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Facts about Wilson, North Carolina

Date: 1934 | Identifier: F264.W7 F29 1934
Facts about Wilson, North Carolina / compiled and published by the Wilson Chamber of Commerce ; Lester Rose, editorial manager. Wilson, NC : the Chamber, 1934. 84 p. : ill., 1 map ; 24 cm. Includes indexes. more...
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WILSON
NORTH CAROLINA


[Illustration:


Photo of road and trees]

The City of Beautiful Trees






[Illustration:

The Branch Banking and
Trust Company

The Largest and Strongest Bank in Eastern Carolina, With a Background of Sixty Years of Safe Banking and Trust Service, Is Keeping Step with the Progress of Wilson and Carolina
Home Office — — — — — — Wilson, N. C.]





Facts About Wilson
North Carolina



Compiled and Published by the
WILSON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
Wilson, N. C.
OCTOBER 15, 1934

LESTER ROSE, Editorial Manager

EDITORIAL COMMITTEE
STEVE ANDERSON, Chairman
Thomas Woodard
Dwight Fouts
O. P. Dickinson
Graham Woodard
H. S. Hilly
John Barclay

Statistics for this book were collected by the following men:
T. J. Hackney
Thomas Bridgers
B. D. Kent
Windsor Woodard
E. W. Edwards
Geo. L. Bent
John Leach
Robert Williford
Casper Smith
R. E. Overman
T. A. Guthrie
Silas R. Lucas

Printed by P. D. Gold Publishing Company
Wilson, N. C.
Photographs by Holden's Studio, Wilson, N. C.
Engravings by Metropolitan Engraving and Electrotype Co., Richmond, Va.





[Illustration:

HON. LOUIS D. WILSON
The man for whom Wilson County was named.]





A History of Wilson and Wilson County

The town of Wilson was incorporated by the General Assembly of North Carolina on January 29, 1849. It later became the county seat of Wilson County, which was created by an act of the Legislature in 1855, from portions of Edgecombe, Nash, Johnston and Wayne counties. The new county was named for the Hon. Louis D. Wilson, long a member of the Senate from Edgecombe, and a volunteer in the Mexican War, where he died of fever. The town of Wilson is situated near the center of the county. The county was early divided into ten townships for the purpose of organizing school districts.

The town from its incorporation in 1849, when it was just a crossroads, until about 1890, made a very slow growth. But during the decade 1890-1900, several events of historic importance took place, which had a great influence on the growth and the importance of the town.

First, in 1890, the first tobacco warehouse was built in Wilson. It proved quite successful both from the standpoint of being a convenience to the farmers who had heretofore sold their tobacco in Rocky Mount and other centers, and also as a business enterprise for the owners. From the beginning, Wilson proved popular as a tobacco market. The growth of the town may be dated from this first tobacco sale. During the 44 years that the Wilson tobacco market has been running, it has not only attained eminence by being the largest in the world for the sale of flue-cured tobacco, but justly claims to be the most efficient market of any tobacco belt.

The second thing of importance in this decade was the beginning of the industrial and manufacturing development of the town which was then begun. Wagon manufacturing, cotton mills and the making of cigarettes were all started in this decade.

Third, one of the most important things that happened in 1890-1900 was the building of the Norfolk-Southern railway, giving this town modern connection and transportation east and west. The Atlantic Coast Line had, from the day of the incorporation of the town, given service north and south. Now, by having access to the Port at Norfolk and the Capital at Raleigh, by means of the Norfolk-Southern as well as connection north and south, Wilson was in a much better commercial strategic position.

The fourth thing that happened in the 1890-1900 decade to influence the growth and progress of Wilson was the establishment by the town of its first public utilities. The electric light plant was the first utility established. It was begun in 1892 through a bond issue of $15,000.00. The lights were turned on during the following year. The water works were started with a bond issue of $60,000.00 in 1893. From that time until now our municipally owned utilities have been a source of constant pride, commercial progress, and help toward tax relief to the citizens of Wilson. The water works, the electric light plant, and the gas works, combined, today have a property value of about one and a half million dollars. The annual average profit is about $150,000.00, which is turned over to the public treasury for the relief of the taxpayers, giving Wilson a very low rate of taxation.

Since the 1890's, the population of Wilson has steadily increased until today it is the trading center for a population three times larger than the actual population of Wilson, which is approximately 15,000.





Wilson is known far and wide as a town of beauty, particularly in its residential section. West Nash Street has been selected by many as one of the ten most outstanding places of beauty in North Carolina.

In 1926, Wilson dedicated with appropriate ceremony the handsome one-half million dollar Court House. In November, 1928, the new Post Office and United States Court House was dedicated.

The educational life of Wilson has been one of steady progress under the leadership for two decades of the late Dr. Chas. L. Coon. Thoroughly modern buildings house the consolidated schools in each township of the county. The town also has Atlantic Christian College, a four-year senior grade A College, one-half of whose 300 students come from the county and town of Wilson.

For over half a century, Wilson has been served by two exceedingly strong banks, the Branch Banking & Trust Company, and the National Bank.

In 1932, the Board of Aldermen voted to have a town manager, and this request was granted by the Legislature. Since that time the town has been governed by a manager. This new method of government has proved very satisfactory in the conducting of the town government and in the maintenance of the town's credit. All Wilson bonds are now quoted above par.

Wilson has recently begun the development of parks and playgrounds, and there are now two parks and five playgrounds for use this summer.

Wilson is known as a neighborly, friendly town, and its slogan might well be, “A Good Place To Live.”


[Illustration:


Starr florist nursery greenhouses]

STARR, The Florist

Phone 234

502-510 Maplewood Ave.

“FLOWERS THAT PLEASE”

Bonded Member Florist Telegraph Delivery Association.






[Illustration:

WILSON COUNTY COURT HOUSE
]


[Illustration:

CHARLES L. COON HIGH SCHOOL
]





The Town of Wilson—Its Form of Government

From 1848 until 1933 the town had a Mayor-Aldermanic form of government. In 1933 the people voted for a Mayor-Aldermanic-City Manager form of government and a City Manager was accordingly installed in June, 1933.

The town is governed by a Mayor and five Aldermen. The Mayor is the chief executive officer of the Town while the City Manager is the chief administrative officer, working under the direction and control of the Board of Aldermen.

The town is divided into five wards. A mayor is elected by the town at large while each ward names one Alderman who must be a resident of the ward which names him. An election for town officers is held every two years and after assuming office the Aldermen name a City Manager. The different phases of the Town's work are divided into departments such as utilities, finance, police, fire, street, etc.

A regular meeting of the Board is held each month on Thursday after the first Monday at which time reports of the condition of the Town are made by the City Manager to the Mayor and Board. Necessary ordinances are passed, complaints and requests of citizens are heard and the affairs of the Town discussed and regulated as the need arises. No ordinance may be passed and no appropriation made other than at regular meeting. The Board holds special meetings whenever the need arises.

Power, Lights, Gas and Water

The electric, gas, water plants, and distribution systems of Wilson are municipally owned. The Town of Wilson owns 75 miles of distribution lines outside of its corporate limits, and furnishes lights and power to several hundred rural customers. At the present time an extension program is being promoted for the purpose of extending these lines over a larger area of Wilson County.

The Town of Wilson furnishes lights and power to the following near-by towns: Elm City, Black Creek, Lucama, Stantonsburg, Saratoga, Walstonburg and Rock Ridge.

The Utilities of the Town of Wilson, including land, building and distribution systems are valued at $1,948,812.77. The electric plant has the most improved equipment and a generator capacity of 8,750 K. W. The service rates are as follows:

HOME ELECTRIC SERVICE RATE
Schedule D

This rate shall be available to all residence customers, except business houses, hotels, boarding and rooming houses, public buildings and apartment houses where more than one apartment is on the same meter.

First25Kw-hrs.@8cperKw-Hr.
Next75Kw-hrs.@5cperKw-Hr.
Next200Kw-hrs.@3cperKw-Hr.
Next300Kw-hrs.@1½cperKw-Hr.

MINIMUM BILL $1.00 PER MONTH WHEN LIGHTS ONLY ARE CONNECTED.






[Illustration:

VIEWS OF WILSON MUNICIPAL PLANTS
1. Air View Hydro-Electric Plant
2. Light and Water Plant
3. Filtered Water Reservoir]





ELECTRIC RATES
Commercial Electric Lighting—Schedule A

First15Kw.Hrs.permonth9cperKw. hr.
Next85Kw.Hrs.permonth7.7cperKw. hr.
Next200Kw.Hrs.permonth6.3cperKw. hr.
Next500Kw.Hrs.permonth5.4cperKw. hr.
Over800Kw.Hrs.permonth4.5cperKw. hr.

The above rate, Schedule A shall be available to all business houses, hotels, boarding houses, rooming houses, public buildings, apartment houses, where more than one apartment is on the same meter. Net minimum monthly charge under this Schedule A Rate is $1.00 per meter.

HIGH-LOW TENSION POWER
Industrial Rate—Schedule B

First100Kw.Hrs.permonth5cperKw. hr.
Next700Kw.Hrs.permonth3.6cperKw. hr.
Next1,700Kw.Hrs.permonth3.2cperKw. hr.
Next3,500Kw.Hrs.permonth2.7cperKw. hr.
Next10,000Kw.Hrs.permonth2.3cperKw. hr.
Next20,000Kw.Hrs.permonth1.8cperKw. hr.
Next20,000Kw.Hrs.permonth1.6cperKw. hr.
Over56,000Kw.Hrs.permonth.9cperKw. hr.

GAS RATES

For first2,000Cubicft.permonth$1.35per M.
For next5,000Cubicft.permonth$1.15per M.
For next10,000Cubicft.permonth$1.00per M.
For next10,000Cubicft.permonth.90per M.
All over27,000Cubicft.permonth.80per M.

MINIMUM BILL $1.00 PER MONTH.

WATER RATES

For first400Cubicft.@$2.50per1000Cu.ft.$1.00
For next2,800Cubicft.@$1.50per1000Cu.ft.$4.20
For next6,800Cubicft.@$1.25per1000Cu.ft.$8.50
All over10,000Cubicft.@$1.10per1000Cu.ft.

MINIMUM BILL $1.00 PER MONTH.

WATER SUPPLY

Wilson's water supply is taken from a lake at the head of Contentnea Creek. The watershed and storage space are ample to meet every requirement. The filtering and pumping plant has a capacity of 3,000,000 gallons daily. The distribution system and fire hydrant service reach every part of the town. Sewer and water are also available in every section.

The analysis of the water is as follows:

CHEMICAL ANALYSIS (Parts Per Million)

Total dissolved solids73
Organic solids (Loss on Ignition)7
Mineral Residue67
Total Alkalinity (as CaCO3)22.5
Normal Carbonates (as CO3)0
Bicarbonates (as HCO3)22.5






[Illustration:

VIEWS OF WILSON MUNICIPAL PLANTS
1. Turbine Room (Interior)
2. Boiler Room (Interior)
3. Air View, Light, Water and Gas Plants]





Hydroxides (as OH)0
Sulphates (as SO4)26.0
Chlorides (as Cl)7.0
Nitrates (as NO3).07
Nitrites (as NO2).12
Free Chlorine (as Cl)0
Free Ammonia (as NH3).054
Albuminoid Ammonia (as Organic N).022
Oxygen-consuming Capacity (as O2)2.2
Iron (as Fe) Colorimetrically.02
Calculated Hardness (as CaCO2)19.9
Soap Hardness (as CaCO3)15.2
Fluorine (as Fl2)0
Dissolved Silica (As SiO2)5
Iron & Aluminum Oxides (as FeO3 and Al2O3)2
Calcium (as Ca)3.5
Magnesium (as Mg)2.7
Sodium & Potassium (Na)16.0

Population

According to the Federal Census of 1930 Wilson had a population of 12,613, an increase of 258 percent since 1900. If the city limits were extended about a half mile in each direction, taking in the suburbs which actually connect and are part of the town, the population would be about 16,500.

The population of Wilson County in 1930 was 44,914 as compared to 23,596 in 1900.

The rapid expansion between 1900 and 1930 is evidence in itself of the progressiveness of the community.

This section is making a fast upward trend in its agricultural and industrial development, which will lead to continued growth.

G. S. Tucker & Co.

Furniture — Home Outfitters

Let Us Serve You

Established in Wilson in 1896

Phone 174

Geo. W. Grady, Mgr.


[Illustration:


Photograph of Thomas-Yelverton Company Funeral Home]

THOMAS-YELVERTON COMPANY

Funeral Home

And Ambulance Service

“Call 58

We are never late”






[Illustration:

Map of the Town of Wilson North Carolina. Gladding Engineering Company Wilson, N.C.
]





Health Department

The Wilson County Health Department consisting of a whole-time health officer, a whole-time nurse, a sanitation and milk inspector, and a secretary, affords the people of Wilson and Wilson County the benefits of modern advances in preventive medicine and sanitation. This department carries out a carefully prepared twelve-month program, covering school work in all the schools in the county, sanitation in Wilson and Wilson County, inspection of cafes, restaurants, hotels, and markets, the care of indigent tuberculosis patients, holding venereal, orthopedic, tuberculosis, and midwives’ clinics. In addition, the modern methods of preventive medicine are available to everyone free.

Increasingly favorable results of the work carried on by the Health Department are reflected in the incidence and mortality rate of preventable diseases, both of which each year show a marked improvement over the preceding year. Smallpox and typhoid fever have been almost entirely eliminated. Malaria, once a scourge, has been reduced to where it is now a negligible factor in the health of the community. There is also a steady decrease in diphtheria and the number of new cases of tuberculosis each year.

Welfare Work of Wilson

The welfare work in Wilson, both town and county, is carried on by three separate organizations, the oldest of which is the County Board of Charity and Public Welfare. This board is appointed by the State Board, and recommends a nominee for superintendent of Public Welfare, who is elected by the State Board and the county, and is paid by the county.

For the past seven years the welfare work of the town has been carried on by the Wilson Welfare Association, a private organization controlled by a board and conducted by an Executive Secretary. Both the town and county governments contribute regular sums monthly to this organization.

For the past two years, the Federal Government has supplemented the appropriations of the local governments and the donations of individuals to the extent of $325,000.00. This was first known as the Relief Fund, then it was enlarged and known as the CWA, and now it is called the ERA, Emergency Relief Administration. The County Superintendent of Public Welfare is also the administrator and director of Federal Relief.

Photos for This Publication Made By HOLDEN STUDIO Duplicates may be secured at any time.





Southern Dairies

Ice Cream of the South


[Illustration:


Photograph of Southern Dairies facility]

Also operating a modern milk plant manufacturing a full line of dairy products.

Drink Pasteurized Milk, It Is Safe.


[Illustration:

Southern Dairies Ice Cream
]

SOUTHERN DAIRIES, INC.

200 Railroad Street

Wilson, N. C.

Telephone 976


[Illustration:

Tested and Approved Serial No. 4844 by Good Housekeeping Bureau Conducted by Good Housekeeping Magazine NDP
]





Wilson Hospital and Clinical Facilities

The town of Wilson is one of the oldest medical and hospital centers in the State of North Carolina. The first hospital was established here in 1898 by Drs. C. E. Moore and Albert Anderson, two of the state's most prominent physicians for more than a half century, and two of the South's pioneer hospital executives. The Old Sanatorium, established by them, was the forerunner of the town's present hospitals. These institutions include three hospitals and one clinical laboratory as follows: The Moore-Herring Hospital, established in 1913; The Carolina General Hospital, established in 1920; The Mercy Hospital, established in 1913, and the Contentnea Pathological and Clinical Laboratory, established in 1929.

The Moore-Herring Hospital, composed of a staff of four doctors, and the Carolina General Hospital, whose staff is composed of three doctors, are privately owned, but through cooperation with the town and county welfare departments, the indigent as well as the more fortunate patients refer to them for attention.

The Mercy Hospital for colored people only was reorganized on a community basis in 1928. It is controlled by a board of trustees. All physicians of the town and county, both white and colored, are eligible for membership on the staff. This hospital is used by Wilson, Pitt, and Green Counties, as it is the only hospital in these counties for colored people.

The Contentnea Pathological and Clinical Laboratory, operated by a specialist, is designed for extensive examination and limited treatment of potentially ambulant patients. It was organized in January 1929.

The combined bed capacity of the three hospitals and clinic is 135. These institutions are modern, steam-heated, brick buildings, well equipped in every respect. They maintain modern X-ray and diagnostic laboratories and well equipped operating departments, where general and special surgery is done. Men of excellent training are in charge of these departments.

The Hospitals are all general in character, admitting patients, medical, obstetrical and surgical. Isolation wards for contagious diseases are also available. The nursing and general care of patients is done by well trained nurses. All positions of trust and responsibility are held by graduate nurses and those who have had special training.

The Medical profession of Wilson embraces twenty-five active men. The specialists, general surgery, eye, ear, nose and throat, pediatrics, X-ray and Radiology are represented by alert, well qualified men who have affiliations with one or more of the hospitals. The general practitioners are also progressive and highly qualified physicians who have hospital affiliations either on the regular or courtesy staff of one or more of the hospitals.


[Illustration:

1. Moore-Herring Hosptial 2. Carolina General Hospital 3. Mercy Hospital (Negro) 4. Contentnea Pathological and Clinical Laboratories
Photo collage of four photographs]






[Illustration:


1. Moore-Herring Hospital
2. Carolina General Hospital
3. Mercy Hospital (Negro)
4. Contentnea Pathological and Clinical Laboratories]





Statistical Data for County and City Schools

WILSON CITY UNITBoth units are served by one superintendentWILSON COUNTY UNIT
NUMBER BUILDINGSNUMBER BUILDINGS
WhiteColoredWhiteColored
451323
VALUE BUILDINGS, FUR. AND FIXTURESVALUE BUILDINGS, FUR. AND FIXTURES
WhiteColoredWhiteColored
$544,230$108,235$800,131.00$48,592.00
ENROLLMENT 1933-34ENROLLMENT 1933-34
WhiteColoredWhiteColored
2606238344712883
TEACHERS AND PRINCIPALS EMPLOYED 1933-34TEACHERS AND PRINCIPALS EMPLOYED 1933-34
WhiteColoredWhiteColored
624510850

The white high school is a member of the Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. The students who receive a standard diploma may enter any college without an examination.

The colored high school is rated a standard high school.

A new colored school building is in the process of erection for use in 1934-35.

There are six rural standard high schools in Wilson County. Students from these schools make good records in college. This year two of these will offer a course in agriculture for the first time. All the white school buildings are equipped with modern conveniences.

During the past three years there have been seven new colored school buildings erected in the County Unit.

ELM CITY UNIT
NUMBER BUILDINGS
WhiteColored
25
VALUE BUILDINGS FURNITURE AND FIXTURES
WhiteColored
$158,400.00$10,300.00
ENROLLMENT 1933-34
WhiteColored
909742
Teachers in this Unit 1933-34
WhiteColored
2214

The High School Department of this Unit belongs to the Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools.






[Illustration:


1. Negro Grammar School
2. Negro High School
3. Winstead Grammar School
4. Margaret Hearne Grammar School
5. Frederick Woodard Grammar School]





Atlantic Christian College

Wilson, N. C., is the seat of Atlantic Christian College, the only standard four-year college of arts in the central section of Eastern North Carolina. For nearly a third of a century the institution has been rendering service in the field of higher education to young men and young women of the southeast.

The college is owned and operated by the Christian Church in the Carolinas, but its patronage and support are secured from its friends regardless of denominational lines. Less than half of its student body of three hundred comes from the homes of its own church people.

The college plant is located on a square in the northwestern part of Wilson. In recent years substantial improvements have been made in the buildings and equipment. A gymnasium has just been constructed, walks laid, and a plan of beautification of the campus put into effect. It is hoped that an additional dormitory may be built in the next year to provide in a better way for the increased attendance.

The college has an endowment fund of some $350,000.00 which enables it to offer its services at a very reasonable cost. Worthy students may secure loans and scholarships or part-time employment to aid them in their college career.

It is the purpose of the college administration to fit the course of study more closely to the needs of the present day. A beginning has already been made in this readjustment, centering around the chief lines of human endeavor instead of the traditional and fragmentary study of subjects.

Wilson County Library

In 1921 the Department of Literature of the Woman's Club established a free public library in Wilson with 600 volumes. The library has grown steadily. It now has about 7,000 volumes and 7,000 readers. Last year the circulation was 46,955.

Since 1925 the library has been sponsored by the town and county, and is free to all the people of the town and county. The library occupies two rooms in the Wilson County Court House.

Besides being a source of great pleasure to the reading public, the library furnishes parallel reading for the public schools of the town and county. Special attention is given to the junior readers who throng the library for pleasure-reading and for help in their school work.

The reference department is excellent in its wide scope of usefulness.

Thomas-Yelverton Co.

“Better Furniture”

Where High Grade Furniture Is Sold At Reasonable Prices.

Phone 57-58





Atlantic Christian College


[Illustration:

Atlantic Christian College
]

Wilson, N. C.

A college for young men and women.One Year Business Course.
Fine Arts.
Four year courses leading to A. B. degree.Good program of Physical Education.
Very Reasonable Expenses.

Thirty-third session opens September 10th.

For catalogue and information write to

Pres. H. S. Hilley, Wilson, N. C.

Williford Motor Company

Ford Sales and Service

Best Used Cars In Town

Watch The Fords Go By

117-119 N. Douglas St.—Tel. 98

W. M. WIGGINS & CO.

Plumbing and Heating Contractors

IRON FIREMEN

WILSON, N. C.

PHONE 891





Wilson Churches

The town of Wilson is one of the few towns in America not overchurched. It is fortunate in having a small number of strong churches that effectively care for the religious and spiritual life of the town. It has five strong churches with full-time ministers who are well educated and highly trained for their work.

The Methodist Church is the largest in membership with some 1300 members. The Christian and Missionary Baptist Churches come next with about 800 members each. The Presbyterian and Episcopal Churches have slightly less than 500 members each, but nevertheless are strong influential churches.

In addition to these five larger churches five other churches, smaller in membership, do effective work for the community as well as furnish places of worship for their members. These are the Five Points Missionary Baptist Church, the Freewill Baptist Church, the Primitive Baptist Church, the Pentecostal Holiness Church, and the Roman Catholic Church. In conjunction with the Roman Catholic Church, a grammar school is conducted by the Sisters. The Orthodox Jews maintain a small synagogue in Wilson and The Salvation Army operates a Mission.

The negroes of Wilson maintain separate churches, and the Methodist, Baptist and Presbyterian congregations are especially large, active and well organized. Six smaller negro churches here also serve this race in Wilson.

In the small towns and the rural sections of Wilson County, there are more than thirty churches of the following denominations: Southern Baptist, Methodist, Presbyterian, Primitive Baptist, Christian, Freewill Baptists and Holiness. The Methodist and the Baptist are the influential churches in Elm City and Stantonsburg.

Boy Scouting

The East Carolina Council of Boy Scouts has its headquarters in Wilson. The offices of the Scout Executive are located on the second floor of the Court House. Daily office hours are 8:15 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

On August 1, 1934, there were in the Council 41 troops with 895 registered Scouts. The Scout Executive concentrates his work in Wilson and Wilson County and renders office service and whatever other assistance possible in a larger area including the towns of Rocky Mount, Greenville, Kinston, New Bern, Washington, and quite a number of smaller towns and communities.

Camp Charles, a camp for all the Scouts of the Council, is about fifteen miles west of Wilson. It consists of 73 wooded acres, a lake, a large mess hall, a craft shop, cabins and other facilities adequate to meet the camping needs of the entire Council. It is used for overnight camping in winter and mass and troop camping in summer. During the summer of 1934 the camp was used for the first time by a group of underprivileged girls under adequate leadership.

The Council affords a well-rounded program of citizenship development and general character education for teen-age boys and for younger boys of Cub age, 9, 10 and 11.

Among the regular features of Scouting in the East Carolina Council are cooperation with the Chamber of Commerce and various civic clubs in the community, good turns, regular troop meetings, Scout leaders’ training schools and advancement in the various phases of Scouting.






[Illustration:

WILSON CHURCHES
1. Methodist
2. Catholic
3. Baptist
4. Christian
5. Presbyterian
6. Negro Baptist
7. Primitive Baptist
8. Negro Presbyterian
9. Episcopal
10. Negro Methodist]






[Illustration:


1. Wilson Dining Hall
2. Anyscouts Cabin
3. Baptist Church Cabin
4. Lions Club Cabin
5. Christian Church Cabin
6. Kiwanis Craft Shop
7. Totem Pole
8. Less-Privileged Girls Camp]






[Illustration:

Wilson Theater
]


[Illustration:

Carolina Theater
]

WILSON AND CAROLINA THEATRES

“Wilson's Greatest Entertainment”

CHURCHWELL'S

“The Quality Shop”

Jewelers and Engravers

110 East Nash Street

Flowers By Wire Anywhere

Telephone No. 1094

Wilson Floral Company

Flowers For All Occasions

Seeds Bulbs Shrubs

307 Hill Street

Wilson, N. C.





L. J. HERRING, Dr., V. M.

DR. R. LANE, Associate

Dr. L. J. Herring Implement Co.

Veterinarians

For Sale—International Trucks and the full line McCormick-Deering Farming Implements and Tractors. Diesel Engines.

“We service what we sell”

Res. Phone 482

Wilson, N. C.

Office 469

A Most Complete Stock

For The Entire Family At

Farris’ Department Store

“TRADE MORE FOR LESS MONEY”

109-111 S. Tarboro St.

Wilson N. C.

Shop with Confidence — and — Wear with Pride

LEDER BROS.

Newest Department Store

116 S. Tarboro St.

Wilson, N. C.






[Illustration:

New Briggs Hotel
]

The Popular Hotel In Wilson

New Briggs Hotel

You can sleep in a clean room newly painted and papered.

— EUROPEAN —

100 Rooms — 50 Baths

Rates: $1.25 to $2.

Special Rates To Motor Parties

Cafeteria in Connection

Serving The Best Foods Properly Cooked At Reasonable Prices

— FREE PARKING —

WHEN IN WILSON STOP AT NEW BRIGGS HOTEL

R. LYNDO GRIFFIN, Proprietor.





Wilson Country Club

The Wilson Country Club was chartered May 6, 1915. During the same year it acquired a 125 acre tract of land between highway No. 22 and the waters of Contentnea Creek, about four miles south of the town of Wilson on U. S. Highway No. 301.

It is now able to offer to its members and the public the advantages of a well-constructed and well-kept eighteen-hole golf course, outdoor swimming pool, tennis courts, and a modern club house. It is kept by a whole-time professional man who gives instructions at reasonable rates.

No charge is made for house guests or members. Non-resident guests and tourists are welcome to use its facilities, the greens fee being $1.00.

Nash Street, The Beautiful

John Muir, the white-haired lover of nature, once wrote, “show me a town that loves trees and I'll show you a town that loves God and all His wonders.” He might have added “and a town that holds rank with any other as a beauty spot.” Wilson is such a town, and it is called a town because its dads haven't yet seen fit to change its charter and label it officially a city. If Wilson is not a city, where is one? And if Wilson is not a beauty spot, also, where is one? Ten years ago the nation's most famed geographical and pictorial magazine picked out one Wilson thoroughfare, Nash street, for exemplification and declared it more attractive and beautiful than any street elsewhere.

Running from healthy, hearty, wholesome farming country on the town's west, Nash street cuts a line, knifelike, through a beautiful residential neighborhood on east into the town's thriving, alert business section, and darting across the railroad, loses itself again in an equally healthy, hearty, wholesome country farther on, three easy miles of wonder street.

If one hunts for beauty he must, of course, start beyond Pine street and journey west. Here he finds a broad, tree lined avenue, and, on both sides, behind broader lawns faced with green and gardened flowers, homes of many types of architecture, ranging from colonial and puritan, down through the category of chalet, Gregorian, cottage, brick and frame.

But it is not the homes of Nash street that offer the greatest attraction. All towns have homes but not all have trees. The high spot in Nash street beauty is its greenness and its trees, whose trunks tower heavenward in some places as their boughs touch the ground in others. On both sides Nash street is enshrouded umbrella-like and offers a cooling and inviting shade for more than a solid mile. New Haven may advertise its elms, Charleston may tell of its Magnolia grandiola, New Orleans may urge you to see its moss hung “swamp angels,” but Wilson invites a tree lover to see trees, just trees.

And when it says trees, it offers an assortment on Nash street seldom found elsewhere. Pecans, magnolias, maples, birch, beech, walnut, umbrella, live oaks, cypress, hickory, pines, and tall evergreens loom up and over the loveliest of crepe myrtle, of pink and salmon hues. Occasionally a startlingly red-barked madrone may be






[Illustration:

AIR VIEW WILSON COUNTRY CLUB
]


[Illustration:

NASH STREET, LOOKING WEST FROM PARK AVENUE
]





seen with its great, glossy green leaves, stretching its ruddy trunk skyward for maybe 90 feet, and by its side, a Mimosa with its feathery dignity and simplicity that no man-made work can rival.

These are but some of the Nash street giants of horticulture, but beneath their sweeping boughs one finds also floriculture, man-high ferns, dainty pink oxalis, star flowers, blushing flesh colored azalea and many other kinds of summer garden perennials.

If as Keats said, “a thing of beauty is a joy forever,” then truly, Wilson should be a happy town with so much beauty always evident.

Parks, Playgrounds and Resorts

Peter Pan Park is a playground for tots of pre-school age. It is equipped with apparatus for games of various kinds and has a trained supervisor in charge.

Stronwood and Gold Parks are of ten to fifteen acres each in extent, and are equipped with attractive apparatus for games and recreation. Each park has a swimming pool for children and is in charge of competent supervisors.

Greenhill Park is located in the town's industrial section, and is equipped with open-air showers.

Parks and playgrounds in Wilson are well kept, shady and easily accessible to the various residential sections of the town.

Located six miles west of Wilson on State Highway No. 58 is Silver Lake. This is one of Wilson's most inviting recreational centers for both old and young. It is patronized extensively by people of this and adjacent counties.

As a resort it offers swimming, boating, fishing, bowling and dancing. It is also equipped for camping parties and for the serving of luncheons and banquets.

Drink—


[Illustration:

Coca-Cola
]

In Bottles

It Had To Be Good To Get Where It Is

BARNES-HARRELL COMPANY

J. T. BARNES

W. N. HARRELL

W. D. ADAMS






[Illustration:

GOLD PARK
]


[Illustration:

SILVER LAKE
]


[Illustration:

PETER PAN PARK
]


[Illustration:

STRONWOOD PARK
]





Wilson Tobacco Market

Located in Wilson, North Carolina, the world's largest bright leaf tobacco market, are ten of the most modern and up-to-date warehouses to be found on any tobacco market, regardless of type, whether of bright leaf or burley. Each warehouse is designed to give to all tobacco offered for sale by the forty or fifty thousand tobacco producers selling tobacco here, the best advantages possible to bring out its true merits, as to quality and texture. From the time of the opening of the Wilson Tobacco Market each season, up until the Thanksgiving Holidays, covering a period of approximately three months, there are placed in straight rows of a width of 43 inches, with a space of 18 inches between rows, a variation of between thirty and thirty-five thousand baskets of tobacco each day, awaiting sale. The latter quoted number constitutes the capacity of the Wilson warehouse floors, which, in other figures, aggregates a total of 700,000 square feet. The warehouse floors, when filled to capacity, will hold approximately four million pounds of tobacco.

Those huge warehouses, which seasonally operate on the Wilson market are:

Banner Warehouse

Carolina Warehouse

Centre Brick Warehouse, Nos. 1 and 2

Farmers Warehouse

New Planters Warehouse

Smith Warehouses A and B

Watson Warehouse Nos. 1 and 2

To handle the seemingly unlimited amount of fine quality of tobacco annually for sale in Wilson there have been erected nine large tobacco redrying plants which, when combined, furnish a redrying capacity of approximately two million pounds daily, with ten hours as the regulation running time.

With the exception of the Imperial Company, Ltd., each one of these companies maintains storage houses in Wilson, which carry storage capacity of forty-four thousand four hundred hogsheads.

Imperial Tobacco Company, Limited

Redrying capacity 300,000 lbs.

No storage houses.

R. P. Watson Company, Inc.

Redrying capacity 250,000 lbs.

Storage capacity 13,500 hogsheads.

Southern Tobacco Company, Inc.

Redrying capacity 100,000 lbs.

Storage capacity 6,000 hogsheads.

W. T. Clark & Co.

Redrying capacity 100,000 lbs.

Storage capacity 2,000 hogsheads.

Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co.

Redrying capacity 150,000 lbs.

Storage capacity 4,500 hogsheads.

Wilson Tobacco Company, Inc.

Redrying capacity 250,000 lbs.

Storage capacity 8,000 hogsheads.






[Illustration:


1. E. J. O'Brien & Co.
2. Export Leaf Tobacco Company
3. Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co.
4. Imperial Tobacco Company
5. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company]





Export Leaf Tobacco Co. Two plants

Redrying capacity 275,000 lbs.

Storage capacity 9,000 hogsheads.

E. J. O'Brien & Co.,

Redrying capacity 100,000 lbs.

Storage capacity 1,400 hogsheads.

Those companies maintaining branch offices and green packing plants on the Wilson market are:

R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company

American Suppliers Inc.

In addition to the foregoing concerns, the James I. Miller Tobacco Company, Inc., and Whitehead & Anderson, Inc. have stationed on this market their head offices from which they supervise the purchasing of tobacco in the various tobacco belts.

During the marketing season in Wilson there are employed daily approximately five thousand men and women, of which number some two thousand are employed by the warehouses.

There are five sets of buyers operating simultaneously on the Wilson Tobacco Market. They are composed of some of the finest judges of tobacco to be found anywhere. At a selling rate of three hundred sixty piles of tobacco per hour, it is possible for these men to purchase on an average of approximately one million three hundred fifty thousand pounds per day, as this is the maximum selling rate for all tobacco offered for sale in Wilson. With seven hours as the regulation sales day, warehouse floors when filled to capacity can be cleared in three days.

Since the opening of the Wilson Tobacco Market on September 19, 1890, Wilson has continually been on the upward trend, until now it stands out in the tobacco industry as the corner-stone of some huge edifice.

YearPounds Sold
18901,508,109
18912,106,904
18923,067,191NO RECORDS KEPT UNTIL 1902
18933,508,710
18943,740,422
18957,680,227
189610,171,034
18979,325,175
189811,569,207
189918,077,970
190015,129,708
190115,273,809ReceiptsAv. Per Lb.
190222,296,077$ 2,430,272.3910.90
190322,201,7711,507,500.256.79
190413,806,4791,465,481.426.90
190515,319,4691,329,899.298.42
190614,242,5661,525,378.8210.71
190715,509,7201,702,967.2510.98
190818,752,3571,845,222.099.84
190917,071,9021,449,813.568.49
191010,836,1231,167,121.3310.77
19118,818,1811,318,998.9714.79





YearPounds SoldReceiptsAv. Per Lb.
191216,381,076$ 3,225,561.8819.88
191320,819,1603,961,886.1519.03
191429,889,5683,999,224.2013.38
191534,170,7204,155,159.6412.16
191628,454,3335,753,466.1320.22
191733,244,37810,262,539.4830.87
191837,815,27813,624,844.6636.03
191942,330,59622,720,280.4453.67
192062,204,93013,446,382.9121.61
192142,864,16212,169,100.7628.38
192242,342,36012,679,644.2829.94
192371,517,35015,856,451.4322.18
192452,931,46714,125,168.2126.68
192576,666,27720,514,758.2326.75
192669,662,22818,712,054.7126.86
192776,563,26412,609,225.0823.00
192884,247,62617,202,236.3920.42
192982,820,69216,830,792.6820.32
193086,096,01011,897,669.5513.82
193166,362,7245,992,660.779.03
193237,709,5304,654,830.3513.34
193370,552,14211,871,832.1716.82


[Illustration:

Farmers Warehouse
]

Sell Your Tobacco At

The Farmers Warehouse

Where Tobacco Brings The Top Market Price.

J. S. Leach and W. O. Harrison Proprietors

A. O. DAVIS, Auctioneer

Highest Prices and a Square Deal Guaranteed to All

YOU ARE WELCOME AT ALL TIMES

Phone 617

Wilson, N. C.






[Illustration:


1. Air View Southern Tobacco Company
2. Interior View Tobacco Redrying Plant
3. W. T. Clark & Co.
4. R. P. Watson & Co.
5. Air View Wilson Tobacco Company]






[Illustration:

Smith Warehouse
]

Smith Warehouse

“A” and “B”

MOST MODERN AND UP-TO-DATE WAREHOUSES IN THE WORLD

Electric Fans

For Comfort of Farmers and Buyers

1000 Sky Lights

Not a Dark Spot

Rubber Tired Trucks

To Eliminate Noise and Confusion

Clean, Airy, Sanitary, Rest Rooms

For the Comfort and Convenience of Our Friends

Service

Courtesy

Efficiency





Agriculture

Wilson County is termed an Agricultural County with practically ninety per cent of its income derived directly or indirectly from agricultural products. A few statistical facts will give a brief outline of the agricultural conditions and the value of the farm and farm machinery of the county.

Number of farms4,734
Acres of cultivated land in farms181,233
Acres per farm38.3
Value of farm land and buildings$15,591,079.00
Land alone$11,111,473.00
Buildings alone$ 4,479,606.00
Dwellings alone$ 2,809,807.00
Value of implements and machinery$ 703,135.00
Buildings per farm$ 3,293.00
Average value per acre$ 86.03

The farms mentioned above are operated as follows:

980 operate by owners who live on their own farms.

4 operated by managers.

3,750 operated by tenants.

It is very interesting to know that over a period of ten years there has been an increase of 411 farms operated by tenants. This is an unfortunate situation for the farmers from an agricultural and social standpoint, as statistics prove that where a large number of farms are owned and operated by their owners living on the farms, the general agricultural and social conditions are greatly improved.

Soil:

The soils in Wilson County are mostly made up of the following types:

Norfolk sandy loam is the prevailing type carrying about eighty per cent of the tillable land.

Portsmouth soil is next which carries about fifteen per cent of the tillable land.

The other five per cent of the soil is made up of various types, none of which is of great importance in the county from an agricultural point of view.

Sedimentary clays suitable for brick making occur in considerable quantity on the east and northeast edge of Wilson. Two areas contain workable granites, twelve miles west of Wilson and three miles north of Elm City. Shell marl has been dug at numerous places along Toisnot and Hominy creeks, near Sharpsburg, and along White Oak Swamp. Analyses show from 38 to 72 per cent calcium carbonate.

As a whole the soils are considered very fertile from a crop standpoint with most of the soils producing about the average crops from this section of the state.

Crops:

The three major crops in Wilson County are tobacco, cotton and corn. For the past several years the consumption of the two cash






[Illustration:

AGRICULTURAL SCENES OF WILSON COUNTY
1. Cotton Field
2. Interior View Tobacco
Warehouse
3. Corn Field
4. Tobacco Field
5. Dairy Barns
6. Hogs on Self Feeder
7. Dairy Cattle]





crops mentioned has been considerably lower than the supply, therefore, it became necessary for the government to take some steps to control the production of these crops. A voluntary campaign for both of these crops was put into effect throughout the bright belt for tobacco and through the cotton states. The farmers of Wilson County were very loyal toward this program, signing up about 98 per cent of their tobacco acreage and about 98 per cent of their cotton acreage.

Under the Agricultural Adjustment Program, Wilson County was allotted a tobacco base of 29,330.7 acres. Taking out 30 per cent of this amount, the farmers will be allowed to plant 20,531.5 acres. They were allowed a base production of 22,444,595 pounds. With 30 per cent reduction they will be allowed to sell 15,711,216 pounds.

Of the total area of 238,728 acres in Wilson County, 138,572 or about 58 per cent of the land area, are classed as forest lands. Some 54 per cent of the forest area is farm woodland, including about 3,426 acres of woodland pasture. In 1925 there were only 5,839 acres in cultivated pasture land, while in 1934 this amount has increased to 10,966 acres. Of this forest area, the principal species are loblolly pine, 75 per cent; short-leaf pine, 20 per cent; and some oak and gum. The estimated total stand is about 30,000,000 board feet of saw timber accessible by road and rail according to most recent available estimates.

It is hoped that under the present change of the Agricultural Program the farmers of Wilson County will become more self-sustaining from a standpoint of feed and food supplies for their own farms by producing these supplies on the farm and by producing a better quality of products. This will mean an increase in prices, which will improve the social and economic conditions of the farmers.

Jesse S. Anderson

Thomas H. Woodard

Anderson, Deans & Woodard GENERAL INSURANCE [UNK] BONDS

Fidelity Building

Phone 652

Wilson Hardware Company

“Court House in Front of Us”

Wilson's Largest Hardware Store

Sporting Goods, Paints, Building Material, Household and General Hardware.





To Better Serve You

Watson Warehouses

No. 1

No. 2


[Illustration:

Watson Warehouses
]

We wish to sincerely thank our friends and customers for their loyalty and good will during the past season, which enabled us to maintain our leadership of the Wilson Market, and we again offer you a quality of service in the sale of your tobacco that we believe cannot be found elsewhere.

SALES FORCE

Selby Anderson

Hob Anderson

A. B. Baines

Henry T. Carraway

Jesse B. Williams

W. C. Thompson

Robert Creech

Watson Warehouses

No. 1

No. 2

Leaders Since 1904

Wilson, N. C.





1893—1934


[Illustration:

The Centre Brick Warehouse No. 1 and No. 2
]

The Centre Brick Warehouse

First Sale

Every Day

No. 1 and No. 2

First Sale

Every Day

Merits the Sale of Your 1934 Tobacco Crop

ADDITIONAL DOLLARS. The Centre Brick for the past ten years has led the Eastern Carolina average more than $2.00 per hundred pounds.

AS A RESULT The Centre Brick again sold more tobacco in 1932 than any warehouse firm in the bright belt. Leading The Wilson Market by Selling 35% of Its Total Sales.

REASONS FOR OUR HIGHER PRICES

1—Our unusual ability and experience gained during 40 years in selling farmers’ tobacco.

2—The best warehouse force in existence.

3—The equipment and floor space necessary to take care of more than 7,300 baskets of tobacco, over one million pounds daily.

4—A conscientious desire as warehousemen and farmers to get you those extra dollars.

Cozart-Eagles & Co.

Wilson, North Carolina





Petroleum Distribution

Wilson and Wilson County as well as the several adjoining counties receive their gasoline, motor oil and other petroleum products from distributing warehouses owned or operated by eight major Oil Companies. The companies operating in this vicinity are: Pure Oil Company of the Carolinas, Gulf Refining Company, Sinclair Refining Company, Standard Oil Company of New Jersey, Texas Oil Company, National Oil Company, Hackney Oil Company and the Shell Oil Company.

These eight Oil Companies operate large bulk plants and have in a large measure control of approximately 40 service stations in Wilson and 50 or 60 more in the surrounding territory. The Petroleum Industry gives employment to nearly 1,000 people in Wilson and within a radius of a few miles outside the city limits.

The Oil Companies of Wilson distribute every month to the consumers of the territory approximately 350,000 gallons of motor fuel and kerosene. Motor oil consumption will amount to nearly 8,000 gallons a month. Other products used in Wilson each month in large quantities are: soap, lubricants of all kinds, both automotive and industrial, fuel oil, tires, batteries and miscellaneous items like roofing material and solvent machine oil.

These eight Companies have invested in the vicinity of Wilson or caused to be invested nearly 2,000,000 dollars. They furnish petroleum and affiliated products to consumers amounting to over $1,000,000.

Central Service Station


[Illustration:

Central Service Station
]

Cor. Barnes & Douglas Sts.

Phone 45

Dealers in Pure Oil Products HORACE THOMAS, Mgr.






[Illustration:

Farmer's Cotton Oil Company
]






[Illustration:

Farmer's Cotton Oil Company
]





Industries

The industrial development of Wilson dates back from the year 1854 at which time Hackney Brothers was organized and engaged in the manufacturing of buggies. From year to year there followed a rapid change in more modern inventions in vehicles for travel, automobiles having almost replaced the use of buggies. In keeping with this progressive development Hackney Brothers in 1919 discontinued the manufacturing of buggies, reorganized under the name of Hackney Bros. Body Company and since that time have been engaged in manufacturing the modern type of commercial bus bodies, their weekly output now being approximately 40 bodies, depending upon the size and type.

The Hackney Wagon Co. was organized in 1903 and is still in operation, making the most modern type of wagon, the output being approximately 50 per week.

Hackney Industries, Inc., was organized in April 1934. This factory manufactures steel commercial bus bodies. The weekly output is about 15, depending upon the size and type.

During the busy season these three factories employ a total of approximately 350 people with a weekly pay-roll of about $8,000.

Wilson has three up-to-date fertilizer plants, two of which operate cotton gins. The Contentnea Guano Co. was organized in 1907. It manufactures acid phosphate and a high grade line of fertilizer. The daily output is 800 tons.

The Farmers Cotton Oil Co. was organized in 1902. This company has several units for the manufacturing of various products. It manufactures a high grade line of fertilizer with a daily out-put of approximately 400 tons. A feed unit is operated with an out-put of 50 tons of manufactured feeds per day. A modern gin is also operated with daily ginning capacity of 75 bales. In the ginning of this cotton there is an extraction of about 60 tons of seed, which are put through a crushing process, producing cotton linters, cotton seed hulls, and cotton seed oil. This plant also operates a unit for manufacturing bale covering which is used for wrapping cotton.

The Southern Cotton Oil Co. was organized in 1900. It manufactures a high grade line of fertilizer with a daily capacity of 200 tons. It operates a cotton gin with a capacity of 100 bales per day which produce 80 tons of cotton seeds. These seeds are put through a crushing process, producing cotton linters, cotton seed hulls, and cotton seed oil.

During the busy season these three factories employ a total of approximately 200 people with a total weekly pay-roll of about $3,500.

Wilson has three modern ice factories: Colonial Ice Co., organized in 1904; Independent Electric Ice Co., organized in 1929; and the City's Ice & Fuel Co., organized January 1, 1934. These three plants manufacture a total of approximately 110 tons of ice per day and employ a total of approximately 50 people with a combined weekly payroll of about $900.

Southern Dairies Inc. was organized in 1900 and is engaged in the manufacturing of ice cream with a daily capacity of approximately 1500 gallons.

Wrights Ice Cream Co. was organized in 1931. It has a daily capacity of approximately 100 gallons.






[Illustration:

Hackney School Bus
]

HACKNEY

De Luxe

SCHOOL BUS BODIES

Designed and built to give SAFETY, STRENGTH, COMFORT, and APPEARANCE at moderate prices.

HACKNEY De Luxe School Bus Bodies are constructed with the same pains-taking care that has characterized other Hackney products for almost a century.

Careful consideration of expenditures was never more essential, not only in the business world but in public expenditures as well. Expensive experiments cannot be carried on with the taxpayer's money. PROVEN products only will be considered.

Hackney De Luxe School Bus Bodies will help you work out your Transportation problems. Choose a body you KNOW will give satisfactory performance along with safety and appearance.

HACKNEY BROTHERS BODY CO.

WILSON, N. C.





The Barnes-Harrell Company bottles approximately 3,000 cases of Coca-Cola per week.

The Acme Candy Co. manufactures approximately 3500 pounds of various kinds of candy per week.

The two ice cream plants, Candy plant and Bottling plant have a total of 61 employees with a weekly pay-roll of about $2,200.

Wilson has two lumber mills, one marble and granite factory and a mattress factory. The Williams Lumber Company operates lumber mills in Wilson and Rocky Mount, North Carolina. The Wilson plant cuts 40,000 feet of lumber per day. This lumber is cut into all sizes and types to be used for things of wooden construction. The plant is equipped to manufacture sash, doors, blinds, framing, etc.

The H. G. Stephenson Lumber Co. cuts 5,000 feet of lumber per day and purchases about an equal amount from other mills. The mill is equipped to make lumber into all sizes and shapes in addition to the making of sash, doors, frames, and blinds.

The Wilson Marble & Granite factory was established in 1908. Manufacturing of memorial monuments, markers and head-stones is carried out on an extensive scale.

The Wilson Bedding Company was established in 1922. This plant is equipped to manufacture between thirty and forty mattresses per day, the number depending upon the grade and type. The plant is equipped to renovate old mattresses.

The two lumber mills, the marble and granite factory and the bedding company employ a total of 110 people, and have a total weekly pay-roll of approximately $1,475.

A canning factory has just been established in Wilson by the Federal Government operating under the supervision of the FERA. Present plans call for the canning of beef cattle for about nine months during the year, with the other 3 months devoted to the canning of fruits and vegetables. This plant will employ approximately 400 people.

The Wilson Cotton Mills were organized in 1882. They are well equipped to manufacture the best quality of cotton yarn. When operating full time they use about 2,000 bales of cotton annually, which is all bought locally, and from this amount of cotton there is about 1,000,000 pounds of product in the form of cotton yarn manufactured. When operating full time they employ approximately 75 people.

The combined weekly pay-roll of the Canning Factory and Cotton Mill is approximately $3,900, the two plants employing a total of approximately 475 people.

Although not actually engaged in manufacturing, the tobacco redrying plants located in Wilson are an important factor in the industrial life of the community, particularly from the standpoint of the number of people they employ and their pay-rolls. The companies operating redrying plants in Wilson, North Carolina, include the following: Export Leaf Tobacco Co., R. P. Watson Tobacco Co., W. T. Clark & Co., Southern Tobacco Co., Imperial Tobacco Co., Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co.,, E. J. O'Brien & Co., and the Wilson Tobacco Co. The R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. and the American Supplies Inc., maintain branch offices and green packing plants. Whitehead & Anderson and James I. Miller Tobacco companies are tobacco brokers and maintain headquarters in Wilson from which they supervise the purchasing of tobacco in the various belts. During the busy season these factories employ a total of approximately 2800 people, their total weekly payroll being about $35,000.





During the tobacco season, which involves a period of about 4 to 5 months, there are ten large auction tobacco warehouses operating which employ about 2500 people with a total weekly pay-roll of approximately $20,000. These warehouses include the following: Farmers Warehouse, Centre Brick 1 and 2, New Planters Warehouse, Watson Warehouse 1 and 2, Smith Warehouse A and B, Carolina Warehouse, and the Banner Warehouse.

Two of the nation's largest meat packers maintain branches in Wilson, namely, Armour & Co. and Wilson & Co. These two plants handle a complete line of packing house products and manufacture fresh and smoked sausages. They employ a total of approximately 80 people with a combined weekly pay-roll of about $1600.

There are several other types of business represented in Wilson which handle and distribute various commodities on a large scale. The number of people these businesses employ and their pay-rolls are an important factor, yet they are not actually engaged in manufacturing, which would likely eliminate them from an industrial classification.

The total weekly pay-rolls of all businesses above mentioned amount to approximately $75,675 while the number of people employed is 7,000.

With the more recent trend toward decentralization of industries, Wilson County is in an ideal situation to attract additional manufacturing development, especially small manufacturing enterprises. The climate is wholesome, there is an ample supply of capable and intelligent labor and excellent power and transportation facilities. The possibilities for industrial development, from the standpoint of available natural resources, are most promising.


[Illustration:

Wilson Iron Works
]

Wilson Iron Works

MACHINERY OF ALL KINDS SOLD & REPAIRED

“Builders of Friendship and Bigger Business”

208 Lodge St.

Phone 981






[Illustration:

Southern Cotton Oil Company
]

Southern Cotton Oil Company

Manufacturers

COTTON SEED PRODUCTS

HIGH GRADE FERTILIZERS MODERN COTTON GINNERY

The Southern Cotton Oil Co.

Wilson, North Carolina





Cotton Market

Wilson is known throughout Eastern North Carolina as one of the largest and best cotton markets in the state. Cotton grown in all of the adjoining counties is brought to the local market for sale, and brings the highest possible prices.

Wilson County is served by 24 active gins. During the 1933-34 season it ginned approximately 12,000 bales. The local market sold about 10,000 bales.

The following wholesale buyers are represented on the local market: Alexander Sprunt & Son, Z. V. Eure & Co., J. H. McFadden & Co.; Rogers & Co., and the W. T. Lamm Cotton Co. Besides the wholesale buyers the following merchants buy cotton direct from the farmers: P. L. Woodard & Co., General Supply Co. and B. A. Barnes Co. They sell to one of the above wholesale firms or direct to the mills.

Wilson has two modern storage warehouses: The North State Bonded Warehouse, and the Wilson Cotton Warehouse Co. Both of these warehouses are bonded under the Federal and State Warehouse system and are checked periodically by Federal Inspectors to see that all cotton is accounted for, properly tagged, protected from the weather and insured for the full market value.

P. L. WOODARD & CO. GROCERIES [UNK] HARDWARE

FARMING IMPLEMENTS

General Agents

CONTENTNEA GUANO CO.

Daily Freight Service Between Richmond, Va. and Eastern North Carolina Points

Thurston Motor Lines FAST [UNK] SAFE [UNK] RELIABLE

HOME OFFICE

208 N. Railroad St.

WILSON, N. C.

Phone 84






[Illustration:

Contentnea Guano Co.
]

Contentnea Guano Co.

Manufacturers of SUPERPHOSPHATE AND QUALITY FERTILIZERS Over a Quarter Century






[Illustration:


Abstract illustration of Wilson as a hub of railroad transportation]

The above map is designed to prove the central position that Wilson occupies as the hub of Eastern North Carolina. The lines indicate the distances and location of a number of leading towns surrounding Wilson. Hard surfaced roads lead from Wilson to all towns shown on the map.

Trade Area

Wilson's retail area covers a radius of from twenty to thirty miles including all of Wilson County and parts of adjoining counties. Due to the extensive wholesale business carried on in Wilson the wholesale trade area would cover approximately fifty miles, although there are some classes of wholesale businesses located here, which do business over the entire state.

According to the United States Bureau of Census, the retail stores in Wilson County in 1933 did a retail business amounting to $5,695,000. The 1933 report also shows 396 stores in Wilson County having a total of approximately 900 employees.





Financial Institutions

The well-being and progress of a community depend upon its financial institutions. Wilson, North Carolina, points with pride to the following banks and building and loan associations which have contributed so much to its betterment, advancement and financial security. Condensed statements of these institutions are as follows:

BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY
Home Office
WILSON, N. C.

BRANCHES AT GOLDSBORO, PLYMOUTH, SELMA, FAYETTEVILLE, WILLIAMSTON, KINSTON, ELM CITY, WARSAW, all located in eastern North Carolina.

RESOURCES

Loans and Discounts$ 2,249,000.00
Stocks and Bonds8,084,000.00
Cash and due from Banks2,240,000.00
Other Resources463,000.00
$13,036,000.00

LIABILITIES

Capital—Preferred$ 400,000.00
Capital—Common400,000.00
Surplus200,000.00
Undivided Profits and Reserves410,000.00
Deposits11,626,000.00
$13,036,000.00

NATIONAL BANK OF WILSON
Organized July 15, 1932

RESOURCES

Loans and Discounts$ 492,000.00
Stocks and Bonds540,000.00
Cash and Due from Banks750,000.00
Other Resources2,000.00
1,784,000.00

LIABILITIES

Capital$ 100,000.00
Surplus50,000.00
Surplus50,000.00
Undivided Profits and Reserves61,000.00
Deposits1,573,000.00
1,784,000.00





Sell Tobacco Here!


[Illustration:

Banner Warehouse
]

IF THERE IS ANY PLACE BETTER NOBODY HAS FOUND IT

CRUTE & FLEMING

Banner Warehouse

Wilson, N. C.

YOUR PATRONAGE APPRECIATED





WILSON HOME AND LOAN ASSOCIATION
Organized 1889

RESOURCES

Mortgage loans$330,000.00
Stock loans7,000.00
Other Resources68,000.00
405,000.00

LIABILITIES

Installment Stock outstanding$117,000.00
Full Paid Stock133,000.00
Profits and Reserves37,000.00
Bills Payable58,000.00
405,000.00

ATLANTIC BUILDING AND LOAN ASSOCIATION
Organized 1907

RESOURCES

Mortgage loans$240,000.00
Stock loans11,000.00
Other Resources54,000.00
305,000.00

LIABILITIES

Installment stock outstanding$148,000.00
Full paid stock64,000.00
Profits and Reserves39,000.00
Bills Payable54,000.00
305,000.00

CAROLINA BUILDING AND LOAN ASSOCIATION
Organized 1925

RESOURCES

Mortgage loans$51,000.00
Stock loans1,000.00
Other resources1,000.00
53,000.00

LIABILITIES

Installment stock outstanding23,000.00
Full paid stock25,000.00
Profits and reserves5,000.00
53,000.00

FEDERAL FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION

A branch of the Federal Land Bank of Columbia, South Carolina, is located in Wilson. The work carried on by this office is the appraising of farm land for long time farm loans.

The territory served by this office includes 50 counties of Eastern North Carolina.

At the present time employes of this office number approximately 55.





Publishers and Printers

Wilson has one newspaper publisher and four printing establishments, as follows:

The P. D. Gold Publishing Company established in 1867. It now has three publications: Zion's Landmark, a semi-monthly Primitive Baptist paper; The Wilson Times, a semi-weekly, published each Tuesday and Friday; The Daily Times, a daily paper except Sunday.

Barrett's Printing House established in 1896.

Stallings’ Printing House established in 1910.

Sansbury Printers established 1923.

All of these four printing establishments are equipped with the most modern machinery which enables them to handle all types of job printing.

Hotels, Apartments and Tourist Homes

Wilson has two first-class hotels. The Hotel Cherry has 200 rooms and the Briggs Hotel 100 rooms. The majority of the rooms are equipped with bath. Both hotels have modern dining rooms and serve excellent food.

There are three other hotels of about third to fourth class of which the total rooming capacity is approximately 100.

There are several modern tourist homes, rooming houses, boarding houses and eight apartment houses in Wilson.


[Illustration:

Carolina Laundry
]

Launderers and Dry Cleaners since 1900

Most modern equipment

Experienced employees

WE SOLICIT YOUR BUSINESS

CAROLINA LAUNDRY

Phones 369-370

233-5-7 S. Tarboro St.






[Illustration:

Williams Lumber Company
]

Williams Lumber Company

“We Sell Everything To Build Anything”

Wilson

Lumber and Building Material

Rocky Mount






[Illustration:

APARTMENT HOUSES OF WILSON
1. Anderson Flats
2. Varita Court Apartments
3. Oettinger Apartments
4. Colonial Apartments]






[Illustration:


Photograph of Tudor's Florist greenhouses nursery]


[Illustration:

Tudor's Florist
]

RETAIL AND WHOLESALE

FLORIST

Growers of Fine Flowers and Plants for the Wholesale and Retail Trade.

Decorations and Floral Designs for Every Occasion.

U. S. 301

WILSON, N. C.

PENNEY'S

The J. C. Penney Company

1934 marks the Tenth anniversary of the Wilson store, and the J. C. Penney Company has just completed extensive alterations for a new and larger store, doubling its floor space to better accommodate an increasing volume of business.

PENNEY'S






[Illustration:

SOME REPRESENTATIVE WILSON HOMES
1. Dr. H. B. Best Residence
2. A. A. Ruffin Residence
3. J. T. Barnes Residence
4. J. C. Eagles Residence]






[Illustration:

Carolina Warehouse
]

CAROLINA WAREHOUSE

W. BOYD CLARK & J. J. GIBBONS, Props.

We solicit your patronage and promise you courteous, efficient service and our best efforts in the sale of your tobacco.

BOYD CLARK

Sales Manager

J. J. GIBBONS

Auctioneer





Railroad Transportation

Wilson, North Carolina, is perhaps served in a more adequate way, in so far as rail transportation is concerned, than any other town in the Eastern part of North Carolina. It is the only town served by the main line of two trunk line railroads. The main lines of the Atlantic Coast Line and Norfolk Southern both serve Wilson.

Locating the town geographically by its railroads, it is 482 miles south of New York and 540 miles north of Jacksonville, or practically half way between the congested areas of the “Atlantic Seaboard” and “The Winter Playground of the Nation.” It is 143 miles from the Port of Norfolk, 109 miles from the Port of Wilmington, and 120 miles from the Port of Morehead City.

Measuring the distance by hours rather than miles, the Norfolk Southern and the Atlantic Coast Line deliver carload shipments from California in nine days. Kansas shipping points are only five days distant; Chicago, Illinois, is four days out; New York, thirty-six hours; Philadelphia, Baltimore and Washington, twenty-four hours; Memphis, Tenn., three days; Atlanta, Ga., two days; Jacksonville, Fla., two days and from the ports in North Carolina and Virginia, twelve hours. In other words, Wilson is so located, in so far as railroad transportation is concerned, that a merchant or manufacturer has quick transportation North, East, South and West, and this transportation is so dependable that inventories can be reduced to a minimum, or rather orders can be shipped at the last moment with definite assurance that they will reach their destination in time.

The Atlantic Coast Line and the Norfolk Southern operate daily package cars from many of the large industrial centers, maintaining a schedule in most instances that equals passenger schedules. By reason of the location of Wilson on the main line of the two railroads serving it, about fifty freight and passenger trains enter the town daily.

The freight and passenger rates compare most favorably with those of any other in the South. The schedules are excellent.

M. G. ROSE & SONS

Merchandise Brokers

Flour, Feeds, Grain, Hay, Salt

217-218 National Bank Bldg.

Office Phone 352

Residence Phone 732-W.

Williams Auto Co.

For Economical Transportation

East Green St.

Phone 888


[Illustration:

Chevrolet
]

Wilson, N. C.






[Illustration:

The Dixie Inn
]

THE DIXIE INN

“WHERE FRIENDS MEET AND EAT” Located Four Miles South of Wilson, N. C., Intersection U. S. 301 & 17

Every City Has Its

Leading Store

In Wilson It Is—


[Illustration:

Gettinger's The Dependable Store Wilson, N.C.
]






[Illustration:


Map showing the Washington-Florida short route before the Interstate highway system]

This map shows the Washington-Florida short route. It is the shortest, fastest and most desirable route North and South between New York and Florida. No toll bridges. Follow U. S. No. 1 from New York via Baltimore to Petersburg, Va., and from there follow U. S. No. 301 to Summerton, S. C., and from there follow U. S. No. 401 to Waterboro and from there follow U. S. No. 17 to Jacksonville, Fla. The distance from Baltimore, Md., to Jacksonville, Florida, is 808 miles. There are excellent hotels and tourist homes along this entire route.

When passing through Wilson, N. C., stop at the Chamber of Commerce office for maps and complete road information.






[Illustration:

Texaco
]


[Illustration:

FRANK'S
Intersection 42 & U. S. 301]

Holt Oil Co.

Agents

WILSON, N. C.


[Illustration:

PAT'S
Opposite Hotel Cherry]

Buy At This Sign


[Illustration:

Texaco
]

“Have No Regret”


[Illustration:

Five Points, on U. S. 301
]


[Illustration:

Texaco
]


[Illustration:

WILLIARD'S
U. S. Highway No. 301
Tobacco Warehouse District]

Holt Oil Co.

Agents

WILSON, N. C.





Wilson County Road System

The town of Wilson is located in the central part of Wilson County and is served by a system of good roads unsurpassed by any county in the State of North Carolina. It has A No. 1 hard surfaced roads leading North, South, East and West. In fact, every through highway coming into or leading from Wilson is hard surfaced. From a distribution standpoint, Wilson has unexcelled facilities, as can be verified by the State Highway map. Wilson County now has approximately 100 miles of paved highways in addition to several hundred miles of good dirt roads, passable the year around.


[Illustration:

W. M. Rogers & Company
]

“Let's Do Business Together”

W. M. Rogers & Company

BROKERS & DISTRIBUTORS QUALITY FOOD PRODUCTS

General Offices, Rogers Terminal Bldg., Wilson, N. C.

Lovelace-Green Motor Co.

WILSON, N. C.

TERRAPLANE and HUDSON

Motor Cars

The Home of Good Used Cars





Motor Truck and Bus Service

There are five automobile truck lines operating in and out of Wilson. Thurston Motor Lines, with headquarters at Wilson, N. C., operate daily truck line service from Goldsboro via Wilson, N. C., and Richmond, Va., making connections with all Northern and Southern points.

Stallings Truck Lines, with headquarters at Spring Hope, N. C., operate daily truck line service from Wilson, N. C., to Raleigh, N. C., making connection with all points East and West.

The Norfolk-Carolina truck lines, with headquarters at Norfolk, Va., operate daily truck line service from Wilson, N. C., to Norfolk, Va.

Forbes Transfer Company and Hollingsworth Motor Freight Company, both having headquarters here, do general local For Hire delivery service, in addition to the hauling by motor trucks of all kinds of freight to any and all points.

There are three bus lines operating in and out of Wilson.

The Seashore Transportation Company, with headquarters at New Bern, N. C., operates a daily schedule from Rocky Mount, N. C., via Wilson, N. C., to Goldsboro, N. C., Morehead City, N. C., and Beaufort, N. C.

The Carolina Coach Line, with headquarters at Raleigh, N. C., operates a daily schedule from Raleigh, N. C., via Wilson, N. C., to Washington, N. C.

Sutherland Bros., with headquarters at Washington, N. C., operate a daily round trip schedule between Washington, N. C., and Raleigh, N. C.

Corbett Motor Co.

Buick-Pontiac Sales and Service

Good Used Cars

213 S. Goldsboro St.

Telephone 96

Wilson Auto Sales

DEALER FOR

STUDEBAKER, PLYMOUTH and DE SOTO Cars

110 N. Douglas St.

Phone 248





WILLIS N. HACKNEY

W. D. HACKNEY, Jr.

HACKNEY

Tire Company Wholesale OPERATORS Retail

The B. F. Goodrich Rubber Company Warehouse

GOODRICH, SILVERTOWN, GOLDEN PLY,

TIRES & TUBES

Goodrich Cavalier Cases

Goodrich Commander Cases

Batteries and Accessories

PHONE 402






[Illustration:

New Planters Warehouse
]

New Planters Warehouse

Wilson, N. C.

“SERVICE YOU CAN DEPEND ON”

Owners and Proprietors

R. T. SMITH

B. W. CARR

W. G. CARR, Jr.






[Illustration:

1. Fair Grounds Grand Stand
]


[Illustration:

2. Confederate Monument
]


[Illustration:

3. Nash Street, Looking West from Douglas
]


[Illustration:

4. Wilson Fire Station
]


[Illustration:

5. Woman's Club
]





Miscellaneous Statistics

Climate: The annual averages for Wilson and Wilson County are as follows:

Rainfall4.6 inches
Temperature60.8 degrees

POST OFFICE RECEIPTS

The receipts of the Post Office at Wilson, North Carolina, for the fiscal year June 30, 1933 to June 30, 1934 were $50,734.53.

FAIR GROUNDS

(Owned and operated by American Legion of Wilson)

Grounds cover 36 acres.

Grand Stand has seating capacity of 3,000.

Race track ½ mile, dirt.

Buildings on grounds include poultry, live stock, swine and stables.

Ten refreshment stands.

Fair dates for 1934, October 22-27.

GRAIN EXCHANGE

John F. Clark & Co., of New York, N. Y., maintain a grain exchange in Wilson, North Carolina, which is located in the National Bank Building, mezzanine floor offices numbers 1, 2 and 3.

This office receives continuous daily market quotations on grain, stocks, bonds, cotton, tobacco, sugar, provisions, coffee, raw rubber, silk, silver, lead, zinc, tin, cotton seed oil, hides, wool and a few other commodities, and has private wires throughout the entire South.

John F. Clark & Co. are members of all principal exchanges.


[Illustration:

Amerson-Boswell Company
]

A. E. BISHOP

J. C. JOYNER

F. W. BOSWELL

AMERSON-BOSWELL COMPANY

107 N. Pine Street

Funeral Directors and Embalmers

AMBULANCE SERVICE

WILSON, N. C.

Office Day or Night Phone 210

Residence Phones 571—1371






[Illustration:

Carroll's Inc.
]

(Food Specialists)

LEADING GROCERS FOR 29 YEARS

PHONES 62 & 63

109 WEST NASH ST.

CARROLL'S, Inc.

Colonial Ice Company


[Illustration:

ICE Health Guard U.S. Pat. Off
]

ICE Keeps FOOD With Original Flavors.

An Odorless, Troubleless Refrigeration.

COAL

BLUE GEM, SPLINT, and POCAHONTAS.

Phones 202—41





Civic, Fraternal, Business, Educational, and
Social Organizations of Wilson

CIVIC

Rotary Club

Kiwanis Club

Lions Club

Woman's Club

Business and Professional Women's Club

Wilson Garden Club

Wilson Chapter American Red Cross

Wilson Tubercular Association

Chamber of Commerce

Wilson Merchants Association

FRATERNAL

Mount Lebanon Lodge No. 117, A. F. and A. M.

Mount Lebanon Chapter, No. 27, R. A. M.

Mount Lebanon Council, No. 13, R. and S. M.

Mount Lebanon Commandery No. 7, K. T.

St. John's of Jerusalem Council No. 7, A. M. D.

Wilson Chapter No. 145, O.E.S.

Enterprise Lodge No. 44, I.O.O.F.

Wilson Encampment No. 40, I.O.O.F.

Roselle Rebekah Lodge No. 109, I.O.O.F.

Post T., Travelers Protective Association

Gold Leaf Council No. 672, United Commercial Travelers.

Wilson Council No. 40, J.O.U.A.M.

Wilson Lodge No. 989, Loyal Order of Moose.

Wilson Camp No 13499, Modern Woodmen of America.

PATRIOTIC

Daughters American Revolution

United Daughters of the Confederacy

Wilson County Post No. 2058 V.F.W.

Robert B. Anderson Post, No. 13, American Legion

Voiture No. 930, Forty and Eight

Wilson American Legion Auxiliary

Wilson Chapter War Mothers

Wilson Squadron Sons of the Legion

BUSINESS

Wilson Board of Trade

Wilson Tobacco Warehousemen's Association

PROFESSIONAL

Wilson County Medical Society

Wilson County Bar Association

Ministers Union

Wilson Utilities Club

EDUCATIONAL

Winstead Parent Teachers Association

Woodard Parent Teachers Association

Current History Club






[Illustration:

SOME REPRESENTATIVE WILSON HOMES
1. W. W. Graves Residence
2. W. T. Lamm Residence
3. Fred Flowers Residence]





Margaret Hearne Parent Teachers Association

East Carolina Council Boy Scouts of America

Wilson Book Club

SOCIAL

Wilson Country Club

Wilson Shrine Club

Volunteer Firemen's Club

Gold Leaf Cotillion Club

NEGRO ORGANIZATIONS

FRATERNAL

Hannibal Lodge 1552

Grand United Order of Odd Fellows

Mount Hebron Lodge of Masons.


[Illustration:

R. E. Quinn & Co.
]

R. E. QUINN

T. H. THURSTON

H. V. WOODALL

R. E. QUINN & CO.

Furniture

Stoves, Radios and Electric Refrigerators See us before buying—We satisfy.

Phone 1026

201 S. Goldsboro St.

A Cordial Invitation Is Extended To You To Visit


[Illustration:

Lucielle's Dress Shop "Where Smartness Prevails"
]

205 E. Nash St.

Phone 730

Wilson, N. C.





EFIRD'S


[Illustration:

Efird's Department Store
]

THE BIG, BUSY STORE IN WILSON





Telephone and Telegraph Facilities

The telephone exchange of Wilson is owned and operated by the Carolina Telephone and Telegraph Company. It is of the most modern type having an extensive underground system. The total investment of the plant has a value of approximately $230,198 and a total of 44 long distance circuits terminating in, and many through circuits passing through the Wilson exchange.

There are 2250 subscribers. All Wilson subscribers can be connected to 97 percent of all telephones in the world. Additional foreign countries are being added rapidly. There are 28 people empassing through, the Wilson exchange.

There were in 1933 4,099,584 local exchange connections handled and 96,285 long distance calls originated in the Wilson exchange.

Wilson is served by both the Western Union Telegraph Company and the Postal Telegraph Company, the equipment of both companies being modern in every respect. The Western Union is equipped for both morse and simplex printer operation and the Postal for morse operation. Both companies have ample messenger call box facilities, with circuits covering the entire town. Without any additional equipment either company could handle at least twice the present volume of business.


[Illustration:

Boykin Grocery Co., Inc.
]

1885

1934

Boykin Grocery Co., Inc.

“Wholesale Grocers”

Wilson

N. C.





Southern Grain and Provision Co.


[Illustration:

Southern Grain and Provision Co.
]

WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTORS

407-411-415 E. Barnes St.

Phones 1366-1367





INDEPENDENT

Ice and Coal Co.

PUREST ICE and SUREST SERVICE

QUALITY COAL

600 Herring Ave.

Phones 682 and 310


[Illustration:

Pender's
]

The New PENDER STORE in Wilson

Interests in the future of Wilson—In the health of its citizens and in performing our duty as purveyors of quality foods—economically.

PENDER'S





Business and Professional Summary of Wilson

Agricultural Implement and Machine Dealers4Fertilizer Manufacturers3
Finance Company1
Auto Body Manufacturers2Fish Markets, Retail4
Auto Accessories and Parts8Fruit and Produce6
Auto Dealers7Furniture Dealers5
Ambulance Service3Florists3
Architects2Funeral Homes3
Attorneys41Furniture Repair Shops3
Auto Tire Dealers4
Gift Shops2
Bakeries2General Supplies Stores2
Banks2Garages, Auto9
Brokers, Merchandise and Food4Grain Exchange1
Hotels3
Bicycle Shops2Hospitals3
Blacksmiths and Horse Shoe Shops2Ice Cream Manufacturers2
Beauty Parlors4Ice Manufacturers3
Beer Distributor1Insurance Agencies25
Bonded Warehouse1Iron Works1
Bottler1
Building and Loan Associations3Jewelry Stores4
Bus Lines3Junk Yard1
Building Material Dealers7
Barber Shops12Laundries3
Ladies’ Ready-to-Wear and Millinery15
Candy Manufacturer1
Cafes16Live Stock Dealers2
Cannery1Lumber Mills2
Chiropractors2
Coal and Wood Dealers7Men's Furnishings2
Cleaners and Pressers7Monument Manufacturer1
Children's Ready-to-Wear1Meat Markets, Retail3
Cotton Brokers2Meat Packing Companies2
Ministers12
Clinic1
Contractors2News and Soda Shops7
Cotton Gins3
Cotton Mills1Osteopaths1
Plumbing Shops3
Department Stores6Photographer1
Dentists7Physicians25
Drug Stores10Piano Store1
Publisher1
Exclusive Tobacco Brokers2Printing Shops4






[Illustration:

Brown & Crawley
]

BROWN & CRAWLEY

Wholesale Meats and Provisions—Abattoir In Conection

We Solicit Inquiries From Live Stock Dealers.

BUYERS OF LIVE STOCK IN CAR LOAD LOTS.

T. E. BROWN

R. J. CRAWLEY

BARNES

Motor and Parts Company

COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE

Wrecker Service Day and Night

315 East Barnes St., One and one-half block off U. S. 301

Phone No. 435

Wilson, N. C.

Best Equipped Automotive Service In N. C.





Retail Hardware4Tailors3
Real Estate Agents6Telegraph Companies2
Railroads2Telephone Exchange1
Recreation Parlors5Theatres4
Retail Grocery Stores35Truck Lines3
Railroad Offices3Tobacco Redrying Plants9
Rugs, Cleaning1Tobacco Warehouses10
Transfer Companies2
Stationer, Retail1Typewriter Agent1
Shoe Stores2
Slaughtering Plant1Variety Stores3
Service Stations50
Sewing Machine Dealer1Wagon Manufacturer1
Seed and Feed Dealer1Wholesale Gas and Oil8
Shoe Shops3Wholesale Grocers6


[Illustration:

AIR VIEW OF TOBACCO WAREHOUSE DISTRICT
]

Graham Woodard, President

Geo. T. Stronach, Sec'y-Treas.

—Quarter of a Century of Service—

1907-1934

Wilson Insurance and Realty Company

119 South Goldsboro Street

Wilson N. C.






[Illustration:

AIR VIEW BUSINESS DISTRICT, LOOKING WEST ON NASH STREET
]

Chamber of Commerce

Wilson has a very active Chamber of Commerce. Its office is in the lobby of the Hotel Cherry.

The office library includes directories of approximately 200 towns and cities of the United States in addition to road maps of each state. Up-to-date records are kept which make it possible for the office to be recognizd as a bureau of information.

A cordial invitation is extended to local and out-of-town people to visit the office for such information as may be desired, which will be gladly given free.

Frank M. Miller

GENERAL INSURANCE & REALTOR

City and Farm Property

Offices: Wilson, N. C., and Goldsboro, N. C.


[Illustration:

Engravings in this book made by - Metropolitan Engraving & Electrotype Co. Designers Photo-Engravers Electrotypers 1314 Ross St. Richmond, Va.
]






[Illustration:

Hotel Cherry
Photo collage - Exterior and interior view]

Hotel Cherry

W. E. BARNES, Manager

200 Modern Fire Proof Rooms

Dining Room In Connection

Excellent Food [UNK] Reasonably Priced

Free Parking





Table of Contents

PagePage
Agriculture36-38Photographs: (continued)
Boy Scouting20Country Club, Nash Street27
Chamber of Commerce82Parks, Playgrounds and Resorts29
Churches20Five Redrying Tobacco Plants31
College, Atlantic Christian18Four Tobacco Redrying Plants and One Interior View34
Cotton Market49
Country Club26Six Agricultural Views37
Financial Institutions52-54Air View Tobacco Warehouse District81
Health Department12
History of Wilson and Wilson Co.3-4Four Apartment Houses—Varita Court, Oettingers, Colonial and Anderson57
Hospital and Clinical Facilities14
Hotels and Apartment Houses55
Industries44-46-47Four Attractive Wilson Residences59
Library18Fair Grounds, Nash Street Business Section, Fire Department, Woman's Club, Confederate Monument69
Location51
Map: City of Wilson11
Map: (Showing Wilson as hub of Eastern North Carolina)51Three Attractive Wilson Homes73
Map: North-South Short Route63Air View Wilson's Business District82
Miscellaneous Statistics70
Motor Truck and Bus Service66Population10
Nash Street The Beautiful26-28Portrait: Hon. Louis D. Wilson2
Organizations: Civic, Fraternal, Business Educational and Social72-74Power, Lights and Water6-8-10
Publishers and Printers55
Parks, Playgrounds and Resorts28Railroad Transportation61
Petroleum Distribution41Road System65
Photographs:Schools, Wilson and Wilson County16
Court House, High School5Summary Wilson's Business Enterprises79-81
Municipal Plants7Telephone and Telegraph Facilities76
Municipal Plants9Tobacco Market30-32-33
Hospitals and Clinics of Wilson15Town of Wilson—Its Form of Government6
School Buildings of Wilson17
Churches of Wilson21Trade Area51
Camp Charles (Boy Scout Camp)22Welfare Work of Wilson12






[Illustration:

National Bank of Wilson
]

Capable and Courteous Service

To This Community

National Bank of Wilson

(Member Federal Reserve System)





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