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Second annual catalogue of the North Carolina state colored normal schools for 1905-06

Date: 1905 | Identifier: LC2802.N8 N66 1905/06
Annual catalogue of the North Carolina State colored normal schools for ... Raleigh, N.C. : State Board of Education E.M. Uzzel & Co., State Printers and Binders), : Includes catalogs of the annual sessions of the Elizabeth City Colored Normal School, the Fayetteville Colored Normal School and the Slater State Colored Normal School (Winston-Salem, N.C.) Description based on: 2nd (1905-06). more...
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SECOND ANNUAL CATALOGUE
OF THE
NORTH CAROLINA
State Colored Normal Schools
FOR
1905-'06
WITH
ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 1906-'07
WINSTON-SALEM, FAYETTEVILLE, ELIZABETH CITY
"THE PEOPLE HAVE A RIGHT TO THE PRIVILEGE OF EDUCATION, AND IT IS THE DUTY OF THE STATE TO GUARD AND MAINTAIN THAT RIGHT."-- Constitution of North Carolina.





PROPERTY OWNED BY COLORED PEOPLE.

The report of the State Auditor of North Carolina for the year 1903 gives the following facts about the value of property in North Carolina:

Assessed value of all taxable property, $433,687,809.50.

White property$332,978,471.00, or 76.8 per cent.
Colored property14,852,811.00, or 3.4 per cent.
Railroads, etc.85,856,527.00, or 19.8 per cent.
Listed white polls201,276, or 73.7 per cent. of all polls.
Listed colored polls71,830, or 26.3 per cent. of all polls.

POPULATION, 1870-1900.
1870.1880.1890.1900.
Total population1,071,3611,399,7501,617,9471,893,810
White687,470867,2421,055,3821,263,603
Colored392,891532,508562,565630,207
Percentage total population, white63.3361.9665.2366.7
Percentage total population, colored36.6738.0434.7733.3





SECOND ANNUAL CATALOGUE
OF THE
NORTH CAROLINA
State Colored Normal Schools
FOR
1905-’06
WITH
ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 1906-’07



WINSTON-SALEM, FAYETTEVILLE, ELIZABETH CITY

RALEIGH:
E. M. UZZELL & CO., STATE PRINTERS AND BINDERS.
1906.




FACTS ABOUT COLORED PUBLIC SCHOOLS, 1904-’05.
Rural.City.Total.
Colored school population192,72034,256226,976
School enrollment132,36316,458148,821
Average daily attendance73,9589,43283,390
Percentage of enrollment in daily attendance.56.57.56
Percentage of school population enrolled.68.48.65
Average number of children enrolled with each teacher.546155
Teachers employed2,4132692,682
Percentage of teachers women60.972.962.1
School term in days8015982
Average monthly salary of teachers$22.20$31.40$25.62
Average annual amount paid each teacher$89.08$248.85$105.10
Salary per school day$1.11$1.57$1.28
Salary per week while employed$5.55$7.85$6.41
Salary per week (52 weeks)$2.41$6.57$2.85
Total amount paid teachers$214,951.91$66,940.69$281,892.60
Total amount spent for buildings$17,825.64$4,677.58$22,503.22
Total expenditures for colored schools$232,777.55$71,618.27$304,395.82
Percentage of total expenditures spent for colored schools.16.313.515.5
Percentage of total school population colored31.738.332.5
Spent for each child enrolled$1.76$4.35$2.05
Spent for each child in daily attendance$3.14$7.59$3.65
Number of schools2,284522,336
Schools having only one teacher2,16822,170
Schools having two or more teachers11650166
Average area covered by each rural school21.3 sq. m.
School-houses2,198632,261
Log houses293293
Value of school property$273,368.00$197,438.00$470,806.00
Average value of each house$124.37$3,133.93$208.23





STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION.

R. B. GLENN, Governor, President.

J. Y. JOYNER, Superintendent Public Instruction, Secretary.

F. D. WINSTON, Lieutenant-Governor.

J. BRYAN GRIMES, Secretary of State.

B. R. LACY, Treasurer.

R. D. GILMER, Attorney-General.

B. F. DIXON, Auditor.

CHARLES L. COON, Superintendent of Normals.

By authority of laws enacted by the Legislatures of 1903 and 1905, the general control and management of the State Colored Normal Schools is vested in the above board.





INCREASE IN PROPERTY VALUES BY RACES, 1891-1904.
Year.Total Assessed Value of all Property.Railroads, Telegraph, etc.White Property.Colored Property.
1891$262,796,816$16,668,802$234,109,568$8,018,446
1901$342,222,009$58,780,200$271,981,493$11,460,316
Increase ten years$79,425,193$42,111,398$37,871,925$3,441,870
Percentage increase ten years.30.2252.616.142.9
1904$442,418,677$87,022,746$339,969,769$15,426,162
Increase three years$100,196,668$28,242,546$67,988,276$3,965,846
Percentage increase three years.29.248.024.934.6
1903$433,687,809$85,856,527$332,978,471$14,852,811
Increase one year$8,730,868$1,166,219$6,991,298$573,351
Percentage increase one year.2.01.32.13.8

The above figures are taken from the reports of the State Auditor of North Carolina. The figures show that the assessed value of colored property is increasing at a more rapid rate than the rate of increase for all other property except railroads and other corporation property.





RECORD OF PROGRESS 1905-’06.

During the school year 1905-’06 the Slater School Board at Winston-Salem conveyed to the State Board of Education its property, consisting of about sixteen acres of land, together with the school buildings and equipment, which have cost about $40,000. The State Board assumes a debt of $12,000 on this property. But the property is easily worth $25,000. This means that a gift of at least $12,000 has been made to the State by citizens of Winston-Salem and elsewhere, who owned this property.

During the year twenty-six acres of land near Fayetteville have been purchased for a school site, at a cost of $1,500. The colored people and their white friends in that vicinity have contributed $529.84 of this amount; $500 has been paid out of the Colored Normal School annual appropriation, and the remainder has been advanced through the liberality of Messrs. E. E. Smith and T. W. Thurston, the first-named being the principal of the Fayetteville Normal School and the other the superintendent of the Ashley-Bailey Silk Mill. Both are colored men deeply interested in the success of the work at Fayetteville.

At Elizabeth City eighteen acres of land have been bought during the year, at a cost of $2,000. Of this amount $1,652.43 has been contributed by the colored people of that section of the State, aided by their white friends in that vicinity and elsewhere. Some years ago a gift of five acres of land for a school site at Elizabeth City was made by a friend of the work at that place. The eighteen acres purchased this year adjoins this five acres, making a site of twenty-three acres in all.

During the year, therefore, it will be seen that $15,500 has been added to the permanent equipment of these three colored normal schools, less than $1,000 of which has been expended out of the annual appropriation of State funds. This means that the State has been given nearly $15,000 during the year to aid in helping along the work of training teachers for the colored public schools.

In addition to what is said above, it should be remembered that about $5,000 in good pledges remains to be collected at Fayetteville and Elizabeth City. This sum will be available as soon as building work is begun at these places. Many colored people at both these places have also expressed a willingness to aid by means of labor as soon as the State can see its way clear to undertake such operations.

But this is not all the progress that has been made. The teachers and pupils of these schools are more in earnest than ever. They are doing better work than ever before. The average attendance is better,





the principals have had less trouble with discipline, and the citizens, both white and black, are taking more interest in the work than ever before. The work of each school in detail can be seen from the matter contained in this catalogue. I regret that space does not permit printing more complete and detailed accounts of what is being done. But enough is given to convince any fair-minded person that these schools are worth the State's attention and care. An extra appropriation from the State equal in amount to what has been given by the local communities would enable us to put these schools into permanent homes of their own, thus greatly increasing their usefulness and efficiency.

CHARLES L. COON.





GENERAL INFORMATION.
TUITION.

Tuition in all the normal schools is free to those who intend to teach in the colored public schools of North Carolina. Those who do not intend to teach must pay $10 a year tuition. These schools are maintained for the purpose of training teachers for the elementary public schools. It is only just and right that those who take advantage of these schools, and who do not intend to teach, shall pay the tuition charges.

PURPOSE.

The Colored State Normal Schools at Winston-Salem, Fayetteville and Elizabeth City are maintained by the State for the purpose of training teachers for the colored elementary public schools of North Carolina. The school at Winston-Salem was established in 1895; the school at Elizabeth City in 1891, and the school at Fayetteville in 1877.

REGULATIONS.

The following general regulations apply to all the normal schools:

1. Pupils of both sexes are to be admitted, but all boarding pupils must consult the local principal before making any arrangements for boarding outside the school dormitories.

2. Only pupils of good moral character will be admitted or retained in the schools.

3. No pupil will be admitted to any of the schools after the opening week, except upon examination, which examination will cover the previous work of the class to which admission is sought. All such examinations and their result must be approved by the superintendent.

4. No pupil will be advanced to a higher class except upon the satisfactory completion of the work of the preceding class. All tests and examination questions shall be first approved by the superintendent, and no promotion to a higher class shall be valid except approved by the superintendent.

5. The school year shall consist of eight months of twenty school days each. No holidays except Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year's Day shall be given. A Christmas recess not exceeding ten days may be given, but such recess shall not be included in the school year of 160 days.

6. Three unexcused absences or tardies during the year shall cause any pupil to be suspended from school for the remainder of the year. No principal shall accept any excuse for tardiness or absence except the serious sickness of the pupil or his immediate family. The superintendent shall have the power to define the terms absence and tardiness.





7. No substitute teacher shall be employed, except upon the approval of the superintendent, and no student shall be permitted to teach any normal class.

8. All students who receive free tuition shall sign a pledge to teach two years in the colored public schools of the State.

9. The satisfactory completion of the work of the fourth grade of the elementary school as set forth in the State Course of Study will be required for entrance on the work of the normal course of study.

BEGINNING OF SESSION 1906-’07.

The session of 1906-’07 will begin at Fayetteville, September 17, 1906; at Elizabeth City, September 17, 1906, and at Winston-Salem, October 1, 1906.





COURSES OF STUDY.

The following courses of study are offered in all the normal schools, subject to present limitations as to equipment. The normal school begins with fifth-grade work, the high school with ninth-grade work, and the primary school with first-grade work.

NORMAL ELEMENTARY COURSE.
FIRST YEAR.

1. READING:

a. Phonics (spelling, writing, diacritical marks): Harrington's Spelling Book, Part II, pp. 1-48, including the words found in the reading and other subjects of study.

b. Longfellow's Song of Hiawatha, Francillon's Gods and Heroes, Ruskin's King of the Golden River, Hawthorne's The Great Stone Face.

2. LANGUAGE:

a. The Story (oral and written).

b. Copying and dictation by sentences and paragraphs. The copying and dictation must not take the sentence out of its place in the paragraph. The relation of sentence and paragraph must be retained in all the work. Use the readers as the basis of the work.

c. Hyde's Lessons I, pp. 1-158, for formal work, omitting all composition and picture lessons.

3. DRAWING:

a. Use Normal Drawing 1. The pupils are not simply to draw lines, but learn to draw real things, using lines.

b. Book 2 should be taken up after Book 1 has been completed.

4. ARITHMETIC:

a. Review notation and numeration; formal addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of whole numbers and fractions, and take up:

b. Decimals, compound quantities and percentage, using Colaw and Ellwood's Primary, pp. 228 to end. Teachers should own Werner Arithmetic 2.

5. HISTORY:

a. Read Hansell's Primary History to get a general view of the subject.

b. Study—Colonies. The teacher will take up the study of the Colonies after plan of Guerber's Story of the Thirteen Colonies.





6. GEOGRAPHY:

a. Home Geography. Teachers will follow plan of Tarr and McMurry's Geography 1.

b. Pupils must study the life histories of a number of common plants and animals by means of the school garden.

c. Use Maury's Elementary Geography to give pupils an idea of the world as a whole. Teachers should own Tarr and McMurry's Geography 1.

7. SCIENCE:

Agriculture, Cooking, Sewing.

SECOND YEAR.

1. READING:

a. Phonics (spelling, writing): Harrington, Part 2, pp. 49-92; words from other subjects.

b. Clarke's Story of Troy, Guerber's Story of the Greeks, Warren's Stories from English History.

2. LANGUAGE:

a. Story (oral and written); copying and dictation.

b. Hyde's Lessons 1, pp. 159-206, omitting all picture and composition lessons.

3. DRAWING:

a. See first year.

b. Use Book 3 after 1 and 2 have been completed.

4. ARITHMETIC:

Take up no new subjects. Use Colaw and Ellwood's Advanced Arithmetic to strengthen and extend work already done, omitting all reviews and supplementary exercises.

5. HISTORY:

a. Study Revolution, using biographies of Washington, Adams (Samuel), Franklin, Henry.

b. Read Hansell's Higher on Revolution.

Teachers should own Fiske's War for Independence.

6. GEOGRAPHY:

Study North America, using plan of Tarr and McMurry's Geography 2; Maury's Manual to end of North America, with North Carolina Geography.

7. SCIENCE:

Elementary Agriculture, Physiology, Cooking, Sewing.





THIRD YEAR.

1. READING:

a. Phonics (spelling and writing); review Harrington; words from other subjects.

b. Poems of Knightly Adventure, Irving's Knickerbocker Stories, Guerber's Story of the Romans; Selections, Whittier, Holmes.

2. LANGUAGE:

a. The Story (oral and written); copying and dictation.

b. Buehler's English Grammar begun; study Parts 2 and 3, and then Part 1.

3. DRAWING:

a. See first year.

b. Use Book 4 after 1, 2 and 3 have been completed.

4. ARITHMETIC:

See second-year work. Review of subject.

5. GEOGRAPHY:

Study Europe and the other continents after plan of Tarr and McMurry's Geography 3; Maury's Manual from end of North America to end of book.

6. HISTORY:

a. Read Hansell's Higher, from Revolution to end of book.

b. The Nation: Use biographies of Jefferson, Boone, Fulton, Whitney, Morse, Lincoln, Lee.

c. Civil Government should be studied in connection with history.

7. SCIENCE:

Agriculture, Cooking and Sewing, Physiology.

FOURTH YEAR.

1. READING:

a. Phonics and complete review of spelling, with instruction how to teach children to read, spell and write.

b. Holbrook's Hiawatha Primer, Claxton's Grimm's Fairy Stories, Baldwin's Fairy Stories and Fables, McMurry's Robinson Crusoe, Moulton's Bible Stories, Cook's Story of Ulysses, Pratt's Legends of the Red Children.

The object of reading the above books here is to make students thoroughly familiar with their contents and with the methods of teaching and using the books in the primary grades 1-4.





2. LANGUAGE:

a. Buehler's English Grammar completed.

b. Oral and written language work, based on the reading of this year, with methods of teaching language grades 1-4.

3. DRAWING:

a. Book 5, Normal Drawing.

b. Review of Books 1-4, and instruction in how to teach drawing, grades 1-4.

4. ARITHMETIC:

a. Werner Arithmetic 3. This book contains work in elementary algebra and concrete geometry, as well as in higher arithmetic.

b. Review of the subjects of notation and numeration; addition, subtraction, multiplication and division of whole numbers and fractions; simple decimals, simple compound quantities, simple percentage, and how to teach these subjects, grades 1-5.

5. HISTORY:

a. Read Myers’ General History.

b. North Carolina History and review of the subject of history as contained in this course.

6. GEOGRAPHY:

a. Review of subject as studied in this course.

b. Geography, grades 1-4, and how to teach it.

7. SCIENCE:

Agriculture, Cooking and Sewing, Physiology.

OUTLINE OF NORMAL HIGH SCHOOL COURSE.

First Year— I. English—

a. Literature (reading), 3.

b. Grammar and composition, 2.

c. Spelling and phonetics, 2.

II. Mathematics—

a. Arithmetic, 2.

b. Algebra, 3.

III. General History, 3.

IV. Physiology, 2.

V. Physical Geography, 3.

VI. Drawing, 2.





VII. Agriculture, 3.

VIII. Domestic Science, 2.

The Arabic figures mean the number of recitations a week. The recitation periods for agriculture and domestic science are to be each 60 minutes in length; for the other subjects, 45 minutes each.

Second Year—I. English—

a. Literature (reading), 3.

b. Grammar and composition, 2.

c. Spelling and phonetics, 2.

II. Mathematics—Algebra, 3.

III. General History, 3.

IV. Botany, 4.

V. Drawing, 2.

VI. Agriculture, 3.

VII. Domestic Science, 2.

The recitation periods for agriculture and domestic science are to be 60 minutes for each; for the other subjects, 45 minutes each.

Third Year— I. English—

a. Literature (reading), 3.

b. Grammar and composition, 2.

c. Spelling, etc., 2.

II. Mathematics—Geometry, 3.

III. English History, 3.

IV. Drawing, 2.

V. Agriculture, 3.

VI. Domestic Science, 2.

VII. Teaching (theory and practice), 5.

The recitation periods for agriculture and domestic science are to be 60 minutes each; for the other subjects, 45 minutes each.

Fourth Year—I. English—

a. Literature (reading), 3.

b. Grammar and composition, 2.

c. Spelling, etc., 2.

II. Mathematics—

a. Geometry, 2.

b. Arithmetic, 1.





III. History—

a. United States History, 3.

b. Civics, 2.

IV. Drawing, 2.

V. Agriculture, 3.

VI. Domestic Science, 2.

VII. Teaching (theory and practice), 3.

The recitation periods for agriculture and domestic science are to be 60 minutes each; for the other subjects, 45 minutes each.

PRIMARY SCHOOL COURSE.

It is sometimes necessary, on account of the poor preparation of those who apply for entrance to the classes of the normal schools, to have a good primary school in connection with each normal. It is also necessary to have such a school in which candidates for graduation from the normal schools can be required to teach successfully prior to graduation.

FIRST YEAR.

1. READING:

a. Phonics—spelling and writing.

b. Holmes’ First Reader (third month), Holbrook's Hiawatha Primer (Geography), Claxton's Grimm's Fairy Stories (History).

2. LANGUAGE:

a. The Story (oral only).

b. Copying by sentences and paragraphs.

c. Dictation by sentences and paragraphs.

Teachers should use the readers for this work. The copying and dictation must not take the sentence out of its place in the paragraph. The relation of sentence and paragraph must always be retained.

3. DRAWING:

a. Permit and encourage children to draw live objects such as they desire.

b. Let the writing be introduced by means of drawing.

c. Use Book 1, Normal Drawing.

4. ARITHMETIC: See second year.

5. HISTORY: See Reading.





6. GEOGRAPHY:

a. See Reading.

b. Let the children have a garden and by that means study the life histories of at least four common plants. Let the location determine what plants are to be studied. Plants that furnish food, clothing or shelter will be most interesting to children. The life histories of some animals should also be studied. The moth, the butterfly, the toad and any animals which furnish food or clothing will be interesting.

SECOND YEAR.

1. READING:

a. Phonics—spelling and writing; Harrington, Part 1, pp. 20-40; also words from other subjects.

b. Holmes’ Second Reader, Baldwin's Fairy Stories and Fables (History), McMurry's Robinson Crusoe (Geography).

2. LANGUAGE: See first year.

3. DRAWING: See first year.

4. ARITHMETIC:

a. Counting 1-100, using real things.

b. Notation and numeration, 1-1000.

c. The thirty-six addition facts.

The teacher should use Colaw and Ellwood's Primary Arithmetic, pp. 1-109, omitting pp. 66-76 and pp. 1-6.

5. HISTORY: See Reading.

6. GEOGRAPHY:

a. Let the children have a garden. See first year.

b. Children learn direction and get ideas of distance, form, color. See Drawing Work.

c. Weather Chart: Cause of wind, rain, frost, dew, change of seasons, should be learned and discussed in connection with the weather chart.

THIRD YEAR.

1. READING:

a. Phonics—spelling and writing; Part 1, Harrington, pp. 40-78; also words from other subjects.

b. Holmes’ Third Reader, Cook's Story of Ulysses, Moulton's Bible Stories (History).

2. LANGUAGE:

a. The Story (oral and written).

b. Copying and dictation. See first year.





c. Teachers should do formal work. Hyde's Lessons 1, pp. 1-70, omitting all picture and composition lessons. Children must not have the book.

3. DRAWING: See first year.

4. ARITHMETIC:

a. Formal addition, subtraction, multiplication and division.

b. Colaw and Ellwood's Primary, pp. 109-203. Children may have the book for first time. Teachers should own Werner Arithmetic 1.

5. HISTORY:

Bible Stories. (See Reading).

6. GEOGRAPHY:

a. Home Geography—local soil, land and water forms; roads, railroads, trade and manufacturing; relation of plants and animals to soil; life histories of some common plants and animals. See first year.

b. Teach children to draw to a scale the school-house and grounds; the township and county, locating the roads, the railroads, the postoffices and their own dwellings.

FOURTH YEAR.

1. READING:

a. Phonics—spelling and writing, diacritical marks; Harrington, Part 1, pp. 20-78, in review; also words from other subjects.

b. Holmes’ Fourth Reader, Francillon's Gods and Heroes, Moulton's Bible Stories (New Testament).

2. LANGUAGE:

a. The Story (oral and written); copying and dictation. See first year.

b. Hyde's Language Lessons 1, pp. 1-70, omitting all picture and composition lessons. Children may have language book in their hands for the first time.

3. DRAWING:

a. See first-year work.

b. Use Book 2 after Book 1 has been completed.

4. ARITHMETIC:

a. Review previous work and teach common fractions.

b. Colaw and Ellwood's Primary, pp. 209-227. Add many practical examples. Teachers should own Werner Arithmetic 1.





5. HISTORY:

a. Bible Stories. (See Reading).

b. Exploration and Discovery: Use stories of Columbus, Cortez, De Soto; Cabot, Drake, Raleigh; Cartier, Champlain, La Salle; Hudson. Teachers and pupils will find Shaw's Discoveries and Explorers, Eggleston's Great Americans, and Montgomery's Beginners’ American History helpful-books.

6. GEOGRAPHY:

a. Use Home Geography in Tarr and McMurry's Geography 1.

b. Continue to study life histories of some common plants and animals by means of the school garden.

c. Begin to study Maury's Elementary latter part of year.

Teachers should use Tarr and McMurry's Geography 1 for supplementary work.

The Primary School will be in charge of a supervising teacher, working under the superintendent and the local principal. The regular normal teachers and the fourth-year normal pupils will assist in the teaching. The daily programmes will be made by the superintendent to meet local needs and conditions.









ELIZABETH CITY
COLORED NORMAL SCHOOL
1905-’06
(FIFTEENTH YEAR)

THE SESSION OF 1906-’07 BEGINS SEPTEMBER 17, 1906

LOCAL BOARD OF MANAGERS:
E. F. LAMB, President,J. B. LEIGH, Treasurer,
S. L. SHEEP, Secretary,W. G. GAITHER,
R. W. ASKEW.

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE:
E. F. LAMB,S. L. SHEEP,
J. B. LEIGH.





TEACHERS:
P. W. MOORE, Principal.
JOHN T. DOLES,SARA H. EDWARDS,
JOHN H. BIAS,FANNIE O. BUTLER,
MATILDA A. ENOS,BESSIE E. GEORGE.





SOCIETIES.

Prayer-meeting.—The Wednesday after-school prayer-meeting is so conducted that it is a source of religious and spiritual help to the life of the students and teachers. The meeting is regularly conducted by Rev. J. T. Doles. Occasionally the colored and the white ministers of the city lead the meeting.

Christian Associations.—The Young Men's and Women's Christian Associations are greatly instrumental in toning up and deepening the moral and religious life and activity of the student-body.

Lyceum.—The Lyceum is a literary society officered by the students, but under the supervision of the teachers. It affords the students an opportunity to become acquainted with parliamentary usages and to have practice in public speaking and discussion. This society meets weekly and renders an occasional public program.

OTHER INFORMATION.

The expenses for board and washing per calendar month are $7 for young men and $6 for young women. Young women who come as self-boarding students will be required to pay for room rent and fuel only $1.75 per calendar month. Bring towels, combs and brushes for individual use.

Students must make good all damage done to furniture or buildings resulting from carelessness.

Any other information not contained in this catalogue the principal will be glad to give. Address P. W. Moore, Principal, State Normal School, Elizabeth City, North Carolina.





PAID CONTRIBUTIONS TO BUILDING FUND 1905-’06.

The following amounts have been paid to Mr. J. B. Leigh, Treasurer, from May, 1905, to May, 1906, for the purpose of buying a site and erecting a building for the Colored Normal School at Elizabeth City:

CONTRIBUTIONS BY WHITE FRIENDS.

ELIZABETH CITY—Dr. O. McMullan, $35; A. B. Seeley & Son, $25; O. F. Gilbert, $75; J. H. LeRoy, $50; McCabe & Grice, $50; M. N. Sawyer, $50; P. W. Melick Co., $50; I. M. Meekins, $50; N. K. Barker, $10; J. C. Brooks, $25; Dr. L. S. Blades, $50; O. J. Woodley, $50; J. D. Hathaway, $5; H. H. Lavenstein, $5; M. L. Sanderlin, $25; Rucker & Sheeley, $25; George R. Bright, $25; Owens Shoe Co., $25; Fred. Davis, $10; J. P. Overman, $5; Dr. A. L. Pendleton, $10; S. M. Rallinson, $5; W. H. Jennings, $5; J. C. Spence, $5; J. Haywood Sawyer, $25; G. M. Scott, $5; H. Clay Tunis, $25; W. T. Old, $5; Dr. C. W. Sawyer, $5; Sheriff Charles Reid, $5; Pritchard & Jackson, $5; Culpepper, Griffin, Old & Grice Co., $5; Mrs. M. E. Fearing, $1; D. M. Jones, $10. Total, $761.

FROM ELSEWHERE—T. Brown Belfield, Philadelphia, Pa., $25; J. W. Steacy, York, Pa., $250; William I. Bowditch, Boston, Mass., $25; P. D. Hamilton, Waterbury, Conn., $5. Total, $305.

CONTRIBUTIONS BY COLORED PEOPLE.

ELIZABETH CITY—Dr. G. W. Cardwell, $25; T. J. Rayner, $14; Miss H. A. Mebane, $5; M. D. Spellman, $1.50; John Sutton, $5; David Hampton, $2; Rev. J. T. Doles, $25; Prof. J. H. Bias, $10; John Taylor, $0.25; Washington Perry, $1; George T. Jones, $1.25; State Normal School, $97.60; Nathaniel Overton, $1; Mrs. Ida A. Brown, $5; Mrs. Cornelia Perkins, $0.50; Mrs. Priscilla Sawyer, $5; Miss Bessie George, $5; Miss C. McMurran, $1; Miss C. W. Watson, $0.25; Prof. P. W. Moore, $25; Mrs. F. O. Butler, $20; Alfred Bowe, $1.25; Miss Mary Whitehurst, $0.25; Miss O. W. Whitehurst, $1; John Bradshaw, $5; John Long, $5; H. Barrington, $1; J. H. Perkins, $0.25; P. A. Robinson, $0.25; Cicero White, $0.25; Miss C. W. Whitehurst, $2.25; J. C. Hollowell, $1; Rev. J. H. Wilson, $5; J. W. Barrington, $1; Miss M. L. Harvey, $1; J. E. Brown, $5; C. W. Brown, $5; W. E. Simpson, $1; J. J. McClease, $0.25; Mrs. Alice Johnson, $1; Miss L. E. Robbins, $1; Rev. L. E. Fairley, $0.50; Mrs. Mary E. Jones, $1; Mrs. Annie E. Jones, $5; Mrs. Mary E. Reid, $2; Rev. P. W. Holley, $1; Henry Pool, $0.25; Allen Simpson, $1; — Brothers, $0.25; W. H. Dance, $17; David Overton, $0.25; Mt. Lebanon Church, $20; Noah Cartwright, $1; Hugh Cale, $1; A. Brockett, $0.25; Daniel Stallings,





$1; Miss Minnie Sawyer, $1; Rev. George W. Williams, $1; A. Pendle, $0.25; W. R. Lane, $0.50; Rev. H. M. Maloy, $0.25; Miss L. M. Brown, $0.25; D. W. Perkins, $0.40; S. F. Sutton, $0.30; — Harris, $0.25; George Midgett, $0.50; L. D. Overton, $0.25; Mrs. Martha Riddick, $1; Mrs. Alice Haughton, $0.25; Olive Branch Church, $7.63; Miss A. L. Trafton, $2; Miss Irene Long, $1; Mrs. Lizzie Targinton, $1; George Bright, $1; George Mitchell, $0.50; a friend, $0.25; Andrew Williams, $0.25; Moses Brickhouse, $2; Miss E. A. Leigh, $1; Thomas Whidbee, $1; Elisha Overton, $6; Mr. and Mrs. Robert Bowe, $1; J. C. Williams, $2; Frank Simon, $0.25; Jordan Pool, $10. Total, $382.43.

EDENTON—Rev. M. M. Weston, $5; Miss S. F. Gregory, $1; Miss E. E. Skinner, $2; W. E. Burke, $0.25; Rev. C. M. Cartwright, $1; Rev. M. P. Hawkins, $1; Hannibal Badham, $1. Total, $11.25.

WINDSOR—W. A. Smallwood, $10; Miss Maggie R. Peterson, $1; A. C. Thompson, $1; J. J. Hyman, $1.50; H. D. Cooper, $3.50; Miss Ella Foreman, $1; J. E. Thompson, $3.50; W. A. Cooper, $0.25; A. N. Cooper, $0.25; William Carter, $2; Rev. J. A. Robbins, $0.25. Total, $24.25.

SOUTH MILLS—William A. Griffin, $0.50; Miss Addie Taylor, $1; Isaiah Turner, $1. Total, $2.50.

ROPER—Miss H. A. Haughton, $1; J. H. Rowson, $1. Total, $2.

COLERAIN—David Cherry, $5; Miss S. C. Cherry, $0.50; Miss G. O. Jenkins, $5; Miss Rachel Cherry, $0.50. Total, $11.

PLYMOUTH—Arthur N. Sutton, $1; Rev. A. G. Armstead, $1. Total, $2.

NEW BERN—James H. Moore, $1; W. K. Moore, $1. Total, $2.

WASHINGTON—Miss Annie Bonner, $0.50.

WEEKSVILLE—Miss Bessie A. Smith, $1; B. C. Johnson, $0.50; Lawrence White, $5. Total, $6.50.

WINFALL—Miss L. A. Daughtry, $4; Miss E. E. Felton, $5; Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Felton, $5. Total, $14.

PLEASANT HILL—James Blount, $1; Abner Blount, $2. Total, $3.

SHILOH—Cuffy Williams, $5; William Williams, $0.50. Total, $5.50.

MOYOCK—Miss Ida Bormard, $1; Miss Willie Holloman, $0.25; Miss A. O. Wilson, $5; Miss Mary E. Wilson, $5; Mrs. Corprew, $2. Total, $13.25.

KINSTON—Miss Cora Cogdell, $0.25; Robert Kornegay, $5. Total, $5.25.

SNOWDEN—Apollos Dey, $1; E. Snowden, $1; W. H. Baxter, $0.50. Total, $2.50.

BELVIDERE—Rev. Robert Brinn, $1; Miss Alice L. Brinn, $0.75. Total, $1.75.

AHOSKIE—Mrs. J. S. Sills, $0.25; a friend, $0.25. Total, $0.50.

GARYSBURG—Miss K. L. Porch, $1.

FAIRFIELD—Mrs. George Simpson, $0.50.

TULLS—Miss Mamie Ashby, $3.





ULTARE—Miss J. A. James, $1.

SCOTLAND NECK—Miss M. Dickens, $1.

RICHLANDS—Joseph E. Brown, $1.

JACKSON—Miss Idel M. Harris, $0.25.

HERTFORD—Alex. Jones, $0.50.

SEABOARD—Mrs. Young, $0.25.

HYDE COUNTY—Miss Mary E. Willie, $1.

HOBBSVILLE—Miss Elnora Hurdle, $1.

DURANT'S NECK—J. H. Gordon, $0.50; Miss Mary E. Sumner, $10.

POWELLSVILLE— —Sessoms, $0.50.

HARRELLSVILLE—Miss Maude Askew, $0.25; Miss Mary N. Beverly, $1.

COLUMBIA—S. W. Hill, $2.

RYLAND—Rev. E. D. Nowell, $0.50.

ELMVILLE—Miss Rosia Tomer, $0.75.

CREMO—Miss Malinda Cherry, $1.

MARGARETTSVILLE—Miss R. A. Calvert, $5.

CHAPANOKE—Ethel L. Williams, $2.50.

SKYCO—W. S. Bowser, $1.

JAMESVILLE—Robert A. Staten, $5.

MANTEO—Rev. Daniel Hopkins, $1.

WILLIAMSTON—Miss L. C. Griffin, $0.25.

BELCROSS—C. M. Walker, $3.

Total for North Carolina outside Elizabeth City, $155.

FROM ELSEWHERE—Prof. E. C. Cooper, Newark, N. J., $30; Gold Wilson, Renoville, Va., $0.75; Miss S. A. Williams, Gilmerton, Va., $1; Miss Isabella Hollowell, Malden, Mass., $5; Mrs. A. Harrell, Norfolk, Va., $1; Miss M. E. Coleman, Quillin, Va., $0.25; J. Brinkley, Quillin, Va., $5; Sarah F. Christian, Renoville, Va., $1; Miss M. A. Enos, New York, $5. Total, $49.

SUMMARY OF PAID CONTRIBUTIONS TO MAY, 1906.

By white citizens of Elizabeth City$761.00
By white citizens elsewhere305.00
By colored people of Elizabeth City382.43
By colored people of North Carolina outside of Elizabeth City,155.00
By colored people outside North Carolina49.00
Total$1,652.43





RECORD OF PUPILS, 1905-’06.

OCCUPATION OF PARENTS.
Boys.Girls.Total.
Total number of pupils79241320
Pupils whose parents are farmers4384127
Pupils whose parents are preachers51621
Pupils whose parents are merchants31114
Pupils whose parents are butchers134
Pupils whose parents are carpenters31215
Pupils whose parents are fishermen33
Pupils whose parents are teachers527
Pupils whose parents have some other occupation195069
SELF HELP.
Pupils whose parents own their own homes25124149
Percentage whose parents own their own homes32.051.446.5
Pupils who pay all their expenses at school203050
Pupils who partly pay their expenses at school50211261
Pupils whose parents pay all their expenses99





SOME SELF-SUPPORTING STUDENTS 1905-’06.

1. George T. Jones, born in Lewiston, Bertie County; age, 23; attended public school eight terms; entered State Normal School 1902; was janitor, mail-carrier and did other work for school; during vacation worked in furniture store and drug store; taught two Sunday-school classes, sang in choir and paid all his school expenses; father dead; graduated 1906.

2. Moses Collins, born, 1882, in Washington County; attended public school eight terms; worked on farm; attended State Normal School five terms; during vacations worked at saw-mills and on farms; graduated 1906; parents dead; paid all his own expenses.

3. Emily O. Piland, born Gates County, 1880; father dead; worked on farm to educate herself; attended public school ten terms; entered State Normal School at age 18; continued working on farm during vacations; graduated 1906.

4. Clarkie Hinton, born in Pasquotank County, 1886; worked on farm; attended public school nine terms; during vacations worked on father's farm; graduated 1906; has teacher's certificate.

5. Willie Person, born in Northampton County twenty-two years ago; works on farm and at saw-mill; pays own expenses; attended public school ten terms; attended Garysburg High School two terms; entered State Normal School 1905; will graduate 1907; parents living.

6. Lewis Person, born in Northampton County twenty years ago; works on farm and at saw-mill for support; attended public school eight terms; attended Garysburg High School two terms; entered State Normal School 1905; parents living; will graduate 1907.

7. James H. Rowsom, born 1884, in Washington County; attended public school eight terms; works on farm; pays own schooling; mother dead; entered State Normal School 1902; graduated 1906.

8. Mary E. Bonner, born 1884, in Brunswick County, Va.; moved to Northampton County at five years of age; attended public school in Northampton and assisted parents on farm; entered State Normal School 1904; will graduate 1907.

9. Rosia Toomer, born in Chatham County, 1888; father dead; mother owns little farm; works on farm to support family and educate herself; left school this spring to begin farming; attended public school; wants to teach to help her race; entered normal in 1906.

10. Mamie L. Cheek, born twenty years ago; father owns farm; she works on farm; attended public school; entered normal 1906; honest and faithful.

11. Enolia L. Davis of Warren County, 17 years of age; father dead; mother owns home and farm; works on farm; attended public school; entered normal 1906.





GRADUATES AND WHAT THEY DO.

1896.
Name.Present Occupation.Post-office.
Cooper, Emmic C.PrincipalNewark, N. J.
Felton, James E.Winfall, N. C.
Jacocks, Richard C.M. D.Elizabeth City, N. C.
Physic, Charles E.TeacherNewark, N. J.
Rayner, Joanna O.TeacherWindsor, N. C.
Yeates, Charles S.TeacherLatta, N. C.
1897.
Bazemore-Peel, Nettie J.Philadelphia, Pa.
Leigh, Isaac F.Edenton, N. C.
Lewter, Mary E.TeacherLewiston, N. C.
Mebane-Jenkins, Mattie E.TeacherHertford, N. C.
Parker, William W.TeacherJacksonville, N. C.
Perkins, Daniel W.Attorney at LawElizabeth City, N. C.
Rayner, Hannah S.TeacherWindsor, N. C.
Reid, Olive B.TeacherHertford, N. C.
Riddick, Luella E.Elizabeth City, N. C.
Rogers, Alonzo B.TeacherElizabeth City, N. C.
Skinner, Lizzie V.TeacherElizabeth City, N. C.
1899.
Fleming, Lizzie C.Elizabeth City, N. C.
Jenkins, CatherineTeacherGatesville, N. C.
McDonald, Mary E.Elizabeth City, N. C.
Stallings-Fleming, Carrie E.Elizabeth City, N. C.
Trafton, Alexena L.TeacherGatesville, N. C.
Williams, IsaiahTeacherCreswell, N. C.





1900.
Name.Present Occupation.Post-office.
Barrington, HerbertTeacherElizabeth City, N. C.
Bonard, Ida G. M.TeacherCamden, N. C.
Brinn, Alice L.TeacherBelvidere, N. C.
Brockett-Butler, Jennie H.TeacherElizabeth City, N. C.
Burke, Nellie A.TeacherElizabeth City, N. C.
Harrell, GeorgianaTeacherWeeksville, N. C.
Lewis, James B.TeacherElizabeth City, N. C.
Midgett, Charles M.TeacherElizabeth City, N. C.
Midgett-Dunbar, Ella M.TeacherManteo, N. C.
Pierce, James F.TeacherWindsor, N. C.
Weeks, Alfred L. E.Minister and PrincipalNew Bern, N. C.
Whitfield, George R.Teacher
1901.
Brinkley, CloteeTeacherNorfolk, Va.
Brown, Louise M.TeacherElizabeth City, N. C.
Hawkins, Bertha J.TeacherChapanoke, N. C.
Hill, Amanda M.TeacherColumbia, N. C.
Jones, Annie E.TeacherElizabeth City, N. C.
Rayner, Thomas J.TeacherElizabeth City, N. C.
Starke, Lucius C.BusinessElizabeth City, N. C.
1902.
Brockett, John H.TeacherElizabeth City, N. C.
Cooper, Thomas S.Principal Public SchoolElizabeth City, N. C.
Law, John P.TeacherMerry Hill, N. C.
Little, Carlee M.TeacherEdenton, N. C.
McDougald, Emma L.TeacherWhiteville, N. C.
Outlaw, Henry S.TeacherMerry Hill, N. C.
Sessoms-Turner, Mamie L.TeacherElizabeth City, N. C.





1903.
Name.Present Occupation.Post-office.
Felton, Mattie E.TeacherHertford, N. C.
Fields, Mamie E.TeacherQuillin, Va.
Lewis, Joseph A.TeacherJamesville, N. C.
Walker, Cortez M.TeacherBelcross, N. C.
Whitehurst, Catharine W.TeacherElizabeth City, N. C.
Williams, Ethel L.TeacherChapanoke, N. C.
Wilson, Mary E.TeacherMoyock, N. C.
1904.
Askew-Spellman, Willie G.Elizabeth City, N. C.
Brockett, Mary E.TeacherElizabeth City, N. C.
Cherry, David K.TeacherPowellsville, N. C.
Cooper, Henry D.TeacherWindsor, N. C.
Cooper, Roberta OvertonTeacherElizabeth City, N. C.
Gaskill, Carrie A.TeacherNew Bern, N. C.
Gregory, Sarah F.TeacherEdenton, N. C.
Jordan, Benjamin F.TeacherIdalia, N. C.
Newby, Julia E.TeacherElizabeth City, N. C.
Outlaw, William A.TeacherWindsor, N. C.
Phelps, Lela A.TeacherEdenton, N. C.
Riddick, John T.Elizabeth City, N. C.
Speller, Richard B.TeacherWindsor, N. C.
Staton, Robert A.TeacherJamesville, N. C.
Warren, HerbertElizabeth City, N. C.
Wilson, Alice O.TeacherMoyock, N. C.

1905.
Name.Post-office.
Brown, Ida A.Elizabeth City, N. C.
Brothers, Edward L.Elizabeth City, N. C.
Bright, MarchElizabeth City, N. C.
Calvert, Ruth A.Margarettsville, N. C.
Daughtry, Louetta A.Winfall, N. C.





1905.
Name.Post-office.
Felton, Ellenor E.Winfall, N. C.
Hawkins, Laura J.Edenton, N. C.
Harvey, Mattie L.Elizabeth City, N. C.
Jenkins, Golena O.Colerain, N. C.
Kornegay, Raleigh W.Kinston, N. C.
Mebane, Hattie A.Elizabeth City, N. C.
Mizell, Annie J.Colerain, N. C.
Midgett, Mary E.Elizabeth City, N. C.
Newby, Maggie E.Elizabeth City, N. C.
Robbins, Lillie E.Elizabeth City, N. C.
Sawyer, Sarah F.Elizabeth City, N. C.
Skinner, Ferribee G.Durant's Neck, N. C.
Skinner, Ellen E.Philadelphia, Pa.
Smallwood, William A.Quitsna, N. C.
Sumner, Mary F.Durant's Neck, N. C.
Taylor, Lillie B.Clinton, N. C.
Thomas, Kate U.Elizabeth City, N. C.
Trafton, Eliza L. V.Belcross, N. C.
White, Lucy A.Elizabeth City, N. C.
1906.
Ashby, Mamie E.Tulls, N. C.
Badham, Charles E.Edenton, N. C.
Blount, James N.Pleasant Hill, N. C.
Brinkley, Maggie A.Quillin, Va.
Bowe, Cora W.Elizabeth City, N. C.
Cherry, Sillena C.Colerain, N. C.
Collins, Moses L.Woodville, N. C.
Coleman, Maggie E.Norfolk, Va.
Cooper, Lamb H. N.Windsor, N. C.
Hopkins, Izetta R.Manteo, N. C.
Hinton, Clarkie A.Elizabeth City, N. C.
Jones, George T.Lewiston, N. C.
Mann, Clifton E.Elizabeth City, N. C.





1906.
Name.Post-office.
Overton, Lizzie I.Elizabeth City, N. C.
Piland, Emily O.Gates, N. C.
Rowson, James H.Roper, N. C.
Reeves, Julia M.Hamilton, N. C.
Stalling, Annie G.Elizabeth City, N. C.
Sharp, Pearle A. G.Harrellsville, N. C.
Sharp, Lala L.Harrellsville, N. C.
Thompson, James E.Windsor, N. C.
Thompson, Arthur C.Windsor, N. C.
Watson, Fannie B.Windsor, N. C.
Whitehurst, Olivia W.Elizabeth City, N. C.
Wilson, Nina B.Moyock, N. C.
Wilson, Gold R.Renoville, Va.
Willie, Mary E.Sladesville, N. C.
Williams, John C.Elizabeth City, N. C.





PUPILS 1905-’06.
FIRST-YEAR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS.

SCHOOL YEAR, SEPTEMBER 18, 1905, TO MAY 4, 1906.
Names of Students.Age.Days Present.Date of Entrance.County.
Brown, Ida A.2833Sept.25Pasquotank.
Daughtry, Louetta A.1923Nov.2Perquimans.
Felton, Ellenor E.2022Oct.31Perquimans.
Harvey, Mattie L.182Oct.12Pasquotank.
Newby, Maggie E.18150Sept.18Pasquotank.
Robbins, Lillie E.1720Dec.5Pasquotank.
Skinner, Ellen E.2224Oct.16Chowan.

FOURTH-YEAR STUDENTS.

SCHOOL YEAR, SEPTEMBER 18, 1905, TO MAY 4, 1906.
Archer, Lucy C.2121Nov.14Perquimans.
Ashby, Mamie E.18139Oct.16Currituck.
Badham, Charles E.18158Sept.18Chowan.
Bowe, Cora W.17150Sept.18Pasquotank.
Blount, James N.26150Sept.25Northampton.
Brinkley, Maggie A.22117Oct.18Norfolk, Va.
Coleman, Maggie E.18154Sept.18Norfolk, Va.
Cherry, Sillena C.26122Oct.3Bertie.
Cooper, Lamb N.19145Oct.9Bertie.
Collins, Moses2290Jan.2Perquimans.
Douglas, William N.213Perquimans.
Hinton, Clarkie A.19133Oct.10Pasquotank.
Hopkins, Izettia R.20140Sept.21Dare.
Jones, George T.23155Sept.25Bertie.
Jenkins, David2260Sept.18Bertie.
Jones, Mary E.3513Oct.24Pasquotank.
Moore, James H.24125Oct.6Craven.
Mann, Clifton E.19143Oct.9Pasquotank.
Overton, Lizzie I.16149Sept.18Pasquotank.
Piland, Emily O.23120Sept.26Gates.





Names of Students.Age.Days Present.Date of Entrance.County.
Reeves, Julian M.20158Sept.18Martin.
Rowsom, James H.21150Sept.18Washington.
Stalling, Annie G.18153Sept.18Pasquotank.
Snowden, Ida V.2122Oct.5Camden.
Sharp, Pearlie I.19120Oct.5Hertford.
Sharp, Lala L.23134Oct.17Hertford.
Sutton, Arthur N.2192Oct.16Washington.
Thompson, Arthur C.21132Oct.25Bertie.
Thompson, James E.2090Jan.2Bertie.
Wilson, Nina B.18159Sept.18Currituck.
Wilson, Gold R.17160Sept.18Princess Anne, Va.
Whitehurst, Olivia W.17152Sept.18Pasquotank.
Willie, Mary E.2094Oct.2Hyde.
Watson, Fannie B.22118Oct.16Bertie.
Webb, Lucy C.2021Oct.4Perquimans.
Williams, John C.2122March26Pasquotank.

THIRD-YEAR STUDENTS.

SCHOOL YEAR, SEPTEMBER 18, 1905, TO MAY 4, 1906.
Askew, Elizabeth19150Sept.19Bertie.
Askew, Maud O.2139Oct.19Hertford.
Bright, Susie E.17125Sept.18Pasquotank.
Beverly, Mary N.20159Sept.19Hertford.
Beaman, Arosier P.2136Oct.5Gates.
Borden, Beatrice E.17144Oct.9Lenoir.
Brown, Joseph E.2495Oct.16Onslow.
Boyd, Joshua2354Nov.14Hertford.
Bonner, Mary E.2190Jan.2Northampton.
Baker, Sterling E.1990Jan.3Halifax.
Bass, Hattie O.1744March6Camden.
Cartwright, Addie P.18160Sept.18Chowan.
Christian, Sarah F.19155Sept.18Princess Anne, Va.
Capehart, Ida O.18150Sept.18Chowan.





Names of Students.Age.Days Present.Date of Entrance.County.
Cherry, Malinda1948Oct.9Bertie.
Dey, Apollos17151Sept.18Currituck.
Dillahunt, Susan E.19121Oct.13Craven.
Dickens, Mary E.184Dec.5Pasquotank.
Dickens, Lula E.1772Jan.3Pasquotank.
Davis, Enolia L.1790Jan.2Warren.
Everett, Daisy F.19147Sept.18Washington.
Everett, Goldia E.16149Sept.18Martin.
Ellis, Minnie B.2243Sept.18Northampton.
Fitts, Emma M.1889Jan.2Warren.
Garris, James E.2356Nov.15Northampton.
Griffin, Lena C.1988Jan.2Martin.
Hawkins, Etta L.1798Sept.18Pasquotank.
Hollowell, Josephine20101Sept.18Pasquotank.
Harris, Idel M.24156Sept.22Northampton.
Hargett, Ida M.2337Sept.19Lenoir.
Hinton, Kittie V.2619Sept.26Pasquotank.
Hyman, James J.23124Oct.27Bertie.
Holloman, Luke1735Nov.14Hertford.
Johnson, Martha A.17119Sept.18Pasquotank.
Jordan, Philip W.20136Oct.9Beaufort.
Maloy, Mary L.18131Sept.18Pasquotank.
Outlaw, Jennie L.19120Oct.19Bertie.
Perkins, Malinda A.18117Sept.18Pasquotank.
Person, Willie21124Nov.7Northampton.
Person, Lewis20124Nov.7Northampton.
Rayner, Mary E.24105Sept.19Bertie.
Rayner, Madison T.20109Sept.19Bertie.
Respass, Jane1729Nov.13Martin.
Rayner, Carrie L.2022Sept.22Bertie.
Styron, Cora M.22122Oct.26Craven.
Sills, Mary E.2780Nov.9Hertford.
Simons, Pinkie R.1926Sept.22Bertie.
Taylor, Addie V.2017Oct.25Camden.
Thornton, Mabel P.1988Jan.2Warren.





Names of Students.Age.Days Present.Date of Entrance.County.
Williams, Willie2290Sept.18Camden.
Williams, Annie E.2343Sept.19Lenoir.
Wilson, Ida W.23129Sept.18Currituck.
White, Amanda J.2124Oct.3Bertie.
Willie, Edward H.21101Oct.16Hyde.

SECOND-YEAR STUDENTS.

SCHOOL YEAR, SEPTEMBER 18, 1905, TO MAY 4, 1906.
Alston, Alice M.1887Jan.2Northampton.
Bright, Johnnie14143Sept.18Pasquotank.
Brockett, Katie E.14157Sept.18Pasquotank.
Barcliff, John W. H.1699Nov.6Perquimans.
Barnard, Mary I.24152Sept.18Currituck.
Brown, Jessie B.17136Sept.18Pasquotank.
Brinn, Minnie M.16147Oct.2Perquimans.
Boston, Noah1647Oct.16Martin.
Bond, Daisy M.1848Feb.23Bertie.
Cogdell, Cora A.21154Sept.19Lenoir.
Cartwright, Roxana21111Oct.2Pasquotank.
Corprew, Adelaide1829Oct.2Currituck.
Carter, Mary17122Oct.17Bertie.
Cooper, Willie A.17130Oct.23Bertie.
Cooper, Annie W.17124Oct.23Bertie.
Cox, Mettie L.18127Oct.23Perquimans.
Cooper, Willie H.20101Nov.6Pasquotank.
Cheek, Minnie L.20109Nov.27Warren.
Cherry, Symera T.1753Jan.3Bertie.
Davis, Peter W.18129Sept.18Pasquotank.
Dickens, Mariah19118Nov.7Halifax.
Foreman, Ella M.1850Sept.18Bertie.
Felton, Miley I.15121Oct.31Perquimans.
Faison, Sallie J.1989Jan.2Northampton.
Gatling, Arvey V.2274Dec.4Hertford.
Gordon, Joseph H.213Oct.9Perquimans.





Names of Students.Age.Days Present.Date of Entrance.County.
Houcutt, Marie L.16104Sept.18Pasquotank.
Hollomon, Willie B.17160Sept.18Currituck.
Hoggard, Maggie16128Sept.18Pasquotank.
Hollowell, Mary E.16109Sept.20Pasquotank.
Harrison, Katie L.23138Sept.25Washington.
Holly, Easter19133Oct.10Pasquotank.
Johnson, Ida M.1798Sept.18Pasquotank.
James, Julia A.19131Oct.20Northampton.
Kee, Mamie M.19129Oct.19Northampton.
Keys, Chelise20108Nov.27Beaufort.
Keys, Cottie A.18110Nov.27Beaufort.
Kee, Mary I.2342Jan.3Northampton.
Leigh, Roy15140Sept.18Pasquotank.
Long, Mamie H.18136Oct.11Northampton.
Moore, Ruth S.14150Sept.18Pasquotank.
Mizell, Celia W.22150Sept.19Bertie.
Moore, William K.24123Oct.23Craven.
Montgomery, Priscilla C.1887Jan.3Norfolk, Va.
Newby, Benjamin H.17127Oct.9Pasquotank.
Overton, Mary L.14159Sept.18Pasquotank.
Overton, James16132Sept.18Pasquotank.
Peterson, Maggie R.20154Sept.18Bertie.
Phelps, Estella19125Sept.18Pasquotank.
Pool, Malinda A.19128Sept.18Pasquotank.
Peebles, Annie R.18146Oct.16Northampton.
Rice, Cradie17147Sept.18Pasquotank.
Riddick, Isabella19129Sept.18Pasquotank.
Rowsom, Clarelon C.1896Sept.18Washington.
Riddick, Daisy L.20150Sept.27Gates.
Rollins, Lorena15133Oct.9Chowan.
Sawyer, Minnie E.16135Sept.18Pasquotank.
Simpson, Hattie A.12135Sept.18Pasquotank.
Simpson, Ebner F.14159Sept.18Pasquotank.
Stephenson, Madie17101Oct.23Northampton.
Spellman, Maud R.16107Oct.23Currituck.





Names of Students.Age.Days Present.Date of Entrance.County.
Sumner, Maggie P.21120Nov.8Perquimans.
Smith, Bulah G.1813Nov.14Bertie.
Smith, Bessie A.2092Nov.11Pasquotank.
Sessoms, Pattie J.22120Oct.3Bertie.
Stephenson, Delia F.1977Jan.11Northampton.
Targinton, Fannie C.14155Sept.18Pasquotank.
Turner, Isaiah2638Sept.18Camden.
Taylor, Lucy B.1698Oct.9Bertie.
Toomer, Rosia1849Jan.4Chatham.
Whitehurst, Mary I.14153Sept.18Pasquotank.
Williams, Sallie A.20150Sept.18Norfolk, Va.
Woodhouse, Mary J.17152Sept.18Pasquotank.
Whitehurst, Ada E.1646Sept.18Pasquotank.
White, Paulina17131Oct.2Pasquotank.
Webb, Emma15143Oct.4Perquimans.
Young, Annie M. B.18133Oct.23Northampton.

FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS.

SCHOOL YEAR, SEPTEMBER 18, 1905, TO MAY 4, 1906.
Adams, Jennie E.1673Sept.18Pasquotank.
Alexander, Elizabeth16114Nov.7Halifax.
Barnes, Willie13154Sept.18Pasquotank.
Bright, Annie L.13121Sept.18Pasquotank.
Bright, Viola16144Sept.18Pasquotank.
Bright, Freddie10143Sept.18Pasquotank.
Blount, Mary O.19152Sept.18Chowan.
Banks, Mahalia19121Oct.2Pasquotank.
Bowser, Briettie T.1551Nov.21Tyrrell.
Bowser, Moranda L.1454Nov.21Tyrrell.
Beasley, Rosetta2071Jan.2Bertie.
Barnes, Nicye1673Jan.10Chowan.
Bell, Annie M.1787Jan.3Pasquotank.
Cartwright, Elenora17132Sept.18Pasquotank.
Cooper, Ethel E. S.16159Sept.18Washington.





Names of Students.Age.Days Present.Date of Entrance.County.
Calvert, Willie C.1860Nov.15Northampton.
Chatmon, James A.2250Jan.2Currituck.
Calvert, Mary L.1790Jan.2Northampton.
Coffey, Pauline A.1875Jan.8Beaufort.
Cherry, Rachel E.2174Jan.16Bertie.
Dozier, Drusilla17122Oct.23Pasquotank.
Deloatch, Cora L.1788Jan.2Northampton.
Deloatch, George T.2244Jan.2Northampton.
Duers, Duncan1772Jan.8Pasquotank.
Felton, Cassanda1528March26Gates.
Gregory, Elsie17156Sept.18Pasquotank.
Green, Emma I.15159Sept.18Martin.
Glover, Fred.15127Sept.18Pasquotank.
Gray, William B.1838Jan.3Hyde.
Gallop, Lethia1775Jan.8Currituck.
Gibson, George171Jan.8Pasquotank.
Hayes, Mamie L.18134Sept.25Bertie.
Hawkins, Hannah16130Oct.13Craven.
Hoskins, Katie18163Oct.23Gates.
Haley, Lizzie16119Oct.25Currituck.
Holly, Anna1777Jan.3Pasquotank.
Harris, Alethia R.1984Jan.3Chowan.
Hollowell, Christopher1836Jan.10Pasquotank.
Hurdle, Elnora1664Feb.1Gates.
Johnson, Fannie F.17119Sept.18Pasquotank.
Johnson, Daisy L.15159Sept.18Pasquotank.
Johnson, Alice F.16148Sept.18Norfolk, Va.
Jordan, Sylva22129Oct.9Beaufort.
Jones, Alexander2084Jan.2Perquimans.
Jenkins, Minnie S.1795Jan.2Bertie.
Jenkins, Dunkin W.1611Jan.22Bertie.
Lamb, Sophia M.14141Sept.18Pasquotank.
Lovick, Matilda1682Jan.8Pamlico.
Lassiter, Mollie B.1759Jan.15Hertford.





Names of Students.Age.Days Present.Date of Entrance.County.
Lane, Effie B.2037Feb.12Hertford.
McAlister, Lucile1777Sept.18Pasquotank.
Mebane, Frank J.13157Sept.18Pasquotank.
Mullin, Mamie E.17150Sept.18Currituck.
Maloy, Alice Lee13133Sept.18Pasquotank.
Outlaw, Katie L.16126Sept.22Bertie.
Overton, Roxana14125Sept.22Pasquotank.
Outlaw, Lucy1759Jan.2Bertie.
Outlaw, Mary G.1764Jan.25Hertford.
Outlaw, Priscilla1465Jan.25Hertford.
Parker, Mary L.15158Sept.18Pasquotank.
Pierce, Pearl H.16135Oct.16Bertie.
Parker, Sarah E.1599Nov.26Bertie.
Poole, Mary1846Feb.5Pasquotank.
Riddick, Kizzirah1673Sept.18Pasquotank.
Riddick, Charlie D.2157Oct.2Pasquotank.
Spruill, Bunnie16137Sept.18Washington.
Smallwood, Mary S.17120Oct.23Bertie.
Sharp, Emma J.2055Jan.19Hertford.
Sutton, William H.1542Feb.12Washington.
Snowden, Caroline1738March6Currituck.
Snowden, Rosanna1642March6Currituck.
Snowden, Seward1444March6Currituck.
Turner, Lucy13137Sept.18Pasquotank.
Tripp, Laura16133Oct.9Beaufort.
Vassar, Emma J.25124Oct.23Northampton.
Winfield, Rutherford R.15153Sept.18Pasquotank.
Woodhouse, Talmage14148Sept.18Pasquotank.
Whitehurst, Alice M.13156Sept.18Pasquotank.
Warren, Bennie14157Sept.25Pasquotank.
Westcott, Lurana B.14140Oct.2Currituck.
Wilson, Dennis15103Oct.2Pasquotank.
White, Hattie A.1977Nov.26Pasquotank.
White, Maggie1589Dec.4Pasquotank.





Names of Students.Age.Days Present.Date of Entrance.County.
White, Isadora16Dec.4Pasquotank.
Willie, Mettrah S.1852Jan.2Hyde.
Williams, Golden1740Jan.3Pasquotank.
Ward, Andrew J.1820Feb.5Bertie.

SUMMARY OF ENROLLMENT.

Normal high school7
Normal elementary—fourth year36
third year54
second year77
first year87
Primary school59
Total320





FAYETTEVILLE
COLORED NORMAL SCHOOL
1905-’06
(TWENTY-NINTH YEAR)

THE SESSION OF 1905-’06 BEGINS MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1906

LOCAL BOARD OF MANAGERS:
H. L. COOK, Chairman,H. W. LILLY, Treasurer,
Q. K. NIMMOCKS, Secretary,L. C. BRODGEN.
R. F. DEVANE.





TEACHERS:
E. E. SMITH, Principal.
J. F. K. SIMPSON,J. G. SMITH,
MISS E. J. COUNCIL,MISS I. G. JACOBS,
MISS E. W. JACOBS.





SOCIETIES.

The Normal School Literary Society meets once a week. The Normal Band of Hope, a temperance society, meets once a month. These societies are under the supervision and direction of the Normal School teachers.

BOARD.

Board costs $5 to $7 per month. Students who board in private families must conform to the regulations of the school and be subject to the advice and direction of the principal in the selection of boarding accommodations.





PAID CONTRIBUTIONS 1905-’06.

The following sums have been paid toward purchasing a site and erecting a building for the Fayetteville Normal School, May, 1905, to May, 1906:

BY COLORED PEOPLE.

G. W. McMillan, $1; James C. Gill, $5; Dennis Tysor, $1; Rev. J. S. Brown, $1; W. J. Peacock, $5; Fred. Fleming, $5; E. N. Williams, $20; Mrs. Annette Council, $5; Mrs. Rachel McAlister, $5; cash, $1; R. W. Thaggard, $2; Prof. E. Evans, $5; Samuel Hodges, $3; Rev. N. B. Dunham, $2; Rev. J. S. Settle, $5; W. H. McNeill, $5; C. A. Cogdell, $2; H. C. Tyson, $1; E. J. Campbell, $2; G. A. P. Wilkerson, $5; Joshua Barney, $10; S. L. McQueen, $5; proceeds concert, $40; proceeds concert. $21; Miss E. W. Jacobs, $5; Miss E. J. Council, $25; Miss I. G. Jacobs, $25; Prof. J. F. K. Simpson, $13; Prof. J. G. Smith, $25; E. E. Smith, $50; Miss Virginia T. Thurston, $2; cash, in different sums, $5; cash collected by E. N. Williams, $8.84. Total, $315.84.

BY WHITE PEOPLE.

J. W. Ingold, $5; J. B. Starr, $5; A. A. McKethan, $5; Bevil & Vanstory, $5; E. E. Gorham, $5; H. Lutterloh, $5; Bank of Fayetteville, $15; National Bank of Fayetteville, $15; F. W. Thornton, $5; W. E. Kindley, $5; Fayetteville Furniture Co., $5; Mike Folb, $5; W. F. Blount, $5; J. A. Oates, $5; S. H. McRae, Esq., $5; H. C. Bash, $5; Huske Hardware House, $25; Cape F. D. G. Co., $5; J. B. Troy, $5; W. H. Marsh, $5; W. M. Walker, $4; R. Burns, $5; The Armfield Company, $5; W. M. Martin, $5; J. H. Culbreth & Co., $5; E. H. Jennings, $2; Fayetteville Ice Company, $5; B. E. Sedbery Sons, $5; D. H. Ray, $5; J. L. Kennedy, $5; B. C. Gorham, $5; Shuford, Rogers & Co., $5; A. P. Johnson, $5; W. L. Hawley, $1; A. H. Slocumb, $1; J. C. Gorham, $1; A. L. McCaskell, $1; J. M. Goddard, $2; W. T. Sanders, $1; L. C. Wooten, $1; J. M. Lamb, $5. Total, $214.

SUMMARY OF PAID CONTRIBUTIONS.

From colored people$315.84
From white people214.00
Total$529.84





FOURTH-YEAR STUDENTS.

SCHOOL YEAR, SEPTEMBER 18, 1905, TO MAY 4, 1906.
Names of Students.Age.Days Present.Times Tardy.Date of Entrance.County.
Barney, Caroline161472Sept.18Cumberland.
Black, John W.191240Oct.9Robeson.
Coley, Robert F.241480Sept.18Wayne.
Fleming, John Walter241490Sept.25Sampson.
Jiggetts, Carrie B.181570Sept.18Robeson.
Jones, Estella161510Sept.18Bladen.
McAllister, Annette H.181570Sept.18Cumberland.
McLauchlin, William H.231470Oct.2Cumberland.
McMillan, George W.211240Oct.31Cumberland.

THIRD-YEAR STUDENTS.

SCHOOL YEAR, SEPTEMBER 18, 1905, TO MAY 4, 1906.
Bethea, Sarah E.201200Nov.6South Carolina
Cromartie, Lettie J.23830Oct.2Bladen.
Goodman, Flora K.151530Sept.19Cumberland.
Johnson, Lena A.211180Nov.6Cumberland.
Kennedy, Anthony T.21401March12Lenoir.
McKay, Douglass19500Sept.18Bladen.
McNeill, Ella J.161570Sept.18Bladen.
Melvin, Amerida C.141012Sept.19Cumberland.
Melvin, Dora201220Nov.6Cumberland.
Melvin, Nellie J.181220Nov.6Cumberland.
Moore, Coleman19500Sept.18Bladen.
Morrison, Christian J.23580Nov.20Cumberland.
Morrison, Geneva H.25680Nov.20Cumberland.
Newell, Aurelia C.211430Oct.2Bladen.
Parker, Olivia20350Oct.20Cumberland.
Patterson, Ezekiel K.20371March12Lenoir.
Williams, Emily E.21390Oct.20Cumberland.
Williams, Wayman15440Dec.25Cumberland.





SECOND-YEAR STUDENTS.

SCHOOL YEAR, SEPTEMBER 18, 1905, TO MAY 4, 1906.
Names of Students.Age.Days Present.Times Tardy.Date of Entrance.County.
Adams, Lillie M.17690Oct.18Cumberland.
Anderson, Mary A.191490Sept.18Cumberland.
Andrews, Hattie B.171470Sept.18Cumberland.
Armstrong, Minnie A.171260Oct.31Cumberland.
Avant, Alice18350Oct.18Cumberland.
Baldwin, Lizzie20470Oct.2Scotland.
Beatty, Hannah D.161381Sept.18Cumberland.
Beathea, R. L.21490Jan.22Dillon, S. C.
Blackman, Mary C.181350Sept.18Cumberland.
Boykin, William O.20420Jan.15Cumberland.
Brooks, Mary Hattie141370Oct.2Robeson.
Brown, Ida Moore191230Sept.18Warren.
Caple, Mary K.16830Nov.20Cumberland.
Cogdell, Daisy19640Oct.23Cumberland.
Covington, Susie A.17690Jan.8Cumberland.
Evans, Allen T.17500Nov.20Cumberland.
Evans, William19500Nov.20Cumberland.
Galbreath, Robert T.19430Jan.3Robeson.
Geddie, Marsana23530Nov.13Cumberland.
Holmes, Emma J.151500Sept.18Cumberland.
Hughes, Delilah18650Oct.9Cumberland.
Jackson, Lula23140Nov.20Cumberland.
Jiggetts, Willie151221Nov.13Robeson.
Johnson, Alice Lee18930Nov.13Dillon, S. C.
Kelly, William James22880Jan.3Bladen.
Mallett, Maud18620Feb.19Harnett.
McDonald, Effie J.18440Oct.23Cumberland.
McKay, Mary C.17800Nov.20Moore.
McKinnon, Wade21560Oct.23Robeson.
McLean, John B.19410Jan.3Clio, S. C.
McPhail, Katie171050Nov.20Cumberland.
McRae, Z. D.21390Nov.27Scotland.
Owens, Rena A.24640Oct.4Sampson.
Ray, Mary C.201110Nov.20Cumberland.





Names of Students.Age.Day Present.Times Tardy.Date of Entrance.County.
Reeves, Augusta18220April24Cumberland.
Robinson, Lilly191080Sept.27Bladen.
Smith, Carrie L.181080Nov.23Harnett.
Smith, Catherine24640Jan.3Richmond.
Smith, Elsie P.17510Oct.23Cumberland.
Smith, Lauretta171120Nov.14Harnett.
Smith, Thomas J.18770Oct.16Sampson.

FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS.

SCHOOL YEAR, SEPTEMBER 18, 1905, TO MAY 4, 1906.
Adams, Mary B.17781Nov.17Cumberland.
Adams, Lou Bertha151052Oct.30Cumberland.
Ashley, Mary K.181090Oct.9Cumberland.
Beatty, Isaac15993Sept.25Cumberland.
Berry, Bettie18620Jan.8Cumberland.
Brewington, Julius21340Nov.6Sampson.
Brewington, Lillie C.19400Nov.25Robeson.
Bryant, Maggie D.191040Nov.25Cumberland.
Byrd, Louisa16870Jan.3Cumberland.
Caple, Sarah14890Nov.21Cumberland.
Cogdell, Mamie151262Oct.2Cumberland.
Cole, Mary C.17650Jan.3Cumberland.
Crawford, Mollie16840Jan.3Richmond.
Crenshaw, Rosa Lee20571Jan.8Sampson.
David, Laura15590Oct.2Scotland.
Davis, James141570Sept.18Wake.
Dixon, Thomas20620Nov.6Cumberland.
Evans, Alice18851Nov.15Moore.
Evans, Eugene17820Nov.6Cumberland.
Evans, Mary A.18820Nov.6Cumberland.
Evans, Mary J.141040Oct.2Cumberland.
Evans, Willie18820Oct.6Cumberland.
Freeman, Pearson15370Jan.3Cumberland.
Graham, Lydia20850Nov.15Cumberland.





Names of Students.Age.Days Present.Times Tardy.Date of Entrance.County.
Groton, Eliza22150Sept.18Cumberland.
Hendon, Ann Eliza151251Oct.9Cumberland.
Hurst, Lillie E.121491Sept.25Cumberland.
Hurst, Nellie J.17670Oct.9Cumberland.
Johnson, Rebecca15560Sept.18Cumberland.
Kelly, Maggie251200Nov.6Cumberland.
Kelly, Robert17550Dec.18Cumberland.
Lane, Sarah18690Nov.14Bladen.
Mainor, Irvin J.15950Oct.16Cumberland.
Manning, John21451Jan.15Cumberland.
McAlister, Nancy V.161070Nov.21Robeson.
McDonald, Sandy261162Sept.19Cumberland.
McKay, Josephine19242Nov.21Cumberland.
McNeill, Fannie18612Oct.30Cumberland.
Miller, Cicero15960Oct.16Cumberland.
Miller, John S.17750Oct.16Cumberland.
Miller, Maggie B.151560Sept.18Cumberland.
Monroe, Nina17220Feb.5Cumberland.
Morgan, Atha11570Feb.12Cumberland.
Mumford, L. J.20730Nov.6Richmond.
Murphy, John14830Sept.25Cumberland.
Murphy, Missouri16600Oct.12Cumberland.
Parker, Louvinia15180April9Cumberland.
Ray, Joseph15430Jan.3Robeson.
Roberts, Hattie161410Sept.18Cumberland.
Robinson, May J.161180Nov.6Cumberland.
Robinson, Vinie18620Nov.16Bladen.
Ross, L. M.19590Dec.4Cumberland.
Sampson, Cleveland19570Oct.30Sampson.
Scurlock, Julia17860Nov.21Robeson.
Simmons, Lany E.19380Jan.3Robeson.
Smith, Edna14610Jan.29Robeson.
Smith, Pearler151560Sept.18Robeson.
Spearman, Bertha161220Nov.14Cumberland.
Thames, Alberta181490Sept.18Cumberland.





Names of Students.Age.Days Present.Times Tardy.Date of Entrance.County.
Thames, Clandia1880Sept.18Cumberland.
Thames, John R.14930Nov.15Cumberland.
Thurston, Virginia T.15802Jan.3Cumberland.
Toomer, Effie171480Sept.25Cumberland.
Underwood, Carrie181200March6Cumberland.
Walker, Janie151042Sept.25Cumberland.
Walker, Mamie151402Oct.9Cumberland.
Whitted, Carrie L.15570Jan.3Bladen.
Whitted, John M.20140Jan.15Bladen.
Williams, Alice D.16520Sept.18Cumberland.
Williams, Melissa16160Nov.13Cumberland.

STUDENTS NOT INCLUDED IN THE FOREGOING
CLASSIFICATION.

Name.Age.County.
Andrews, Rena15Cumberland.
Baldwin, Willie16Robeson.
Brown, L. M.17Cumberland.
Carroll, I. M.21Robeson.
Fairley, Celia14Moore.
Halliday, A. T.19Cumberland.
McKinnon, Blanche16Robeson.
McKinnon, Lillie15Robeson.
McLaurin, Ora B.16Robeson.
Smith, G. W.18Cumberland.
Townsend, Clarence21South Carolina





RECORD OF STUDENTS, 1905-’06.

Number of Students.Males.Females.Total.
Whose parents are farmers3996135
Whose parents are mechanics71118
Whose parents operate saw-mills112
Whose parents are merchants213
Whose parents are preachers5914
Whose parents follow other occupations235
Who paid their entire school expenses729
Who paid their school expenses in part11617
Who were not absent a day for any cause276390
Who were absent only on account of sickness102131
Enrolled in fourth year549
Enrolled in third year71118
Enrolled in second year122941
Enrolled in first year185270
Enrolled in non-classified Normal3811
Total enrollment in Normal45104149
Enrollment in Practice School61106167
Grand total106210316





SLATER STATE
COLORED NORMAL SCHOOL
(WINSTON-SALEM)
1905-’06
(ELEVENTH YEAR)

THE SESSION OF 1906-’07 BEGINS OCTOBER 1, 1906

LOCAL BOARD OF MANAGERS:
H. E. FRIES, President,W. A. BLAIR, Treasurer,
S. G. ATKINS, Secretary,A. H. ELLER,
H. R. STARBUCK.





TEACHERS:
C. G. O'KELLY, Principal.
JOHN W. WOODY, Business Manager.
MISS IDA E. HOUSTON, Matron.
F. M. KENNEDY,P. J. WILLIAMS,
JOHN C. WILLIAMSON,O. R. POPE,
MISS F. B. WATKINS,MISS HATTIE B. HOLLEY,
MISS L. M. HAYES,MISS LILLIAN L. PULLIAM,
JOHN A. CROOM.





SOCIETIES.

The Eureka Literary Society for young men and the Garrett Literary Society for young women have regular meetings. There are also a Young Men's Christian Association, a Young Women's Temperance Union and a Christian Endeavor Society, which hold regular meetings and are helpful organizations in the promotion of good morals.

EQUIPMENT.

The Slater School has considerable equipment for industrial work. Cooking, sewing, farming, dairying and gardening are taught.

EXPENSES.

Board (payable in advance), per month$6.00
Washing.75
Fuel.75
Incidental fee for the school year1.00

All students must furnish their own lights.

All students must bring their own bedding, including quilts, blankets, sheets and pillow-cases.

All students must pay at least one month's expenses before they can be enrolled.

Students must pay for any damage to furniture or buildings resulting from carelessness or violence.

OTHER INFORMATION.

Information not contained in this catalogue will be cheerfully furnished by the principal, C. G. O'Kelly, Winston, N. C.





HOW SOME STUDENTS PAY THEIR EXPENSES.

Hugh R. Mosley, Rockingham County, worked on a brick-yard to secure enough money to enter Slater in the winter of 1902. During first vacation he worked on a railroad in West Virginia. Has since paid his own way by all kinds of manual labor. Graduated May, 1906. He is 23 years old.

W. E. Patterson, Mecklenburg County, is 21 years old; is in the first Normal class. He was born and reared on a farm; picked peas and cotton for his neighbors to get money enough to come to Slater two years ago. He has been working on the school farm and making his own way.

Charles W. Roseman, Lincoln County; born 19 years ago. Carried mail on a star route to get railroad fare and clothes with which to leave home. Entered the primary school at Slater in 1902. He has steadily worked on the farm and at other work to make his own way. He is now a member of the regular First-year Normal Class.

Belle Ballard, 18 years old; born in Camden, S. C.; entered Slater in January, 1904; has worked at Slater Hospital laundry, in the Slater kitchen and at other work and has made her way for two years. She is now in the First-year Normal Class and thinks she can continue in school until she graduates. She pays all her expenses.

Cornelius Redd, 17 years old; graduated in 1906; has worked in a tobacco factory and made money enough to pay his expenses for five years.

M. Q. Cele, 26 years old; born in Africa; he is learning our language and writes a fairly good hand. His story in his own words follows:

My home is in South eastern part of Africa. When the white missionary first came over to the part of Africa where I came from I was very young, but he lived till I was grown enough to know him. So before he was there a long time my father became civilized, and he was told of this country and its school, so he made up his mind to send me over here. Although the expenses were so high to pay my way from Africa to here we knew that we can make up enough to bring me over here. We didn't know that the school shall cost me any thing since we didn't have any body to tell us that. So after all my father starded me for America. I reached New York City May 25, 1901. I stop there one week, the white good friend I stoped with, he learned of Slater so he sent me to Slater School. When I first come here, three things discourage me badly that many times I wish that I never knew of this country. First was I couldn't talk English. Second I didn't have funds to pay my way in school. Third I came from a place where a man don't have to work, and so I never work





before I come here but when I find that I must work if I must live in this country so I make up my mind that I am going to work, so now I can do as much work as any man of my size and also I can talk little English and write such as I have written in this letter. I have been making my own way through school every since I came here. The way I get my schooling I work hard during vacation and two years ago I was fortunate to get a job in the city that I work at every afternoon when school duties are over I have to go there for cleaning up, and in that way I get help. And I hope to do that till I get through the school then return home to Africa.

MADIKANE QANDIYANE CELE.

Slater School,

Winston-Salem,

N. C.





WHAT SLATER STUDENTS ARE DOING THIS SUMMER.

CLASS OF 1905.
Names of Pupils.Present Occupation.Post-office.
Biggers, Paul A.TeachingWaxhaw, N. C.
Pannell, John H.FactoryWinston-Salem, N. C.
Pringle, JohnIn schoolLincoln University.
Reynolds, Joseph H.FactoryWinston-Salem, N. C.
Ashe, Annie M.In schoolWinston-Salem, N. C.
Blackburn, NettieIn schoolWinston-Salem, N. C.
Hairston, Mattie B.TeachingLexington, N. C.
Hunt, MinnieAt homeWinston-Salem, N. C.
Lewis-Hairston, SallieTeachingWalnut Cove, N. C.
Smith, EstherIn schoolRaleigh, N. C.
Wright, SelinaAt homeWinston-Salem, N. C.
HIGH SCHOOL PUPILS 1905-’06.
Ashe, Annie M.At homeRaleigh, N. C.
Blackburn, Nettie E.At homeWinston-Salem, N. C.
Brown, RosaWith relativesNew York City.
Peace, Lula J.At homeRaleigh, N. C.
FOURTH-YEAR PUPILS 1905-’06.
Battle, Lizzie E.Domestic serviceSalisbury, N. C.
Carr, RobertaAt homeWinston-Salem, N. C.
Diggs, Jessie E.At homeWinston-Salem, N. C.
Diggs, James T.CarpenterWinston-Salem, N. C.
Hairston, ChambersFactoryWinston-Salem, N. C.
Hauser, Allie M.At home on a farmYadkin County.
Mosley, Sallie M.At home on a farmMadison, N. C.
Mosley, Hugh R.At home on a farmMadison, N. C.
Phifer, Maria E.Domestic serviceSalisbury, N. C.
Redd, W. CorneliusFactoryWinston-Salem, N. C.





THIRD-YEAR PUPILS 1905-’06.
Names of Pupils.Present Occupation.Post-office.
Atkins, Russel C.Excelsior factoryWinston-Salem, N. C.
Beck, AnnieAt home on a farmBethania, N. C.
Cele, M. Q.FactoryWinston-Salem, N. C.
Clark, Lillian N.At home on a farmYadkin County.
Fuller, JessieDomestic serviceWinston-Salem, N. C.
Hanes, EmmaAt homeWinston-Salem, N. C.
Hancock, Radford C.Clerk in storeWinston-Salem, N. C.
Hauser, MamieAt home on a farmYadkin County.
Hauser, AnnieAt homeColumbus, Ohio.
Jarratt, Maggie L.At home on a farmYadkin County.
Kennedy, MabelAt homeWinston-Salem, N. C.
Lopp, NettieAt homeThomasville, N. C.
Mason, Lucy B.At home on a farmRaleigh, N. C.
Mason, Nancy D.At home on a farmDavie County.
Mitchell, VirginiaAt homeWinston-Salem, N. C.
Pyne, SalenaAt homeGoldsboro, N. C.
Ramseur, Vivian C.CarpenterWinston-Salem, N. C.
Turner, Elmer E.Shoe-makerWinston-Salem, N. C.
Welch, CelestiaAt home on a farmRockingham County.
Willis, AdaAt homeWinston-Salem, N. C.
SECOND-YEAR PUPILS 1905-’06.
Atkins, Harvey B.Excelsior factoryWinston-Salem, N. C.
Champlain, Lulu M.At homeWinston-Salem, N. C.
Collett, BessieAt homeMorganton, N. C.
Covington, CarrieAt home on a farmWinston-Salem, N. C.
Diggs, BelleAt homeWinston-Salem, N. C.
Eaton, BunaDomestic serviceWinston-Salem, N. C.
Galloway, Minnie L.Domestic serviceWinston-Salem, N. C.
Graham, Francis D.At homeWinston-Salem, N. C.
Green, Lillie M.Domestic serviceWinston-Salem, N. C.
Hall, CleoAt homeWinston-Salem, N. C.
Henderson, Ernest E.At homeLiberty, N. C.
Moyer, Robert S.DrayingWinston-Salem, N. C.
Oaks, WarnerFactoryWinston-Salem, N. C.





Names of Pupils.Present Occupation.Post-office.
Pitts, EthelAt homeGuilford College, N. C.
Reynolds, RobertaAt homeWinston-Salem, N. C.
Scales, JamesDrayingMadison, N. C.
Sheffield, OrvilleSchool farmWinston-Salem, N. C.
Slaughter, MattieAt homeReidsville, N. C.
Tucker, BessieDomestic serviceAsheville, N. C.
Williams, Harry B.At home on a farmDavie County.
Williamson, Eliza J.Domestic serviceDavidson, N. C.
FIRST-YEAR PUPILS 1905-’06.
Ballard, BelleDomestic serviceWinston-Salem, N. C.
Bingham, HoracePark guardWinston-Salem, N. C.
Bridges, WalterFactoryWinston-Salem, N. C.
Chambers, LoisAt homeStatesville, N. C.
Copney, AlonzoHotel waiterWinston-Salem, N. C.
Evans, LenaAt homeMadison, N. C.
Garden, Clifton S.At homeMorganton, N. C.
Hairston, SusieAt home on a farmPine Hall, N. C.
Harrison, John L.DrayingWinston-Salem, N. C.
Hobson, CarvieRailroadWinston-Salem, N. C.
Haywood, Colonel Q.At home on a farmGarner, N. C.
Johnson, WilliamIn serviceColumbus, Ohio.
Koger, PattieAt home on a farmBethania, N. C.
Lynch, DolphusAt homeMorganton, N. C.
McNeely, J. P.At home on a farmKing's Mountain, N.C.
Noisette, BelleDomestic serviceCharlotte, N. C.
Patterson, W. E.School farmWinston-Salem, N. C.
Ramseur, Thomas A.PaintingWinston-Salem, N. C.
Ray, IdaAt homeWinston-Salem, N. C.
Reynolds, ElsieAt homeWinston-Salem, N. C.
Reynolds, EffieAt homeWinston-Salem, N. C.
Robinson, NettieAt homeAsheville, N. C.
Roseman, CharlesSchool dairyWinston-Salem, N. C.
Russel, CarrieAt homeAsheville, N. C.
Smith, BuretteAt home on a farmHiddenite, N. C.





Names of Pupils.Present Occupation.Post-office.
Vaughn, CoraAt home on a farmPine Hall, N. C.
Vaughn, PearlieAt home on a farmPine Hall, N. C.
Wilson, WhitlockAt homeVirginia.
Wall, PeterAt home on a farmWalnut Cove, N. C.
Winchester, BerthaAt homeWinston-Salem, N. C.





PUPILS 1905-’06.

HIGH SCHOOL PUPILS.
SCHOOL YEAR, SEPTEMBER 28, 1905, TO MAY 9, 1906.
Names of Pupils.Age.Days Present.Times Tardy.Entered.County.
Ashe, Annie M.201491Oct.9Wake.
Blackburn, Nettie E.2014615Sept.28Forsyth.
Brown, Rosa191352Oct.23Forsyth.
Peace, Lula J.171360Oct.23Wake.
FOURTH-YEAR PUPILS.
SCHOOL YEAR, SEPTEMBER 28, 1905, TO MAY 9, 1906.
Battle, Lizzie E.201510Sept.28Craven.
Carr, Roberta191352Sept.28Forsyth.
Diggs, Jessie E.15606Sept.28Forsyth.
Diggs, James T.1611311Sept.28Forsyth.
Hairston, Chambers181060Oct.26Forsyth.
Hauser, Allie M.201560Sept.28Yadkin.
Mosley, Sallie M.181560Sept.28Rockingham.
Mosley, Hugh R.231421Oct.16Rockingham.
Phifer, Maria E.231530Sept.28Lincoln.
Redd, W. Cornelius171531Sept.28Forsyth.
THIRD-YEAR PUPILS.
SCHOOL YEAR, SEPTEMBER 28, 1905, TO MAY 9, 1906.
Atkins, Russel C.151530Sept.28Forsyth.
Beck, Annie211320Oct.13Forsyth.
Cele, M. Q.261500Oct.4Africa.
Clark, Lillian N.181510Sept.28Yadkin.
Fuller, Jessie241270Sept.28Forsyth.
Hanes, Emma1930Oct.10Forsyth.
Hancock, Redford C.23400Oct.19Virginia.
Hauser, Mamie191560Sept.28Yadkin.
Hauser, Annie171562Sept.28Forsyth.





Names of Pupils.Age.Days Present.Times Tardy.Entered.County.
Jarratt, Maggie L.181550Sept.28Yadkin.
Kennedy, Mabel181541Sept.28Tennessee.
Lopp, Nettie171338Oct.24Davidson.
Mason, Lucy B.181091Sept.28Wake.
Mason, Nancy D.19620Jan.12Davie.
Mitchell, Virginia16351Oct.30Forsyth.
Pyne, Salena17861Oct.2Wayne.
Ramseur, Vivian C.241162Nov.16Lincoln.
Turner, Elmer E.2014511Oct.2Forsyth.
Welch, Celestia211510Sept.28Rockingham.
Willis, Ada191427Sept.28Forsyth.
SECOND-YEAR PUPILS.
SCHOOL YEAR, SEPTEMBER 28, 1905, TO MAY 9, 1906.
Atkins, Harvey B.131430Oct.17Forsyth.
Champlain, Lulu M.181540Sept.28Forsyth.
Collett, Bessie171432Oct.16Catawba.
Covington, Carrie181160Nov.13Forsyth.
Diggs, Belle131396Sept.28Forsyth.
Eaton, Buna18931Nov.21Davie.
Galloway, Minnie L.191520Sept.28Forsyth.
Graham, Frances D.171160Sept.28Forsyth.
Green, Lillie M.181551Sept.28Buncombe.
Hall, Cleo13910Dec.4Forsyth.
Henderson, Ernest F.161292Oct.20Alamance.
Moyer, Robert S.191420Oct.5Virginia.
Oaks, Warner151330Oct.5Forsyth.
Pitts, Ethel171131Sept.28Guilford.
Reynolds, Roberta171190Nov.20Forsyth.
Scales, James20841Jan.8Rockingham
Sheffield, Orville15751Feb.1Michigan.
Slaughter, Mattie14442Nov.6Forsyth.
Tucker, Bessie171420Oct.16Buncombe.
Williams, Harry B.19290Nov.22Davie.
Williamson, Eliza J.221160Nov.20Mecklenburg.





FIRST-YEAR PUPILS.
SCHOOL YEAR, SEPTEMBER 28, 1905, TO MAY 9, 1906.

Names of Pupils.Age.Days Present.Times Tardy.Entered.County.
Ballard, Belle181523Sept.28South Carolina
Bingham, Horace19583Oct.20Forsyth.
Bridges, Walter17932Dec.29Forsyth.
Chambers, Lois161552Sept.28Iredell.
Copney, Alonzo16570Jan.11Buncombe.
Evans, Lena18862Oct.9Rockingham.
Garden, Clifton S.181183Oct.18Burke.
Hairston, Susie21670Oct.3Stokes.
Harrison, John L.20600Nov.6Mecklenburg.
Hobson, Carvie181532Sept.28Maryland.
Haywood, Colonel Q.22650Jan.8Wake.
Johnson, William17970Oct.3Davie.
Koger, Pattie19920Jan.2Forsyth.
Lynch, Dolphus17420Oct.18Burke.
McNeely, J. P.281232Sept.28Gaston.
Noisette, Belle181021Oct.30Mecklenburg.
Patterson, W. E.211541Sept.28Mecklenburg.
Ramseur, Thomas A.211463Sept.28Lincoln.
Ray, Ida151500Sept.28Forsyth.
Reynolds, Elsie161003Nov.20Forsyth.
Reynolds, Effie141104Nov.20Forsyth.
Robinson, Nettie141290Nov.3Buncombe.
Roseman, Charles191221Nov.13Lincoln.
Russel, Carrie171362Oct.16Buncombe.
Smith, Burette20360Oct.23Alexander.
Vaughn, Cora171461Oct.3Stokes.
Vaughn, Pearlie16820Oct.3Stokes.
Wall, Peter181046Oct.3Stokes.
Wilson, Whitlock171470Oct.7Virginia.
Winchester, Bertha161386Oct.16Forsyth.





RECORD OF PUPILS, 1905-’06—HIGH SCHOOL AND NORMAL.
Boys.Girls.Total.
Number whose parents are farmers91827
Number whose parents are preachers5712
Number whose parents are doctors112
Number whose parents have some other occupation162844
Total315485

SUMMARY OF ENROLLMENT.
Enrolled in High School4
Enrolled in Normal School81
Enrolled in Primary School232
Enrolled in Night School31
Special pupils17
Total enrollment365









DECREASE IN GENERAL ILLITERACY, 1880-1900.
1880.1890.1900.
Total population 10 years of age and over959,9511,147,4461,342,669
White608,806754,857904,978
Colored351,145392,589437,691
Total illiterates 10 years of age and over463,975409,703386,251
White192,032173,722175,907
Colored271,943235,981210,344
Percentage of illiteracy48.335.728.7
White31.523.0119.5
Colored77.460.1147.6

DECREASE IN ILLITERACY, BY SEX, 1880-1900.
1880.1890.1900.Decrease in 20 Years.
Male illiterates 10 years of age and over.213,196184,506181,22831,968, or 15 per ct.
White84,06475,72682,4921,572, or 1.87 per ct.
Colored129,132108,78098,73630,396, or 23.5 per ct.
Female illiterates 10 years of age and over.250,779225,197205,02345,756, or 18.2 per ct.
White107,96897,99693,41514,553, or 13.4 per ct.
Colored142,811127,201111,60831,203, or 21.8 per ct.

DECREASE IN SCHOOL-AGE ILLITERACY, 1880-1900.
1880.1890.1900.Decrease.
Total illiterates 10 to 20, inclusive173,386118,000105,00468,382, or 39.4 per ct.
White75,59549,47949,61625,979, or 34.3 per ct.
Colored97,79168,32155,38842,403, or 43.3 per ct.

Every son, whatever may be his expectations as to fortune, ought to be so educated that he can superintend some part of the complicated machinery of social life; and every daughter ought to be so educated that she can answer the claims of humanity, whether these claims require the labor of the head or the labor of the hand.—Horace Mann.





“Every human being has an absolute, indefensible right to an education; and there is the correlative duty of government to see that the means of education are provided for all. Government protects childhood, but childhood has more than physical wants. Infanticide is prohibited, but life is not worth living unless instruction supervenes. Otherwise, no true life, no real manhood. It is a travesty on manhood to make a brutal prize-fighter its representative. Education is due from government to children. The school is supplementary to family, to churches, in the province of education. Society rests upon education in its comprehensive meaning. Man must be educated out of, lifted above animal impulses—a state of nature—and made to respect social forms, the rights and duties of persons and property. Education is to prepare the individual for life in social institutions. Crime and ignorance and non-productiveness are antagonistic to society. . . . The first necessity of civilization is a system of universal education.”—Dr. J. L. M. Curry.

“The strength of every community is dependent upon the average of the intelligence of that community, and this intelligence is dependent upon the education of the entire mass and not of the few.”—Charles B. Aycock.

“To close the door of hope against any child within the borders of the State, whatever be his race or condition, by deliberately removing him from the possibility of securing such training as will fit him for the life he has to live, is un-Christian, un-democratic and un-American.”—Gov. N. C. Blanchard.

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