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Historic New Bern guide book

Date: 1934 | Identifier: F264.N5 C3 1934
Historic New Bern guide book / by Gertrude S. Carraway ; sponsored by New Bern Merchants Association and Chamber of Commerce. New Bern, N.C. : [The Association?], 1934. [24] p. : ill., map ; 21 cm. more...
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Historic New Bern


[Illustration:


Bear on Shield]

Guide Book
New Bern, N.C.





The Gaston
Hotel

Located In Historic New Bern, North

Carolina, on Federal Highway No. 17

Stop over night with us or spend some time here where fishing and hunting are excellent. Golf at Country Club.

Guests here enjoy large steam heated, comfortable sleeping rooms, spacious parlors, sun rooms—Excellent food. Dining room in charge of Southern caterer.

EUROPEAN PLAN

RATES

$1.75 Without Bath

$2.25 With Bath

Weekly or MOnthly Rates Upon Request

J. V. BLADES, Manager





UNDERWEAR


[Illustration:

SHIRTS AND SHORTS
Hand drawing of a man modeling Hanes underwear and a golf club]

The outstanding features of HANES Underwear, its acceptance by millions of men and boys throughout the United States as a standard make at popular prices, are based on the fact that the manufacturers have endeavored to produce the finest garments possible at the lowest prices possible. This, plus the fact that the HANES line is complete from Shirts and Shorts to many types of Union Suits in woven and knitted materials for both men and boys adds variety to value, comfort and economy.

Elastic Knit Union Suits for Men and Boy Elastic Knit Shirts and Drawers for Men “Merrichild” Waist Suits for Children “Merrichild” Sleepers for Little Tots Shirts and Shorts for Men and Boys Athletic Union Suits for Men and Boys


[Illustration:

SAMSONBAK
Hand drawing of a man modeling Hanes underwear and a yo-yo]

P. H. HANES KNITTING COMPANY

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C.—NEW YORK OFFICE: 93 WORTH ST.





Good roads and electric power are the team that has helped pull North Carolina to the highway of success. We gladly continue our contribution of public service to further advance the communities we serve.

TIDE WATER POWER COMPANY

The Slater Lumber Co., Inc.

MANUFACTURERS OF

NORTH CAROLINA PINE

BAND SAWN, KILN DRIED

ROUGH AND DRESSED

Mixed Car Shipments Our Specialty

SPECIALTIES:

CEILING, SIDING, MOULDING, CASING, FINISH AND FLOORING





PROUD OF OUR
HISTORY

Equally Assured As to Our Future

New Bern has a proud historical record second to no city in the state. And no section is more blessed with natural advantages and possibilities.

VISITORS ARE WELCOME

Resort Features Are Unsurpassed

East Carolina is especially favored for agricultural advancement and industrial opportunity. There's a welcome for all tourists and visitors; neighborliness for new citizens; and cooperation for all business enterprises.

City of New Bern

LEON C. SCOTT, Mayor





REMEMBER

Only the Ford gives you a V-8 engine—Unless you pay more than $2,000

FORD CARS and FORD TRUCKS

W. C. HAGOOD, Inc.

54 Craven St. — — — Phone 951

Experienced Travelers Choose the Modern Way


[Illustration:


Bus]

Gold Star Drivers

Safe, Frequent, Dependable Service

SEASHORE TRANSPORTATION CO.

New Bern, N. C. — — — Phone 980





WELCOME
TO
NEW BERN

NORTH CAROLINA

“THE LAND OF ENCHANTING WATERS”

New Bern Merchants Association

— — AND — —

Chamber of Commerce

GROVER C. MUNDEN, President
J. T. KENNEDY, V.-Pres.HELEN HAWK, Sec'y.
N. C. THOMPSON, 2nd. V. Pres.J. G. DUNN. JR., Treas.

OFFICE: CITY HALL BLDG.—’PHONE 433





Be Thrifty
Shop at
Belk's Dept. Store

NEW BERN, N. C.

Condensed Statement of Condition of

BRANCH BANKING & TRUST COMPANY

At the Close of Business December 30, 1933

RESOURCES:
Loans and Discounts$ 1,117,277,78
Other Stocks and Bonds45,306.00
Banking Houses and Real Estate452,737.64
Cash and Due from Banks$2,992,411.61
United States Bonds6,231,982.64
North Carolina Bonds1,403,476.18
Marketable Municipal and Land Bank Bonds620,548.45
Loans Secured by Marketable Collateral with Cash Values in Excess of the Loans838,095.0312,086,513.91
$13,701,835.33

LIABILITIES:
Capital Stock—Common$ 400,000.00
Capital Stock—Preferred400,000.00
Surplus200,000.00
Undivided Profits41,069.30
Reserves101,539.66
Dividend Payable January 1, 19348,000.00
Deposits12,551,226.37
$13,701,835.33

(Trust Department Assets Not Included)

R. E. HARRIS, Asst. Vice-Pres.

Upon the strength of the above statement and the backing of our Directors, we solicit your business, promising every accommodation consistent with sound banking. No account too small to receive our most careful attention.





HISTORIC
NEW BERN

Guide Book

By
GERTRUDE S. CARRAWAY

Sponsored By
NEW BERN MERCHANTS ASSOCIATION AND
CHAMBER OF COMMERCENEW BERN, N. C.1934.




[Illustration:

NEW POSTOFFICE BUILDING
]





New Bern—Past

Second oldest town in North Carolina, New Bern, from a historic standpoint, is one of the most important and interesting cities of America.

The namesake of Berne, Switzerland, the city was settled in 1710 by Swiss and German colonists, seeking religious, political and industrial freedom and advancement in the New World. Their leader was Baron Christopher deGraffenried, to whom Queen Anne of England had granted a tract of land on the Neuse and Trent rivers in east Carolina.

Despite hardships and dangers, the settlement grew and prospered, becoming the center of provincial business, culture and political activity. Here was established the first printing press, with publication of the first newspaper, first pamphlet, and first book. Here, too, was started the first incorporated school in the province. New Bern was long called, “The Athens of North Carolina.”

A prominent part was played by the section in colonial and revolutionary affairs, the city being the seat of English government in the province. The first two provincial conventions were held at Tryon Palace, in defiance of royal orders. British rule in the province was ended with the driving out of Royal Governor Josiah Martin from the city on May 31, 1775. The region furnished many brave officers and men for the revolutionary period.

Of national importance is the fact that the first celebration of Independence day in North Carolina and one of the first in America took place here. In observance of the second anniversary of the adoption of the Declaration of Independence, New Bern citizens joined in a spirited celebration on July 4, 1778. Only Boston and Philadelphia had held such observances. An account of the local celebration can be found in the North Carolina Gazette for July 10, 1778, the earliest published report of the kind still extant in any part of the United States.





New Bern was also the first town, it is believed, to celebrate Washington's birthday. A special celebration was held here on Feb. 22, 1799, before his death on December 14 of that year. A copy of the New Bern Gazette for Feb. 23, 1799, contains an account of the event and is thought to be the first record of a public celebration of the day, now a legal holiday in all states, territories and possessions of the United States.


[Illustration:

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
]





New Bern—Present

A city of 12,000 inhabitants, New Bern is one of the most interesting and attractive small towns in America. Though proud of the past, citizens are mindful of the present and keep their eyes turned towards a better future.

With the Gulf stream only 75 miles away, the climate is usually mild and balmy. The average temperature for the section is said to be 62 degrees, as a rule cool in summer and warm in winter. Cooling breezes blow from the rivers, to give a summer average of 79 degrees. The rainfall averages about 60 inches a year.

Agricultural and industrial advantges give New Bern an unquestioned lead in many ways. Fishing, hunting, and water sports add to the resort facilities. Drainage projects in various parts of the coast should add still further to the improved conditions. The betterment of all classes has been given much attention in recent years.

Educational opportunities have long been exceptionally good. There are many churches, too, its members interested in the religious life of the community and social well-being of residents. Civic and patriotic organizations function regularly, proud of their part in the upbuilding of the section.

The business district, with its modern offices and stores, is unusually efficient. Business and professional men and women make it a point to do all in their power to render the best service possible.

The city government is composed of the mayor and ten aldermen, two from each of the five wards, with a city clerk, tax collector, and chief of police, all of whom are elected by the people, and a number of appointive officers.

The water and light plant is owned by the municipality, valued at $1,500,000 and serving more than three thousand





meters in and near the city. Despite great improvements and extensions made recently, both the water and the light rates are kept low, and power can be furnished cheaply to any plant or factory. Gas and telephone service are available from privately owned companies.

The city has a splendid fire department, with a central fire station for the two volunteer companies, and the fire loss ratio is comparatively low. Both the city and the county maintain modern, efficient departments for all civic and county needs, making New Bern and Craven county one of the best places in the world in which to reside.


[Illustration:

ELKS TEMPLE
]





New Bern—Future

Few cities in the country possess the natural resources and advantages of location and surroundings which can be justly boasted by New Bern.

Built at the junction of two wide rivers, the city is only 40 miles from the coast, a location that might be used to the same excellent advantage as London, Paris, Rome, Philadelphia and many other river cities.

Port terminals at Morehead City and planned connection between the mainland and Cape Lookout should prove tremendously important for the growth and prosperity of this city as an industrial and shipping center. Through all East Carolina in recent years there has been noticeably evident a spirit of modern improvement and progressive tendency. As the capital of this great area, New Bern should reap bountiful results.

With water and rail transportation, the town also has paved roads radiating in all directions, connecting the extensive trade territory of 100,000 persons. New Bern is the hub of this fertile and favored region.

Halfway between New York and Florida, with a mild climate, it has an ideal location as headquarters for tourists and sportsmen. In time it should become a yachting center, convenient for yacht owners to select as a halfway point between destinations.

In the background is an unsurpassed farm section, suited for the raising of many crops, truck, poultry, livestock and cattle. Marked progress is being made along agricultural lines, especially in scientific production and cooperative marketing. A pickle factory and a tomato cannery are among the most recent developments.

Raw materials of many kinds may be found in abundance in the region. Timber has furnished a primary industry. One of the largest sawmills in the southeast has long been located here. Other sawmills and a veneer mill are utilizing much of the available timber. There is said





to be good opportunity for establishment of successful furniture factories.

Excellent clay for ceramic purposes; marl lime, already being used for fertilizer, which might be used satisfactorily for cement; fish products and many other raw materials might well be used for other manufacturing plants. Two plants of Cohen, Goldman and company, manufacturers of men's clothing, prove the adaptability of the city for such national sewing rooms.

Easily accessible from any point, the section has remarkable resort facilities, with appeals for spring, summer, fall or winter visitors. Golfing and yachting, bathing and motoring, fishing and hunting are chief advantages.

Christy Matthewson, Bud Fisher, Babe Ruth, and Rex Beach are among those praising the sporting features of the section. Irvin S. Cobb wrote enthusiastically:

“There is no locality in the United States east of the Mississippi river where hunting and fishing may be enjoyed with such satisfactory and successful results as in Northeastern North Carolina, and notably in the section of it bordering on and adjacent to the Trent river. For climate, for the variety and abundance of game, for its accessibility from points both north and south of it, this district is unique. To my way of thinking, it offers practically everything that an outdoor man could ask for.”

As said former Senator F. M. Simmons, of New Bern: “In the mild winter climate within practically a night's ride of the great centers of population as far as New York; on the main line of yachts plying north and south and connected by a 12-foot channel with over 3,000 miles of inland waterways, affording exceptional fishing and hunting and within a few miles of one of the best hunting preserves in America; on a beautiful water course, beside a picturesque old city surrounded by magnificient forests of virgin evergreens, and where golf may be played almost every day of the year, New Bern would seem to furnish an ideal location for a great winter resort.”





Nearby Places of Interest

In the center of a fertile, historic and advantageous area, New Bern is surrounded with numerous places of outstanding interest to all types of persons.

Greatly blessed by a bountiful nature, the Land of Enchanting Waters holds attractions for all who love the great outdoors. Followers of Izaak Walton may quickly experience the thrill of landing fish of many salt or fresh water types. Swimming, boating, bathing, and beach sports are among the chief diversions. Splendid hunting makes the section an ideal sportsmen's paradise. Good roads make motoring a pleasure, while hikers may find picturesque lanes through fragrant woodlands or along charming waters.

For the lover of history and past glories, too, there is an abundance of storied spots along the Carolina coast. In Craven county, named for William, Earl of Craven, a Lord Proprietor of Carolina, there are many historic sections. Fort Barnwell, for instance, in the upper part of the county, still recalls the bloody defeat of the Indians


[Illustration:

HISTORIC FORT MACON
]





there in 1712. The name of Croatan in the lower part of the county is suggestive of the unfortunate “Lost Colony” at Roanoke Island off the coast where Virginia Dare, first child of English parentage in America, was born and baptized in 1587.

Just across Trent river from New Bern are buried three Governors of North Carolina: Richard Dobbs Spaight and Richard Dobbs Spaight the younger in a family vault on the old Clermont plantation; and Abner Nash, a little farther westward, on his Pembroke plantation.

Three forts erected during the War Between the States may still be seen in the section. Fort Totten, a federal construction, is on the western edge of the city, between state highways 10 and 30. Originally its embankments extended all the way across New Bern, from Trent to Neuse river. Fort Brice is a federal site across Trent river, on the river banks, not far from James City. Fort Lane is a Confederate fort on Neuse river, about three miles below New Bern, where took place the battle of New Bern.

The first road and ferry in the state are thought to have led from New Bern to Bath, oldest town in the state, where may be seen now the oldest church in North Carolina. Nearby is the “Original Washington.” also in the heart of a historic and resort section.

All along the coast are sites of historic, scenic and recreational interest, as Nags Head, Ocracoke, Hatteras and various islands or parts of the sand banks. On the interior are Edenton, third oldest town of the state, and many other interesting sections. The counties adjoining Craven are especially fertile and advantageous places for agriculture or industry, vacationists or visitors.

East of New Bern are Morehead City, Beaufort, Atlantic and many other interesting coastal communities. Atlantic beach, with its large pavilion, bathhouses, and hotel, is one of only two ocean beaches in the country that have the decided advantage of extending east and west.





Manteo, Indian friend to the first whites on Roanoke Island, is said to have been born on Harkers Island, justly famed for its fishing and scenic beauty.

Three miles from historic Beaufort, one of the most beautiful small towns in the country, is Fort Macon, historic landmark owned by the state, where for more than 150 years there has been a fortress. The present fort is more than a century old. Nearby are the life-saving station, coast guard headquarters and wireless apparatus.

To the south is Cape Lookout, one of the best potential harbors along the Atlantic coast. Camp Glenn, the state rifle range for North Carolina national guardsmen, where infantrymen hold annual summer encampments, is situated between Morehead City and Morehead Bluffs. Many other interesting sites are found up Bogue sound, called the “Mediterranean Sea of America.”


[Illustration:

JOHN WRIGHT STANLY HOUSE BEFORE REMOVAL TO REAR
OF NEW POSTOFFICE BUILDING

]






[Illustration:


Tourist Map of New Bern]





Tour of Historic Spots

(Follow broken black line on accompanying map of New Bern streets.)

1. Union Point. East Front and South Front streets. At the junction of Neuse and Trent rivers, King Taylor of the aboriginal Indians is said to have lived with his tribe. The site was purchased by Baron Christopher deGraffenried, founder of New Bern, who built there a government house in 1710. Recently the spot has been developed and beautified as a municipal park by the Woman's club in cooperation with the city. The Woman's clubhouse is located there on Neuse river shore.

2. Treaty Tree. East Front and Pollock streets. Here is said to have been signed an important treaty between the Indians and the early colonists.

3. Oaksmith House. East Front and Pollock streets. The large brick corner house is known as the Oaksmith house, where lived the Oaksmith family some years ago. Above the Pollock street entrance are two lion's heads, symbolic of royalty, and in the middle is the head of a lady, said to represent Queen Anne, of England. This myth is not true, but it makes an interesting story, since the tradition is that deGraffenried was in love with Queen Anne.

4. Oldest House. 46 East Front street. Now modernized and improved, this was formerly an old brick kitchen for the spacious Haslen residence. It is thought to be the oldest house still standing in Craven county. During his boyhood John Bird Sumner, later Bishop of Chester and then Archbishop of Canterbury in England from 1848 to 1862 is said to have stayed there on a visit here with his mother, who was Dr. Haslen's sister.

5. First Printing Press. East Front and Broad streets. Here was erected in 1749 the first printing press in North Carolina by James Davis, first state printer, who also printed there the first newspaper, the first pamphlet and the first book in the province.

6. Council Bluffs. East Front street at the end of Broad. Near here Baron deGraffenried is believed to have first landed with his Swiss settlers in 1710. Treaties with the Indians are said to have been signed under two large oak trees that formerly stood on the river bluffs there.

7. Shrine Home. East Front street at Broad. This has been the headquarters for Sudan Shrine temple since 1920, following its organization in 1917 from a part of Oasis temple territory. New Bern is said to be the smallest city in the world where all Masonic degrees through the 32nd may be conferred.

8. Historic Cannon. East Front river shore. An ancient cannon unearthed several years ago in the center of town is thought to be one of the original cannons from Tryon Palace.

9. Emory House. East Front street at New President James Monroe and Vice President John C. Calhoun were entertained here, once the home of the late Judge Mathias E. Manly, of the state supreme court.






[Illustration:

EMORY HOUSE
]

10. Birthplace of Elizabeth Shine. East Front street at end of Short street. Here was born June 7, 1765, Elizabeth Shine, the mother of Admiral David Glasgow Farragut (1801-1870), a most famous naval hero of modern times, who entered the United States navy at the age of nine years, serving with distinction for his country in both the War of 1812 and the War Between the States.

11. Home of Col. Joseph Leech. East Front street at Change. Among the many offices of Col. Joseph Leech, (1720-1803), were the following: member of first provincial convention; member of assembly; member of council of safety; member state constitutional convention; state treasurer; custodian Tryon Palace; Mayor of New Bern during visit of Washington in 1791.

12. Cypress Tree. In rear of Smallwood yard, on Neuse river, off Change street. Under this historic cypress the first ship built in North Carolina was constructed and launched. There treaties were signed by the Indians and early colonists. Gen. Nathaniel Greene and Richard Dobbs Spaight, later Governor of North Carolina, who resided there, held an important conference under the tree during the closing days of the Revolutionary war, Spaignt helping to save the patriot cause by pledging his personal fortune and state influence. George Washington, Edward Everett and other notables have stood in its shade.

13. Smallwood House. 95 East Front street. Dating back to the early part of the nineteenth century, this house is listed in New York as a perfect type of Georgian architecture. Its exquisite hand-carved interior woodwork is unsurpassed.

14. Jarvis House. East Front street at Johnson. Another brick specimen of early days. During the War Between the States it was used by federal officials, as one of a number of local dwellings occupied by northern soldiers. It was also one of the places used as a federal hospital.





15. Capture of Underwriter. Near drawbridge on Neuse river passenger bridge. Just north of the drawbridge on Feb. 2, 1864, Capt. John Taylor Wood, of the Confederate Navy, with a crew in seven cutters came down the river from Kinston and boarded the powerful United States gunboat, “Underwriter.” In a terrific hand-to-hand fight, the southerners captured and burned the gunboat. The Confederates reported six men killed, 22 wounded, and two taken prisoners; while the federals reported nine killed, 18 wounded and 18 taken prisoners.

16. Burnside's Headquarters. Johnson street at East Front. The handsome old Slover residence, dating back to the early days of the nineteenth century, with its now-modernized antique kitchen and slave quarters in the rear yard, served as the headquarters for Gen. A. E. Burnside, of the federal army, after the capture of New Bern on March 14, 1862, by northern troops during the War Between the States.

17. Birthplace of William Gaston. Johnson street at Craven. A marker here states that in a house previously on the lot William Gaston, noted jurist and orator, who composed the North Carolina state anthem, “The Old North State,” was born Sept. 19, 1778.

18. Home of William Gaston. Craven street at New This was the home of Judge William Gaston during many years of his adult life. The upper porch balustrades are pointed out as especially fine old types. In the rear yard is his law office building.

19. Washington Oak. In front of side entrance to county courthouse, Craven street. Surrounded by a protecting guard, an oak tree stands as a memorial to President George Washington. Similar oaks were planted in 1925 in the other eight cities of North Carolina visited by the first president in 1791. They were gifts of Mrs. William N. Reynolds, of Winston-Salem.

20. Boulder to Three Governors. Courthouse lawn, Broad street at Craven. A large granite boulder contains three bronze memorial tablets for New Bern's three Governors of North Carolina: Richard Dobbs Spaight, Richard Dobbs Spaight the younger, and Abner Nash. All three are buried across Trent river. Inside the courthouse are portraits of the first Richard Dobbs Spaight and of the Earl of Craven.

21. Postoffice Building.. Craven and Pollock streets. This building was completed and occupied as the city postoffice Apr. 1, 1897. Until sold to the federal government, the land had been owned by the New Bern academy, as bequeathed by Moses Griffin. The town clock was added some years after the government building was finished. On the church lot adjoining the property long stood an original hickory tree, under which a treaty was said to have been signed by Baron deGraffenried with the Indians. In 1932 the city agreed to take over the building as a city hall upon removal of the postoffice and federal offices to the new federal building.

22.. Site of Old Bank of New Bern. 54 Craven street. Here was the old Bank of New Bern, established in 1804. Ten-dollar bills from there were known as “Bill Gastons,” during the presidency of William Gaston.

23. City Hall. Craven street, between Pollock and South Front streets. In the old city hall hangs a banner of Berne, Switzerland,





presented to the city in 1896 by the Burghisses of Berne, through the Swiss Ambassador, after New Bern had adopted the armorial bearings and colors of the parent city. Three Swiss bears adorn the exterior of the building. Inside, too, are old parchment grants to deGraffenried, who was probably the only person to receive a real title of nobility for his new home in America—“Landgrave of Carolina.”

24. Gaston Hotel. South Front street, between Craven and Middle. One of the oldest hotels still in continuous service in the south. Honoring William Gaston, its original name was Gaston house in 1855, then changed to the Chattawka, which was the Indian name for their settlement here before arrival of the white men. From here the Tuscarora Indians, following their defeat in the Indian wars early in the eighteenth century, went to join the five Iroquois nations of Indians in New York, making the sixth nation, and are said to have bestowed the name of their old home town upon the now-famous Chautauqua, N. Y.

25. First Baptist Church. Middle street. Local Baptists organized May 11, 1809. Meredith college and Furman university get their names from former local pastors. Wake Forest college was the idea of a New Bern pastor, William Hooper, second president of the institution. Samuel Wait, first president of Wake Forest, became prominent in North Carolina because of an accident that forced him to come to New Bern. The Biblical Recorder, state Baptist publication, was started here in 1835 by Rev. Thomas Meredith.

26. Christ Episcopal Church. Pollock and Middle streets. Following organization of the parish in 1715, the first of three brick churches on this property was finished about 1750. King George II of England gave the parish a silver communion service, Bible and prayer book. The present church edifice dates back to 1873. This is believed to be the only place in America where two Episcopal dioceses have been organized, the diocese of North Carolina in 1817 and the diocese of East Carolina in 1883.

27. Lady Blessington Cannon. At corner of churchyard fence, across from Elks temple. This cannon was taken from the British Ship-of-War Lady Blessington, captured after a sharp engagement during the Revolution by an armed privateer belonging to John Wright Stanly, New Bern patriot. Use of it was made in laying off the city of New Bern.

28. Old Court House and Market House. Intersection of Middle and Broad streets. There met the committee of New Bern citizens, whose resolution of May 31, 1775, as vigorous, forceful and fearless as any in American annals, effected within a few hours the precipitous flight of Josiah Martin, the last of the Royal Governors of North Carolina. At the old courthouse, too, at the May term of court, 1786, in the case of Bayard against Singleton, the court held in principle for the first time in America that the judicial power is independent of the legislative power and that the legislature is limited in its powers by the Constitution.

29. Christian Science Church. Middle street near Broad. This is the oldest Christian Scientist church in East Carolina. Its cornerstone was laid Jan. 1, 1904. Financial contribution towards its first expense was made by Mrs. Mary Baker Eddy, discoverer of Christian Science.





30.. City Library. Next to Christian Science Church. This circulating library was started around 1900, from a nucleus of books that had been begun in 1895 by the Kings Daughters. The New Bern Library association was incorporated in 1912. Formerly the house was the residence of Joseph A. Williams, son of William J. Williams, famous artist, who had resided on the corner.

31. New Postoffice. Middle street at New. Started in 1933, this new building, along colonial design, was authorized by congress with an appropriation of $325,000. Its location is on historic ground, being the original site of the John Wright Stanly house, now pushed to the background on New street to make the corner lot available for the government building.

32. Centenary Methodist Church. Middle street at New. During 1802 a local Methodist organization was formed and a church building erected, the second church structure for this city. In 1843-44 a church was built on New street, being called “Centenary.” It is still standing. The present structure dates back to 1904.

33. Roman Catholic Church. Middle street just beyond New. St. Paul's Roman Catholic parish is the oldest Catholic parish in North Carolina, established in 1820. Originally it comprised practically all east Carolina, and members attended services here from as far west as Greensboro. The present building was erected in 1841. Previously Catholic gatherings were often held at the home of Judge William Gaston.

34. Jewish Synagogue. Across from Catholic church. The synagogue, Chester B'Nai Sholem, was built in 1908, women of the congregation


[Illustration:

BURNSIDE'S HEADQUARTERS
]





earning the money to buy the property and men taking the responsibility of paying for the edifice. Jews have long been prominent in the business life of the section and had several other smaller synagogues previously.

35. Hancock-Lee House. 166 Middle street. Built in 1777, this house is a fine example of local colonial wooden architecture. There is no proof for the erroneous tradition that it was once headquarters for Lighthorse Harry Lee, of Virginia, except that the name, “Lee”, is cut in upper beams of the house interior.

36. John Wright Stanly Home. New street near Middle. The colonial home of John Wright Stanly, illustrious patriot, who lost fourteen privateers during the Revolution, and later the home of his son, John Stanly, famous jurist and legislator. Here George Washington was entertained in 1791. Marquis de Lafayette, Gen. Nathaniel Greene and other outstanding leaders are said to have been guests there. Greene is reported to have obtained there from Stanly a loan of money that assisted valuably in the winning of the Revolution. In this house was born Feb. 17, 1817, Gen. Lewis Addison Armistead, grandson of John Stanly, who led in person Pickett's division in the famous charge at Gettysburg and was killed at the peak of the Confederate advance behind the captured federal guns.

37. First Presbyterian Church. New street, across from Stanly home. Dedicated Jan. 6, 1822, this handsome church was constructed, it is said, from a design by Sir Christopher Wren, noted English architect. Its colonial arrangement, with the pulpit in the front of the building, is of special interest. The church was organized here in 1818.

38. New Bern Academy. New street at Hancock. The New Bern academy was the first incorporated school in North Carolina. Started in 1764, it received a state charter two years later. The oldest building still standing was erected in 1806 of brick brought from England. Its original portico has been recently restored. The building is one of the oldest in the country still in constant public school service. First trustees for the school were approved by King George III of England. Many distinguished North Carolinians were educated there. The high school building, on Hancock and Johnson streets, was named for Moses Griffin, who died in 1816, leaving his property for the education of indigent boys and girls.

39. Masonic Temple and Theater. Hancock street at Johnson. The Masonic temple, completed in 1808, is one of the oldest still in use in the United States. The home of St. John's lodge, No. 3, second oldest Masonic lodge in North Carolina, chartered Jan. 10, 1772, it has been honored locally by Presidents Washington and Monroe. Interior architecture is considered among the finest in the country. The Masonic theater there is the oldest theater still operating in the United States.

40. Spaight-Stanly Duel. In rear of Masonic temple. There took place Sept. 5, 1802, the famed duel between Gov. Richard Dobbs Spaight and John Stanly, both of New Bern, in which Spaight was mortally wounded.

41. Raines birthplace. Presbyterian manse, 61 Johnson street. In a house on this plot in June, 1803, was born Gen. Gabriel J. Raines, head of the torpedo and harbor defense bureau of the Confederacy, whose inventions in submarine explosives locked Confederate harbors and held the federal fleet at bay.





42. Cedar Grove Cemetery. Queen and George streets. In Cedar Grove cemetery, opened in 1800 by Christ church and turned over to the city in 1854, are buried William Gaston, jurist, orator, and author of the state anthem; William J. Williams, famous artist, who painted the Masonic portrait of George Washington; Peter Custis, Moses Griffin, and other important personages. The Confederate monument in the center of the cemetery, easily seen from the front entrance, was erected May 11, 1885, by the Ladies’ Memorial association.

43. Kafer Park. George and Queen streets, across from cemetery. This is the city athletic field, a part of the area condemned by the city to become city property after the disastrous forty-block, $1,000,000 fire here December 1, 1922.

44. Federal Cemetery. End of National avenue. This cemetery, consisting of seven and a half acres, was established Feb. 1, 1867. Graves of around 3,500 soldiers, from a score of states are located there, the names of about 1,100 being unknown. Several northern states have erected monuments to their dead.

45. Inventor of Colt Revolver. Broad street near George, just beyond St. Luke's hospital. The Colt revolver is said to have been invented here in his shop by James Gill, talented inventor, jeweler and silversmith. His home was around the corner on Burn street, the Hargett “Groendyke” home, now a dilapidated but fine old specimen of Dutch colonial architecture.

46. Broad Street Christian Church. Broad street at Burn. This church is comparatively new. The land on which it stands is historic. In a house previously there, Josiah Martin, last Royal Governor of North Carolina, took refuge from Tryon Palace, before being permanently driven from New Bern on May 31, 1775. From the city he fled to an English Warship off Fort Johnston near Wilmington.

47. Federal Prison. Eden street at Pollock. One of several local sites used as federal prisons during the War Between the States. It was there that Emeline Pigott, Confederate heroine and spy, was imprisoned.

48. Federal Hospital. Pollock street at George. Here was one of several hospitals during the War Between the States. On top of the attractive old structure can be seen a “Captain's Walk,” one of several in New Bern, found only in coastal towns. Sea captains had them constructed on their roofs, so as to be able to view their ships coming up the river.

49. First Free School. Pollock street at Hancock. The first free school in North Carolina is said to have been held there by Dr. Elias Hawes.

50. Tryon Palace. 24 George street. Only one wing of famous Tryon Palace, long considered the most beautiful building in the Americas, is still standing. The palace was built 1767-1770 and was burned in 1798. There Royal Governor William Tryon made his home, followed by Royal Governor Josiah Martin. It was there on Aug. 25, 1774, that met the first provincial convention in North Carolina, called in contemptuous defiance of Royal proclamation, the second thus held in America. Washington and other notables were entertained there. The first state officials of North Carolina as an independent state were inaugurated in this first state capitol; and the first state general assembly met there April 7, 1777.





Additional Facts

Colonial architecture in New Bern, justly famed, is similar to New England types, largely due to the influence of extensive early water trade with northern ports. Much of the woodwork is thought to have been carved by James Coor, Englishman, who came here as a naval architect.

As an example of the pioneer features still noticeable here, foot scrapers cut into wrought-iron handrails may be seen at colonial homes, as the old Judge Donnell home, on upper Craven street. The adjoining office has a perfectly proportioned entrance.

Hand-carved mantels are among the most distinctive features of many old homes here. Two New York architects spent two days in the Harvey house at 41 South Front street to study the detail work of a handsome mantel there.

New street has been the home of many prominent personages, as William Blackledge, John Wright Stanly, John Stanly, Richard Dobbs Spaight, Jr., Francis Zavier Martin, J. L. Taylor, state chief justice, and William Gaston.

William Blount, who became a governor of Tennessee and senator from that state, lived once at Bellair and owned property in New Bern. Blount and Richard Dobbs Spaight were two of the five North Carolina representatives at the constitutional convention.

There is an unconfirmed rumor that William Gaston had his desk and writing equipment buried with him in his tomb at Cedar Grove cemetery.

Located here at different times have been a castor oil factory, ship-building plants, baseball bat and axe handle factory, turpentine and rosin distilleries, grist mills and paper plant.

Martin Howard, chief justice of the royal colony of North Carolina from 1767 to 1773, resided on his plantation, “Richmond,” near New Bern. His judicial career was a period of disturbance, marked principally by the War of the Regulators and trial of the offenders. He was founder and first worshipful master of St. John's lodge of Masons.

George E. Badger, superior court judge, United States senator and Secretary of the Navy, was a native of Craven county.

Ex-Senator Otis F. Glenn, of Chicago and Washington, owns the handsome estate previously the property of the late Dr. Earl S. Sloan, maker of Sloan's liniment. It is on the country club road.

Numerous priceless relics are to be found in this section, including many pieces of antique furniture from Tryon Palace.

Don Francisco De Miranda, “the precursor of the Independence movement in Spanish America,” visited New Bern in 1783. Ebenezer Hassard, postmaster general, came here in 1777.

The New Bern Benevolent society, founded in 1837 and incorporated in 1843, is probably the oldest in the state. A chief present project is the Enoch Wadsworth home for old ladies on Pollock and Burn streets.

Hannis Taylor, Minister to Spain and authority on international law, was born in the house at 18 Broad street.

An ancient cedar at the corner of the Roberts lot, on Pollock and Metcalf streets, is a survivor of the primeval forest that long marked the edge of the town. Then it stood just within the Tryon Palace grounds.





Of more than fifty miles of streets in New Bern, about half are paved; while practically all sidewalks, totalling around 35 miles, are paved.

A country club and golf course have a picturesque location on Trent river near the city.

New Bern is the county seat of Craven county. There are four courts here—police court, recorder's court, superior court, and federal court, besides magistrates’ tribunals.

The coast guard cutter Pamlico has its headquarters in New Bern with Lieut. D. F. deOtte in command. Its dock is in Neuse river, off Broad street.

Among the displays of interesting old weapons at Joe Anderson's drug store is an ancient garrote, Spanish inquisition instrument for strangling criminals, found near Tryon Palace.

The Show Shop here was the first picture theater built from the ground up in North Carolina. It has been operated continuously since April 1, 1911. Its manager, T. B. Kehoe, has probably been in the show business longer than any other person in the state.

Christ church owns handsome lace covers for communion, made from small bits of valuable laces, donated by different persons. This is one of only three such sets in America.

Pollock street was named for Thomas Pollock, an early settler. Metcalf street took its name from an English Lord. Eden street was named for Gov. Charles Eden; and Pembroke for the Earl of Pembroke. There are a King street and a Queen street, as well as a George street, named for King George.

An airport, “The Simmons-Knott,” is located on the Bryan estate across Trent river.

Two tobacco warehouses are open here, with full sets of buyers representing the leading manufacturing companies, during the tobacco season in the new bright leaf belt

New Bern has facilities of the Norfolk Southern and Atlantic Coast Line railroads extending in several directions. The union station is on Queen street at the end of Hancock.

To show the balmy winter climate, a resident on February 28 picked 22 kinds of flowers from her garden.

An example of the handsome old residences, the Washington Bryan house at 115 Pollock street used to have silver doorknobs.

Battery D, 113th Field Artillery, North Carolina national guard, has its armory on New street across from the Presbyterian church.

G. S. Waters has an ancient buggy-automobile that he made in 1903, one of the first of the kind.

Camp Ki-Ro, several miles down Neuse river, named for the local Kiwanis and Rotary clubs, is open for boys and girls in the summer.

The leading civic, patriotic and fraternal clubs are well organized here, and visiting members are invited to their meetings.

A leading farmer states that produce of practically every kind, “except succotash and macaroni,” can be raised in this section.

One of the oldest mutual fire insurance organizations, the New Bern Company of Mutual Insurers, was formed here in 1794.

This section might well be used as a training ground for northern baseball clubs.

Even Will Rogers, in his inimitable style, has paid tribute to the outstanding history of New Bern.

Donald Ross, designer of golf courses, declared that the local golf course was one of the best natural locations for the purpose he had ever seen.






[Illustration:


New Bern City Hall]

CITY OFFICERS

MAYORLEON C. SCOTT
CLERKFRANK T. PATTERSON
TAX COLLECTOREDWARD CLARK
CHIEF OF POLICEA. L. BRYAN

ALDERMEN: C. T. Hellinger and John F. Rhodes, Jr., first ward; S. H. Scott and B. M. Potter, second ward; H. G. Tolson and Kenneth R. Jones, II, third ward; C. D. Lancaster and C. J. McCarthy, fourth ward; L. C. Lawrence and R. C. Godwin, fifth ward.

CHURCH DIRECTORY

Broad Street Christian Church, Broad and Burn streets.

Centenary Methodist Church, Middle and New streets.

Christ Episcopal Church, Pollock and Middle streets.

First Baptist Church, Middle street.

First Church of Christ, Scientist, Middle street.

First Presbyterian Church, New street.

Free Will Baptist Church, Fleet street.

Jewish Synagogue, Middle street.

Mission, Broad street.

Pentecostal Holiness, Pollock street.

Riverside Methodist Church, Avenue A.

Salvation Army, Crescent and Guion streets.

St. Paul Catholic Church, Middle street.

Tabernacle Baptist Church, George and Broad streets.





DENTISTS

Civils, Dr. Harvey W., Mohn Building, Phone 741.

Hand, Dr. W. L., Elks Temple, Phone 92.

Johnson, Dr. Charles B., Elks Temple, Phone 46.

Parker, Dr. Z. V., 103 Craven street, Phone 113.

OPTOMETRISTS

Baxter, Dr. J. O., 63 Pollock street, Phone 413.

Menius, Dr. E. F., 95 Middle street, Phone 129.

OSTEOPATH

Lewis, Dr. Sherman T., 55 New street, Phone 258.

CHILDREN'S SPECIALIST

Bender, Dr. Ernest L., Elks Temple, Phone 911.

EYE, EAR, NOSE AND THROAT SPECIALISTS

Daniels, Dr. R. L., Elks Temple, Phone 170.

Woodard, Dr. E. D., Mohn Building, Phone 41.

PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS

Ashford, Dr. C. H., 113 Pollock St., Phone 231.

Barker, Dr. C. S., 121 Broad St., Phone 119.

Duffy, Dr. Charles, 117 Pollock St., Phone 77.

Duffy, Dr. R. N., Craven and Johnson, Phone 81-J.

Duffy, Dr. Leinster, 117 Pollock St., Phone 77.

Gibbs, Dr. N. M., Elks Temple, Phone 244-J.

Jones, Dr. R. D. V., St. Luke's Hospital, Phone 54.

Latham, Dr. J. R., 81 Pollock St., Phone 780.

Patterson, Dr. J. F., St. Luke's Hospital, Phone 54.

Pollock, Dr. Raymond, 168 Middle St., Phone 710.

Wadsworth, Dr. H. B., 95 Broad St., Phone 414.

LAW FIRMS

Abernethy and Abernethy, Mohn Building, Phone 237.

Barden and Stith, Elks Temple, Phone 76.

Bass, T. E., 95 1-2 Middle St., Phone 134.

Duffy, Rudolph, 133 Middle street.

Dunn and Dunn, Hughes Building, Phone 37.

Derrickson, Vernon B., Phone 150.

Eubank, L. J., Branch Bank, Phone 70.

Grantham, L. T., 93½ Middle St., Phone 87.

Guion, John A., 40 Broad St., Phone 132.

Guion, W. B. R., 40 Broad St., Phone 16.

Lee, W. H., Elks Temple, Phone 455.

Moore and Moore, Elks Temple, Phone 45.

Moore, Lon J., Broad and Middle.

McCotter,, D. C., Jr., Dunn Building, Phone 712.

Nunn, R. A., 50 Craven St., Phone 64.

Rouse, W. B., 67 1-2 Craven, Phone 773.

Ward and Ward, 79 Pollock, Phone 11.

Ward, D. L., Craven and Pollock Sts., Phone 59.

Warren and Warren, Elks Temple, Phone 283.

Willis, D. H., Dunn Building.

Whitehurst, Henry P., Elks Temple, Phone 743.

Whitehurst, R. E., Elks Temple, Phone 772.





Advertisers

A and O, cold remedy.

Baxter's Jewelry Store.

Belk's Department Store.

Belwood Farm, Dairy.

Benton's Garage.

Blades Motor Co., Dodge and Plymouth cars.

Block's, ladies’ ready-to-wear.

Bowden's Oyster Bar.

Braddy's, laundry and dry cleaning.

Branch Banking and Trust Co.

Brewer Beauty Shoppe.

Carolina Telephone and Telegraph Co.

Cash Feed House.

Cavanaugh's, gasoline, oil and tires.

Central Cafe.

Chadwick, W. C., insurance.

Charles Store, department store.

City of New Bern.

Coastal Oil Co., Shell gasoline.

Coca Cola Bottling Works.

Commercial Hardwood Co.

Cox's, Sally, Corset Shop.

Craven Motor Co., Chevrolets.

Davis New Deal Cafe.

Dowdy Furniture Co.

Duffy's Drug Store.

Duncan's Filling Station.

Dunn Agency, insurance.

Dunn, Owen G., printing office.

Eagle, R. R., engineer.

Eaton, S. K., Co., jewelry.

Farmers Suppy House.

Five Points Milling Co., meal and feeds.

Fulcher's Meat Market.

Gaston Hotel.

Great Atlantic and Pacific Tea Co., groceries.

Hagood Realty Co.

Hagood, W. C., Inc., Fords.

Hanes, P. H., Knitting Co., Winston-Salem, N. C.

Harrison, J. M., groceries.

Hill's, men's clothing.

Hobson-Duffy, florists.

Home Pride Store, groceries.

Hotel New Bernian.

Ideal Electric Shoe Shop, shoe repairing.

Jacobs’ Shoppe, drink, smokes, meals.

Kafer's Bakery.

King Watson, seafoods.

Kiwanis Club.

Kress S. H., and Co., 5 and 10 cent store.

Lancaster and Rowe, insurance and bonds.

Lipman, Joe, furniture.

Lipman, Sam and Son, department store.

Lucas and Lewis, wholesale groceries.

Lupton, M. L., wholesale fish.

Masonic Theatre.

Maxwell Company, wholesale merchants.

McCarthy, T. F., and Son, groceries.

McDonald's, drinks, smokes.

McLellan Stores Co.

McIlwean's, farm products.

Merit Shoe Store.

Metropolitan Club, drinks, smokes billiards.

Mill Supply Co., radios and electric refrigerators.

Minich's, hairdressing shop.

Mitchell, Thos. J., Sons, Hardware

Mohn's Beauty Salon.

Mohn, N. E. and Co., wholesale hay.

Morton Motor Co., Hudsons and Terraplanes.

Nehi Bottling Co.

New Bern Auto Supply Co.

New Bern Building and Loan Association.

New Bern Building Supply Co.

New Bern Electric Supply Co.

New Bern Merchants Association and Chamber of Commerce.

New Bern Morris Plan Co.

New Bern Oil and Fertilizer Co.

New Bern Sales Co., Chryslers and Plymouths.

Nina's Beauty Shop.

Orringer Pickle Co.

Parker, S. B., and Co., sheet metal.

Parsons’ Beauty Shop.





Pender's Stores, groceries.

Penney, J. C. Co., dept. store.

Pinnix Drug Store.

Pugh Grocery Co., wholesale groceries.

Rainbow Dry Cleaners.

Ritchy's, cleaners and dyers.

Roberts, S. G., wholesale groceries.

Rotary Club.

Royal Cafe.

Royall, H. E., fruits and vegetables.

Sadler, Mamie C., groceries.

Scott's, gasoline, oil, tires.

Seashore Transportation Co., bus transportation.

Show Shop, movie theater.

Shriver Flower Shop.

Slater, J. E., lumber mill.

Smaw, D. G., funeral director.

Southeastern Brewing Co., beer.

Stallings Bros., plumbers.

Star Grocery.

Stith and Taylor, insurance.

Sun-Journal, morning and afternoon newspapers.

Swan Motor Co., Studebakers.

Taylor and Bell, groceries.

Taylor, John R., insurance.

Taylor Motor Co., Buicks, Olds and Pontiacs.

Texas Company, Texaco gasoline.

The Florist.

Thompson Shoe Store.

Tide Water Power Co.

Turner-Tolson Furniture Co.

Vivian's Beauty Parlor.

Vogue, The, ladies ready-to-wear.

Warrington, Ralph B., groceries.

Waters Auto Tire Co.

Weeks, M. M., groceries.

Whitty, J. C., and Co., farm supplies.

Williams’ Millinery Shop.

Willis, Joe K., Co., funeral director.

Wootten-Moulton Studio, photographers.


[Illustration:

TRYON PALACE AS ORIGINALLY BUILT
]





COASTAL OIL
COMPANY

NEW BERN, N. C.

SHELL PETROLEUM PRODUCTS

“You Can't Go Wrong In Choosing New Bern”

MAXWELL
COMPANY

WHOLESALE MERCHANTS

New Bern, N. C.

Headquarters for Quality and Service

PHONE 91

“Taxes Have Been Reduced”





IT'S A PLEASURE TO
SHOP THERE!

That is what women say of the Pender's Stores. Its clean, neatly arranged stores, quality foods, unusual values and unexcelled service make your shopping trip a pleasure.

Pender's Stores

Since 1871
T. F. McCarthy & Son

Groceries of All Kinds

Paints, Oils and Varnishes

217-219 POLLOCK STREET

PHONE 52





TRY A TANK FULL OF


[Illustration:

Texaco
]

TEXACO FIRE CHIEF GASOLINE

YOU'LL LIKE IT

W. B. BLADES, Agent

The Texas Co.

Lucas & Lewis, Inc.

For 42 years a leading wholesale grocery in this section, carrying nationally-advertising brands.

South Front and Middle Streets

PHONE 900





The Mill Supply
Company

Machinery - Supplies

Electric Refrigerators

Radios - Paints

Auto Accessories

Sam Lipman & Son
Department Store

WHOLESALE

30 SOUTH FRONT STREET

PHONE 1005

RETAIL

65-69 MIDDLE STREET

PHONE 203


[Illustration:

A & P
]

VISIT YOUR NEAREST A & P FOOD STORE

For Quality Foods At Low Prices


[Illustration:

NRA Member We Do Our Part
]


[Illustration:

The Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Co.
]

SOMEONE SOMEWHERE WOULD LIKE
TO HEAR YOUR VOICE

Wouldn't the folks back home be excited to hear your cheery “hello”? Isn't there some friend in another city you've been intending to write to, but just haven't found the time? Or a boy or a girl away at school, and maybe a little lonely, too? The station-to-station rate is low in the day and much lower at night.

Carolina Telephone and Telegraph Co.





SALLY COX'S CORSET
SHOP

Home of Gossard Products

Scientific Corset Fitting

81 POLLOCK STREET

Williams’ Millinery

Hats Exclusively

Gage Hats a Specialty

129 MIDDLE STREET

THE
VOGUE

Ladies’ Ready-To-Wear and Millinery

Exclusive but not Expensive

NEW BERN—MOREHEAD CITY

THOMPSON
SHOE STORE

Quality Footwear at

Reasonable Prices

Natural Bridge Shoes for Women

Nunn Bush and Bob Smart Shoes for Men

“Making the Foot Comfortable”

97 MIDDLE STREET

PHONE 492

Never a Better Time
to Own Sterling Silver


[Illustration:

LEMON FORK $1.0
]

Flatware Essentials in the KIRK REPOUSSE

Each
Medium Knives$ $2.00
Medium Forks$2.25
Teaspoons$1.00
Salad Forks$1.50
Butter Spreads$1.25
Cr Soup Spoons$1.50

The Every

Day Set


[Illustration:

BUTTER KNIFE $2.25
]

6-Knives

6-Forks

6-Teaspoons

$30.50

Baxter's Jewelry Store





BEAUTY PARLORS
Vivian's Beauty Shop

79 POLLOCK ST.

PHONE 44

MINICH'S
HAIRDRESSING SHOP

KAFER BLDG.—PHONE 484

“A Woman's Hair is Her Crowning Glory”

MOHN'S BEAUTY SALON

MOHN BUILDING

PHONE 82

Keep Your Beauty and Charm

NINA'S BEAUTY SHOP

4TH FLOOR ELKS TEMPLE

PHONE 133

“Let Us Help Bring Out the Best in You”.

Retain Your Youth by Using Our Service Regularly

Brewer Beauty Shoppe

94 POLLOCK ST.—PHONE 387

We Make Loveliness Lovelier

Parsons’ Beauty Shop

EVERYTHING FOR BEAUTY

2nd Floor Hughes Building

Pollock and Middle Streets

PHONE 110

VISIT OUR STORE

Our New Bern store was the first unit in our present system of 31 successful Charles Stores, founded here nine years ago on sound business principles and meeting a popular demand.

VARIETY OF SUPPLIES

There's no better place to find at reasonable prices all the articles you need and want for yourself, your home, and your friends. Our facilities are always at your service.

Charles Stores Company, Inc.

ELKS TEMPLE

SHOW
SHOP

EAST CAROLINA'S

AMUSEMENT CENTER

The first picture theatre built from the ground up in North Carolina. In continuous operation since 1911. Now one of the most modern and attractive in the state.

Four Picture Shows Daily

Prices 10c—20c—30c





Farmers Supply
House

L. W. BRAY, Mgr.

Hay, Grain, and Feed

Poultry and Dairy Supplies

Groceries

STATE TESTED SEEDS

PHONE 742

THE S. B. PARKER
COMPANY

(INCORPORATED)

“EVERYTHING IN

SHEET METAL”

ROOFING, SHEET METAL

WORK, WARM AIR

HEATING

46-48 CRAVEN ST.—PHONE 299

Drink

NEHI

In Your Favorite Flavor

Take Home a Bottle

PAR-T-PAK

A Dime Will Treat the

Whole Family

SAM K. EATON
COMPANY

JEWELRY

Silver, China, Brass,

Souvenirs—Gifts

ESTABLISHED 1862

95 MIDDLE STREET





SCOTT'S SERVICE
STATION

GOODYEAR TIRES

EXIDE BATTERIES

GASOLINE AND OIL

POLLOCK AND HANCOCK STS.

PHONE 440

TAYLOR MOTOR
COMPANY

Buicks, Olds and Pontiacs

42 CRAVEN STREET

PHONE 50

“A Good Store For Men . . . In A Good Town”


[Illustration:

Hills Incorporated
]

“Known For Good Clothes” MRS. HAZEL HILL, President G. C. MUNDEN, Secty.-Treas.

NEW BERN, N. C.

Masonic
Theatre

ESTABLISHED 1808

Oldest Theatre Operating

In America

Four Picture Shows Daily






[Illustration:

The Morris Plan
]

“The Bank for the Individual”

We Are Here To Serve You

The New Bern Morris

Plan Co.

67 CRAVEN ST.

THE FLORIST

T. W. CARLISLE, Mgr.

278 BROAD ST.—PHONE 871-W

STALLINGS BROS.

Plumbing and Heating

70 CRAVEN ST.—PHONE 177

Joe K. Willis Co.

‘Complete Funeral Service’

Ambulance Service

30 BROAD STREET

PHONES 210 AND 687

DUFFY'S DRUG
STORE

New Bern's Most Modern and Also

Most Ancient Drug Store

ESTABLISHED 1835

FOR FEED OF ALL KINDS

Call Or See

CASH FEED HOUSE

W. B. SMITH, Prop.

29 MIDDLE STREET

Have Your Clothes Cleaned

—at—

RITCHY'S

Cleaners - Dyers - Hatters

80 MIDDLE ST.—PHONE 425

DRINK


[Illustration:

Coca-Cola
]

IN BOTTLES

New Bern Coca Cola

Bottling Works, Inc.





MAY

YOUR STAY

IN THE CITY

BE AN ENJOYABLE

ONE. VISIT THIS STORE

IF YOU NEED ANYTHING

KRESS

“The Home of Real Values”

J. C. WHITTY & CO.

McCormick-Deering Farm

Machines and Implements

20 CRAVEN STREET

S. G. ROBERTS

Wholesale Grocer

103 S. FRONT ST.—PHONE 188

METROPOLITAN
CLUB

BEER, SMOKES AND SODAS

BILLARDS

59 POLLOCK STREET

JACOBS’ SHOPPE

Smokes, Drinks, Magazines, Papers, Sweets, Home-Made Hot and Cold Plate Lunches

MIDDLE AND POLLOCK STS.

LUPTON FISH &
OYSTER CO.

WHOLESALE FISH

17 MIDDLE STREET

Blades Motor Co.

Dodge Cars and Trucks

Also Plymouths

84 POLLOCK ST.—PHONE 153

TAKE

A and O

FOR COLDS

A AND O COMPANY

NEW BERN, N. C.





HOBSON-DUFFY

FLORISTS

Phone 561-J—Upper Broad St.

FIVE POINTS MILLING AND
FEED COMPANY

A. L. Waters, Manager. Meal, Hay, Grain, Feed. At 5 Points—Phone 156

IDEAL ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP

155 Broad St.—J. Khoury, prop.

BEST WORK—LOW PRICES

MORTON MOTOR CO., INC.

Hudsons and Terraplanes

104 South Front Street

DUNCAN'S
FILLING STATION

MOREHEAD CITY ROAD

LANCASTER AND ROWE

All Kinds of

INSURANCE AND BONDS

McDONALD'S

Drinks, Smokes, Sandwiches

136 MIDDLE STREET

STOP AT

KAFER'S BAKERY

134 MIDDLE STREET

New Bern Auto Supply Company

Auto Parts of All Kinds

Wholesale and Retail

S. T. ROACH, Mgr.

McILWEAN FARM

WHAT YOU WANT IN

FARM PRODUCTS

83 BROAD STREET

PHONE 530

DON'T FORGET

KING WATSON

South's Most Noted Seafoods

W. C. CHADWICK

General Insurance—214 Mohn Bldg.

PHONE 145

N. E. MOHN & Co.

HAY—STRAW—GRAIN

H. E. ROYALL

FRUITS AND VEGETABLES

PHONE 33

JOE LIPMAN

Furniture and Radios

J. M. HARRISON

GENERAL MERCHANDISE

New, Queen and Broad Sts.

TAYLOR AND BELL

Staple and Fancy Groceries

105 East Front Street

PHONE 161

FULCHER'S
MEAT MARKET

Fancy Native Meats of All Kinds

Ralph B. Warrington

MEATS AND GROCERIES

BOWDEN'S OYSTER BAR

Finest Oysters in City All-Ways

27 MIDDLE STREET





Wootten-Moulton

THE GIFT THAT ONLY YOU CAN GIVE—YOUR

PHOTOGRAPH

DRINK LION BEER

NEW YORK'S FAVORITE BEER SINCE 1850

IN BOTTLES OR ON DRAUGHT

SOUTHEASTERN BREWING CO.

PHONE 23

New Bern Oil & Fertilizer Company

MANUFACTURERS OF COTTON SEED PRODUCTS

AND HIGH GRADE FERTILIZERS

New Bern Building & Loan Association

ESTABLISHED 1887

“THE HOME BUILDERS”

Save the Building and Loan Way—Your Neighbor Does

NEW BERN SALES CO., INC.

Chrysler and Plymouth

96 Middle St. — — — — New Bern, N. C.

Anything You Need In Laundry Or Dry Cleaning

You'll Make No Mistake In Sending To—

BRADDY'S

PHONE 29—75 S. FRONT STREET

FOLLOW THE LEADER! BUY A

Sales

CHEVROLET

Service

One Sold Every Second

CRAVEN MOTOR COMPANY

New and Used Cars

57 Craven St. — — — Phone 173





HOME PRIDE STORE

188 BROAD STREET

Groceries and Fresh Meats

PHONE 78

SHRIVER FLOWER SHOP

Flowers for All Occasions

146 MIDDLE STREET

HAGOOD REALTY CO.,

(Incorporated)

Real Estate, Fire Insurance and Rentals

MOHN BUILDING

PHONE 115

VISIT DAVIS NEW DEAL CAFE

Newest and Most Up-To-Date Cafe In New Bern


[Illustration:


Man repairing a tire]

Waters Auto Tire Co.

131½ Broad Street Good Place To Buy Since 1887

JOHN R. TAYLOR

Manager Eastern District The Mutual Life Insurance Co. of New York

“Oldest American Co.”

NEW BERN, N. C.

AROUND THE CORNER

Past the Postoffice and the City Hall

CAVANAUGH'S, INC.

AUTO SERVICE

When You Are At New Bern Take Your Meals At

THE ROYAL CAFE

102 MIDDLE STREET

NEW BERN ELECTRIC
SUPPLY CO.

Light Equipment and Supplies Contractors

BENTON'S GARAGE

For Auto Repairs Call 796-J

8 FLEET STREET

Also Auto Wrecking Service

Belwood Dairy

BEST JERSEY

MILK AND CREAM

COMMERCIAL
HARDWOOD CO.

Manufacturers of Band Sawn Hardwood Lumber





HOTEL NEW BERNIAN

Located In the Center of Everything

87½ MIDDLE STREET

STITH AND TAYLOR

General Insurance

71 CRAVEN STREET

You Will Find the Best

Cuisine in New

Bern at the CENTRAL CAFE

A Good Place to Eat—Next to Home

67 POLLOCK STREET

We Can Supply All Your Drug Store Needs

PINNIX DRUG STORE

PHONE 746

OPPOSITE UNION STATION

“If You Don't Trade With Us We Both Lose Money”

Shoes And Hose

You can always get the best shoe and hose values in East Carolina at

MERIT SHOE Co. Inc.

130 MIDDLE ST.

STAR GROCERY
COMPANY

Wholesale and Retail Grocers

“QUALITY AND SERVICE”

60 MIDDLE STREET

PHONE 57

SWAN MOTOR
COMPANY, Inc.

STUDEBAKER

Sales and Service

84½ POLLOCK STREET

PHONE 275


[Illustration:

J.C. Penney Co. Incorporated
]





BLOCK'S

Ladies’ Ready-To-Wear of the Better Kind

RAINBOW
CLEANERS

“Better” Tells It All

221 POLLOCK ST.—PHONE 308

BUILDING

MATERIALS

New Bern Building Supply Co.

D. G. SMAW

Funeral Director and Embalmer

AMBULANCE SERVICE

56 HANCOCK ST.

PHONES 167-380

Orringer Pickle
Company

MANUFACTURERS OF Carolina Maid Pickles and Pickle Products

If It's Groceries You Want

CALL

M. M. WEEKS

Best Values

156 SOUTH FRONT STREET

PHONE 225

DOWDY FURNITURE CO.

“New Bern's Largest and Best Furniture Store”

NEW BERN, N. C.

Corner Middle & South Front Sts.

Mamie C. Sadler

GROCERIES, MEATS, AND GENERAL MERCHANDISE

Country Produce Bought and Sold

107 Griffith Street

Phones 723—724—725





McLellan Stores Co.

All Needs Filled at Lowest Prices.

MIDDLE AND POLLOCK STS.

R. R. EAGLE

CIVIL ENGINEER AND CONIRACTOR


[Illustration:

Rotary International
]

“Service Above Self—He Profits Most Who Serves Best”

Visiting Rotarians are invited to the weekly supper meetings every Tuesday evening at 6:45 at the Gaston Hotel.

Insure With

THE DUNN AGENCY

67 CRAVEN ST.—PHONE 447

THOMAS J.
MITCHELL SONS

Hardware - Sporting Goods

PUGH GROCERY
COMPANY

WHOLESALE GROCERY

JOHNSON AND HANCOCK STS.

PHONE 300


[Illustration:

Kiwanis Club
]

The New Bern Kiwanis Club extends a cordial welcome to visitors in New Bern. Visiting Kiwanians are invited to the bi-weekly meetings at the Hotel New Bernian.

NEW BERN KIWANIS CLUB

QUALITY FURNITURE

Colonial and Modern Types

Turner-Tolson Furniture Co.

HOME OUTFITTERS

MIDDLE ST.—PHONE 172





Owen G. Dunn

Manufacturing Stationer


[Illustration:


f symbol cipher]

PRINTER, RULER AND BLANK

BOOK MAKER


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f symbol cipher]

NEW BERN, N. C.





For Reading and Buying Guidance

Thousands Buy The Morning And Evening

Sun-Journal


[Illustration:


symbols]

New Bern and nearby towns are served by Carrier—Craven, Pamlico, Carteret, Jones and Onslow Counties by mail—The Paper with reader Interest and Reader Confidence, inspires by clean news and advertising policy.





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