carolina
Brewer, Mary LaneNorth Carolina
Britt, EstherGeorgia
Brown, AmandaNorth Carolina
Brown, Alice LeeNorth Carolina
Brown, EstherNorth Carolina
Brooks, BlancheNorth Carolina
Buchanan, JanieJapan
Buie, AmandaNorth Carolina
Buie, IsabelNorth Carolina
Bullock, Mary WatkinsNorth Carolina
Burgess, AlmaSouth Carolina
Carmichael, OraNorth Carolina
Clarke, ElizabethVirginia
Clyburn, KathleenSouth Carolina
Cook, LindaNorth Carolina
Cooper, LouiseNorth Carolina
Cox, RuthNorth Carolina
Coxe, MarieNorth Carolina
Dalton, ElizabethGeorgia
Davis, PearlNorth Carolina
Deaton, CatherineNorth Carolina
Dew, Joe AnnaFlorida
Dupuy, MargaretNorth Carolina
Erwin, Onie RuthGeorgia
Evans, SadieNorth Carolina
Fischer, SadieSouth Carolina
Fountain, AvisNorth Carolina
Funk, Annie LeeSouth Carolina





Gibson, CatherineNorth Carolina
Gibson, FrancesNorth Carolina
Graham, ElizabethNorth Carolina
Graham, JohnsieNorth Carolina
Griffin, Eddie ClareNorth Carolina
Gué, RhodaSouth Carolina
Hall, LillianNorth Carolina
Hall, MargaretNorth Carolina
Hall, SarahNorth Carolina
Helms, ChristineNorth Carolina
Hinson, Ellie FordNorth Carolina
Holland, RuthNorth Carolina
Hope, HazelSouth Carolina
Hubbard, LeilaNorth Carolina
Hughes, MargaretNorth Carolina
Hunsucker, LucyNorth Carolina
Johnson, ElsieNorth Carolina
Jones, AlmaNorth Carolina
Jones, MargaretNorth Carolina
Lemmond, EllenNorth Carolina
Lewis, HazelNorth Carolina
Lore, KittyNorth Carolina
Love, LenaNorth Carolina
McAlpine, LouiseGeorgia
McColl, MyrtleNorth Carolina
McCormick, Cora BelleNorth Carolina
McCormick, VirginiaNorth Carolina
McCullers, Hattie LeighNorth Carolina
McCutchen, ElmaSouth Carolina
McCutchen, JennieSouth Carolina
McDaniels, IreneNorth Carolina
McGirt, FrancesGeorgia
McInnis, MaudSouth Carolina
MacIntosh, Lily MayGeorgia
McIntyre, KatherineNorth Carolina
McIntyre, LouiseSouth Carolina
McKinnon, MarthaNorth Carolina
McKinnon, FloraNorth Carolina
McKnight, WillieSouth Carolina
MacLaurin, PearleSouth Carolina
McLean, GraceNorth Carolina
McLean, CatherineNorth Carolina
McLellan, SadieSouth Carolina
McLeod, Katie BlueNorth Carolina
McNeill, HannahNorth Carolina
McPhail, EllaNorth Carolina
MacRackan, AdaNorth Carolina
Mallard, JennieNorth Carolina
Mandeville, LouiseGeorgia
Maynard, ClaudiaNorth Carolina
Montgomery, LenaSouth Carolina
Moody, EvelynSouth Carolina
Moore, MargaretNorth Carolina
Murray, MildredMississippi





Odum, PrentissNorth Carolina
Opie, T. F. Mrs.North Carolina
Plexico, Nannie MaySouth Carolina
Plexico, LucilleSouth Carolina
Poole, MaryNorth Carolina
Pratt, VirginiaSouth Carolina
Price, EvelynNorth Carolina
Price, RebeccaSouth Carolina
Ray, LillianNorth Carolina
Roberts, MaryNorth Carolina
Sample, LillianNorth Carolina
Sardinas, AngelicaCuba
Scott, SallieVirginia
Scott, GoniaArkansas
Shaw, AlmaFlorida
Smith, BerniceFlorida
Smith, SueSouth Carolina
Snoddy, MamieNorth Carolina
Stevenson, MabelNorth Carolina
Thomasson, NellieNorth Carolina
Tolar, TascaNorth Carolina
Tomlinson, LossieNorth Carolina
Tomlinson, GeorgiaNorth Carolina
Toon, ElizabethNorth Carolina
Toon, DorothyNorth Carolina
Turner, RubyNorth Carolina
Vardell, Mary LyndaNorth Carolina
Walker, Mary KennaNorth Carolina
Whiteside, Willie MaeNorth Carolina
Williamson, FrancesNorth Carolina
Wilson, Carrie DellSouth Carolina
Womble, JessieTexas
Woodruff, ElizabethNorth Carolina
Wright, LeroyNorth Carolina

ORGAN

Buie, HelenNorth Carolina
Bustard, AgnesVirginia
Dandredge, NelleGeorgia
Gué, AnnieSouth Carolina
Lemmond, EllenNorth Carolina
Poole, MaryNorth Carolina

HARMONY

Boyd, Mary AliceNorth Carolina
Dandredge, NelleGeorgia
Foy, FannieNorth Carolina
Griffin, Eddie ClareNorth Carolina
Johnson, ElsieNorth Carolina
Lemmond, EllenNorth Carolina





Mandeville, LouiseGeorgia
Murray, MildredMississippi
McGirt, FrancesGeorgia
Overcash, EstelleNorth Carolina
Price, EvelynNorth Carolina
Shaw, AlmaFlorida
Walker, Mary KennaNorth Carolina
Wilson, Carrie DellSouth Carolina
Womble, JessieTexas

THEORY

Bain, Nellie MaeNorth Carolina
Brown, AmandaNorth Carolina
Buie, HelenNorth Carolina
Deaton, CatherineNorth Carolina
Dew, Joe AnnaFlorida
Fischer, SadieSouth Carolina
Frank, VirginiaSouth Carolina
Goodman, GraceNorth Carolina
Hall, LillianNorth Carolina
Hall, SarahNorth Carolina
Jones, AlmaNorth Carolina
Mallard, JennieNorth Carolina
Mandeville, LouiseGeorgia
Maynard, ClaudiaNorth Carolina
Montgomery, LenaSouth Carolina
Murray, MildredMississippi
McCormick, Cora BelleNorth Carolina
McCullers, Hattie LeighNorth Carolina
McIntyre, KatherineNorth Carolina
McLeod, Katie BlueNorth Carolina
Overcash, EstelleNorth Carolina
Price, EvelynNorth Carolina
Shaw, AlmaFlorida
Turner, RubyNorth Carolina
Williamson, FrancesNorth Carolina
Woodruff, ElizabethNorth Carolina
Womble, JessieTexas

VOICE

Black, EllenNorth Carolina
Brogden, MildredNorth Carolina
Brown, AmandaNorth Carolina
Brown, EstherNorth Carolina
Clyburn, KathleenSouth Carolina
Cooper, LouiseNorth Carolina
Dabbs, ElizabethSouth Carolina
Dupuy, MargaretNorth Carolina
Foy, FannieNorth Carolina
Fraley, ThelmaNorth Carolina
Gué, RhodaSouth Carolina
Hale, MaryNorth Carolina
Hall, LillianNorth Carolina
Irwin, ElizabethVirginia





Mallard, JennieNorth Carolina
Mallard, Mary LouiseNorth Carolina
Mandeville, LouiseGeorgia
Marlette, AltaNorth Carolina
McCullers, Hattie LeighNorth Carolina
McDaniels, IreneNorth Carolina
McFadyen, MaryNorth Carolina
McGirt, FrancesGeorgia
McIntosh, Lily MayGeorgia
McKinnon, KatharineNorth Carolina
McLeod, AdaSouth Carolina
McLeod, Katie BlueNorth Carolina
McNeill, BestyNorth Carolina
McPhaul, LillianNorth Carolina
Overcash, EstelleNorth Carolina
Pope, HelenNorth Carolina
Pratt, VirginiaSouth Carolina
Price, EvelynNorth Carolina
Ray EvelynNorth Carolina
Sample, BessieNorth Carolina
Shepherd, HelenNorth Carolina
Turner, RubyNorth Carolina
Wilder, Mary PageNorth Carolina
Wilkinson, LoisNorth Carolina
Wilson, Carrie DellSouth Carolina

VIOLIN

Britt, RuthGeorgia
Covington, PrattNorth Carolina
Council, JaneNorth Carolina
Currie, SarahNorth Carolina
Frank, VirginiaSouth Carolina
Goodman, GraceNorth Carolina
Griffin, Eddie ClareNorth Carolina
Hodgin, MargaretNorth Carolina
Koon, MaryNorth Carolina
Manning, MarionSouth Carolina
McNeill, BetsyNorth Carolina
Young, CarolineNorth Carolina

VIOLONCELLO

McIntosh, Lily MayGeorgia

EAR TRAINING

Boyd, Mary AliceNorth Carolina
Buchanan, JanieJapan
Foy, FannieNorth Carolina
Johnson, ElsieNorth Carolina
Lemmond, EllenNorth Carolina
Mandeville, LouiseGeorgia
McGirt, FrancesGeorgia
Overcash, EstelleNorth Carolina
Price, EvelynNorth Carolina
Walker, Mary KennaNorth Carolina
Womble, JessieTexas





ART

Bracey, InaNorth Carolina
Cassells, Mary AnnaGeorgia
Collison, MarjorySouth Carolina
Finley, KateNorth Carolina
Gué, HelenSouth Carolina
Moore, MargaretNorth Carolina
McIlwinen, MaryNorth Carolina
Powell, MaribelNorth Carolina
Revell, SadieNorth Carolina
Rogers, JanieSouth Carolina
Scott, ElizabethNorth Carolina
Smith, MurphyNorth Carolina
Street, RuthNorth Carolina
Woodruff, ElizabethNorth Carolina

EXPRESSION

Bain, EllenNorth Carolina
Blount, AlmaNorth Carolina
Brown, MargaretNorth Carolina
Cassels, Mary AnnaGeorgia
Cleveland, Annie LeeFlorida
Cumming, KateNorth Carolina
Davis, AnnaVirginia
Gué, HelenSouth Carolina
Hubbard, LeliaNorth Carolina
Huntley, MarjorieSouth Carolina
Lemmond, MamieNorth Carolina
McIntyre, LouiseNorth Carolina
Orr, ElizabethNorth Carolina
Sardinas, AngelicaCuba
Southerland, EleanorNorth Carolina
Whitted, ElizaNorth Carolina

COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT

Bustard, AgnesGeorgia
Cassels, Mary AnnaVirginia
Conoly, MaryNorth Carolina
Covington, PrattNorth Carolina
Davis, PearlNorth Carolina
Evans, SadieNorth Carolina
Fraley, ThelmaNorth Carolina
Funk, FlorenceSouth Carolina
Harry, Addie SueNorth Carolina
Hall, VirginiaNorth Carolina
Hand, LottieNorth Carolina
Hart, ViolaNorth Carolina
Helms, ChristineNorth Carolina
Holland, RuthNorth Carolina
Harrell, HannahSouth Carolina
Hoyle, MaryNorth Carolina
Kiser, CarrieNorth Carolina
Koon, AnnieNorth Carolina





Lathan, GladysNorth Carolina
McIntyre, LucilleNorth Carolina
McLeod, AdaSouth Carolina
McMillan, RubyNorth Carolina
Smith, MiriamNorth Carolina
Springs, MargaretNorth Carolina
Tillman, EuniceNorth Carolina

ORCHESTRA
MR. VARDELL, Conductor
VIOLINS

Council, JanieNorth Carolina
Dixon, LouiseNorth Carolina
Frank, VirginiaSouth Carolina
Goodman, GraceNorth Carolina
Griffin, Eddie ClareNorth Carolina
Hodgin, MargaretNorth Carolina
Manning, MarionSouth Carolina
Vardell, Jane DicksonNorth Carolina

VIOLA

Britt, RuthGeorgia

VIOLONCELLO

McIntosh, Lily MayGeorgia

DOUBLE BASS

Mandeville, LouiseGeorgia

PIANO

Buchanan, JanieJapan

ORGAN

Buie, HelenNorth Carolina





SUMMARY

Art14
Collegiate Students215
Commercial Department25
Clothing and Textiles93
Ear Training11
Expression16
Foods and Cookery87
Harmony15
Organ6
Piano127
Preparatory Department59
Theory27
Violin12
Violoncello1
Voice39
747
Counted more than once435
Total312

SUMMARY BY STATES

Arkansas1
Cuba1
Florida6
Georgia19
Japan1
Kentucky1
Mississippi1
North Carolina223
South Carolina49
Texas1
Virginia9
Total312













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