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The Carolina Yacht Club : history, charter, by-laws, sailing regulations

Date: 1953 | Identifier: GV823.W95 M66 1953
The Carolina Yacht Club : history, charter, by-laws, sailing regulations / [compiled and written by Louis T. Moore] Wrightsville Beach, N.C. : [Carolina Yacht Club], 1953. 68 p. : ill. ; 23 cm. On cover: Centennial, 1853-1953. more...
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THE
Carolina Yacht Club
WRIGHTSVILLE BEACH
NORTH CAROLINA


[Illustration:


Flag with red star]

CENTENNIAL
1853-1953









THE
Carolina Yacht Club

HISTORY
CHARTER
BY-LAWS
SAILING REGULATIONS

ORGANIZED 1853

[Illustration:

Carolina Yacht Club Wrightsville Beach, N.C. Incorporated 1872
]


INCORPORATED 1872WRIGHTSVILLE BEACH, NORTH CAROLINA




PRINTED 1953

WILMINGTON PRINTING COMPANY






[Illustration:

CAROLINA YACHT CLUB BEFORE DESTRUCTION IN STORM OF 1899
—from Wilmington Messenger, August 22, 1897

]





Officers

1953

COMMODORE

W. HAMPTON TILLERY

FLEET CAPTAIN

KENNETH M. SPRUNT

FLAG CAPTAIN

DONALD FISHER

PURSER

ALLAN T. STRANGE

MEASURER

H. VAN REID

MARSHAL

WILLIAM L. BEERY, JR.

GOVERNING BOARD

COL. JOHN BRIGHT HILL

DAVID R. MURCHISON, JR.

WILLIAM L. BEERY, JR.






[Illustration:

CAROLINA YACHT CLUB IN 1953
]





Acknowledgment

This interesting short history of The Carolina Yacht Club — the age of which is exceeded only by that of The New York and The New Orleans Yacht Clubs — was compiled and written by Louis T. Moore, Chairman of the New Hanover Historical Commission, and a member of the Club. The Club thanks Mr. Moore for placing on record these facts and amusing incidents of the past one hundred years.





Carolina Yacht Club

1853 - 1953

BY
LOUIS T. MOORE
Chairman, New Hanover Historical Commission

In a conscientious effort faithfully to portray the venerable and honorable life of such a representative organization as The Carolina Yacht Club, of Wilmington, and Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina, one is confronted at the outset with the rather disturbing fact of the lack of official records to cover a century of existence which ends with the summer of 1953.

Unfortunately the actual official minutes of the first twenty years of existence after 1853, the year of organization, appear to have been lost. There are at hand several aged minute books. These cover fairly well the career of the Club to the year 1906. Thereafter, the records are intact and of a nature to merit careful future preservation.

With the foregoing explanation of actual difficulties and problems which confront one who has every intention of presenting as far as possible direct life acomplishments of an organization so historic as The Carolina Yacht Club, with some fear and trepidation we will now enter upon the task. There is full purpose and objective of formulating a record which may represent, at least, a verbal human interest picture of a family club in the true sense of the word. It is certainly pleasing to know it is an organization ranking next to two others in this country, in its founding and aspirations.

With a membership now of approximately six hundred, consisting principally of residents of Wilmington, the Club is a colorful, unique, and widely known unit among institutions of such nature. The year 1953 marks the formal observance of the one hundredth anniversary. It stresses as well, ten decades of genuine entertainment and service to the personnel, with accompanying unbounded enjoyment by those so fortunate as to possess membership. This statement also is based on the fact that for a period of twelve to fifteen years prior to actual unification in 1853 those who founded the association were yachting companions, both on and off the waters of Wrightsville Sound, and the Cape Fear River. During the period of time mentioned, and prior to actual organization, the founders planned and held races near the ocean and on the broad waters of the Cape Fear River.

In recording history sometimes it would be pleasing if one could present wishes rather than actual facts. However, if he is to be entirely correct it must be admitted that The Carolina Yacht Club is the third to have been formed in this country. It is neither the first nor the second, as many have hoped and some have professed to believe.

Illustrative of the controlling thought which motivates the publication of this review it should be remembered that old Omar Khayyam, a





gifted poet, prior to his death in 1123, undoubtedly in reference to the importance of truthful recording of history, gave forth the following verse:

  • “The moving Finger writes on; and having writ,
  • Moves on; nor all your Piety nor Wit
  • Shall lure it back to cancel half a line,
  • Nor all your tears wash out a Word of it.”

So, no matter how many regretful tears we may shed we cannot wash out a single word of the following facts.

To establish beyond question the relative positions as regards first, second, and third places in the lives of the three recognized yacht clubs generally given the preference, this recorder decided to communicate with officials of the New York and the New Orleans Yacht Clubs.

From the organization in the northern metropolis came the following reply: “In response to your recent inquiry please be advised that the New York Yacht Club was organized and chartered in the year 1843 and has been in continuous operation since that time.”

In answer to the inquiry sent to New Orleans came a prompt response from the Executive Director of the Southern Yacht Club: “In reference to your letter of April 23, please accept the statement that our charter shows and proves that the Southern Yacht Club was organized in the year 1849. This organization also is known and recognized as the second oldest yacht club in the United States.”

So, there is the record which speaks for itself. It demonstrates and establishes the fact that The Carolina Yacht Club is the third in order of formation, in the country. Until there comes a time when it is possible to juggle figures so that 1853 is accepted as a date definitely prior to 1843 and 1849, history as already written must be accepted as Truth.

Here is a point, however, which can always be regarded with pride, not only by members of The Carolina Yacht Club but by the people of Wilmington as well! For the then small town of Wilmington in 1853 with a population hardly in excess of 6,500, to have ranked itself with New York, then as now the largest city in the United States, and with New Orleans, which a hundred years ago also was a city with many times the population Wilmington possessed, and to follow so closely in their footsteps in perfecting an active, flourishing yachting organization, was an acomplishment of no mean proportions indeed. It was, and is, one which our North Carolina “City by the Sea” can ever reflect upon with pardonable joy and unbounded gratification.

As a matter of record it is interesting to know and to realize that when The Carolina Yacht Club was formally launched in 1853, there were only seven active and enthusiastic yachtsmen, co-founders of the club. They were John Reston, Richard Bradley, Daniel Baker, Parker Quince, Richard J. Jones, Talcott Burr and T. M. Goodman. These gentlemen, with others of their friends and associates, held frequent and closely contested races for a few years.





The lowering clouds of the fratricidal strife which resulted in The War Between The States, 1861-1865, brought complete cessation of the Club's activities. Many of the original members answered the tocsin of war, responding to go to the defense of their beloved Southland.

It is (and justifiably so), a proud claim of the Club that it not only weathered the storms of the great struggle mentioned, but that it also passed, unhurt, through four other conflicts. These were the Spanish-American strife in 1898, World Wars I and II, and the Korean War. At the conclusion of each of the first mentioned four great misunderstandings, the Club was alerted. Each time it became more aggressively active in the development and advancement of yacht racing than had ever before been attempted.

The first post war regatta was held on July 4, 1866. This was less than sixteen months after the South had yielded to superior forces and resources. Records indicate that the entries were three in number. The names of the yachts were the Carolina, the Retta, and the Annie. It seems right and proper that Carolina's star even then was in the ascendancy as the craft of that name was the winner in this initial post war sports event.

As time passed there was born a desire and spirit to further liberalize and make more attractive and effective a widening influence in the sphere of yacht racing. Therefore decision was reached to apply for a new and more comprehensive charter. This new bill of sailing rights was filed in the Superior Court of New Hanover County, June 21, 1873.

Just at this point it may be advisable and in order to glance backward to 1853. That was the year when the Club actually was formed. Unfortunately and regrettably, the minute books for the period 1853-1873, are not available and presumably have been lost. There may be a reasonable and acceptable explanation for this situation.

Mr. Norwood Giles, an honored member of the Club for many years, spent a great part of his life in Wilmington. Later he resided in New York. In the early eighteen eighties Mr. Giles was prompted to prepare a sketch of the organization. Undoubtedly he must have asked that original minute books be sent to him so that he could check certain facts and dates. If this was done, then in some way return of the records must have been overlooked by employes of Mr. Giles in his New York offices. This is probably the most reasonable assumption which can be offered as to a possible reason why the documents for the twenty years noted cannot be found.

Nevertheless, the results of Mr. Giles’ research were incorporated in a delightfully prepared paper of voluminous nature. His effort was based on a study of the Club records, now unfortunately lost. Therefore, it will be necessary and in order to consult his production to preserve a form of continuity in the development of this narrative.

Mr. Giles’ account seems to have emphasized in far greater detail actual races and the results of same, rather than to furnish a complete and detailed record of the real historical development of the body. As





regards actual reference data there is necessarily an absence of same in his paper which is accounted for by the explanation just outlined.

Mr. Giles recites the fact that Mr. Richard Bradley was the first Commodore. It was then believed that through regular club races it would be decided who was the most skilled sailor and where was anchored the swiftest yacht. In lieu of settling such problems, however, it was developed rather that every member of the new organization appeared to be a natural genius, and every boat a champion in the true sense of the word.

For a decade prior to 1853 the Sounds had been ruled consecutively by the Abovna, owned by R. J. Bernard; Saucy Jack, owned by Richard Bradley; Little Girl, owned by Captain Gautier, and Sue, by Hazel Burgwin.

The Sue is said to have been the first cat boat ever floated on Wrightsville waters. This craft developed great speed. It demonstrated quite early in its career the capacity and qualities of boats of this particular variety. It also was the first in local waters to possess the innovation of a center board. It has been handed down as a fact that the crew members saw the bottom of this board about as frequently as its top.

Following many notable victories of the Sue it was retired and the Eliza Ann made its appearance. This was an open keel boat and the owner, Mr. Henry Bradley, thought it perfection. There are many legends of its wonderful performances as recounted in season and out by its proud owner. Among other characteristic memories, Mr. Bradley, who was a “Greenville Sounder,” ejaculated that when he sailed his craft over to Masonboro residents of the latter resort tightly drew in their blinds to shut out so odious an object as his boat.

The Columbia was owned by Mr. Talcott Burr. It proved to be a special rival of the Eliza Ann. These two boats had many closely contested races for the championship. It was while this latter boat was in its glory that organization of the Club was perfected in 1853.

A short time later a yachting event of interest was the defeat of the Eliza Ann by the Young American. This latter boat was owned by Captain C. D. Ellis. It was the first regularly fitted yacht in this section, was decked, and completely rigged as a sloop. This craft was looked upon as a marvel of speed and elegance.

In 1854 Mr. Daniel Baker was elected Commodore. It was in that year that Mr. Parker Quince, of Masonboro, built a boat or canoe of three logs pinned together. This he called the Jennie Q, probably because it bore such a “Q”-rious appearance. Strange as it may seem this craft developed considerable speed. As time passed it was the winner in contests with other well known local boats. The master proved to be a bragging mate. Through his boastings he is said to have incurred the mortal hate of many an envious rival.

The next most popular boat to be developed was La Favorite. It was clinker built and originally was intended as a fishing craft. Its accomplishments at Savannah, however, were such as to win admiring comments.





Mr. Richard Bradley purchased and fitted it as a yacht. In 1855 La Favorite undoubtedly was the smartest gem in the fleet. The season was one of great excitement and strenuous competition. La Favorite was the pride of the waters. It not only defeated all the old boats but the newer ones, as well, when the latter made their appearance. This speedster probably secured its name from Donizetti's great opera, “La Favorita,” which was very popular at the time.

The Flying Cloud (undoubtedly named for one of the most famous of the Clipper ships then sailing the seven seas), built in 1851, was quite a handsome yacht. Among its numerous fittings was a small closet at the stern. There the Commodore kept what he called a “Life Preserver.” This arrangement which may have been liquid and possibly enclosed in a bottle, the generous officer refused to patent. It was not long before all other boats in use are said to have infringed upon the plan and to have installed one for the enjoyment of all crew members.

In 1856 came the downfall of La Favorite at the hands of the Twilight, of Masonboro. This boat was the property of John Quince, by whom it was splendidly handled. It had an iron center board which was very hard to manage. It so mutilated the fingers of the crew of Masonboro boys that not one could pick a banjo, or quitar, with any degree of comfort.

In 1857 General Alexander MacRae was elected Commodore. It was then whispered that Mr. Bradley soon would have another boat which would “clean up” the Sound. It was bought by Mr. Jos. Flanner, who presented it to Mr. Bradley. The cost is said to have been about $700. It was built in New York by “Bob” Fish.

This particular boat is said to have been of strange design, resembling somewhat a great smoothing iron. It had a bow sprit hanging twelve feet over the cut water. As this craft had beaten all rivals in and around New York there was great local excitement when it appeared on the waters of the Sounds adjacent to Wilmington. It is interesting to know that this rather strange and unusual marine production was called the Princess. It is said never to have been beaten in subsequent races, although many yachts were bought, or especially built, to defeat her.

In the Winter of 1859 another strange model was produced by Mr. Sol. Morse. This was thought to be perfect in design and construction. It was named the Carolina and proved speedy and very reliable. Mr. T. M. Gardner was Commodore of the Club during the season of 1859. The Carolina now took first position among the Club's fast craft. It maintained this position in 1860, when Mr. Gardner was reelected Commodore.

It was in the early summer days of 1861 that the tide of war swept over the land. This called for the services of many of the best members and their boats. The military took possession of the yachts. A roll call after the war showed the following absent: Flying Cloud, owned by Daniel Baker; Twilight, owned by W. A. Wright; Alice Haigh, William Lippitt; Sand Crab, C. C. Morse; Fiddler, E. Savage; Eleanor, John and William Giles; Atlanta, C. & N. Giles; Hiawatha and Princess, Richard





Bradley; Vashti, R. H. Grant; Rob Roy, Thomas Wright; Dewdrop, General Alexander MacRae; Mollie, Dr. Wm. B. Meares; Undine, George Harriss, and Callie, owned by J. J. Conolly.

Notwithstanding unsettled conditions and vexatious times which followed the termination of the war, the Club lived. On July 4, 1866 Commodore Gardner lined up the following named boats for action: Carolina, Retta, and Annie. The Carolina was declared winner.

In the following six years the Club was guided by Mr. Henry Burkheimer as Commodore. Due to depressed economic conditions there was not a very great amount of interest manifested in the organization. However, the annual Fourth of July Regatta was not overlooked. During this period there was continuing rivalry between the Carolina and the Retta. The apathy mentioned was in no wise due to the fault of Commodore Burkheimer. It resulted from understandable conditions which had followed the recent great conflict.

The point in the Club's history is now reached where the general review prepared by Mr. Giles reaches a conclusion. Thereafter, and until approximately 1906 there is available for consultation and reference, minute books of the association. These cover about thirty years, following which records for the more modern decades are on file.

The effort, henceforth, will be to stress as far as possible, human interest incidents as revealed by the somewhat musty tomes of “ye olden time.” When such references are called to his attention, the reader should remember that every point was deemed quite important. So much so as to justify consideration by the Governing Board, or one of several active committees.

Here and there a paragraph might be incorporated, the effect of which may be to bring a smile to the countenance of the reader. In such instances it should be well remembered that each and every incident was considered of sufficient seriousness to justify attention by those who were in charge of the organization's affairs. There will be no special effort to indulge in fun or humor. The reader is warned in advance that some of the points to be developed, at least will cause him to wonder if definite, careful, analytical consideration of each and every subject was not the best procedure, after all.

In the spring of 1873, the Little Walter, later called the Restless, appeared upon the scene. This was one of the most elegantly fitted and best equipped boats ever to be shown locally. It was what is known as a “Philadelphia cat.” It was fifteen feet long and equipped with an immense sail. After a few upsets on the Cape Fear river, the owner, Walter Coney, announced that he was ready to pit her against the best local boats then afloat. In the first race this craft clearly out distanced all contestants. It reached “The Dram Tree” buoy, on the Cape Fear river, without shifting a sail. Its triumph was entire and complete. This particular boat was deemed a marvel and repeatedly led the fleet in many a contest.

In June of 1873 it was deemed advisable to more definitely organize the club and to secure a charter most liberal in its general terms. This





was effected and renewed interest was the immediate result. The formal application was filed. It set forth that it was desired “to form a Private Corporation,” the name of which was to be continued as “The Carolina Yacht Club.”

It was outlined in the document that the principal place of business was to be “on the banks of Wrightsville Sound, about east of the mouth of Lee's (Bradley's as it is now generally designated) Creek, on the waters of said Wrightsville Sound, extending North and South at the pleasure of said Corporation, and on the waters of the Cape Fear River, within the Counties of New Hanover and Brunswick.”

Following the action noted there was an immediate revival of interest, which result greatly pleased everyone.

“In the golden haze of the olden days,” as now, social features were important attributes. In the fifties and late sixties of the past century manuscripts reveal many references to “Banks’ Parties.” So they were known at that time. Members would sail from the mainland to what is now Wrightsville Beach. There they would spend the days and evenings, and enjoy such pleasures as bathing, fishing, and crabbing, always to be followed with an appetizing spread of succulent dishes, fruits, etc.

Just at this point it might be of interest to note the cycles of variation which have marked access to “The Banks” since The Carolina Yacht Club was organized in 1853. In the first quarter of a century, or even longer, sail boats had to be utilized to reach the seaside destination. Then, during the next period a snorting, puffing little steam engine which drew a succession of toy like passenger coaches, carried pleasure seekers from their homes in Wilmington to the Beach, which at that particular time was commencing to display signs of the really remarkable development that has come with passing years. Next, one finds the installation of a modern high power electric trolley system, which, with cars of adequate size and travel comfort, served to accommodate a steadily increasing volume of traffic. About a quarter of a century ago modern demands necessitated abolition of the trolley system. It was succeeded with the installation of a causeway across the marshes. This now furnishes access to Wrightsville Beach, supplemented with a modern automobile highway of dredged materials, hard surfaced, which parallels the western shore of the island resort.

After the new charter had been secured and a small club house erected on “The Banks,” (as Wrightsville Beach of today then was known), in the minutes of 1873 it is set forth that 29 keys to the building were furnished as many members. It was in this same year unanimous agreement was recorded to adopt as the Club flag a white ground, with red star in the center.

Orders were issued to prepare a sufficient number of flags so that every boat sailing on the Fourth of July would be in position to fly one of the club emblems at the mast-head. For the regatta in that particular year three prizes were awarded to the several boats finishing first, second, and third.





It was soon discovered that the number of keys originally ordered was insufficient. A new requisition was authorized. This increased the total of available keys to a half hundred.

At this period a ruling also was adopted, which limited the length of the boats to twenty feet. It was also decided to have the Club purchase two prizes, “at a very moderate price,” to be awarded winners in the approaching August regatta.

The records disclose at that time, less than a decade after “The War,” all of the families in the Club had Negro family servants. These colored people were highly respected by their employers. In many instances the latter had been former owners of their servants, prior to the abolition of slavery.

Among the yacht owners were many who were desirious of using these faithful employes in some capacity on their boats. This question was placed before the members for decision. While there was a decided difference of opinion, as disclosed in the minutes the decision was recorded in this wise: “The subject of allowing Negroes to act as sailing Masters of yachts was brought up. It was agreed by majority vote not to allow Negroes to act in any official capacity on board yachts, or on the club grounds.” Aside from formal races, however, many members used their servants as crew members or handy men aboard the yachts.

An interesting reference to the apparent slowness of one of the boats is attested by the following extract: “For the Gazette was reserved the honor of bearing the Anchor home, as a memento of established tardiness.”

The initiation fee “is declared to be $5.” It is interesting to know that this preliminary required payment remained at that figure for many years. As a direct comparison of prices then and now, there is a payment item which declares, “four kegs of lager, sixteen dollars,” whereas today one is required to pay twenty-five cents for a bottle which holds a few ounces only.

The minutes show that William A. Wright, Esq., was elected Commodore in 1874. It was shortly after the annual meeting in that year that Mr. J. M. Cazaux secured his fine yacht, Rosa. It was not very successful as a cat boat, and was beaten in the first three races. Afterward when sloop rigged this racer proved to be very fleet and almost a sailing marvel in light weather. Its performances on the Cape Fear River, where races were first held, are especially worthy of note. On that stream this craft won continuously from other boats.

The Ripple, built in New York for Mr. Norwood Giles, was launched locally in 1875. It had a beam of 8½ feet and length of 18½ feet. In the first annual race in which it was entered the Ripple lost by a slight margin. It is recorded as a fact, however, that this is the only annual race which this particular boat failed to win. It was awarded the Championship Flag in 1875 and held the emblem for two years without suffering a defeat. It is interesting to know that the time made by this boat in one race of 1 hour, 24 minutes, and 1 second, was the best on





record prior thereto and for many years later. This boat was credited with more victories than any other craft on the Club register.

While Mr. Giles was entirely too modest to capitalize on the position he held in the local racing world, nevertheless it can be stated with candor and truth that he was regarded as the greatest local sailor of his time.

In the early nineties Mr. Giles sold the Ripple to Mr. George Chadbourn. This boat won the July 4 race of 1895, which gave her at least twenty years of successful sailing.

After disposing of the Ripple, Mr. Giles purchased the Pirate, in Boston, where it had been a great race winner. She was the fastest boat in these waters but was too large for the Sounds and did not win many races.

Until 1910 all races were started from the shore. All boats were in the same general class and were handicapped, based on their stated overall length. During the period of about 1890 to 1899 the smallest boat, which was usually the Sprite, started first and the largest, the Pirate, last. To win, this particular largest boat had to pass all the others, which was often impossible in the local restricted waters.

In the year 1910, or possibly a year or two later, largely upon the insistence of Mr. T. P. Hammer, (who had just moved to Wilmington from Philadelphia), the flying start was adopted. Thereafter handicaps were based on the combination of load, water line, length, and the square root of sail area.

During the great storm of 1899 the Pirate was floated out of her boat house on Lee's (Bradley's) Creek. The boat continued its storm driven journey toward, and into the trestle spanning the marshes. A part of the skeleton is still there.

It is recorded on May 3, 1875 that the owners of all yachts entering races were requested to provide, or have provided, uniforms for their respective crews. A committee was selected to devise and adopt a uniform belt for the members to use, with the letters “C.Y.C.” on it.

Even at that early date the comfort and convenience of spectators at the yacht races appears to have been a matter of prime consideration. It is shown in the minutes for 1875 that Mr. Norwood Giles was appointed a committee of one to examine the condition of the club house. He was authorized to have a shed built on the west side of “The Banks” for the accommodation of spectators at the races.

The minutes dated Thursday, May 27, 1875 state: “The first Regatta of the season took place on this date on the Cape Fear River. The run was from a buoy in the river opposite Market Street dock, thence to, and around, a buoy opposite ‘The Dram Tree’ and return, and repeat, being an overall distance of eight miles.”

Then came the report of that very important committee which had been appointed to consider the question of uniform belts, etc. The report stated that there had been obtained samples of belts and that one had been adopted which would suit admirably. It was to be of white ground, with blue edge. The belts were to be purchased at a cost of





ten dollars per dozen. It was made obligatory for each and every member of the Club to wear the insignia on regatta days. “Forty belts were ordered, each one to be paid for as delivered and accepted.”

Other forms of races were not overlooked. This, despite the fact that the principal degree of interest, as a matter of course, centered around yacht racing. The minutes for June 15, 1875 said: “In the four-oar boat race, gotten up under the auspices of the Club, and which took place immediately after the Regatta, there were six boats entered. These drew their positions in order. The Mary Wheeler came in first, finishing the course in remarkably fast time and was awarded the first prize of twenty dollars. The course was from Market dock buoy, around a buoy opposite Kidder's Mill.”

March 23, 1876 an interesting item is disclosed. It indicates that the question of ownership of the property was a vital one, even at that comparatively early stage of the Club's life, “Resolved that a Committee of three be appointed to inquire into, and if practicable, procure a title to that portion of Wrightsville Banks, upon which has been erected the wharf, the club house, etc. of the organization.”

The same minutes reveal a very thoughtful and graceful action. Undoubetedly, this was largely inspired by the recipient's brilliant record while serving in the Confederate States’ Navy: “Resolved that Captain John Newland Maffitt, of Wilmington, and Captain W. B. Whitehead be, and the same are hereby elected Honorary Members of this Club.”

During the summer of 1876 it was stated that “The Banks” had been purchased at Sheriff's sale by Mr. George Harriss, Sr. However, he is said to have felt as binding prior claims to the property which formerly had been held by Mr. John A. Sanders.

A deed was submitted in which the members sought to purchase from ocean to sound, a strip of land one hundred feet in width, with the privilege of using an additional five hundred feet on each side of the parcel.

There was a vast amount of correspondence relative to the proposal. For a time the result was an agreement on the part of the owners to permit the Club to use the property in question. There was a reservation that the owners would have the privilege of entering at their pleasure and of having their friends do likewise, when such privileges did not interfere with actual functions of the association. This adjustment was the best the Club could secure at the particular time the effort was made. It was deemed advantageous for all purposes and an agreement along the general lines set forth, was entered into.

The minutes for August 4, 1877 state: “the Rosa beat the Ripple in this race, running to Fowler's Point and back. This was the only race in the history of the Club which ever was run through Masonboro Inlet.”

The yacht Ripple also seems to have continued its winning ways throughout this season. There is a notation under date of Sept. 22, 1876: “The Ripple's time is the fastest by six minutes and fourteen seconds ever made on the course.”





As all good structures, soonor or later, must face a similar condition, it is shown on the minutes for May 7, 1878, that Father Time was getting the better of the club house. At that time the structure had survived on “The Banks” for a number of years. It is stated: “The Banks’ House at Wrightsville is badly in need of general repairs. A committee is to be appointed by the Commodore to solicit financial aid from all the citizens of Greenville, Masonboro and Wrightsville Sounds, and Wilmington, who are connected with the Club. This anticipated aid is to be used to repair the Banks’ House.”

In May of 1878 the organization sustained a great loss in the death of its venerable and beloved aged Commodore, Mr. William A. Wright. He had held the position for four years prior to his death.

Captain I. B. Grainger was then chosen for the position which had been vacated by death. He entered upon his duties with a spirit of enthusiasm and genuine ardor which augured well for future results. He served not only as Commodore but also as Master of the Yacht Foam. Unfortunately, he died in August of the same year. The Club thus suffered the misfortune of losing two of its esteemed Commodores within a period of three months.

No election was held to fill the second vacancy within such a short space of time, in the highest office in the gift of the body. Mr. O. A. Wiggins, second officer, served as Commodore for the balance of the season in 1878. This gentleman was chosen officially for the position in May of 1879. He continued to fill the office with credit to himself and satisfaction to his associates, until May of 1884. At that time he was succeeded by Pembroke Jones, Esq.

Next, there is a reference which should be heralded with the sound of popping corks, “June 12, 1878.—After the distribution of the regular prizes had been concluded, the champagne was opened and toasts were drunk to the new Commodore, the Club, and to the different yachts of the squadron.” All of which brings the fleeting thought that while all the members were not in such condition at all, nevertheless the “frequent toasts were pretty well drunk.”

To judge from the following extract one is rather forced to the conclusion that the old adage, “while the cat is away, the mice will play,” is more or less applicable to the revealed situation: “The Commodore reported regretfully and mournfully that the janitor had been drunk and laid the case before the meeting. After motion the janitor was discharged.” The action as taken at least must have provided one more recruit for the militant prohibition forces, at a later period to be so valiantly led by redoubtable Carrie Nation, the doughty feminine hatchet wielder from the Middle West, as she attacked wet beverage spots in her continued effort to “dry up” the country.

Then, as well as in later days the Purser was having his personal troubles in persuading members to pay their dues with “rectitude and promptitude.” Undoubtedly, in a manful effort to lift him from the financial morass where he might unceremoniously have been dumped,





the organization adopted the following: “Resolved that dues unpaid for the years previous to 1879 be remitted. In consideration thereof the Purser shall drop from the list of members the names of all parties who fail to pay dues for the year of 1879.”

One can consider and recall the rather liberal salaries and allowances of the average wage earner of today. Certainly his most tender sympathy would be extended a person who now might find himself in the same position, (as regards compensation), of the janitor who was serving the Club in the (for him), troubulous year of 1879. Maybe our readers will smile at the pay which was given him.

This is the actual record of the action taken at a meeting on August 2, 1879: “The Commodore shall appoint any suitable person to take charge of the club house and keep the same clean and in repair. The said person shall be at liberty to charge FIVE CENTS (capitals ours) of all persons who enter the club house, (excepting members of the club). The said fee of five cents is to be retained by the person so appointed, for and in consideration of his keeping the club house clean and in repair as before stated and required.”

The following items are rather unique and interesting. They disclose some of the services which were furnished the club members back in those halcyon days of 1877-1879:

“Paid to Virgil MacRae, for transporting fresh drinking water to The Banks$3.50”
“To Annual Dues for each member$2.50”
“Paid to Virgil MacRae, for furnishing and carrying ice for the July 4 races$7.75”

Like Banquo's ghost of old, the question of securing fee simple title to the property still appeared to be a source of vexation and worry for the membership. The record on May 1, 1888 reads as follows: “Motion passed for the Commodore to appoint a committee of three to effect, if possible, the purchase of blank feet of beach fronting on the Sound, and running back to the ocean, and also to perfect plans for erecting a club house thereon.”

The general description of the desired tract is rather unusual, starting as it does at the Sound and extending backward to the ocean. Under present day practices and procedure it is probable that a description of a lot at Wrightsville Beach would mention the ocean frontage first and then extend the boundaries backward toward the Sound. However, at the time the action was taken the Sound exposure was regarded as the more important, the ocean side appearing to have been of little consequence.

On July 9, 1883 this was recorded: “When the Committee has received $500 on the Building Fund its members may proceed with the building of the club house, etc., to cost $1,000. The committee is authorized to take steps to provide for the additional sum of $500.”





In late 1883 it is disclosed that active plans were inaugurated to increase the membership and within a short time there were considerable additions to the lists.

To evidence the point that the Commodore of the Club, in truth and in fact, was “first in the hearts of his clubmen,” let us think well upon the following paragraph. Then, duly rejoice that such tender sentiments were in evidence when a genuine leader had decided to retire from office: “Mr. Jos. Cronly proposed in most complimentary terms the thanks of the Club be tendered the retiring Commodore for his long services and zeal in the interest of the Body. This was unanimously adopted. Then it was noticed that pearly tears quivered upon the eyelids of every member present. As soon as their choking emotions were sufficiently allayed they gave him three hearty cheers and extended other marks of esteem and gratitude. These he bore with his accustomed resignation.”

The record then advances the statement that the yacht Foam was purchased by Messrs. G. D. and W. L. Parsley in 1884. Alterations were made in the rig and trim, which wonderfully improved her. Later the name was changed to the Mascotte. Under this later title the boat was successful and secured some brilliant victories. Then it is said: “Monday evening we held our 34th annual meeting. Ours is the second oldest yacht club in America. We have as fine boats of their class as can be found. Our roll shows 130 names. Our Club House is commodious and is in charge of a courteous janitor.” Elsewhere it has been indicated that the Club is third, not second in order of formation.

Could the following paragraph, dated May 5, 1884 by any chance have been written by the Purser with his tongue in his cheek, and with a solemn wink of his weather eye?: “The Commodore elect visited upon the members present a speech, the recollection of which they will carry with them forever. Its effect was magical. In the course of an hour or two, after he began, these sturdy yatchsmen were observed glancing at each other anxiously and holding hard to their belaying pins. Upon the conclusion, after quite some time, they were so greatly stirred that every man rose to his feet and swore (they were in the humor for it), that they were very, very glad—that the yachting season had begun so auspiciously, and then immediately adjourned.”

An ominous and foreboding warning was proclaimed in clarion tones, in the following quotation from the minutes of June 30, 1885: “A communication was read from the janitor reporting violations of rules by at least two members.”

Undoubtedly apprehensive and fearful of a horde of visitors unless proper precautionary steps were taken, and immovable bars placed somewhere near the entrance, the record for May 3, 1886, discloses the following protective measure: “A short time will be allowed members in which they may introduce their friends. However, it is resolved that members of the Club who keep a Boarding House, or Hotel, shall not be allowed to introduce their boarders.”





Now, everyone is familiar with the fact that prospects for military draft as a preliminary warning and announcement, receive a handsomely engraved card, or letter. The caption of this is “Greetings From The President.” The salutation is followed with the unwelcome intimation and direct statement of fact that the unlucky recipient is wanted by his “Uncle Sam.” Not to be out done in such similar regard, as of June 29, 1887, handsomely engraved cards were placed in the mails and forwarded to dues delinquents, solemnly and lugubriously warning them that they would be “dropped on account of the nonpayment of dues.”

On May 7, 1888 there is recorded a vote of thanks to the Directors of the Wilmington Sea Coast Railroad for the gift of grounds adjacent to the club house.

In 1888 evidently there was sentiment prevailing to the effect if a member did not possess his own bath suit he had no one but himself to thank for inability to secure a suit in which to garb his manly form prior to entering the waters of old ocean. On July 16 of said year it is solemnly set forth: “Resolved that bathing suits must not be kept for hire in the Club House. Further, that the janitor be instructed to forbid all persons bathing unclothed in front of the club at night, and to report names of members violating this or any other rule.”

In this modern day and time when one reflects upon the extentmor rather lack of extent, of coverage by the inadequate thing classified as a bath suit, certainly he must be forced to agree that the resolution of 1888 just quoted was not so much out of line. After all, it served about the same useless purpose then as a duplicate would produce if adopted today.

Levity and humor were not conspicuous by their absence from the session credited to May 6, 1889. Therein the record discloses the following: “The meeting broke up in very good humor, owing to the frantic efforts of an enthusiastic and genteel member to force the Commodore to appear at all races in a very fancy uniform.”

The management had very little excuse for, or patience with, those forgetful members who did not have sufficient recollection to look up the Club after they had departed. Evidently, and literally, to show them who was “Boss” and to let them know “where to get off,” the minutes for December 19, 1891 say: “It was reported that the Club House was frequently left open. The Chairman of the House Committee was instructed to buy a new lock for the door and keep the key unto himself.”

“To Frolic or not to Frolic,” presumably was a question of prime and major importance in the glamorous days of 1891. The record for that particular period discloses the following revealing and convincing action: “It was moved that the Chair appoint a Frolic Club and that they be allowed the Club House one or two nights a month. The motion was passed.”

Then in the fashion of the army which had reached the top of the hill, only to march down again, the paragraph quoted was supplemented as follows: “Reconsideration of the foregoing was moved. This later





motion prevailed. The original motion then was again widely discussed. The members present expressed themselves as being in favor of ‘The Frolic’ but at the same time against the Club taking official action, as a good many members were opposed. The original motion again was put. This time it lost.” So, it would appear that somewhat like the infant who lived only a week and had carved on its tombstone the epitaph, “Since I was so soon done for, I wonder what I was begun for,” “The Frolic” passed from scenes of earthly woe and disappointment even before it had an opportunity to gasp and inhale the breath of joyous and frolicsome life.

A policy of foresight, based on fine business judgment and sense of values, was started in 1890 when The Reserve Fund was created for the protection of the Club's property. The idea was to have “a back log” of money which could be utilized in time of emergency. The wisdom of this plan has been evidenced several times when the trust fund has been utilized for unforseen measures and direct needs. At the beginning the Fund was started with the allocation of fifty cents from annual dues, supplemented with monies on hand at the end of the year. To evidence the rigid protection accorded this particular trust, it was specified in the beginning that “No draft upon it could be made without the voting consent of four-fifths of the membership present at meetings when suggestions might be made for charges against the Fund.”

In 1891 it was decided to appoint a janitor at a salary, then considered sufficient and liberal of forty dollars a month. To increase his income the Board decided to permit him to sell lunches if he wished but at no time to dispose of “anything liquid.” Whether this denial included non intoxicating water is not revealed. He was also accorded the privilege of renting bath suits. To prevent his becoming a profiteer without conscience the extreme maximum of his charge was set at fifteen cents.

That the janitor was expected to refrain from idleness while “on the job” is proved by a letter he sent to the Governing Board. It stated that a supply of paint had arrived at the Club. He said no bargain had been made with him concerning paint work and he said he would like to know something about the situation. With the utmost gravity and possibly a frown of disapproval because of his presumed non-cooperative attitude, the Board directed the Commodore to advise the janitor that he was capable of and should be willing to do the work. The employe was warned that he must proceed to do the painting within ten days.

There was a kindly and protective provision of “weather permitting.” In case of refusal or unnecessary delay the Board advised they would feel free to make another appointment. Since there is no further reference to this controversy it is to be presumed the janitor proceeded to remove his coat and then apply a somewhat different one to the property.

In 1892 North Carolina's great Governor and Senator, Zebulon Baird Vance, in declining health at the time, visited Wrightsville Beach. Appropriate complimentary resolutions were adopted by the Governing Board





and Governor Vance was invited to avail himself of the privileges of the Club House as long as he wished to do so.

In 1893 there might have been apprehension and fear that some member of the Club would profit unduly at the expense of his brothers in the fraternity. For that reason the decree went forth: “No member of the Club shall be eligible to the position of janitor at the club house.” There was no mention of any application having been filed by a member in possible need of the desirable forty dollar per month position.

In June of 1893 it was decided to “borrow money on behalf of the Club up to $300, using if possible, as security the claim due by the Bank of New Hanover.” At that particular time it is to be assumed that said bank was in extremis, financially, or maybe, already had passed into the throes of permanent rigor mortis.

In March of 1895 it is recorded that success had attended an effort to purchase two lots south of the location of the club house. To assure members that their summer haven was still secure one reads in the minutes: “The House is still there, locked and sealed, and the keys are in our pockets.”

On April 1, 1896 the beloved Honorable George Davis, one of New Hanover County's most distinguished and revered sons, Attorney General of The Confederate States of America in the cabinet of President Jefferson Davis and the only citizen ever to have declined appointment by the Governor to the high position of Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of North Carolina, was the subject of complimentary and well deserved resolutions. These were drafted by the Governing Board on behalf of the membership. Mr. Davis had been made an Honorary Member in 1891.

It was about this time also that a member was reported for leaving a window open. He was warned that in future he would be expected to close all windows. Otherwise, something unpleasant and uncomfortable might happen, to blow him through one of the open outlets.

In 1897 undoubtedly there was general agreement with the proverb, “Brevity is the soul of wit,” extended even to the point of including speeches, as well. It is proclaimed: “A motion was made and passed allowing one man in regular meetings to speak not over two minutes.”

In the minutes of this particular period it is set forth: “After some discussion of the Club's boat, which is kept for the purpose of assisting persons in a perilous position in the surf, the Commodore was directed to appoint twenty men who could captain the boat in case of emergency.” It is not disclosed what solution was in mind if two or more valiant rescuers arrived about the same time and “all” claimed the individual honor of captaining the ship on the voyage of rescue. Whether a debate was supposed to be held to settle the question while the affrighted one in the surf floundered about in eventual hope of reaching dry territory, is not revealed.

Who knows now what is, or was, a vapor stove? Whatever it was there must have been some highly objectionable features concerning it. The minutes proclaim: “A member was notified that a vapor stove put





in the Club by him must be moved out of the house and cared for until the 22nd of the month. If not observed then the said stove shall be shipped to town if not moved in the meantime.” To make the warning even more pertinent and pressing, “a motion was passed imposing a fine of $5 on anyone who might put said vapor stove, or any other like it, back in the club house.”

In the days of 1897 undoubtedly members must have been expected to bring their lunches from town, either cooked or uncooked, or starve as a result of their personal and wanton negligence. The record discloses the following resolution: “No cooking shall be done on the premises, except by the janitor, who shall do so, only then, at his own volition.” In relation thereto was the following resolution of the vintage of 1898: “The Club House is not to be used for the regular sleeping and eating place of any person.” Whether this was used to deprive the janitor of his cooking privileges granted in the preceding year and to relegate him to the list of famished and hungry persons, is not made clear.

In 1898 the Governing Board, following receipt of a request from The Hospital Circle of The King's Daughters, granted the privilege of placing a case of books at the Club House, to be circulated for a reasonable fee. All income was “to be used for the benefit of the work of the Circle.”

That any indolent or parsimonious member who had the audacity to quarter his boat on the porches could expect rigid and merited punishment, is revealed in the following resolution: “The Purser is instructed to send this offending member a bill for $1.50 for storage of his boat on the piazza instead of renting space in the Boat House.” Somewhat akin thereto and in the same year of 1898 it is shown by the minutes: “A member has declined to pay his fee for use of a locker and will not surrender the key which is in his possession. He is to be advised if the fee is not paid within ten days, or the key returned, then he is to be severely punished in direct relation to his offence.”

Then there is revealed a rather contradictory situation when it is stated that charges had been brought against a non-member allegedly for being on the piazza. This personage appears to have been exonerated of any evil or malicious motive. The description of the incident concludes: “It was proved that this individual only went to the outside edge to speak to someone inside.” Just what could have been done to this alien, even if the charge had been sustantiated, is still a mysterious and hidden secret. There is little, if any, doubt he would have thumbed his nose at any would be interferers with his assumed rights, with an impudent invitation for them to do their worst, insofar as he was concerned.

There is on file in 1898 minutes a letter from H. B. Duryea, of Newport, R. I. In this he advises that the yacht Carolina, owned by Mr. Pembroke Jones, a former Commodore and enthusiastic member of the Carolina Yacht Club, “was flying the Bourge of that association, second oldest in the United States.” The letter also stated that a cup was being given the Club to be competed for by “thirty footers.” There is attached





a clipping from one of the metropolitan papers which states as a fact that the Carolina had returned to New York from Newport, “Flying 34 flags, the largest number ever acquired by any boat of her class in a single season.”

That the fair feminine followers of yachting, wives and daughters of members, were neither being overlooked nor discriminated against, is revealed in the following resolution of 1899: “Resolved that an appropriation of ten dollars be made to the Regatta Committee to be expended for prizes for The Ladies’ Race on July 21.”

In the fall of 1899 came the greatest disaster ever to befall the Club. To remedy same the wise collection of The Reserve Fund over the years proved to be helpful indeed. It was at that time there occurred one of the greatest storms ever to visit the vicinity. There was accompanying terrific volume of damage to property at Wrightsville Beach and elsewhere in the section.

The minutes disclose the statement that the club house was a practical wreck, following nature's stern visitation. It was set forth that an assessment to bring in about $3,000, with supplementary aid from the Reserve Fund, would enable the club house to be rebuilt and also care for operational expenses in 1900, estimated at $400. Unanimous sentiment was expressed to the effect that the disaster in no way should be regarded as a regrettable blow which could not be overcome. Everyone was in agreement that the building should be restored at the earliest possible moment. It was decided that restoration should provide a building even more convenient and useful than its predecessor had proved to be throughout the years.

November 19, 1899, at a meeting of the Governing Board it was agreed that the House Committee should have authority to repair, or rebuild, the club house if it could be done for a sum not to exceed $1,000. If that sum should prove to be insufficient then the Committee was authorized to invite bids for the construction of a new building and to report back the result of their findings. At this session a letter was ordered sent to Mr. Norwood Giles, then living in New York. A few years previously he had compiled a delightful outline concerning early points in the life of the Club. Mr. Giles was in poor health. The letter wished for him permanent recovery and expressed a desire for an early return to his youthful environment.

As evidence of the real determination to have a new and modern home, following the great storm, is this extract from the minutes for February 2, 1900: “The Commodore is instructed to employ suitable help to tear down the old club house and have the lumber piled and listed, and to employ Charles McMillan, an architect, to draw plans and specifications, same to be presented to the Board at the earliest possible moment.”

Two months later, in March of 1900, it is disclosed that the plans had been completed and approved. They were then offered to contractors. The lowest bid was submitted by Mr. Thad F. Tyler. He agreed





to construct the new building, using materials on hand, for the sum of $1800.

Then a development transpired which today might be considered rather unusual. Mr. McMillan, the architect, also was a contractor. He asked for a delay of several days in closing the transaction so that he could have an opportunity to submit a bid.

At a second meeting held March 17, 1900 the Governing Board recommended that the contract be awarded to Mr. Tyler at his bid, provided that “he furnishes sufficient financial guarantee that the building be completed by May 20th.” It was noted that the Commodore reported this conclusion as the final action and recommendation of the Building Committee. Mr. McMillan was to supervise the erection of the building for a mutually agreeable fee.

An action which is noticeable today in the general design of the buildings was taken at the session of March 19, 1900, just before the work of rehabilitation was started. This resolution stated: “It has been decided to erect the new building on a line with the front of the dressing rooms, and with an equal distance between building and dressing rooms on either side.”

In May of the same year while the work was in progress, it was decided by the Governing Board to use sawed shingles on the sides of the building. The Purser was instructed to make inquiries in regard to construction prices and then report results. Extreme care can be observed as exercised by the Board. Seemingly they wished to have knowledge of, and to authorize every detail in connection with construction of the new building. This position was deemed to be ethical and proper. Then, if there later should be any criticism or trouble in connection with the contract it could be recognized that said Board was the final authority to be consulted.

Illustrative of the truth of the lines by the immortal Scotch Bard, “Bobbie” Burns, that “The best laid schemes o’ mice and men, Gang aft a-gley, and leave us naught but grief and pain, for promised joy,” came a regrettable misunderstanding. As a result the unfortunate contractor was forced to suffer some financial loss in the transaction.

The minutes for June 16, 1900 state: “It is directed that a letter be written Mr. Charles McMillan, the architect, stating since a misunderstanding has occurred in regard to the partitions upstairs in the club house, that the contractor be informed the Club will claim its right to make deductions for his (contractor's) omissions in the building of four windows and two pairs of steps on western piazza, and grill work and doors. Or the contractor may put up such partitions and doors, and claim will not be made against him.” Just what was the final result in this controversy is not disclosed. Judging from the fact that the Governing Board were strict guardians of the trust imposed, there is little, if any, doubt that the contractor just decided to install the contested features and charge off to experience any extra final outlay which was entailed.





“Provide and use your own garments,” evidently was a slogan taken much to heart in July of 1900 when the Governing Board: “Resolved that the Superintendent investigate the matter of members using the bath suits of other members, without permission of the owner of suit, and to report the names of such offenders, when possible. Further, that the Superintendent was to know the identity of the name-destroying culprit, who cut the name of Mr. Blank from his bath suit.” Just how the Superintenednt was to know the identity of the name-destroying culprit, Deponent knoweth not. Nor does the abstruse record disclose same at any place.

Either the ladies’ yacht races were lessening in popularity among the fair sportswomen, or there was a Scotch influence at large in the distribution of funds in the summer of 1900. The minutes disclose that for a particular contest among the feminine boaters there was an appropriation of five dollars only for prizes. This was exactly one-half the amount allocated for a similar event several years prior thereto.

Evidently in fear that their ardor might be dampened in several respects, the august Governing Board in June of 1900 met to discuss the stoppage of a leak in the roof of the building. It is shown that, after considerable discussion, the question of whether or not to have a damp interior was left with the Commodore to settle.

In 1902 the salary of the janitor still was fixed at the same sum which had been allowed for many previous years—exactly forty dollars per month.

In 1902 there was living in Wilmington a gentleman who was one of the original incorporators of the Club in 1853. He was the venerable and highly respected Mr. Richard J. Jones. As he approached his fiftieth year of active membership he was honored by his fellow members with an award of Honorary Membership for the balance of his life.

The Scotch financial spirit heretofore referred to (and please be assured, gentle reader, that the allusion is not to liquid Scotch spirit), again revealed its provident, saving attitude in June of 1902. It is solemnly recorded: “The Board decided not to purchase a new register this season but to use the old one as long as it would last. If it did not last all summer then to purchase a very cheap book with which to end the season.”

In July of 1902 the management decided not to have any trespassers loitering about the property, even to the extreme where the Wrightsville Beach government itself was included. At this particular time it is recorded: “Decision was reached not to allow the Town of Wrightsville Beach to build their walk through the Club's property. The Purser also is instructed to pay the town tax of $18, this being one per cent of the valuation of $1800.”

Undoubtedly the management did not approve of any intention, or desire, by the janitor to stray far from his business home. Especially in view of the fact that he was drawing the rather inflated salary of forty dollars a month. Here is the action of the Governing Board as taken





at the meeting of March, 1903: “Resolved that the Purser be instructed to notify the janitor that he is not to leave the premises without permission of the Superintendent. If he should do so then he is to be reported to the Governing Board, who then will take such further action as they deem proper and advisable.”

1903 marked the semi-centennial of the organization. A half century had passed since the glamorous days of 1853 when the Club was formed. It was felt right and proper that a joyful celebration should be held in recognition of the first fifty years of existence, and to wish all manner of success as the association entered upon the second half century.

At the May meeting in 1903 Mr. George W. Kidder, Commodore of the Club for three successive seasons, was requested to serve as Chairman of a committee to arrange for proper celebration of the semi-centennial. He was given power to select his own aids. Mr. Kidder asked the Club to state the approximate amount which should be expended for the celebration. He suggested the date be set for the third or fourth week in June. Decision was reached to assess each member one dollar. The aggregate amount to be raised, with supplementary funds, was deemed sufficient properly to stage the celebration.

The program was carried out in pleasing and creditable manner. The occasion proved to be an event of notable and impressive nature. Invitations were sent to many distinguished rulers of governments, prominent officials of this and other countries, and to a great number of individuals interested in yachting. There was an appreciative and cordial reaction and response to the invitations. Illustrative of the acknowledgments which were received, it is deemed appropriate for this permanent record to make brief reference to some of them.

A valuable possession of the Club is a “scrapbook.” In this has been preserved the acknowledgments received from many persons high in the official life of various countries. These exhibits are well preserved and should prove of keen interest to all members of the Club as at present constituted.

For the sake of the record, now that the centennial of 1953 has succeeded the semi-centennial of 1903, possibly a glance at some of the friendly messages which came after receipt of formal invitations to attend, may not prove uninteresting.

On stationary of The White House, at Washington, came a reply from the famous President, Theodore Roosevelt:

“The President regrets his inability to accept the courteous invitation of The Carolina Yacht Club to be present at the Semi-Centennial Anniversary, Tuesday evening, June thirtieth, nineteen hundred and three.”

The Secretary of State wrote: “I regret that it is not possible because of prior engagements to be present at your celebration.”

From the Postmaster General: “I regret exceedingly my inability to accept the kind invitation of The Carolina Yacht Club to attend the Semi-Centennial Anniversary at Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina.”





From the Secretary of Agriculture: “I deeply regret that I will be unable to attend the Celebration, on account of previous engagements.”

The Attorney General, Honorable P. C. Knox, a distinguished lawyer of the time, wrote: “I beg to acknowledge the courtesy of an invitation to be present at the Semi-Centennial Anniversary of The Carolina Yacht Club. I must express regrets that my engagements are of such a nature that I will be compelled to deny myself the pleasure of being present.”

In the hand writing of Naselli, then Consul from Italy, one may read the following interesting acknowledgment: “His Majesty, the King of Italy, my august Sovereign, to whom your Club sent an invitation for the 50th Anniversary of its foundation, has ordered me to convey to you His Royal thanks for your kind thoughtfulness. Happy to be the medium of conveying His Majesty's thanks, I remain, Sir, Yours very truly, Naselli, Consul of Italy.”

From the office of the Ambassador of China, at Washington, came this reply: “I regret that the pressure of official business prevents my acceptance of your Club's kind invitation, and I avail myself of this opportunity to express my sincere thanks to the members of the Club for the compliment thus paid me.”

Signed personally by the greatest yachting sportsman who ever lived, and who, with his various Shamrocks continuously tried to win championship races from America, only to receive continual bitter and disappointing defeats, came this note from Sir Thomas Lipton, an Englishman of the finest type of integrity and character:

“Very many thanks for your kind invitation to attend the Semi-Centennial Anniversary of The Carolina Yacht Club on the evening of the 30th inst. I regret, however, that I cannot have the pleasure of being present as I shall be so busily engaged at that time in connection with the Shamrock. Signed, Thomas J. Lipton.”

To conclude this interesting and valuable collection of acknowledgments there are friendly and appreciative letters and cards, with expressions of good wishes, from practically every yacht club of any importance in the United States.

Again we revert to some of the matters, usual and unusual, which were deemed sufficiently important to be brought before the Governing Board for official attention and proper action.

At the August, 1903 meeting, “The Commodore was empowered to have hills on the south side of the club house leveled off and to fill in a hole around the building.”

At the same meeting: “It was moved that the Purser be instructed to write Mr. R. J. Jones, requesting him to prepare a history of the Club, beginning from 1853, the time he and a few others joined in its organization.” Several months later, Mr. Jones replied. He stated that it was necessary for him to decline, because of his advanced age, and other demands upon his time since he, even then, was actively engaged in business pursuits. He expressed regret that such a decision, necessarily, was forced upon him.





So far as one janitorial position at least is concerned, the summer of 1904 proved to be an occasion for extreme rejoicing and enthusiastic antics by one member of the supervisory fraternity. His heart was filled with gladness when the individual who filled this position for the Club was advised that decision had been reached to increase his salary to sixty dollars per month. There was a warning of responsibility, however, in a proviso that he must be responsible for securing extra help, when needed, and assuring their prompt report to the Superintendent.

In June of 1904 it was ordered that the Consolidated Railway, Light & Power Company be requested to remove one are light, with supporting pole, in front of the Club. Since a year then had elapsed following the celebration of the Semi-Centennial, in rather dilatory manner to say the least, it was decided to have the still-in-place decorations removed from the building.

The average club member of today takes as a matter of course, and an individual right, the privilege of having electricity in his home or place of business. Yet it was just one year less than a half century ago that the following resolution was adopted by the Governing Board: “Resolved that a Committee be appointed to look into the matter of lighting the Club by electricity with report to be filed at the next meeting.” Then, believe it or not, Mr. Doubting Thomas, the following week it was decided to expend the comfortable, possibly extravagant, sum of eighteen dollars, under a contract to install electricity in the Club House for the amount mentioned.

In the summer of 1904 we find the Governing Board, after mature deliberation and much thought reaching the decision: “A committee of one shall be appointed with power to act, to secure a new life boat. He also shall have authority to sell the old boat for the sum of one dollar.” When they reached a period of retirement, life boats in those days evidently had little of reward to anticipate, since they were then to be sold for a dollar. However, if disposed of in allegedly progressive days of 1953 the theoretical dollar would have brought the Club about 53 cents, the present equivalent of a dollar of five decades ago.

Cleanliness was an objective not to be overlooked and never to be forgotten in those balmy days of 1904. This is attested by the following extracts from the minutes of July 1: “Resolved that the Superintendent purchase one hundred rough towels and that the janitor be instructed not to let the same towel be used MORE THAN ONCE before washing same.”

Evidently the conservative spirit of the Governing Board would not permit them to join in suggestions or movements, the effect of which might have been to decrease the revenues of the transit corporation, which even at that date was furnishing excellent service to and from the resort. The minutes for February 20, 1905 reveal this illuminating statement:

“A communication from the Atlantic Yacht Club was read relative to the appointment of a joint Committee to confer with the management of the Consolidated Railways, Light & Power Company to secure





a reduction in rates to and from the Beach. Upon motion it was unanimously decided to have the Purser acknowledge the communication and to say that this Club does not deem it necessary to take action.”

Now there apparently seems to have been a change of attitude, as compared with a position taken years previously. Then it had been decided that no member of the Club should fill a salaried appointment connected with supervision of the club house. In February of 1905 the following action is recorded: “Within ten days after election the Governing Board shall appoint three members to act as a Committee on Membership. One member of the Club is to be selected as Superintendent of the club house and grounds. He shall be exempt from payment of dues and shall be hired at a salary of $40 a year.” There is one certain thing. Even in those days when expenditure of a dollar brought in return one hundred cents in value, the Superintendent, no matter how economical he may have been in his personal expeditures, could hardly have amassed a fortune from the salary which was allowed him.

How many of the present day's younger generation have ever heard of, or seen, a Japanese lantern? Well, they can be advised that a half century ago these illumination adjuncts were popular indeed for decorations. In the minutes for June 23, 1905, it is stated: “A Committee shall be appointed to draft rules for government of bowling alleys (which had been provided as an additional attraction to keep members within the confines of the club house and to persuade them not to go to the hotels for amusement). The Committee also shall have authority to rent a piano and to purchase as many Japanese lanterns as are needed during the season.”

Please remember, dear reader, that sentiment of tender and persuasive nature also has entered into the official existence of The Carolina Yacht Club. From the report of the Commodore for 1905 is gleaned the following item of romantic and social nature:

“Upon one occasion, which many will remember, we had the first wedding since the organization of the Club, to take place in the center of the reception hall. At that time a gentleman and his lady love residing on Greenville Sound, were made man and wife.”

In the summer of 1906 it was decided that the janitor should wear proper and essential garb while he fulfilled the duties of his onerous and responsible position. In the minutes for March it is disclosed: “The salary of the janitor was made $50 per month. The janitor also must provide himself with a suitable uniform, subject to the approval of the Superintendent, TO BE WORN AT ALL TIMES.”

The never yielding determination to maintain economic operation at all times and under all circumstances, is well evidenced by the following notation from the records for July 19, 1906: “A motion was adopted that the Club recognize the heroism of Janitor J. P. Walton, in saving Master Willson, of Charlotte, from drowning, and that he be presented with an appropriate present to cost NOT EXCEEDING FIFTEEN DOLLARS.”





Possibly it is proper and in order to terminate this series of human interest citations, all of which were deemed sufficiently important as to merit consideration and action by the Governing Boards, with a final extract. This followed another destructive storm in the fall of 1906. Happily and fortunately, however, the damage suffered by the club house during this second terrific weather disturbance, was inconsequential and of minor nature. There was no great monetary loss involved. As the storm occurred toward the end of the summer season there was no special interference with the usual activities of the Club. This concluding excerpt from the minutes for November 15, 1905 is set forth in the following terse and forceful manner: “The Board approved the action of the House Committee in closing the Club House for the season, after the big storm, which carried away the trestle of the traction company, thereby preventing members the use of same.”

Since 1906, to the present, the Carolina Yacht Club has been wisely and conservatively managed by successive Governing Boards. The Directors have given freely of their time, thought and effort to direct the affairs of the organization. They have given it the benefit of wise, provident and prudent direction. To all of those who have so generously given of themselves certainly the apreciative thanks of the entire membership is extended in every increasing volume.

As a supplementary note it is pleasing to emphasize that one of the most interesting features of the long and honorable career of this famous progenitor of modern yacht clubs, is that the same courses for regattas at Wrightsville Beach are followed now, just as they were mapped by the founders one hundred years ago.

During the past half century, 1903-1953, the Club has stealily developed and expanded. It has become an even greater factor in the sports and social life not only of the membership, but of the entire community, as well. Under the management and direction of a progressive and aggressive spirit, developed and advanced by some of the younger members, activities of the organization have been greatly broadened in conception and scope.

The sport of yachting was the original motivation for the organization. Now the modern enlarged and improved Club House (successor to the first home, the initial building at Wrightsville Beach), serves as a summer haven for families of members and their friends. Here friendships are fostered and strengthened. Children are permitted many forms of innocent diversion and amusement. Various types of informal entertainment such as receptions, dances, card parties, etc., are frequently and elaborately arranged for the pleasure of those participating.

To evidence the position and influence which surrounds The Carolina Yacht Club as a functioning unit, this altogether inadequate and feeble sketch well may be closed with the statement that the association is a prominent and worthy member of the North American Yacht Racing Union. That body also may be considered and designated as “The Supreme Court of Yachting.”





Possessing an equally important position as that held in the National unit, in a sectional or Tri-State group, this well known yachting organization of Wilmington, Wrightsville Beach and New Hanover County, is regarded as one of the most influential components in the South Atlantic Yacht Racing Association.

Now, as we say “Hail and Farewell” to the first century of life of The Carolina Yacht Club, combined with “Greetings and Welcome” to a lusty Time infant—the second hundred years of life—newer members of the organization may be interested in a concluding and final statement that, undoubtedly for the sake of sentiment and affection, many of the feminine names listed for yachts of “ye olden time” were those of sisters, mothers, or daughters of the valiant hosts of splendid saliors and courtly gentlemen who added so much of prestige, dignity, and influence to the Carolina Yacht Club in its earlier years.

In conclusion, with the first century of honorable existence now terminated, The Carolina Yacht Club enters upon the second epochal ten decades with a forward and confident glance, and a determination to hew for itself an even greater and more important niche in the fabric of the fine community it has so long and honorably served.

ADDENDUM

In one of the timeworn minute books there is to be found a register of a great number of yachts, with their owners listed at the time of recording. These are approximately 85 in number. As a matter of course it is to be understood that this enumeration does not inclule the names, or the owners, of many of the boats later than 1915. For the periods subsequent to that year, if all inclusions were made, the outline would be of such voluminous nature as to cause this record to become as top heavy as some of the earlier yachts themselves are said to have been.

Therefore, the kind approval of those who may read this narrative is requested, with the hope they will understand that what is being sought and portrayed is the background, the glamour, and the fascination so well delineated by the earlier minutes of the Club. The more modern listings, if desired, can be secured with a minimum of time and effort from the well maintained, accurately kept, and splendidly preserved annual minute books subsequent to 1906.

With the foregoing explanation, for the moment let us consult the old records once more. Let us be actuated with the hope and effort particularly to develop, and find, a bird's eye view of the older yachts as they effectively and brilliantly contested for leading positions in scores of races. These, initially were run on the Cape Fear River, within the harbor lines at Wilmington. Subsequently races were held on the lovely waters, sometimes placid, sometimes rough, of the appealing and glamorous Banks Channel, just west of Wrightsville Beach.





Now, to outline the ancient register of the yachts, with their owners. Certainly, it is most appropriate to record the fact that the famous Confederate States’ naval hero, Captain John Newland Maffitt, of Wilmington, stands at the head of the column, displaying the Number One position. His boat was named the Carrie. Then, proceeding in orderly manner, in accordance with the registered number assigned each owner, with his boat, the listings are as follows:

1. The Carrie, John Newland Maffitt: 2. Mollie, John D. French; 3. Bessie Lee, O. A. Wiggins; 4. Little Sister, Clayton and Norwood Giles; 5. Little Walter, Walter Coney; 6. Annie, Henry Burkheimer; 7. Lizzie, I. B. Grainger; 8. Rosa, John M. Cazaux; 9. Undine, (Lost, carried out Masonboro Inlet, to sea, Sept. 17, 1876), John J. Fowler; 10. Qui Vive, W. A. Wright; 11. Retta, F. A. & H. C. Cassidy; 12. Gypsy, A. D. Lippitt; 13. Carolina, E. E. Burriss; 14. Lorelie, John J. Conolly; 15. Curlew, H. G. Latimer; 16. Cora & Eliza, George W. Kidder; 17. Lilly, J. L. Maffitt; 18. Jennie Q, George W. Hewlett; 19. Spray, Ed. S. Latimer; 20. Ripple, Norwood Giles; 21. Empie & Marion, A. E. Wright; 22. Frolic, George D. Parsley; 23. Lizzie, George D. Parsley; 24. Foam, I. B. Grainger; 25. Bonnie, Jos. Price; 26. Loulie, J. W. Atkinson, Jr.; 27. Phantom, John K. Williams; 28. Glide, Norwood Giles; 29. Madge, (Name of owner not shown); 30. Lillian-Florence, H. M. Bowden; 31. Idler, Pembroke Jones; 32. Mabel, G. Herbert Smith; 33. Vixen, Herbert R. Latimer; 34. Bubble, Norwood Giles; 35. Sprite, A. J. Flanner; 36. Peggoty, Henry Walters; 37. Pirate, Norwood Giles; 38. Mamie B., H. L. Fennell; 39. Lizzie L, William Latimer; 40. Curlew, H. G. Latimer; 41. Diote, Henry Walters; 42. Clarendon, Frederick Kidder; 43. Vitesse, M. F. H. Gouverneur; 44. Little Willie, William M. Atkinson; 45. Nixie, (Owner not designated); 46. Thetis, Martin S. Willard; 47. N.G.E., Thomas M. Emerson; 48. Carolina, Pembroke Jones; 49. Eugenie, George Harriss, Jr.; 50. “O.N.”, F. Ancrum Lord; 51. Emma, Charles W. Worth; 52. Josephine, Jos. S. Worth; 53. Question, Walter L. Parsley; 54. Mequero, Dr. George G. Thomas; 55. Sadie, S. Percy Cowan; 56. Yonalee, Davis Brothers; 57. Kayembee, Martin S. Willard; 58. Puzzle, John VanB. Metts; 59. Don Julian, Walter L. Parsley; 60. Buttinsky, Henry J. MacMillan; 61. Gambol, S. Percy Cowan; 62. Raider, Henry J. MacMillan; 63. Little Josephine, S. Percy Cowan; 64. “T.T.”, Charles W. Worth; 65. Reckless, George and Platt W. Davis; 66. Mayfly, Walter L. Parsley; 67. Carolina, Burke H. Bridgers; 68. Fearless, John & VanB. Metts; 69. Pirate, Thomas P. Hammer; 70. Thalia, Thomas P. Hammer; 71. Senga, Nelson MacRae; 72. Elbee, J. Stevenson Brown; 73. Name Not Given, M. J. Corbett; 74. Name Not Given, A. B. Skelding; 75. Osprey, Thomas P. Hammer; 76. Unknown, J. Williams Harriss; 77. Dixie, Walter L. Parsley; 78. Calypso, A. B. Skelding; 79. Name Not Given, A. B. Skelding; 80. Luola, James Sprunt; 81. Bumble Bee, Henry J. MacMillan.





CHARTER OF THE
CAROLINA YACHT CLUB

Issued June 21, 1873 — Amended February 10, 1948

STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA

To the Clerk of the Superior Court of the County of New Hanover:

The persons hereinafter named desire to form themselves into a private corporation for certain social purposes, as hereinafter set forth, in accordance with the provisions of the Act of the General Assembly of the State of North Carolina, entitled “An Act to enable any persons, not less than three, to become incorporated, and to regulate such, and other Corporations,” ratified the 12th day of February, A. D. 1872.

INCORPORATORS

First—Names and residences of those proposing to incorporate: William A. Wright, William A. Cumming, Henry Burkheimer, Eli Murray, George Harriss, Clayton Giles, and William A. Wright, Jr., all of the City of Wilmington, in the County of New Hanover.

NAME, OBJECT AND PLACE OF BUSINESS

Second—The name of the corporation is THE CAROLINA YACHT CLUB. Its principal office is at 401 South Lumina Avenue, Wrightsville Beach, New Hanover County, North Carolina. The general purpose of said corporation and the nature of the business which it proposes to do is exclusively social. It proposes to cultivate by competition and practice among its members increased skill and greater security and safety in the care and management of yachts of all descriptions. It proposes also to establish and maintain one or more club houses on Wrightsville Beach for the convenience and pleasure of its members during the summer months, and to cultivate among its members a spirit of friendliness, convivality, and good sportsmanship in all social activities.

CAPITAL STOCK

Third—There will be no capital stock.

SHARES OF STOCK

Fourth—There will be no shares of stock.

TITLES OF PRINCIPAL OFFICERS

Fifth—The titles of the principal officers shall be as follows: First, “Commodore”; second, “Fleet Captain”; third, “Flag Captain”; fourth, “Purser”; fifth, “Commanders.”





GOVERNING BOARD

Sixth—The corporation shall be governed by a local board composed of the Commodore, the Fleet Captain and three Commanders, with such substitutes or alternates as the By-Laws may prescribe. This board shall be elected annually by the members of the corporation, at such regular annual meeting of the corporation as the By-Laws shall designate. A majority of all members of the corporation shall not be necessary to the due organization of any general meeting of the corporation but a majority of the members attending any such meeting shall be required to elect to any office or to pass or amend a By-Law of the corporation. The By-Laws of the corporation may be amended at any annual or special meeting of the members of the corporation, by a majority vote of the members present, provided notice be given in writing to each member at least ten days prior to such meeting, that changes in the By-Laws are to be considered. At all meetings of the members of the corporation each member shall be entitled to one vote, to be given in person, and not by proxy.

MEETINGS

Seventh—There shall be at least one regular annual meeting of the members of the corporation, the time and place for which shall be designated by the By-Laws. Special meetings of the members of the corporation may, from time to time, be called by the Governing Board.

MEMBERSHIP

Eighth—The members of this corporation shall NOT be individually liable for its debts. Membership in the corporation shall be by invitation only, and members shall be admitted, disciplined, suspended, and expelled in accordance with the provisions of the corporation By-Laws.

DUES AND ASSESSMENTS

Ninth—Each and every one of the members of this corporation shall be liable to such annual dues and assessments as may be provided by the By-Laws.

DURATION

Tenth—The period of existence of this corporation is extended for a term of 99 years from this date. (Feb. 10, 1948).

POWERS

Eleventh—The corporation shall have full power and authority to purchase, lease, and otherwise acquire, mortgage, convey, and otherwise dispose of all kinds of property, both real and personal, both in this state and in all other states, territories, and dependencies of the United States, and generally to perform all acts which may be deemed necessary or expedient for the proper and successful prosecution of the objects and purposes for which the corporation is created.





GRANT OF INCORPORATION

STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA,

COUNTY OF NEW HANOVER

IN SUPERIOR COURT.

The original plan of incorporation of which the foregoing is a true copy signed by the above named corporators, whose signatures have been duly proven to the satisfaction of this Court, having been filed in the office of this Court, permission is hereby given to open books of subscription to the said proposed corporation, according to the terms of said plan, from the date hereof, either in the city of Wilmington or at the banks at Wrightsville Sound, in New Hanover county.

In Testimony Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and affixed the seal of said Court, at office in Wilmington, this 21st day of June, 1873.

J. C. MANN, C. S. C.

Official Seal of the Clerk of the Superior Court County of New Hanover, State of North Carolina.

STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA
DEPARTMENT OF STATE

To all to whom these presents shall come, Greeting:

I, Thad Eure, Secretary of State of the State of North Carolina, do hereby certify the following and hereto attached 5 sheets to be a true copy of the Certificate of Amendment of the Carolina Yacht Club and the probates thereon, as the same is taken from and compared with the original filed in this office on the 10th day of February, A. D., 1948.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my official seal.

Done in Office, at Raleigh, this 10th day of February in the year of our Lord 1948.

THAD EURE,

Secretary of State.

Official Seal of the State of North Carolina.





BY-LAWS
ARTICLE I
OFFICERS AND THEIR ELECTION

Section 1. There shall be a general meeting of the Club on the third Monday in November of each year, to be held at 8:00 o'clock P. M., in the city of Wilmington, N. C., for the election of officers and the transaction of such other business as shall come before it.

Section 2. All officers of this Club shall be elected by ballot and shall hold office for one year and until their successors shall be elected and qualified.

Section 3. The officers of the Club shall be and shall rank as follows: Commodore, Fleet Captain, Flag Captain, Purser and three Commanders. There shall also be a Measurer and a Marshal.

Section 4. The Governing Board shall, as provided in the charter, consist of the Commodore, Fleet Captain and three Commanders.

Section 5. In the event of the death or resignation of either of the first four officers, the Governing Board shall, within thirty days, call a special meeting of the Club for the purpose of filling the vacancy. Should a vacancy occur from the same causes in any other office, it shall be filled by the Governing Board at its first meeting thereafter.

Section 6. Any officer failing to attend two consecutive meetings of the Governing Board without satisfactory excuse, shall forfeit his membership on the Board and the vacancy so made shall be filled as provided in Section 5.

ARTICLE II
OFFICERS AND THEIR DUTIES
COMMODORE

Section 1. It shall be the duty of the Commodore to preside at all meetings and to see that all by-laws, rules and regulations of the Club are enforced. He shall take command of the squadron when assembled.

Within thirty days after the annual meeting, the Commodore shall appoint three members, not members of the Governing Board, who shall constitute and act as the Membership Committee on proposals for membership. This committee shall be known only to the Commodore.

This committee shall be known as the Membership Committee, and their duties are prescribed as follows:

They shall receive from the Commodore all proposals for membership and shall make diligent search into the standing and eligibility of the person proposed. They shall pass upon the proposal by accepting or rejecting the name of the person proposed, and report to the Commodore within ten (10) days after their receipt of the proposal.





No name proposed for membership shall be posted for balloting until after the Membership Committee has passed upon the name proposed.

FLEET CAPTAIN

Section 2. In the absence of the Commodore, the duties of the office shall devolve upon the Fleet Captain.

FLAG CAPTAIN

Section 3. The Flag Captain shall be an assistant to the commanding officer, performing such duties as are prescribed by him. In the absence of the Commodore and of the Fleet Captain, the duties of their offices, respectively, shall devolve upon the Flag Captain.

COMMANDERS

Section 4. In the absence of the Commodore, Fleet Captain, and Flag Captain, their duties shall devolve upon the three Commanders, according to their rank from point of service as a Commander.

GOVERNING BOARD

Section 5. It shall be the duty of the Governing Board to have control and management of all the estate, property and effects of the Club. They shall make the rules of conduct and other rules and regulations of and for the Club, and shall make a report to the Club at each annual meeting in November, of all rules and regulations made and of all matters of interest connected with the affairs of the Club.

They shall, annually, within ten days after their election, appoint three members, who shall constitute the Regatta Committee, which committee shall have authority to appoint, for each race, three members to act as judges, each to be paid a fee not to exceed one dollar for each race.

The Commodore shall appoint a committee of three women, who shall have supervision of the ladies’ quarters at the Club. The duties of this committee will be to report their suggestions and recommendations to the Commodore.

They shall appoint one member, who shall be Superintendent of the Club House and grounds, and they shall employ a suitable person, not member of the Club, to act as Steward, and shall fix his compensation.

The Superintendent of the Club House and grounds shall be exempt from dues and assessments and shall receive as compensation for his duties sixty dollars annually.

Section 6. The Governing Board is expressly forbidden to incur any indebtedness in the name of the Club beyond the amount of the funds in the hands of the Purser, or solvent credits, dues or assessments which shall be due the Club within thirty days. No part of the Reserve Fund shall be construed as being a solvent credit for the purpose of operating the Club until the provisions of Article VII, Section 4 have been complied





with and specific authority has been granted by the Club to use any part of the Reserve Fund.

Section 7. The Governing Board shall adopt a suitable seal, with an appropriate device thereon, as the corporate seal of the Club; also a Club Signal to be carried at the peak of all yachts enrolled in the squadron, and particular signals of like form with the Club Signal, but with colors differently arranged, for use by the Commodore, Fleet Captain, and Flag Captain, respectively.

OFFICE AND DUTIES OF THE PURSER

Section 8. In addition to his duties as Purser, he shall be Secretary of the Club and Secretary of the Governing Board, keeping a correct record in a proper book of the proceedings of all meetings of the Club and of the Governing Board.

Section 9. He shall keep a correct roll of all the members of the Club and shall notify new members of their election and notify any member who may be fined or dropped from the membership. He shall give notice of meetings as hereinafter provided.

Section 10. He shall file and keep properly all documents, records, reports and communications connected with the business and affairs of the Club.

Section 11. He shall collect, and shall deposit in such bank or banks as shall be designated by the Governing Board, all dues, assessments and other moneys belonging to the Club, and pay all bills and debts of the Club, taking proper receipts or vouchers for such payments; but no bills shall be paid until they have been approved by the Governing Board. He shall make Reserve Fund deposits as hereinafter provided.

Section 12. He shall keep a copy of the By-Laws, to be known as the “Official Copy”, and in this copy he shall cause to be inserted blank pages upon which he shall transcribe all amendments to the By-Laws as they are adopted.

Section 13. He shall make a report from time to time, as may be directed, to the Governing Board, of all moneys in his hands, and of all dues for which members may be in arrears, and shall make an annual report to the Club, at their annual meeting in November, in reference to the financial condition of the Club, in which shall be set forth all his receipts and disbursements, and shall file the same with his vouchers among the archives of the Club.

Section 14. He shall keep a correct list of the name, size, ownership, rig and builder of each yacht enrolled in the squadron, a copy of which shall always be open for inspection by members of the Club.





Section 15. In case of his inability to attend any meeting, he shall cause the necessary books and papers to be carried to the place of meeting and delivered to some officer or member of the Club.

Section 16. He shall be exempt from all dues and assessments and shall be allowed five per cent on all collections, provided that his commission does not exceed $500.00 per annum. He shall give a fidelity bond, in a duly licensed and accredited surety company, in such penal sum as is deemed proper by the Governing Board; the premium on said bond shall be paid by the Club, and the bond certificate shall be placed in the custody of the Commodore during his tenure of office.

OFFICE AND DUTIES OF THE MEASURER

Section 17. It shall be the duty of the Measurer to make a correct list of the name, size, rig and measurement of each yacht enrolled in the squadron and deliver the same to the Purser.

Section 18. He shall make a similar return to the Regatta Committee of each yacht entered for any regatta, at least twenty-four hours prior to such regatta.

ARTICLE III
MEETINGS

Section 1. In addition to the regular annual meeting in November, the Governing Board may call special meetings, in its discretion.

The Purser shall notify each member in writing, at least ten days in advance, of all regular and special meetings. When the reserve fund is to be acted on, he shall also advertise the meeting as required by Article VII.

Section 2. Notice to members of special meetings shall state in writing the object of the meeting, and no other business shall be transacted other than such business as may be presented by the Governing Board.

Section 3. A quorum at all meetings shall consist of twenty voting members of the Club.

Section 4. The following shall be the order of business at regular meetings:

1.Reading of the Minutes.
2.Reports of Officers and Committees.
3.Election of Officers.
4.Unfinished Business.
5.New Business.

ARTICLE IV
INITIATION FEES, DUES AND ASSESSMENTS

Section 1. The initiation fee for a new member shall be $150.00. The initiation fee for a Season member shall be $25.00.





The initiation fee for members’ sons and brothers, not yet twenty-two years of age, shall be $10.00. For sons and brothers of members who became over 21 years of age while serving in the armed forces, the initiation fee shall be $10.00, provided application for membership is made the first year they are discharged from the armed forces.

The initiation fee for reinstatement of a former member, heretofore resigned but not having removed his residence from New Hanover County, shall depend on the date of his resignation. If the date of reinstatement is less than five years from the date of resignation the initiation fee shall be $25.00. If the date of reinstatement is more than five years from the date of resignation, the initiation fee shall be $150.00.

There shall be no initiation fee for a former member who resigned owing to moving his residence from New Hanover County, provided reinstatement is requested within twelve months of his return to New Hanover County. If reinstatement is not requested within twelve months of the return to New Hanover County the former member shall be treated as though he had not moved his residence from New Hanover County.

The annual dues of the Club for full membership shall be fixed by the Governing Board at a sum not to exceed $10.00. At any meeting of the Club, after due and advance notice has been given each member as required under Article III, the members may, by a majority vote, direct the Governing Board to make an emergency assessment for special purposes of not more than $10.00 for that meeting. The total of the emergency assessments shall not exceed $10.00 in any one year. Any assessment made in the current year shall be made for that year only.

Section 2. Any member failing to pay dues or assessments within twenty days after notice of same shall, as provided in the Charter, cease to be a member. The Governing Board shall see that proper notice is given, and if payment is not made, shall order such member's name dropped from the rolls and report same to next meeting of the Club.

ARTICLE V
MEMBERSHIP

Section 1. Honorary members may be elected at any regular meeting of the Club or at any special meeting, if stated in the call. They shall be exempt from any payment of any initiation fees, dues or assessment, and shall be entitled to all the privileges of the Club except holding office and voting.

Section 2. Season members shall be entitled to the same Club privileges as regular members, but shall not be permitted to vote in Club meetings. Residents of New Hanover County shall not be eligible for Season membership for more than one season.





SAILING MEMBERS

Any boy or girl under 21 years of age and owning a sailboat may be proposed for a Sailing Membership by a member of the Club. Sailing Members will be elected by a majority vote of the Governing Board for a period of one season and will have all of the privileges of the Club on race days only and will be subject to the By-Laws of the Club. Annual dues for Sailing Members will be $5.00.

Section 3. The Governing Board only may elect to extend an invitation by courtesy card for fourteen days to the Commissioned Officers of the Coast Guard Service, the United States Navy, Army and Marine Corps for any one season.

Upon the expiration of the fourteen days the guest may signify his desire to become a Season member. He will then pay the annual dues for that season and enjoy all the privileges of the Club, except voting at any meeting.

The Governing Board may elect at any time not to extend the invitations if in their judgment they deem it expedient for the interest of the Club.

LADY MEMBERS

Section 4. Any lady who may wish to obtain for herself or herself and family the privileges of the Club and has no male member in her family through whom she may obtain membership, may be proposed for membership in the manner set forth in Section 10 of this Article. All lady members shall be entitled to all privileges enjoyed by male members.

Section 5. In the event of the death of a member, the privileges of the Club House and grounds may be continued to his family upon any lady member thereof assuming his membership and paying the annual dues and assessments, subject to all other rules governing membership. This membership must be assumed by notice to the Purser within twelve months after the death of the member.

Section 6. Any member desiring to resign from the Club shall be allowed to do so if all dues, assessments or fines levied against him or her have been paid.

Section 7. The Governing Board may, by a majority vote, reinstate a former member whose resignation from the Club is of not more than ten years standing. All former members whose resignation is of more than ten years standing shall have to be reelected.

Section 8. Any lady entitled under the rules to the said privileges shall be permitted to personally introduce and extend the said privileges for one day in any season (without providing visitors cards) to other ladies and/or gentlemen who are not residents of New Hanover County.

Section 9. There shall be a charge of $1.00 for personally introducing a lady resident of New Hanover County for each and every day





she is extended the privileges of the Club. This shall not apply to casual entries of not more than one-half hour.

Any lady entitled under the rules to the privileges of the Club may extend the privileges of the Club to two lady guests, residents of New Hanover County, without charge at the regular card parties given by the Club.

ELECTION TO MEMBERSHIP

Section 10. The name of any person wishing to become a member of the Club shall be proposed in writing to the Purser by a member of the Club in good standing who shall have known the applicant personally for not less than one year and so state in his proposal, and endorsed by three other members also in good standing, each one of whom shall personally know the applicant and so state in their endorsement. The applicant must have resided in New Hanover County not less than one year prior to voting on his application by the membership. Neither the proposer nor any of the endorsers shall be members of the Governing Board. The Purser shall maintain a numerical list of applicants and immediately upon receipt of any proposal, shall place the name of the applicant next below the name of the applicant in the last previous application in order of date of receipt, advising proposer of number assigned to the proposal. All proposals shall be recorded on said numerical list without exception regardless of any subsequent action by the membership committee and/or the Governing Board. This list shall be available for inspection by any member. No member may propose more than two applicants or endorse more than two applicants during any year.

If any vacancies in the Club membership exist on May 1st of any year the Purser shall furnish to the Commodore the names of the applicant or applicants, whose name or names have not previously been balloted upon in the order of their numerical standing on the Purser's list. The Commodore will furnish such applications to the membership committee, which shall consider them in the same order as they appear on the list. If the membership committee approves the proposal, it shall be returned to the Commodore who will direct the Purser to place the application on the ballot box of the Club. All voting shall be done in the office of the Purser.

Not later than May 20th of each year the Purser shall notify by mail each member of the Club of that fact, stating on his notice:

Number of Applicant on Purser's list;

Date and place names will be posted for balloting;

Date balloting will close.

Such notice may be enclosed with other mail going to members if convenient.

If the membership committee recommends against the proposal of the applicant, the committee shall forward to the Commodore all relevant data on which its adverse recommendation is based. The Commodore





shall refer this data to the Governing Board and shall advise the proposer of the action of the membership committee. If the proposer so desires, the Governing Board shall appoint a time when he may present the name of the applicant. Then if the Governing Board, by a majority vote of its entire membership, approves the proposal, the Commodore shall direct the Purser to post the applicant's name for balloting as set out above. If the Governing Board's decision is adverse to the applicant, the Commodore shall direct the Purser to so advise the proposer. Any application rejected by the membership committee or the membership may be resubmitted in a subsequent year.

When an applicant's name shall be approved by the membership committee or Governing Board, the Commodore shall direct the Purser to post upon one of the ballot boxes the following card:

Box No._______________

Applicant ______________________________

Proposer ______________________________

Endorsers ______________________________

Date Posted ______________________________

Expiration ______________________________

Starting Number ______________________________

Number of Votes to Elect _________________________

Any member wishing to vote shall apply for a ticket. These tickets shall be in form as follows:

Box No._______________

___________________________________

___________________________________

(perforated line)

Box No.Serial No.
For ( )Against ( )

The member shall then write his name (no proxy allowed) on the upper half of the ballot, and X in one of the squares his vote for or against, tear the ballot at the perforated line and deposit both parts in box of the same number. (Note: Members are cautioned not to let anyone see how they vote.) An affirmative vote of 5% shall be necessary to elect an applicant unless 2% of the membership shall vote adversely, in which case he shall fail of election.





The application must remain posted from the first day of the Club opening for fourteen days including said first day to allow the members of the club to vote on such application. All balloting for the entire year shall be done at the time set forth above except that if there are more applications to be voted on than the ballot box can accommodate, balloting may continue for that number of fourteen day periods necessary to place the names of all applicants to be voted on before the membership of the Club. Balloting shall not be done at any other time of the year.

The Governing Board shall appoint six members, not members of any other committee, who shall be empowered to act as tellers. At the expiration of the fourteen day period a committee of three of the above tellers shall tally and certify the votes. After counting the ballots shall be immediately destroyed, except when an irregularity appears, in which case all of the ballots and the application shall be sealed in an envelope and referred to the Governing Board, who may order a new ballot.

(a) In case of any irregularity the Governing Board may either fine, suspend, or expel the member or members causing such irregularity; provided, however, that no fine for this offense shall be less than $5.00 or suspension for less than sixty days.

(b) At the close of business on the fourteenth day as set forth above, the close of business being deemed to be the normal closing time of the place where the balloting is held, the Steward or Purser shall seal said ballot box.

(c) These ballot boxes shall be so constructed that the Purser will have an individual key to each and the Steward a key to an outside door covering the face of all of the boxes.

(d) Any member desiring to know how many votes have been cast for any applicant may inquire the number of the next ballot of that box and subtract therefrom the starting number, thereby obtaining the desired information.

Purser shall advise applicant of his election or shall advise proposer of applicant's rejection.

ARTICLE VI
FINES

Section 1. The Governing Board is empowered to impose fines for violation of the rules and regulations of the Club, and any member failing to pay such fines for the space of twelve days after notification shall be suspended from the privileges of the Club by the Governing Board until such fines are paid.

ARTICLE VII
RESERVE FUND

Section 1. A Reserve Fund shall be established as follows: The Governing Board shall each year direct the Purser to deduct fifty cents from





the annual assessment paid by each member, and the Purser shall deposit the amount so deducted in bank or banks to be designated by the Governing Board to the credit of the Reserve Fund.

Section 2. At the end of each season and prior to the annual meeting, the Purser shall, after paying all bills rendered and approved by the Governing Board, deposit to the credit of the Reserve Fund, as herein provided, fifty per cent of all balances of money in his charge.

The remaining fifty per cent shall be kept in open account for the succeeding Governing Board, thereby enably them to have funds in hand for operating expenses, repairs, improvements and betterments.

This balance shall be designated as “Operating Balance”.

The following season, as soon as the Purser shall have collected sufficient monies, the Governing Board shall order this balance deposited to the credit of the Reserve Fund.

Section 3. The Reserve Fund Committee shall be the Governing Board, and said committee shall have charge of and invest the Reserve Fund for the best interest of the Club.

Section 4. At any time the Reserve Fund Committee may consider it necessary to use this Reserve Fund, the Governing Board shall call a meeting of the Club, of which, in addition to the notice to be given as required in Article III, notice shall be advertised twice in a daily newspaper, once at least ten days before said meeting and again on the day of the meeting. The advertisement shall state what action is proposed to be taken on the Reserve Fund. It shall require two-thirds vote of the members present at the meeting to use any part of this Reserve Fund.

ARTICLE VIII
YACHT SQUADRON

Section 1. Every yacht owned wholly and in good faith by a member or members of the Club, may be enrolled in the Yacht Squadron upon the owner or some one of the owners filing with the Purser a description of the same, containing its name, ownership, size, rig and builder, if known. From the time of such enrollment such yacht shall be entitled to the privileges and subject to the rules and regulations of the Club.

Section 2. No yacht, unless owned and enrolled as aforesaid, shall be entered in a regatta of the Club.

Section 3. Each enrolled yacht shall carry the Club signals while under way; but if loaned to a person not a member of the Club, she shall not carry its flag or signal, or be entitled to any privileges of the Club. A member using a yacht not enrolled in the squadron may carry the Club flag or signal only by permission of the Commodore previously obtained. Any enrolled yacht sold to any other than a member of the Club shall be stricken from the roll of the squadron.





Section 4. The Commodore shall adopt and cause to be published by the Club, a code of signals and salutes for the proper command and discipline of the Club regattas and races.

REGATTAS

Section 5. During each season the Club shall give not less than two regattas. All races shall be in charge of the Regatta Committee and shall be held in accordance with the current rules of the North American Yacht Racing Union, subject to such revisions as may be made by the Rules Committee of the Club.

The Rules Committee shall consist of the Commodore, Chairman ex officio, the Chairman of the Regatta Committee, the Measurer, and three sailboat owners appointed by the Governing Board of the Club.

Section 6. No yacht shall be sailed in any regatta by any one not a member of the Club, except that sons and daughters of members, under age, and who are not members, shall be permitted to sail boats in all regattas of their class and open races.

Section 7. Should any complaint be made to the Regatta Committee of irregular sailing, or if for any cause said committee shall have doubt of a captain's knowledge of the sailing regulations, it is hereby made the duty of the committee to examine such person and decide as to his or her competency as a sailing master.

ARTICLE IX
SIGNALS

Section 1. The distinguishing signal of the Club shall be a swallowtailed flag with white field, containing a five-pointed red star.

Section 2. Each yacht shall be required to fly the Club signal.

Section 3. The length of these signals shall not exceed one-half inch for each foot or the height from water-line to the truck, and the width shall be two-thirds of the length.

PENNANTS

Section 4. The Commodore shall fly a rectangular flag, which shall have a blue field with a circle of thirteen white stars surrounding a white fouled anchor.

Section 5. The Fleet Captain shall fly a rectangular flag with red field and designed same as for Commodore.

Section 6. The Flag Captain shall fly a rectangular flag with white ground and designed same as for Commodore, except that color or design shall be red.





ARTICLE X
HAT DEVICES

Section 1. The hat device for a Captain (who shall be a boat owner) shall be two crossed fouled anchors with flukes down, embroidered in gold, and at their intersection the Club signal worked on a blue field of enamel in button form, surrounded by a plain scroll of gold.

For members the hat device shall be the same as for Captains, omitting one anchor, the remaining anchor to be diagonal.

Section 2. The Commodore shall have three silver stars, one on top and one on each side of device described in Section 1.

Section 3. The Fleet Captain shall have one silver star on each side of device described in Section 1.

Section 4. The Flag Captain shall have one silver star on top of device described in Section 1.

Section 5. The Ex-Commodore shall have one gold star on top of device described in Section 1.

Section 6. The Purser shall put the letter “P” and the Measurer the letter “M” above the device described in Section 1.

ARTICLE XI
AMENDMENTS

Section 1. These By-Laws may be amended at any annual or special meeting of the Club by a majority vote of the members present, provided notice be given in writing to the Commodore at least thirty days prior to such meeting, who shall not less than ten days prior to such meeting cause the Purser to notify the membership of the proposed change in detail. No proposed change not so presented to the membership may be acted on in the meeting.

ARTICLE XII

Section 1. The Governing Board is authorized to exempt from dues, until their return, all members who have moved from New Hanover County due to service with the Armed Forces of the United States.

ARTICLE XIII

Section 1. Drinking of intoxicants is prohibited in any part of the Club House not designated for that purpose by the Governing Board.

ARTICLE XIV

Section 1. The rules contained in “Robert's Rules of Order” shall govern all meetings in all cases to which they are applicable and in which they are not inconsistent with the By-Laws or the special rules of order of the Club.

ARTICLE XV

Section 1. All By-Laws or resolutions heretofore adopted which are inconsistent with the foregoing By-Laws, are hereby repealed.





RULES
ADOPTED FOR THE GOVERNMENT OF THE
CAROLINA YACHT CLUB HOUSE AND GROUNDS

Resolved, That the Club House has been built and grounds set apart for the exclusive use of its members and guests, as hereinafter provided:

RULE 1

A full list of the officers and members of the Club shall be printed, framed and hung on the walls of the Club House.

RULE 2

No member of the Club shall be allowed to introduce any male resident over eighteen years of age, of New Hanover County, to the privileges of the Club House. Any member so doing shall be liable to a fine of five dollars. Provided, that on race days the Captain of any yacht participating in a race may introduce his crew.

A member's family shall consist of his wife, unmarried daughters, and sons under twenty-two years of age; also his mother, mother-in-law, brothers under twenty-two years of age, unmarried sisters and nieces, dependent upon him and living in his household.

Youths under eighteen years of age, not entitled to the privileges of the Club shall be required to present cards of admission, which may be issued by the Governing Board upon application of their recognized representatives who are members of the Club. Nurses shall also be required to have cards unless accompanied by a member. No child who has the privileges of the Club shall be permitted to introduce the son or daughter of a non member, unless accompanied and registered by a member or his wife.

RULE 3

Cards of admission may be issued to strangers by the Purser only, upon the request of a member, for a period of not exceeding two weeks for any season, and cannot be renewed or a new card issued except by special action of the Governing Board.

Visitors so admitted shall enter their names upon the Club Register.

The Purser shall keep a record of all cards issued.

The Club Register shall be kept by the Steward. Members introducing visitors shall call on the Steward for the Register, enter names of visitors and their own names opposite.

RULE 4

The Marshal and Steward being invested with police authority, shall expel or cause to be expelled from the grounds any one who may be guilty of improper conduct.





RULE 5

No member nor any of his family, nor a guest, with a contagious or infectious disease shall be permitted to use the Club House or grounds. Any violation of this rule shall subject the member to a fine of not less than ten dollars for each and every offense, at the discretion of the Governing Board.

RULE 6

No member, nor any of his or her family, shall be permitted to take any boys over six years of age into the ladies’ dressing room. Any violation of this rule shall subject such member to a fine of not less than five dollars for each and every offense.

RULE 7

Dogs are not allowed on the Club's premises. Penalty for wilful violation of this rule shall be ten dollars for each offense.

RULE 8

It shall be unlawful for servants to eat at the tables on the porches or in the dining room of the Club, a place having been set aside for them. A place has also been set aside for nurses actively engaged in taking care of their charges. Any violation of this rule shall subject the members, under whose card said servant is admitted, to a fine of $5.00 for each and every infraction.

RULE 9

Children under eighteen years of age are strictly forbidden to use the gas for any purpose whatsoever.

RULE 10

The rent of lockers for the season shall be fifty cents.

RULE 11

Any suggestion or complaint must be made in writing and placed in a box provided for said purpose, or turned in to the Superintendent or Steward of the Club.

RULE 12

These rules may be added to or amended at any meeting of the Club without previous notice, or by the Governing Board, provided the proposed amendment is posted in the Club House after the passage of same.

RULE 13

The Governing Board shall make such further rules as may be deemed by them necessary for the government of the Club House and grounds.





They shall be required to have all rules printed in large type and posted in each building and any conspicious place they may desire.

It is preferable that all rules, as far as possible, be made at the beginning of each season.

RULE 14

The Governing Board is vested with authority to deal with any unbecoming conduct on the part of members, members’ family or guests, and may impose a fine of not exceeding ten dollars upon the member for each offense, or expulsion if in their judgment such is deemed necessary. An appeal in case of expulsion from the Governing Board's decision may be taken to the annual meeting of the Club.

RULE 15

Private entertainments are permitted at the Club any time excepting Sundays, Saturdays and holidays. Any member desiring to give a private entertainment can arrange to do so by taking the matter up with the Superintendent. The giving of a private entertainment does not entitle the host to invite any guest who otherwise would be prohibited the use of the Club House and grounds.

RULE 16

The wearing of bath suits on the piazzas of the Club is strictly prohibited.

RULE 17

The upstairs rooms and porches of the Main Building are reserved for members, their families and guests. No ladies under 18 years of age and men under 21 years of age will be permitted under any circumstances.

RULES
REGULATING SLEEPING IN CLUB HOUSE

ADOPTED JUNE 23, 1920, AND AS AMENDED

Rooms and beds have been provided for ladies over the ladies’ dressing room, and beds have been provided for men on the second floor of the gentlemen's bath house.

No sleeping shall be permitted except in these respective quarters. Any member violating this shall be fined not less than five dollars for each offense.





REGULATIONS GOVERNING USE OF SLEEPING QUARTERS

Lodging from 5:00 P.M. to 12:00 o'clock M.

No guests permitted to enter sleeping quarters in wet bath suits

RULE 1

A charge of fifty cents per bed or cot per night shall be made members or those in their families entitled to the privileges of the Club. For one guest when accompanied by a member of the Club or one of a member's family, fifty cents; for each additional guest, one dollar and fifty cents per night. For all guests when not accompanied by a member or one of a member's family, the charge shall be one dollar and fifty cents per night per person.

No member shall be permitted to monopolize these sleeping quarters. The member occupying such quarters shall vacate after one week if other members should desire accommodation and cannot be taken care of.

RULE 2

Reservations for accommodations shall not be made before 5:00 o'clock P. M. on the day preceding the one for which they are desired.

RULE 3

Members or their guests shall register their names and date in Register provided for this purpose each night before retiring.

Any member failing to register shall be fined not less than one dollar for each offense.

RULE 4

Loud talking, whistling, gambling and boisterous conduct will not be allowed.

RULE 5

Lights are to be extinguished after retiring.

RULE 6

Members availing themselves of the privileges accorded, must leave rooms in a neat and orderly condition.

Lounging in sleeping quarters is prohibited after 4:30 P. M.

None but bona fide members, their families, and their guests over eighteen years of age are entitled to these privileges.

Any violation of the above rules will subject the offender to a fine or suspension, or both, at the discretion of the Governing Board.





RACING RULES
(FOR COMPLETE RULES SEE NORTH AMERICAN
YACHT RACING UNION RULES)

RULE 1
GENERAL AUTHORITY OF RACE COMMITTEE

All races and the yachts sailing therein shall be under direction of the Race Committee of the Club under whose auspices the races are sailed. All matters shall be under their control, and all questions which arise respecting such races shall be subject to their decision. The decisions of the Race Committee shall be based upon these rules, so far as they apply; but as no rules can be devised capable of meeting every incident and accident of sailing, the Race Committee shall keep in view the ordinary customs of the sea, and discourage all attempts to win a race by other means than fair sailing and superior speed and skill.

RULE 14
WHEN AMENABLE TO THE RACING RULES

Except as otherwise provided in Rule 30, a yacht shall be amenable to the Racing Rules from the time the preparatory signal for her class is made, and shall continue so until she has finished and her entire hull and spars are clear of the finish line.

RULE 19
BALLAST AND EQUIPMENT

RACING TRIM. Floors must be left down and bulkheads and doors left standing; ladders, stairways and water tanks left in place; and all cabin, galley and forecastle fixtures and fittings and at least one suitable bower anchor and cable must be kept on board. All movable ballast must be properly stowed under the floors or in lockers and no ballast or other deadweight may be used as shifting ballast or for altering the trim of the yacht. No water shall be taken in, or discharged, except for ordinary ship's uses, nor shall any ballast, whether movable or fixed, be shipped, unshipped or shifted after 9 P. M. of the day previous to that on which the race is sailed. A race postponed or resailed shall, so far as this rule is concerned, be considered as a new race.

RULE 24
BOARDING AND LEAVING

Unless otherwise specified in the instructions no person shall board or leave a yacht except in case of accident or injury to a person on board.





RULE 29
DEFINITIONS

(1) A yacht Starts, or is Starting when, after her start signal, any part of her mainmast crosses the starting line in the proper direction. A yacht Finishes when any part of her mainmast crosses the finish line in the proper direction.

(2) Leeward is the side on which a yacht is, or was if luffing head to wind, carrying her main boom. The Leeward Yacht is the yacht on the leeward side of another yacht. The other yacht is the Windward Yacht. These terms apply only to two yachts on the same tack.

(3) A yacht is on a Tack except when she is Tacking or Jibing. A yacht is on the tack (starboard or port) corresponding to her windward side.

(4) A yacht is Clear Astern of another when her hull and equipment are aft of an imaginary line projected abeam from the aftermost point of the other's hull and equipment.

(5) When neither yacht is Clear Astern and the Yachts are clearly within three overall lengths of the longer yacht, they Overlap. Two yachts also Overlap when an intervening yacht overlaps both of them. For the purpose of Rule 30H an overlap that exists between two yachts when they star or when one (or both) of them completes a tack or a jibe shall be regarded as beginning at that time.

(6) A yacht is Overtaking another when she is overhauling her from Clear Astern regardless of their respective courses. Overtaking terminates when an Overlap is established.

(7) A yacht is Tacking from the moment she is beyond head to wind until she bears away, (a) if beating to windward, to a full and by course, or (b) if not beating to windward, to the course on which her mainsail fills.

(8) A yacht is Jibing from the moment her main boom crosses her center line until her mainsail fills on the other tack.

(9) A Normal Course is any course a yacht might sail, in the absence of the other yacht, to finish as quickly as possible. The Course sailed before beginning to luff or bear away is presumably a Normal Course.

(10) The Windward Yacht is Forward of the Mast Line when her wheel or the fore end of her tiller is forward of an imaginary line, called “Mast Line,” projected abeam from the center of the Leeward Yacht's mainmast. When there is doubt, The Leeward Yacht may assume that she has the right to luff, unless the helmsman of the Windward Yacht, when his yacht is Forward of the Mast Line, hails “Mast Line” or words to that effect. The Leeward Yacht must be governed by such hail; And, if she deems it improper, her only remedy is to protest.





(11) The Marks for each yacht are the objects used to indicate the course over which she races, including Government buoys and aids to navigation that the Instructions require to be passed on a specified side. Every ordinary above-water part of such object (including a flag and flag pole) is part of the Mark, but no part below water and no accompanying buoy.

(12) Obstructions are craft under way (including another yacht racing having right of way), craft at anchor (other than any boat used as a Mark), craft aground, wrecks, the shore, piers, structures, fish weirs, fish traps, and shoals over which the yacht in question may not be safely piloted. A buoy is not an Obstruction unless it marks an Obstruction, in which case both the buoy and the shoal or object that it marks are part of the same Obstruction.

RULE 30
RIGHT OF WAY

Rule 30 applies between yachts intending to race from the time they begin to sail about in the vicinity of the start until they have left the vicinity of the course either between races or after their racing is over for the day. At other times (and at all times between other yachts) the Government Right of Way Rules apply. For the purpose of disqualification, Rule 30 applies from the yacht's preparatory signal until she has finished and cleared the finish line.

RULES THAT APPLY BOTH BEFORE AND AFTER STARTING

A. If two yachts are on opposite tacks, the port tack yacht shall keep clear.

B. If two yachts are on the same tack, the Windward Yacht shall keep clear; except that a yacht Overtaking another shall keep clear while she is Clear Astern and, when establishing an Overlap to leeward, shall allow the Windward Yacht ample room to fulfill her newly acquired obligation to keep clear. “Ample room” is room to luff head to wind.

C. A yacht while Tacking or Jibing shall keep clear of a yacht On a Tack. The burden of proof to justify a tack or a jibe made close aboard of another yacht rests on the yacht Tacking or Jibing. When a yacht tacks or jibes into a position that will subsequently give her right of way, (1) she must do so far enough away from the other yacht to enable the latter to hold her course until the tack or jibe is completed and thereafter to keep clear; and (2) in addition, when she is the Leeward Yacht of two close hauled port tack yachts, she shall hail before Tacking if, on completion of her tack or shortly thereafter, the other yacht will have to alter course to keep clear. If two yachts are Tacking or Jibing at the same time the one on the other's port side shall keep clear.

D. A right of way yacht shall never alter course when the other yacht is unable to respond owing to her position, or in such manner as to balk or mislead her when she is in the act of keeping clear.





RULES THAT APPLY ONLY AT START

E. A yacht on the wrong side of the starting line or of its extentions when her start signal is made, shall, until she has Started, keep clear of all yachts that were on the right side of such line when their start signal was made.

F. Before Starting, the right of way yacht may alter course in any reasonable manner, but not quickly if such alteration would affect the course of the other yacht.

G. A Leeward Yacht is under no obligation to give any Windward Yacht on the same tack room to pass to leeward of a Mark of the starting line that is surrounded by navigable water; but a Leeward Yacht shall not after the start signal deprive a Windward Yacht of room at such Mark either by heading above the first Mark or by luffing above close-hauled.

RULES THAT APPLY ONLY AFTER STARTING

H. A yacht may luff a yacht Clear Astern or a Windward Yacht as she pleases and head to wind if she pleases, until the Windward Yacht is Forward of the Mast Line. Thereafter, or if the Windward Yacht was Forward of the Mast Line when the Overlap began, the Leeward Yacht may not sail above her Normal Course while that Overlap continues to exist. The Windward Yacht, unless an Obstruction or other object restricts her ability to respond, is subject to disqualification if luff has to be curtailed because of the proximity of the yachts. In case a yacht has the right to luff all yachts to windward of her, all such yachts shall respond to her luff, even if an intervening yacht would not otherwise have the right to luff.

I. When two yachts are sailing on a free leg of the course: If they Overlap, the Windward Yacht shall not sail below her Normal Course; if one is Clear Astern, steering a course to pass to leeward and is clearly within three overall lengths of the longer yacht, the other shall not sail below her Normal Course.

PASSING MARKS AND OBSTRUCTIONS

J. When two yachts either on the same tack, or sailing down wind on opposite tacks, reach and are about to pass on the same side of a Mark (other than a starting Mark at which the Anti-Barging Rule applies) or of an Obstruction:

(1) If they Overlap, the outside yacht shall allow the inside yacht room to pass or round it. But a yacht Clear Astern shall not be justified in attempting to establish an inside Overlap and thus force an inside passage after the leading yacht is so close to the Mark or Obstruction that she is unable to give room (she is under no obligation to give room before the Overlap is established), or after she has reached it, or has altered her course in the act of rounding it. In case of doubt, it will be presumed that the Overlap was not established in proper time.





(2) If one yacht is Clear Astern, she shall keep clear in anticipation of the rounding maneuver and during it. But if two yachts on the same tack are beating to windward and one is Clear Astern and to windward, the other in Tacking for or around the Mark or Obstruction is subject to Rule C and thereafter to Rule A.

HAILING FOR ROOM TO TACK TO CLEAR OBSTRUCTION

K. If two yachts are standing closehauled on the same tack toward the same Obstruction, and if the Leeward Yacht is unable both to fetch it without tacking and to tack without colliding with the Windward Yacht, the person in charge of the Leeward Yacht may, when safe piloting requires him to take action, hail the Windward Yacht. After such hail the Windward Yacht shall at once allow the Leeward Yacht room to tack, and the Leeward Yacht shall tack immediately her hail is responded to. But if the Obstruction is a right of way yacht or is named in the instructions as a Mark, The Windward Yacht, if she is able to fetch it without Tacking, may hold her course. If she decides to do so, she must forthwith by hail so advise the Leeward Yacht. Thereafter, the Leeward Yacht must adopt other means of clearing the Obstruction, and the Windward Yacht must be disqualified if she fails on that tack to fetch the Mark or to cross the bow of the right of way yacht, as the case may be.

RULE 31
FOULING OR IMPROPERLY ROUNDING MARKS

A yacht shall round the course in such manner as to pass each Mark on the required side in proper sequence, and so that a string representing her wake from the time she starts until she finishes would when drawn taut lie on the required side of each Mark. A yacht shall not touch a Mark unless wrongfully compelled to do so by another yacht. A yacht which has touched a Mark must immediately either abandon the race or hoist a protest signal.

RULE 32
FOULING COMPETING YACHTS

If a yacht, through failure to observe any of these rules, shall foul another yacht, or cause other yachts to foul, she shall be disqualified.

RULE 33
RUNNING AGROUND AND FOULING

A yacht running aground or fouling a buoy, pier, vessel or other object may use her anchors, warps, boats, and other gear to get clear, but may not receive any assistance except from the crew of a vessel fouled. Any gear used must be recovered before she continues the race.





RULE 34
ANCHORING

A yacht may anchor, but must weigh anchor again and not slip. No yacht shall warp or kedge or make fast to any buoy, pier, vessel or other object except for the purpose mentioned in Rule 33. In weighing anchor, yachts having a power windlass as part of their regular equipment may use such power.

RULE 35
PROPULSION

No means of propulsion other than sails shall be employed except as provided in Rule 33.

RULE 36
SOUNDING

No other means of sounding than a lead line shall be employed.

RULE 37
MAN OVERBOARD AND ACCIDENTS

Each yacht must render every possible assistance to any vessel or person in peril and should she not render such assistance she shall be disqualified. If, in the judgment of the Race Committee, any yacht not responsible for the accident shall have thereby injured her chances of winning any prize, it shall order the race resailed between such yacht and the winner of any prize. A yacht losing a man overboard must either recover the man on board before continuing the race or give up the race.

RULE 38
THE FINISH

(1) The finish line shall be indicated by a stakeboat or other mark at one end and a white flag displayed on the Race Committee's boat or station at the other end.

(2) The Race Committee's boat or station at the finish line shall fly the Race Committee's flag and after sunset shall show either the Club's night signal or two red lights.

(3) The time of a yacht at the finish shall be taken when first any part of her hull or spars is on the finish line.

(4) A yacht which has been timed at the finish is not required to pass across the line but remains amenable to the rules so long as any part of her hull, spars or other equipment remains on the line.

(5) After finishing, yachts must keep clear of the line and of other yachts which are still racing.

RULE 39
THE CASE OF A DEAD HEAT

In the case of a dead heat, the race shall either be resailed by the yachts having made the dead heat, or if ordered by the Race Committee, the prize shall be decided by the spin of a coin.





COMMODORES

RICHARD BRADLEY1853
DANIEL BAKER1854—1856
ALEX. MACRAE1857
RICHARD BRADLEY1858
T. M. GARDNER1859—1860

1861 TO 1865
HENRY BURKHEIMER1867—1872
F. A. L. CASSIDY1873
WILLIAM A. WRIGHT1874—1877
I. B. GRAINGER1878
O. A. WIGGINS1879—1883
PEMBROKE JONES1884—1886
WILLIAM LATIMER1887—1890
NORWOOD GILES1891
GEORGE W. KIDDER1892—1895
GEORGE D. PARSLEY1896—1898
F. A. LORD1899—1901
S. P. COWAN1902
J. K. WILLIAMS1903—1904
J. VANB. METTS1905—1906
C. W. WORTH1907—1909
E. A. METTS1910—1911
A. B. SKELDING1912
O. A. WIGGINS, JR.1913—1914
H. J. MACMILLAN1915—1916
J. STEVENSON BROWN1917
PLATT W. DAVIS1918
S. G. MACMILLAN1919—1920





COMMODORES — Continued

J. IRVING CORBETT1921—1922
R. G. RANKIN1923—1924
J. N. BRAND, JR.1925
WADDELL WATTERS1926
CHARLES B. LYNCH1927—1928
A. H. HARRISS, JR.1929—1930
R. G. RANKIN1931—1932
LENOX G. COOPER1933—1934
O. F. COOPER1935
W. W. STORM1936—1937
ROBERT STRANGE1938—1939
EMPIE LATIMER1940—1941
J. C. ROE1942
W. T. BENTON1943
E. R. TOMS1944
S. W. SANDERS1945
JAMES B. LYNCH1946
E. A. METTS, JR.1947—1948
A. E. HUGGINS1949—1951
W. H. TILLERY1952—1953





CAROLINA YACHT CLUB
WRIGHTSVILLE BEACH, N. C.

MEMBERS
A

ADAMS, CLARK E.

ADAMS, J. R.

ALLEN, JAMES F.

ALLEN, L. GLEASON

ALLEN, M. F. JR.

ALLSBROOK, O. O.

ANDERSON, ERNEST A.

ANDERSON, MRS. LORAIN

ANDREWS, CAPT. RICHARD S.

ARTHUR, G. S.

ATKINSON, WM. M.

AVERA, N. A.

AVERY, VERNON G.

B

BAKER, EDGAR

BAKER, W. S.

BAKER, W. S. JR.

BALLARD, RAYMOND L., JR.

BANNERMAN, J. KYLE

BAREFOOT, DR. GRAHAM B.

BAREFOOT, GRAHAM, JR.

BARFIELD, WM. C.

BARNHILL, MAURICE V., JR.

BATTS, A. L.

BAXTER, W. I.

BAYLEY, MISS LILLIAN

BECKER, MRS. C. J.

BEERY,* MRS. E. M.

BEERY, MRS. J. H.

BEERY, MISS LOUISE

BEERY, W. B.

BEERY, W. B., JR.

BEERY, W. L., JR.

BEKAERT, CHAS. J.

BELL, MISS MARY P.

BELL, Z. K.

BELLAMY, R. R.

BENTON, W. T.

BENTON, W. T., JR.

BERGEN, PAUL

BERGEN, CHAS. B.

BETHELL, W. O. P.

BETHUNE, ALEX

BETTS, T. T.

BLACK, R. L.

BLACKWELL, MRS. FRANK

BLAKE, CHAS J.

BOATWRIGHT, S. M.

BONEY, JOHN B., JR.

BONEY, LESLIE N., SR.

BONEY, WM. J.

BOZEMAN, W. L.

BRAND, HERBERT

BRAND, J. N., JR.

BRAND, R. A.

BRIDGER, H. C., JR.

BRIDGERS, B. H.

BRIDGEMAN, JOHN N.

BROADFOOT, BRYAN S.

BROADFOOT, W. G.

BROADFOOT, W. G., JR.

BROGDEN, LEON L.

BROOKS, WM. F.

BROUGHTON, DR. J. O.

BROWN, EDWIN T.

BROWNE, O. L.

BUNTING, MRS. W. S.

BURGWIN, K. O.

BURKHEIMER, GRAHAM J.

BURR, F. S.

BYERS, GEORGE B.

C

CALDER, ROBERT E.

CALLUM, W. L., JR.

CAMERON, B. B.

CAMERON, DANIEL D.

CAMPBELL, J. B.

CAMPBELL, PAUL L.

CAMPBELL, W. B.

CAMPBELL, W. B., JR.





MEMBERS — Continued

CANNON, WM. C.

CANTWELL, BRADFORD C.

CANTWELL, MISS MARY LUCAS

CANTWELL, R. C., JR.

CANTWELL, R. C. III

CANTWELL, WILLARD R.

CARR, JAS. D.

CARROLL, E. F.

CAVENAUGH, CHAS. I.

CAVENAUGH, C. I.

CHEATHAM, A. B.

CHEATHAM, W. T.

CHENEY, W. G.

CHRISTIAN, J. C.

CHRISTIAN, J. C., JR.

CHRISTIE, ROBERT R.

CLARK, GEO. T.

CLARK, GEO. T., JR.

CLARK, M. W.

CLARKE, MRS. E. R.

COBB, BEN H.

CODINGTON, DR. H. A.

CODINGTON, JOHN

COLUCCI, JOHN, JR.

CONLY, H. V.

COOPER, LENOX G.

COOPER, MRS. O. F.

COOPER, W. B.

CORBETT, IRVING J.

CORBETT, JAMES I., JR.

CORBETT, MRS. JOHN A.

COTCHETT, MRS. JAMES G.

CRANMER, DR. J. B.

CRONLY, R. D.

CROUCH, DR. A. M.

CROUCH, W. L.

CROW, MRS. EMMET P.

CROWE, DR. WM., JR.

CURTIS, W. E.

D

DAVIS, C. MCD.

DAVIS, H. L.

DAVIS, J. HOLMES

DAVIS, J. HOLMES, JR.

DAVIS, MRS. PLATT W.

DESCHAMPS, M. M.

DICK, F. W.

DICKINSON, C. L.

DIEHL, A. C., JR.

DIVINE, M. W., JR.

DIXON, W. L.

DOSS, L. L.

DOSS, MRS. R. J.

DOVE, DAN, JR.

DUNN, JOHN O.

DUNN, MURDOCH

DUNN, WM. H.

DOXEY, SANFORD

DURHAM, E. H.

E

EASTERLING, MRS. P. L.

EDWARDS, W. E.

ELLIOTT, DR. A. H.

EMERSON, MRS. AGNES

EMORY, MRS. ELISABETH

EMERSON, HAYWOOD

EMERSON, HORACE

EVANS, W. F., JR.

EVANS, MRS. J. E.

EVERETT, LAWRENCE, JR.

EVERETT, L. S.

F

FARLEY, ADM. J. F.

FARRISS, W. E.

FARTHING, MRS. L. E.

FARTHING, DR. WATTS

FECHTIG, MISS ALLIE M.

FENLEY, J. B.

FIELDS, J. M.

FISHER, DONALD

FISHER, REV. E. B.

FLANNER, MISS CAROLINE

FOARD, O. G.

FONVIELLE, C. E.

FONVIELLE, LOUIS

FONVIELLE, L. W.





MEMBERS — Continued

FONVIELLE, W. A.

FONVIELLE, W. A., JR.

FOX, JAMES C.

FOX, JOHN H.

FOX, J. B., JR.

FOY, N. L.

FOYLES, J. H.

FREEMAN, DR. J. D.

FREEMAN, JERE D., JR.

FRENCH, L. C.

FURR, DR. JAMES

G

GARDNER, DONALD A.

GAREY, G. A.

GARRABRANT, MRS. E. C.

GARRABRANT, WM. P.

GARREN, G. FULTON

GAUSE, MRS. THOS. J.

GAYER, W. W.

GAYLORD, JOHN F.

GEORGE, MRS. NORMAN L.

GEORGE, NORMAN L., JR.

GETTY, R. N.

GILBERT, A. V. B.

GLASS, REV. H. I.

GLASS, W. T., JR.

GLOVER, H. B.

GLOVER, REV. MORTIMER

GOLDEN, JOHN

GRAHAM, DR. CHAS. P.

GRAHAM, F. B.

GRAINGER, MRS. J. V.

GREEN, CHAS. F.

GREEN, CHAS. F., JR.

GREEN, L. W.

GREEN, L. W., JR.

GREENWELL, R. M.

GREER, G. D.

GREGG, J. M.

GREGG, J. M., JR.

GREGG, T. A.

GREGORY, REV. RANDOLPH

GRIST, AUGUSTUS S.

GROOVER, R. L.

GWATHMEY, R. B.

H

HACKLER, FRANK

HALE, JOSEPH W.

HALL, A. B.

HALL, MRS. A. M.

HALL, REV. B. FRANK

HALL, DR. JAS. S.

HALL, JOHN

HALL, JOHN C.

HALL, KENNETH M.

HALL, MRS. LOUIS E.

HALL, THOS. H.

HALL, WM. A.

HALLECK, REV. E. W.

HAMILTON, HORACE E.

HARDIN, EUGENE B.

HARDIN, EUGENE B., JR.

HARDIN, JOHN H.

HARE, DR. R. S.

HARLOW, MRS. W. L.

HARRAH, MRS. MABEL (P. B.)

HARRINGTON, C. M.

HARRISS, A. H., JR.

HARRISS, ANDREW J.

HARRISS, DAVID S.

HARRISS, C. JOHNSON

HARRISS, MRS. EDWIN A.

HARRISS, GEORGE N.

HARRISS, MISS ESTHER E.

HARRISS, MRS. MEARES

HARRISS, WEDDELL

HART, L. E.

HART, L. E., JR.

HARTFORD, CHAS. E.

HARTZOG, W. L., JR.

HAWTHORNE, J. W.

HAYDEN, H. N.

HAYDEN, HERMAN N., JR.

HAZELHURST, WM. W.

HEAD, WM. G.

HEAD, WM. G., JR.

HEINSBERGER, ED

HEINSBERGER,* PHILIP

HENDERSON, J. S.

HENDERSON, W. H.





MEMBERS — Continued

HEYWARD, T. C.

HIATT, J. LAWRENCE

HICKMAN, W. L.

HICKS, MISS SARAH M.

HICKS, E. C., JR.

HICKS, GLASGOW

HICKS, GLASGOW, JR.

HILL, MRS. JENNIE G.

HILL, COL. JOHN BRIGHT

HILL, JOHN BRIGHT, JR.

HILL, GILCHRIST

HILL, WILLIAM L. II

HINES, E. C.

HODGKIN, R. G.

HODGKIN, R. G., JR.

HOGGARD, E. A.

HOGGARD, DR. J. T.

HOGGARD, JOHN T., JR.

HOGUE, CYRUS D.

HOGUE, CYRUS D., JR.

HOLLAND, R. H.

HOLLAND, RAYMOND, JR.

HOOD, J. W.

HOOPER, MRS. J. W.

HOWELL, MRS. ANNIE

HOWELL, CHAS. C.

HOWELL, CLAUDE

HOWELL, MILTON E.

HOWELL, DUDLEY

HOWES, DAVIS H.

HUBBARD, R. B.

HUGGINS, A. E.

HUGHES, J. B.

HUGHES, J. B., JR.

HUGHES, J. WINDER

HUGHES, J. WINDER, JR.

HUGHES, W. T.

HUMMELL, MRS. ELIZABETH H.

HUMPHREY, NATHAN

HUTAFF, OLIVER

HUTAFF, MISS EMMA G.

J

JACKSON, DR. WILBERT

JAMES, HARRY C.

JAMES, MRS. MARY POST

JAMES, THOS. C.

JAMES, WM. CLARK

JAMES, W. G.

JEWETT, R. D.

JOHNSON, DR. GEORGE

JOHNSON, GEORGE, JR.

JOHNSON, WARREN S.

JOLLY, MRS. FRANK M.

JONES, ALBERT E.

JONES, CHAS. F.

JONES, CHAS. F., JR.

JONES, THOS. H.

JORDAN, MISS ELEANOR

JOSEY, E. B.

K

KEITH, MRS. H. L.

KEITH, H. L., JR.

KELLY, ROBERT Y.

KENAN, MRS. GRAHAM

KENAN, THOS. S.

KING, E. Z.

KING, HORACE T., JR.

KING, MRS. J. U.

KING, W. S.

KNOX, DR. J. C.

KOELZ, H. C.

KOONCE, DR. D. B.

L

LAMBERSON, J. W.

LANEY, E. A.

LANEY, EMSLEY A., JR.

LATHROP, MISS BESSIE

LATIMER, HERBERT

LATIMER, MRS. H. G.

LATIMER, H. G., JR.

LATIMER, MRS. WM.

LAWTHER, MRS. RIVERS

LAWTHER, THOS. A., JR.

LEGRAND, RUFUS

LILLY, DR. THOS. B.

LITTLE, FRED E.





MEMBERS — Continued

LITTLE, FRED E., JR.

LITTLE, MRS. GRACE

LITTLE, R. A.

LOCKFAW, D. A.

LONGLEY, HENRY, JR.

LYNCH, GEO. G.

LYNCH, GEORGE G., JR.

LYNCH, JAMES B.

LYNCH, THEO. K.

M

MACMILLAN, W. D.

MACRAE, HUGH II

MARKS, H. A.

MARKS, W. L.

MARSHALL, ALAN A.

MARYE, R. W.

MATHIS, CARL N., JR.

MATTHES, CECIL

MATTHES, MRS. F. A.

MATTHES, F. A., JR.

MCCAIG, MRS. W. D.

MCCLAMMY, MRS. H.

MCEACHERN, HUGH A.

MCINTOSH, D. M.

MCKOY, A. M.

MCKOY, MRS. ELSIE J.

MEARES, RICHARD L.

MEBANE, DR. W. C.

MEDITZ, JOHN M.

MEISTER, MRS. C. L.

METTS, MRS. E. A.

METTS, E. A., JR.

METTS, JAMES I.

METTS, J. VAN B., JR.

MIARS, WM. T., JR.

MILLER, REV. ALEXANDER

MINTZ, RUDOLPH

MITCHELL, CHAS. J.

MITCHELL, GEO. L.

MOORE, A. J., JR.

MOORE, JAS. E.

MOORE, LOUIS T.

MORGAN, GEO. A.

MORRISON, DR. B. R.

MORTON, MISS BLANCHE

MORTON, T. L.

MUNSON, PERCY

MURCHISON, DR. D. R.

MURCHISON, D. R., JR.

MURCHISON, JOHN

MURCHISON, WALLACE C.

MYERS, B. K.

MYERS, B. K., JR.

MYERS, JOHN C.

N

NEWLAND, MRS. H. T.

NICHOLS, POMEROY

NOE, THOS. D.

NOE, MRS. W. R.

NORDEN, MRS. ERIC

NORTHAM, MRS. LILLIE (J. A.)

O

OCHS, COL. WM. VAN DYKE

ORMOND, JOHN

ORMOND, LEWIS

ORRELL, LOUIS

ORRELL, THOS.

P

PACE, DR. S. E.

PACKARD, DANIEL, JR.

PAGE, RINALDO B., JR.

PALMER, GARLAND

PARSLEY, DONALD M.

PARSLEY, DONALD M., JR.

PARSLEY, MRS. R. A.

PATERSON, H. T., JR.

PATTERSON, JAS. S.

PAUL, H. K.

PEARSALL, MRS. F. L.

PEARSALL, MRS. HORACE

PEARSALL, HORACE, JR.

PECK, MRS. O. P.

PECK, WM. M., JR.

PENDLETON, MISS MAY H.





MEMBERS — Continued

PENTON, D. H.

PENTON, HOWARD

PERDEW, WM. E.

PERRY, ALBERT F.

PERRY, A. F., JR.

PESCHAU, H. B., JR.

PICKRELL, MRS. JOHN L.

PIGFORD, DR. ROBERT T.

PLATT, R. C., JR.

PLEASANTS, MISS MARGARET

POISSON, MRS. F. D.

POISSON, CLARK W.

POISSON, DUB.

POISSON, ROCKWELL F.

POISSON, L. J.

POISSON, LOUIS J., JR.

PONS, AUBREY C.

POST, MRS. JAMES F.

POWELL, DR. C. J.

POWERS, DR. F. P.

PRESTON, JOHN E.

PRESTON, L. W.

PRESTON, L. W., JR.

PRESTON, MACON

PRETLOW, MRS. J. C.

PRETLOW, J. P.

PRETLOW, J. C., JR.

PREVOST, STEPHEN

PRICE, K. W.

PRICE, J. A.

PULLIAM, STONE C.

R

RANEY, W. A.

RANKIN, R. G.

RATCLIFFE, MRS. URSULA

REAGAN, RICHARD

REHDER, STANLEY

REID, H. VAN

REYNOLDS, B. B.

REYNOLDS, DR. FRANK R.

RHETT, HASKELL

RHETT, HASKELL, JR.

RICE, J. B.

RIPPY, J. FRED

RITCHIE, WM. A.

ROBERTS, MISS JESSIE S.

ROBERTSON, R. A.

ROBERTSON, W. G.

ROBINS, F. B.

RODMAN, DR. R. B.

ROE, J. C.

ROGERS, R. S.

ROLAND, H. M.

RORISON, HARMON C.

ROSE, MRS. DELLA C. (FRED G.)

ROSS, LAWRENCE C.

ROSS, MRS. FRANK

ROSS, WM. DER.

RUFFIN, PETER B.

S

SANDERS, WARREN S.

SANDERS, WARREN S., JR.

SANDERSON, CHAS. S.

SAUNDERS, MRS. BESSIE G.

SAUNDERS, M. G., JR.

SCOTT, DAVID H.

SCOTT, MRS. DAVID H.

SCOTT, J. A.

SEYMOUR, J. CARL

SHARPTON, JAMES B.

SHEFFIELD, WALTER, JR.

SHEPPARD, MRS. R. M.

SIDBURY, DR. J. B.

SIMPSON, C. E., JR.

SIMPSON, COL. L. L.

SIMKINS, ROBERT I.

SIMKINS, W. G.

SISSON, WILLIAM

SLOAN, DR. DAVID B.

SLOAN, DAVID D.

SLOAN, R. C.

SLOCUM, MRS. R. B.

SMITH, MISS MATTIE L.

SMITH, JACK W.

SMITH, DR. JAS. H.

SMITH, DR. JAS. HOWARD





MEMBERS — Continued

SMITH, DR. JUNIUS C.

SMITH, MISS OCTAVIA

SMITH, MRS. P. R.

SMITH, P. R., JR.

SMITH, STEPHEN

SMITH, MRS. W. R.

SNIPES, QUINCY B.

SOVEREL, RALPH W.

SPEIDEN, MRS. IDA B.

SPOONER, G. H., JR.

SPRUNT, DR. DOUGLAS

SPRUNT, J. L.

SPRUNT, JAMES L., JR.

SPRUNT, KENNETH M.

SPRUNT, L. G.

SPRUNT, WALTER

SPRUNT, W. P., JR.

STACK, L. P.

STACK, N. C.

STOCKARD, MRS. S. A.

STONE, J. S.

STOVALL, HARRY W., JR.

STRANGE, ALLAN T.

STRANGE, ROBERT

SUTHERLAND, W. O. S.

SUTTON, I. J.

SUTTON, WM. H.

SWAIN, G. T.

SWAIN, GEO. T., JR.

SYMMES, COURTLAND

SYMMES, MRS. ELIZA D.

SYMMES, JOHN C.

T

TALIAFERRO, C. F.

TALIAFERRO, MRS. T. CARSON

TAPP, ROBERT E.

TATE, R. H.

TAYLOR, J. DOUGLAS

TAYLOR, JOHN D.

TAYLOR, REV. L. A.

TAYLOR, ROBERT N.

TAYLOR, WALKER

TAYLOR, WALKER, JR.

TAYLOR, WM. B.

THAYER, MRS. ANNIE L.

THOMAS, G. G.

THOMASON, B. H.

THOMASON, B. H., JR.

THORNTON, J. G.

THORNTON, W. H.

THORPE, W. B.

TIDLER, DR. JAMES

TILLERY, MISS EMMA W.

TILLERY, L. B.

TILLERY, L. B., JR.

TILLERY, W. HAMPTON

TOMS, E. R.

TOOMER, MISS CARRIE

TOOMER, E. J.

TOOMER, J. EDWIN

TOOMER, MISS LOIS

TOWLES, E. B.

TRASK, C. HEIDE

TRASK, J. M.

TROY, SAM A., JR.

TRUNDLE, A. S., JR.

TURRENTINE, H. W.

TURRENTINE, H. W., JR.

U

URQUHART, ALEX R.

V

VANCE, HARLEY E.

VAUGHAN, M. H.

VON OESEN, HENRY

W

WALBACH, COL. JAS. DEB.

WALDEN, DR. K. C.

WARD, JOHN

WARNER, R. B.

WASHBURN, B. M., JR.

WATTERS, WADDELL

WATKINS, A. S.

WEATHERSBEE, DR. RANSEY

WEATHERSBEE, DR. RANSEY, JR.

WEAVER, EDWARD

WELLS, HAROLD W.





MEMBERS — Continued

WELLS, HAROLD W., JR.

WELLS, JAMES L.

WESTBROOK, E. M.

WHITE, C. E.

WHITE, C. E., JR.

WHITE, E. L.

WHITE, E. L., JR.

WHITHEAD, MRS. WM. G.

WHITTED, MRS. D. C.

WILLARD, EMERSON

WILLARD, MRS. E. PAYSON

WILLARD, MARTIN S.

WILLETTS, FRED

WILLETTS, FRED, JR.

WILLIAMS, H. RICHARD

WILLIAMS, S. G.

WILLIAMS, R. M., JR.

WILLIAMSON, MRS. J. W.

WILLIS, MRS. M. L.

WILSON, MCC. B.

WITHERSPOON, REV, E. D.

WOOD, E. J.

WOOD, THOS. F., JR.

WOODBURY, L. E.

WOODBURY, L. E., JR.

WOOTTEN, E. Y.

WRIGHT, I. C.

WRIGHT, J. LAURENS

WRIGHT, BISHOP THOS. H.

WRIGHT, THOS. H.

WRIGHT, THOS. H., JR.

* Denotes Honorary Lifetime Members

SEASONAL

BELL, FRANKLIN W.KELLY, A. P.
BURNETT, OSCARMASON, DR. L. B.
GORNTO, GEO., JR.PETTEE, R. H.
GROVE, DR. R. F.STRONG, LUDLOW P.
HARRIS, W. L.TRASK, RAIFORD
HINES, JAMES B.VAN VELSOR, DR. HARRY









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