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St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Clinton, North Carolina

Date: Dec. 05 1954 | Identifier: BX5980.C6 S26 1954
St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Clinton, North Carolina : dedication of St. Paul's parish house and memorials and celebration of the 124th anniversary St. Paul's organization as a parish and the 100th anniversary St. Paul's admission to the diocese, second Sunday in Advent, December 5, 1954. [Clinton, N.C. :|bSt. Paul's Episcopal Church,|c1954] 18 p. ;|c22 cm. Cover title. "The Rt. Rev. Thomas H. Wright, D.D., bishop of the Diocese of East Carolina." more...
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St. Paul's Episcopal ChurchClinton, North Carolina
Dedication of St. Paul's Parish House and Memorials and Celebration of the 124th Anniversary St. Paul's Organization as a Parish and the 100th Anniversary St. Paul's Admission to the Diocese SECOND SUNDAY IN ADVENT December 5, 1954 THE RT. REV. THOMAS H. WRIGHT, D. D., Bishop of the Diocese of East Carolina




Senior Warden: Edwin W. Kerr (1954)

Junior Warden: Mossette L. Butler (1954)

VESTRYHerbert L. Aman (1954)Frank Neely, Treas. (1955)C.B. Taylor, Jr. (1954)Edwin E. Butler (1956)William S. Gill, Jr. (1955)L. Chevis Kerr, Sr. (1956)Clarence Kirven, Jr. (1955)Luther McKinnon (1956)W. Fleet Moore, Sec. (1955)Richard L. Kerr (1956)

LAY LEADERSAlgernon L. ButlerClaude MooreL. Chevis KerrA. McL. Graham

Edwin W. Kerr

CHURCH SCHOOL

Superintendent, Luther McKinnon; Sec. & Treas., Wm. S. Gill, Jr.

Teachers: Mrs. Edwin Kerr, Mrs. Algernon L. Butler, L.C. Kerr, Sr., Edwin E. Butler, Mrs. F.B. Johnson, Mrs. R. C. Mathews.

WOMAN'S AUXILIARY

Mary Graham Chapter: Mrs. Clement C. Bell, President: Mrs. Donald Evans, Secretary; Mrs. Clarence Kirven, Treasurer.

Mary Anna Partrick Chapter: Mrs. L.C. Kerr, Sr., President; Mrs. H. R. Birch, Jr., Vice-President: Mrs. Fleet Moore, Secretary: Mrs. Edwin Kerr, Treasurer.

ALTAR GUILD

Mrs. Donald Evans, President: Mrs. Annie Ferrell, Sec. & Treas.

MEN OF ST. PAUL'S CHURCH

Randolph C. Mathews, President; Frank Neely, Secretary & Treas.

YOUNG PEOPLE'S SERVICE LEAGUE

Gabriel Joe Barbrey, President; Thyra Debnam, Secretary & Treas.

Randolph C. Mathews, Mrs. H.R. Birch, Adult Advisors

ANNIVERSARY COMMITTEEAlgernon L. Butler, ChairmanMrs. F.B. JohnsonL. Chevis KerrMrs. Katharine S. MelvinMrs. Randolph C. MathewsMrs. William S. Gill, Jr.

THE SECOND SUNDAY IN ADVENTDecember 5, 1954

9:45 A. M.
HOLY COMMUNION

Celebrant: Bishop WrightCollect for Purityp. 67Collect, Epistle and Gospelpp. 92-93Nicene Creedp. 71General Confessionp. 75Prayer of Consecrationp. 80Gloria in Excelsisp. 84

11:00 A. M.
DEDICATION AND ANNIVERSARY SERVICE

Organ Prelude: “Serenade”Fr. SchubertProcessional Hymn: “Rejoice, rejoice”# 4

MORNING PRAYER

Opening sentencespp. 3-4Venite (#609)p. 9Psalm 67p.418Psalm 111p.482First LessonIsaiah: Chapter 55Te Deum laudamus (#613)p. 10Second LessonSecond Timothy: Chapter 3Jubilate Deo (#644)p. 15Apostle's Creedp. 15Versicles and Responsesp. 16Collect for 2d Sunday in Adventp. 92Collects and Prayerspp. 77 ff.Hymn: “Come Holy Ghost, Creator blest”# 218(Sing first two stanzas only)THE ORDER OF CONFIRMATIONP. 296Hymn (Sing last three stanzas of #218)SermonThe Rt. Rev. Thomas H. Wright

DEDICATION OF AIMS AND RECEIVING BASON

Let us pray: Oh God, who by Thy Blessed Son hast sanctified and transfigured the use of our material things, bless with the Presence of Thy hallowed grace this Alms and Receiving Bason, which we desire now to set apart in the use of Thy Holy Church, through the same Jesus Christ, our Lord.

In loving memory of Walter Raleigh Noe, I dedicate this Alms and Receiving Bason in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost. Amen.






Offertory:

At the presentation of the Alms—-(Doxology) #139

Benediction:

Recessional Hymn: “Onward, Christian soldiers”—#557

Organ Postlude: “Creation” ——- Franz Joseph Haydn

(NOTE: Immediately after the service in the Church the congregation, led by the crucifer, choir, clergy and Bishop, will march in procession to the Parish House where the corner stone will be laid and the Parish House and memorials dedicated.)

THE LAYING OF THE CORNER STONE AND DEDICATIONS

(OFFICIANT, The Rt. Rev. Thomas H. Wright, Bishop of the Diocese of East Carolina)

The Bishop and the people being assembled before the New Parish House, the persons appointed shall deposit the Foundation Symbols in the Corner Stone as follows:

1. THE CROSS: Mr. Edwin W. Kerr, Senior Warden

Layman. I place the Cross of Christ in this foundation; In the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost. Amen.

Officiant. God forbid that I should glory save in the Cross;

People. For other foundation can no man lay than is laid, which is Jesus Christ.

2. THE HOLY BIBLE: Mr. Mossette L. Butler, Jr. Warden

Layman. I place the Holy Bible in this foundation; In the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost. Amen.

Officiant. Seek ye out the Book of the Lord and read;

People. For we are built upon the foundation of the Apostles and Prophets, Jesus Christ himself being the chief Corner Stone.

3. THE BOOK OF COMMON PRAYER: Mr. Algernon L. Butler

Layman. I place the Book of Common Prayer in this foundation; In the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost. Amen.

Officiant. Prayer shall be made ever unto him, and daily shall he be praised;

People. That we may continue steadfastly in the Apostle's doctrine and fellowship, in the breaking of bread, and in prayers.

4. A HISTORY OF ST. PAUL'S CHURCH: Mr. L. C. Kerr Layman. I place the History of St. Paul's Church in this foundation; In the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost. Amen.

Officiant. A book of remembrances was written before him for them that feared the Lord, and that thought upon his Name;

People. This shall be written for those who come after, and the people which shall be born shall praise the Lord.

Antiphon

From PSAIM 118. Confitemini Domino.

O GIVE thanks unto the Lord, for he is gracious:* because his mercy endureth for ever.

Let Israel now confess that he is gracious, * and that his mercy endureth for ever.

Let the house of Aaron now confess, * that his mercy endureth for ever.

Yea, let them now that fear the Lord confess, * that his mercy endureth for ever.

The Lord is my strength, and my song; * and is become my salvation.

The voice of joy and health is in the dwellings of the righteous; * the right hand of the Lord bringeth mighty things to pass.

The right hand of the Lord hath the pre-eminence; * the right hand of the Lord bringeth mighty things to pass.

Open me the gates of righteousness, * that I may go into them, and give thanks unto the Lord.

This is the gate of the Lord, * the righteous shall enter into it.

I will thank thee; for thou hast heard me, * and art become my salvation.

The same stone which the builders refused, * is become the head-stone in the corner.

This is the Lord's doing. * and it is marvellous in our eyes.






This is the day which the Lord hath made: * we will rejoice and be glad in it.

Help me now, O Lord: * O Lord, send us now prosperity.

O give thanks unto the Lord; for he is gracious, and his mercy endureth for ever.

Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Ghost;*

As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.

(Then the Officiant shall say,)

O LORD, Jesus Christ, Son of the living God, who art the brightness of the Father's glory, and the express image of his person, the one foundation, and the chief corner stone; Bless what we do now in laying this stone in thy Name, and be thou, we beseech thee, the beginning, the increase, and the consummation of this work, which is undertaken to the glory of thy Name; who with the Father and the Holy Ghost, livest and reignest, one God, world without end. Amen.

(Then, assisted by the builders, the Officiant shall lay the stone, and striking it three times with a trowel, shall say,)

I LAY this Corner Stone: In the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost. Amen.

O GOD, who laid the foundations of the earth; make sure this corner stone and the foundation of the Parish House now built in Thy Name, and bless all who took part in this holy undertaking, to the glory of thy holy name; through Jesus Christ our Lord, to whom, with thee and the Holy Ghost, be all honour and glory, world without end. Amen.

HERE let the true faith and fear of God, with brotherly love, ever abide; and may this place now set apart with prayer, and with the invocation and praise of the Most Holy Name, be evermore the Temple, School and Meeting Place of the Most High God; through Jesus Christ our Lord, to whom, with the Father and the Holy Ghost, be all honour and glory, world without end. Amen.

PRAISE ye the Lord, because the foundation of the House of the Lord is laid!

And the Choir and people shall sing with a loud voice: ALLELUIA! ALLELUIA! ALLELUIA!

The Lord be with you; * and with thy spirit.

Let us pray:

O AIMIGHTY GOD, who hast built thy Church upon the foundation of the Apostles and Prophets, Jesus Christ himself being the head corner stone; Grant us so to be joined together in unity of spirit by their doctrine, that we may be made an holy temple acceptable unto thee; through the same Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

DEDICATION OF RECTOR'S STUDY

Let us pray: Oh God, the Holy Ghost, the Teacher who leads us into all truth, Grant us so to give attention to reading, to exhortation, to doctrine, and so to meditate in Thy law that we may be filled with the knowledge of Thy will, in all wisdom and spiritual understanding, through Jesus Christ, our Lord.

In loving memory of Marion Butler and Florence Faison Butler, I dedicate this Rector's study in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost. Amen.

DEDICATION OF WINDOW

Let us pray: Oh Lord, who has filled the world with the radiance of Thy glory, bless, we beseech Thee, this Memorial Window, which we dedicate to Thee, and grant that as the light shines through it, in many colors, so our lights may show forth the beauty of Thy manifold gifts of grace, through Jesus Christ, our Lord.

In loving memory of Elizabeth Bizzell Butler, I dedicate this Memorial Window in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost. Amen.

ANNIVERSARY PRAYER FOR ORGANIZATION OF PARISH

Let us pray: Almighty God, our Heavenly Father, we commemorate this day the organization of St. Paul's






Parish, Clinton. We are grateful to Thee for the sturdy sense, the unshaken convictions, the power of patiently enduring hardships of our Forefathers. May we transmit to our children the Faith which made them strong. May we most thankfully appreciate the blessings which they guarded and which some of them gave their lives to keep. For this priceless horitage of those who have gone before, and which is our solemn responsibility to hand down unimpaired to those who shall take our places, may we show forth our gratitude, not with lips only but in our lives, through Jesus Christ, our Lord. Amen.

ANNIVERSARY PRAYER FOR ADMISSION OF PARISH
TO DIOCESE

Let us Pray: Almighty God, our Heavenly Father, we commemorate this day the admission of this Parish to the Diocese of East Carolina. Help us to continue to build bravely, to live courageously, and to die fearlessly in the Faith and in the spirit of our Lord, Jesus Christ. Amen.

THE COLLECT FOR ST. PAUL THE APOSTLE

O GOD, who, through the preaching of the blessed Apostle Saint Paul, hast caused the light of the Gospel to shine throughout the world; Grant, we beseech thee, that we, having his wonderful conversion in remembrance, may show forth our thankfulness unto thee for the same, by following the holy doctrine which he taught; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

O Almighty and Everlasting God, who dost govern all things in heaven and earth, mercifully hear our prayers, and grant unto us in this Parish and Congregation all things that are needful; strengthen and confirm the faithful; visit and relieve the sick; bless and protect the children; turn and soften the wicked; arouse the careless; recover the fallen; restore the penitent; remove all hindrances to the advancement of thy truth; and bring us all to be of one heart and mind within thy holy Church, to the honor of thy Name; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

THE LORD bless you, and keep you. The LORD make his face to shine upon you, and be gracious unto you. The LORD lift up his countenance upon you, and give you peace, both now and evermore. Amen.

(The people shall now go into the New Parish House for an informal reception and luncheon, to which all are cordially invited.)

* * * * * * *

A HISTORICAL SKETCH
OF
ST PAUL'S PARISH

One hundred and twenty-nine years old! A century of days and weeks gone by—their only record as to how they passed, an old leather-bound parish register, inscribed “St. Paul's Church, Clinton, N. C.” Yet, in those yellowed, musty pages, written by so many hands, is enshrined the life of a small struggling parish.

The Parish Register opens first of all to a handwritten history of the parish, but this is obviously the work of a later rector, or rather several of them, each of whom added to the growing record. The earliest dates are those of baptisms and lists of communicants, for the Church was planted in Clinton soil, before any formal organization, or even a parish, was formed.

The first meetings of any known Episcopalians in Clinton were held on Sunday mornings in Mrs. Richard Holmes's parlor, where lay services were conducted. Opening the Parish Register, we find the quaint, much abbreviated account of those early days.

“The family of Dr. William McKoy and that of Mr. Richard C. Holmes, having settled in the town of Clinton, formed a nucleus desiring the ministrations of the Prot. Epis. Church, as early as the years 1823-26. The first ministrations of the church were performed by the Rev. Adam Empic baptizing the child of the former.” (This child was Allmand Alexander






McKoy, born October 11, 1825, and place of baptism was the father's home.)

“An occasional service had been held by passing clergymen, among them Rev. W. T. Mott, who became the first stationed minister in the year 1830.”

Thomas S. W. Mott, diocesan missionary, first organized the little group of Churchmen into a parish by the name of St. Paul's, with the following vestrymen: Dr. William McKoy, Richard C. Holmes and Lucien Holmes. Shortly after this, a visitation was made by the Bishop of the Diocese, the Rt. Rev. Levi Silliman Ives, who recorded in his Journal of Wednesday, the eighteenth of March, 1832:

“I reached Clinton, Sampson County, at night and preached and baptized four adults, the Rev. Mr. Mott performing the service. The friends of the Church here are few in number but zealous and charming. I am not without hope that with Lay Reading, H. L. Holmes, Esq., having been appointed Lay Reader, and with occasional services from the neighboring Clergy, they will, under the blessing of God, continue to increase.”

Mr. Mott was followed by periodical visits by the Rev. Mr. Jarvis B. Buxton of Fayetteville, who held public services and administered the Sacraments. The Rev. Mr. W. D. Carnes of Wilmington paid one visit to the parish in the year 1831. Baptismal records indicate that Mr. Buxton visited Clinton during the years 1834 and 1835 and held services in “The Adademy used for divine worship.”

The history in the old Parish Register continues as follows: “The Rev. Cameron F. McRae succeeded in the charge and continued his ministry for the space of three months. The Rev. Mr. R. E. Parham entered upon the vacated position, and labored for a short time, but was compelled to abandon his duties in consequence of enfeebled health, and on going to Havana, died there. The Rev. Mr. Gallagher then succeeded, remaining in charge a Twelvemonth, preaching and extending ministrations occasionally in Bladen county.”

At the Convention which met in Wilmington in May 1854 is found reference to St. Paul's Church, “Resolved that St. Paul's Church, Clinton, Sampson County, be admitted into union with the Church in this Diocese.”

At the next Convention, St. Paul's makes its report to the Convention and says that lots have been secured for the erection of a Church. Mention is also made that St. James Church, Wilmington, contributed $600.00 toward the Church in Clinton. The property mentioned was conveyed by Josiah Johnson to the Trustees of St. Paul's Church, being a lot on Sycamore Street, at a cost of $200.00. This deed is dated May 19, 1856.

At the same Convention, Bishop Atkinson reported in his Journal as follows: “On November 28 I went to Clinton where, in the evening at the Court House, I read prayers and preached to a full Congregation. Efforts are being made here to build a Church and the Rev. Mr. Rolfe now stately officiates in the Village.”

The Rev. Mr. M. F. Rolfe evidentally had just become Rector of the Clinton parish in 1856, for we find in the diocesan records that the Rev. Peyton Gallagher made the following report: “I entered upon my duties the 31st of December, 1854, as Rector of St. Paul's Church. The attendance upon Divine service has been encouraging, a general friendliness of feeling on the part of the community manifested toward the Church. The Parish is without a church building but, at the same time, is in possession of a subscription sufficient to warrant the expenditure of the erection of one at no distant day.”

In leaving the charge, Mr. Gallagher reported, in 1856, to the Convention in the following words: “It is due to the members of this Parish to state that they raised the salary of the late Rector $100 beyond the amount originally stipulated.”

In 1856 the Rev. Frederick Fitzgerald made the following report on St. Paul's Clinton: “By recent






direction of the Bishop, I am to make every effort possible to supply this place with services. I feel sure that the future of the Church here is very certain.”

Besides the occasional services of the above named clergymen, St. Paul's Parish records show the following men to have performed Baptisms, either as visiting or resident ministers: The Rev. Mr. A. F. Olmstead and the Rev. Mr. George Benton.

In 1860, St. Paul's was served by the Rev. Lucien Holmes, Deacon. Part of his Convention report was as follows: “This Parish is erecting a church building which is hoped will be finished before the next Convention. I have preached here once a month during the present year to good congregations and consider the prospects of the Church very promising.”

In 1862, the Rev. Joseph C. Huske, the Rector of St. John's Church, Fayetteville, reported to the Convention: “I visited Clinton, Sampson County, and hold a service, including the Communion, on Christmas Day. During the service, a wedding was solemnized, and the Rite of Baptism administered to a white infant.” As this wedding (of Anna Holmes to James C. Dobbin of Fayetteville) is recorded as having been performed in the Church, we know that the Church was partly completed, enough for use.

Troubled war times plagued the growth of the parish between 1860-1865, and it was often without any but lay leadership. The Rev. John C. Tennant served as Rector for several months in the year 1863, and was followed by John Huske Tillinghast, Deacon, of Fayetteville, in 1864. In his report to the Convention of 1865, Mr. Tillinghast states: “This Parish takes pleasure to report a very prosperous condition. Our Church building is only partly completed, but we are making an effort to recommence the work which was suspended during the War Attendance at services has been full and encouraging.”

Evidentally, the newly freed slaves found a

[Note: The original copy of this book has this page duplicated and out of order]

At the Convention which met in Wilmington in May 1854 is found reference to St. Paul's Church, “Resolved that St. Paul's Church, Clinton, Sampson County, be admitted into union with the Church in this Diocese.”

At the next Convention, St. Paul's makes its report to the Convention and says that lots have been secured for the erection of a Church. Mention is also made that St. James Church, Wilmington, contributed $600.00 toward the Church in Clinton. The property mentioned was conveyed by Josiah Johnson to the Trustees of St. Paul's Church, being a lot on Sycamore Street, at a cost of $200.00. This deed is dated May 19, 1856.

At the same Convention, Bishop Atkinson reported in his Journal as follows: “On November 28 I went to Clinton where, in the evening at the Court House, I read prayers and preached to a full Congregation. Efforts are being made here to build a Church and the Rev. Mr. Rolfe now stately officiates in the Village.”

The Rev. Mr. M. F. Rolfe evidentally had just become Rector of the Clinton parish in 1856, for we find in the diocesan records that the Rev. Peyton Gallagher made the following report: “I entered upon my duties the 31st of December, 1854, as Rector of St. Paul's Church. The attendance upon Divine service has been encouraging, a general friendliness of feeling on the part of the community manifested toward the Church. The Parish is without a church building but, at the same time, is in possession of a subscription sufficient to warrant the expenditure of the erection of one at no distant day.”

In leaving the charge, Mr. Gallagher reported, in 1856, to the Convention in the following words: “It is due to the members of this Parish to state that they raised the salary of the late Rector $100 beyond the amount originally stipulated.”

In 1856 the Rev. Frederick Fitzgerald made the following report on St. Paul's Clinton: “By recent






[Note: The original copy of this book has this page duplicated and out of order]

direction of the Bishop, I am to make every effort possible to supply this place with services. I feel sure that the future of the Church here is very certain.”

Besides the occasional services of the above named clergymen, St. Paul's Parish records show the following men to have performed Baptisms, either as visiting or resident ministers: The Rev. Mr. A. F. Olmstead and the Rev. Mr. George Benton.

In 1860, St. Paul's was served by the Rev. Lucien Holmes, Deacon. Part of his Convention report was as follows: “This Parish is erecting a church building which is hoped will be finished before the next Convention. I have preached here once a month during the present year to good congregations and consider the prospects of the Church very promising.”

In 1862, the Rev. Joseph C. Huske, the Rector of St. John's Church, Fayetteville, reported to the Convention: “I visited Clinton, Sampson County, and hold a service, including the Communion, on Christmas Day. During the service, a wedding was solemnized, and the Rite of Baptism administered to a white infant.” As this wedding (of Anna Holmes to James C. Dobbin of Fayetteville) is recorded as having been performed in the Church, we know that the Church was partly completed, enough for use.

Troubled war times plagued the growth of the parish between 1860-1865, and it was often without any but lay leadership. The Rev. John C. Tennant served as Rector for several months in the year 1863, and was followed by John Huske Tillinghast, Deacon, of Fayetteville, in 1864. In his report to the Convention of 1865, Mr. Tillinghast states: “This Parish takes pleasure to report a very prosperous condition. Our Church building is only partly completed, but we are making an effort to recommence the work which was suspended during the War Attendance at services has been full and encouraging.”

Evidentally, the newly freed slaves found a

champion in Mr. Tillinghast, who unwittingly stirred up dissention when he attempted to use the Church building as a school in which to teach colored children the alphabet! Yet, evidence of Christian charity and concern for the former slaves of church members is shown by the large number of Baptisms through the year 1867; colored Confirmations in 1864 through 1866, and even marriages and burials of freedmen from the Church. For the full account of the trouble, and eventual reconciliation between the Rector and his flock, one must read the lengthy account in the first Parish Register.

As always, a great part of the credit for any church growth, must go to the devoted women of the parish. The record of offerings for the year 1868 include money for a melodian. By 1872 the Ladies Aid Society had raised $10 toward painting the Church, and the following year, the same ladies, by private subscription raised $30 for frosting the Church windows and coloring the walls. The records show that they also raised funds to supplement the rector's salary. Remember that this hard-earned money had to be realized at a time of the South's lowest financial ebb, and at sacrifices unknown to us.

The Rev. George N. Stickney, Rector of St. Stephen's Church, at Goldsboro, succeeded the Rev. Tillinghast. He first visited the Clinton parish on Sunday, August 30, 1868; and at the insistance of the vestry, and by their special request, took on part time charge of the same. His first act, that Sunday in August, was to baptize Caroline M. Ferrell. Sponsors were James Alexander Ferrell and Francieana Ferrell. His tenure of office ended in June 1, 1869 when he resigned from St. Stephen's to accept the temporary charge of St. John's Church, Wilmington; but he continued to visit the Clinton parish and to administer the offices and Sacraments until September 25, 1869.






Again there followed a period during which St. Paul's had no rector and had to be served by visiting clergy. According to the historical entry in the Parish Register, “the church, which is finished and furnished with cabinet organ and bell, had been kept open and the Service supplied by Lay Reading, with occasional visits from the Rev. J. W. Lamour of Goldsboro and the Rev. J. C. Huske of Fayetteville.”

On Trinity Sunday, May 26, 1872, the Rev. Edwin Robins Rich, Deacon, of Baltimore County, Maryland, accepted a call from the vestry, composed of R. C. Holmes, John H. Hill, Allmand McKoy, Allmand Holmes, Gabriel Holmes and Marion Ferrell. On this vestry, all of whom were men well-known in the life of the county and state, was the one man ever to be elected from Sampson County to the high office of Governor of North Carolina—Gabriel Holmes.

The next entry, from the same source, is of great importance, but must be shortened here to the bare facts. It was the consecration of the first St. Paul's Church, “held on a bright and beautiful day in October 1872” by the Rt. Rev. Thomas Atkinson. The Rector-elect presented a class of eleven persons for Confirmation, after which the Holy Eucharist was celebrated to a large number of the faithful.

One can almost feel the upward surge of devotion and enthusiasm which Mr. Rich brought with him and transmitted to his people. Eastertide of 1873 was a high point in the growing life of the parish. The Easter offering, or rather that part of it appropriated to the Rectory Fund, amounting to $708.98, was handed to the Treasurer, and a special committee was appointed and instructed to proceed at once with the necessary steps toward securing a Rectory.

The special Easter offerings of that year went to paint the Church, to stain the chancel windows, for gold and silver and colored paper for letters and emblems, and for coloring the walls. A pair of brass altar vases and a Prayer Book for the altar, also a pair of markers for the Bible were given.

On Ember Day in Whitsun Week, 1873, the Rt. Rev. Thomas Atkinson made a visitation of the parish for the purpose of holding two special services: at the morning service the Rev. Edwin Robins Rich was advanced to the Holy Priesthood; and at Evening Prayer two young men were presented for Confirmation. The county court, which was in session under Judge Buxton, adjourned for the morning service.

Yet the same year saw the resignation of this beloved Rector, due to failing health. His final entry in the Parish Register is dated Sunday 19th after Trinity. “Last services of the Rev. Edw. R. Rich as Rector of the parish. A sad day to Pastor and People. May God's richest Blessings rest upon this people forever, Ament.”

And upon this note, so poignant and tender, the history ends. One wonders whether the Rev. Rich would have left his people, could he have foreseen the troubles that lay ahead for the little congregation. For the pretty little frame church, so lovingly furnished and cared for, was destined to be destroyed by a hurricane around the year 1880.

The second edifice to be called St. Paul's was at the southeast corner of Elizabeth and Wall Street, on land given by James and Thomas Ferrell. In a deed to the Trustees of the Diocese of North Carolina, made in August of 1882, reference is made to the land “whereon the new Episcopal Church is now being built.”

The consecration of this new church was the occasion for a lengthy article in an 1899 issue of the Clinton “Democrat”. The consecrator was the Rt. Rev. Alfred A. Watson, beloved Bishop of the Diocese. Side by side with the joyful Consecration service, however, was another news item: the death of Dr. Allmand Holmes, Senior Warden of the parish. His funeral, held at two-thirty, followed the Consecration service of the morning.

The Rev. Frederick Nash Skinner, who came to St. Paul's in 1896, was destined to have the longest tenure of office of any Rector before or since, as






[Note: The original copy of this book has this page duplicated and out of order]

Again there followed a period during which St. Paul's had no rector and had to be served by visiting clergy. According to the historical entry in the Parish Register, “the church, which is finished and furnished with cabinet organ and bell, had been kept open and the Service supplied by Lay Reading, with occasional visits from the Rev. J. W. Lamour of Goldsboro and the Rev. J. C. Huske of Fayetteville.”

On Trinity Sunday, May 26, 1872, the Rev. Edwin Robins Rich, Deacon, of Baltimore County, Maryland, accepted a call from the vestry, composed of R. C. Holmes, John H. Hill, Allmand McKoy, Allmand Holmes, Gabriel Holmes and Marion Ferrell. On this vestry, all of whom were men well-known in the life of the county and state, was the one man ever to be elected from Sampson County to the high office of Governor of North Carolina—Gabriel Holmes.

The next entry, from the same source, is of great importance, but must be shortened here to the bare facts. It was the consecration of the first St. Paul's Church, “held on a bright and beautiful day in October 1872” by the Rt. Rev. Thomas Atkinson. The Rector-elect presented a class of eleven persons for Confirmation, after which the Holy Eucharist was celebrated to a large number of the faithful.

One can almost feel the upward surge of devotion and enthusiasm which Mr. Rich brought with him and transmitted to his people. Eastertide of 1873 was a high point in the growing life of the parish. The Easter offering, or rather that part of it appropriated to the Rectory Fund, amounting to $708.98, was handed to the Treasurer, and a special committee was appointed and instructed to proceed at once with the necessary steps toward securing a Rectory.

The special Easter offerings of that year went to paint the Church, to stain the chancel windows, for gold and silver and colored paper for letters and emblems, and for coloring the walls. A pair of brass altar vases and a Prayer Book for the altar, also a pair of markers for the Bible were given.

[Note: The original copy of this book has this page duplicated and out of order]

champion in Mr. Tillinghast, who unwittingly stirred up dissention when he attempted to use the Church building as a school in which to teach colored children the alphabet! Yet, evidence of Christian charity and concern for the former slaves of church members is shown by the large number of Baptisms through the year 1867; colored Confirmations in 1864 through 1866, and even marriages and burials of freedmen from the Church. For the full account of the trouble, and eventual reconciliation between the Rector and his flock, one must read the lengthy account in the first Parish Register.

As always, a great part of the credit for any church growth, must go to the devoted women of the parish. The record of offerings for the year 1868 include money for a melodian. By 1872 the Ladies Aid Society had raised $10 toward painting the Church, and the following year, the same ladies, by private subscription raised $30 for frosting the Church windows and coloring the walls. The records show that they also raised funds to supplement the rector's salary. Remember that this hard-earned money had to be realized at a time of the South's lowest financial ebb, and at sacrifices unknown to us.

The Rev. George N. Stickney, Rector of St. Stephen's Church, at Goldsboro, succeeded the Rev. Tillinghast. He first visited the Clinton parish on Sunday, August 30, 1868; and at the insistance of the vestry, and by their special request, took on part time charge of the same. His first act, that Sunday in August, was to baptize Caroline M. Ferrell. Sponsors were James Alexander Ferrell and Francieana Ferrell. His tenure of office ended in June 1, 1869 when he resigned from St. Stephen's to accept the temporary charge of St. John's Church, Wilmington; but he continued to visit the Clinton parish and to administer the offices and Sacraments until September 25, 1869.






he served until 1906. Between the leave-taking of the Rev. Rich and the coming of the Rev. Skinner, the Clinton church had been supplied by an irregular succession of clergymen, either resident or visiting, who kept the little congregation together. These were: William Britton, E. W. Gilliam, R. B. Windley, J. M. Hillyar, J. W. Turner and John B. Gribble. The Rev. Turner's record of Baptisms begins with June 1888 and continues through November of 1892. Other services that he conducted place him at St. Paul's through 1894.

One very hot Sunday, in July 1902, Clinton's most destructive fire to date claimed this second church building. During service the fire alarm was heard, and since the town had no fire fighting equipment, everyone left the church to assist. Much of the town, including St. Paul's Church, was burned. Parishioners succeeded in removing the organ, but the heat was so intense that it burned in the churchyard. Mr. Skinner lost all his vestments, and also his watch, which was left on the pulpit. This sudden destruction of their new church was a devastating blow to the little congregation. The local Presbyterians offered the use of their building, which was gratefully accepted; and later, in 1908, when the Presbyterian Church burned, the people of St. Paul's were able to return this kindness, in like manner.

Scarecely were the ashes cold, however, when the vestry, headed by Duncan Moore Partrick, Senior Warden, began immediate plans to sell the old lot and purchase the present site. Too much credit cannot be given Mr. Partrick for the rebuilding job. He gave of his time and money and coordinated the efforts of all the members who, with God's help, worked miracles. Bishop Strange, of the Diocese of East Carolina, wrote an appeal for funds, which members of the parish mailed, with letters of explanation, to all their friends.

The late Mrs. Marion Butler wrote of her recollections of these days: “The church people worked and did everything to raise the money to pay for that

lovely church. By the time the church was finished, I had the noney in hand for the windows and pews.”

The church was built under the active supervision of Mr. Partrick, on a lot 100 × 200 feet, extending from Main to Sycamore Streets. As far as possible, the materials that went into its building came from Sampson County. Only one mill in the county, that of Mr. Richardson Turlington, had a carriage long enough to cut the thirty-two foot rafters. The lumber for the handmade pews, with their quaint carved ends, came from the mill of A. F. Johnson. Mr. F. B. Johnson located the trees on the George Matthis farm and selected only those pines that would square twenty-two inches. Mr. D. E. Clifton built the pews, using solid boards for the backs.

Mr. Skinner ordered the chancel windows from Atlanta. All the present windows in the church, except these, are the work of Geissler of New York, and are memorials to former communicants. Those in the nave depict the Te Deum, the Epiphany, the Ascension, the Holy Eucharist, St. Cecelia, and Jacob Blessing Esau. The main front window shows St. Paul, surmounted by his symbol, the “sword of the spirit” and flanked by symbolic floral representations of the “Rose of Sharon” and the “Lily of the Valley”.

Mrs. Mary A. Moseley and her group of Church-school children, called the “Ministering Circle” gave of their small offerings to help buy the altar cross. The altar itself is a memorial to Mrs. Francenia Ferrell. The other altar brasses are gifts of the Partrick family. The baptismal font was given in memory of his wife, Agnes Partrick, by Mr. Giles Ashton Clute. The present Communion Service is a memorial to the late Senator Marion Butler.

The pipe organ was formerly in the Presbyterian Church in Goldsboro. When a new organ was given this church by the daughters of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Lee, they, in turn, generously gave the present organ to the Clinton church in memory of their uncle and aunt, Dr. and Mrs. Algernon M. Lee.






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Again there followed a period during which St. Paul's had no rector and had to be served by visiting clergy. According to the historical entry in the Parish Register, “the church, which is finished and furnished with cabinet organ and bell, had been kept open and the Service supplied by Lay Reading, with occasional visits from the Rev. J. W. Lamour of Goldsboro and the Rev. J. C. Huske of Fayetteville.”

On Trinity Sunday, May 26, 1872, the Rev. Edwin Robins Rich, Deacon, of Baltimore County, Maryland, accepted a call from the vestry, composed of R. C. Holmes, John H. Hill, Allmand McKoy, Allmand Holmes, Gabriel Holmes and Marion Ferrell. On this vestry, all of whom were men well-known in the life of the county and state, was the one man ever to be elected from Sampson County to the high office of Governor of North Carolina—Gabriel Holmes.

The next entry, from the same source, is of great importance, but must be shortened here to the bare facts. It was the consecration of the first St. Paul's Church, “held on a bright and beautiful day in October 1872” by the Rt. Rev. Thomas Atkinson. The Rector-elect presented a class of eleven persons for Confirmation, after which the Holy Eucharist was celebrated to a large number of the faithful.

One can almost feel the upward surge of devotion and enthusiasm which Mr. Rich brought with him and transmitted to his people. Eastertide of 1873 was a high point in the growing life of the parish. The Easter offering, or rather that part of it appropriated to the Rectory Fund, amounting to $708.98, was handed to the Treasurer, and a special committee was appointed and instructed to proceed at once with the necessary steps toward securing a Rectory.

The special Easter offerings of that year went to paint the Church, to stain the chancel windows, for gold and silver and colored paper for letters and emblems, and for coloring the walls. A pair of brass altar vases and a Prayer Book for the altar, also a pair of markers for the Bible were given.

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On Ember Day in Whitsun Week, 1873, the Rt. Rev. Thomas Atkinson made a visitation of the parish for the purpose of holding two special services: at the morning service the Rev. Edwin Robins Rich was advanced to the Holy Priesthood; and at Evening Prayer two young men were presented for Confirmation. The county court, which was in session under Judge Buxton, adjourned for the morning service.

Yet the same year saw the resignation of this beloved Rector, due to failing health. His final entry in the Parish Register is dated Sunday 19th after Trinity. “Last services of the Rev. Edw. R. Rich as Rector of the parish. A sad day to Pastor and People. May God's richest Blessings rest upon this people forever, Ament.”

And upon this note, so poignant and tender, the history ends. One wonders whether the Rev. Rich would have left his people, could he have foreseen the troubles that lay ahead for the little congregation. For the pretty little frame church, so lovingly furnished and cared for, was destined to be destroyed by a hurricane around the year 1880.

The second edifice to be called St. Paul's was at the southeast corner of Elizabeth and Wall Street, on land given by James and Thomas Ferrell. In a deed to the Trustees of the Diocese of North Carolina, made in August of 1882, reference is made to the land “whereon the new Episcopal Church is now being built.”

The consecration of this new church was the occasion for a lengthy article in an 1899 issue of the Clinton “Democrat”. The consecrator was the Rt. Rev. Alfred A. Watson, beloved Bishop of the Diocese. Side by side with the joyful Consecration service, however, was another news item: the death of Dr. Allmand Holmes, Senior Warden of the parish. His funeral, held at two-thirty, followed the Consecration service of the morning.

The Rev. Frederick Nash Skinner, who came to St. Paul's in 1896, was destined to have the longest tenure of office of any Rector before or since, as






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he served until 1906. Between the leave-taking of the Rev. Rich and the coming of the Rev. Skinner, the Clinton church had been supplied by an irregular succession of clergymen, either resident or visiting, who kept the little congregation together. These were: William Britton, E. W. Gilliam, R. B. Windley, J. M. Hillyar, J. W. Turner and John B. Gribble. The Rev. Turner's record of Baptisms begins with June 1888 and continues through November of 1892. Other services that he conducted place him at St. Paul's through 1894.

One very hot Sunday, in July 1902, Clinton's most destructive fire to date claimed this second church building. During service the fire alarm was heard, and since the town had no fire fighting equipment, everyone left the church to assist. Much of the town, including St. Paul's Church, was burned. Parishioners succeeded in removing the organ, but the heat was so intense that it burned in the churchyard. Mr. Skinner lost all his vestments, and also his watch, which was left on the pulpit. This sudden destruction of their new church was a devastating blow to the little congregation. The local Presbyterians offered the use of their building, which was gratefully accepted; and later, in 1908, when the Presbyterian Church burned, the people of St. Paul's were able to return this kindness, in like manner.

Scarecely were the ashes cold, however, when the vestry, headed by Duncan Moore Partrick, Senior Warden, began immediate plans to sell the old lot and purchase the present site. Too much credit cannot be given Mr. Partrick for the rebuilding job. He gave of his time and money and coordinated the efforts of all the members who, with God's help, worked miracles. Bishop Strange, of the Diocese of East Carolina, wrote an appeal for funds, which members of the parish mailed, with letters of explanation, to all their friends.

The late Mrs. Marion Butler wrote of her recollections of these days: “The church people worked and did everything to raise the money to pay for that

[Note: The original copy of this book has this page duplicated and out of order]

lovely church. By the time the church was finished, I had the noney in hand for the windows and pews.”

The church was built under the active supervision of Mr. Partrick, on a lot 100 × 200 feet, extending from Main to Sycamore Streets. As far as possible, the materials that went into its building came from Sampson County. Only one mill in the county, that of Mr. Richardson Turlington, had a carriage long enough to cut the thirty-two foot rafters. The lumber for the handmade pews, with their quaint carved ends, came from the mill of A. F. Johnson. Mr. F. B. Johnson located the trees on the George Matthis farm and selected only those pines that would square twenty-two inches. Mr. D. E. Clifton built the pews, using solid boards for the backs.

Mr. Skinner ordered the chancel windows from Atlanta. All the present windows in the church, except these, are the work of Geissler of New York, and are memorials to former communicants. Those in the nave depict the Te Deum, the Epiphany, the Ascension, the Holy Eucharist, St. Cecelia, and Jacob Blessing Esau. The main front window shows St. Paul, surmounted by his symbol, the “sword of the spirit” and flanked by symbolic floral representations of the “Rose of Sharon” and the “Lily of the Valley”.

Mrs. Mary A. Moseley and her group of Church-school children, called the “Ministering Circle” gave of their small offerings to help buy the altar cross. The altar itself is a memorial to Mrs. Francenia Ferrell. The other altar brasses are gifts of the Partrick family. The baptismal font was given in memory of his wife, Agnes Partrick, by Mr. Giles Ashton Clute. The present Communion Service is a memorial to the late Senator Marion Butler.

The pipe organ was formerly in the Presbyterian Church in Goldsboro. When a new organ was given this church by the daughters of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Lee, they, in turn, generously gave the present organ to the Clinton church in memory of their uncle and aunt, Dr. and Mrs. Algernon M. Lee.






The cross on top of the church was given by Mrs. Cornelia Happer Faison and her sister, Mrs. Pocahontas Happer Bumgardner. Part of the money for this was realized from the sale of homemade ice-cream by these devoted women. Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Faison, Jr. gave the side door; and the young women of the church, headed by Mrs. India Bumgardner Humphrey, sponsored various fund-raising projects with which to buy the front church door.

There have been sixteen rectors to serve the third St. Paul's, all of whom labored for the welfare of the parish and for its growth, both material and spiritual. Serving longest, in length of years, were the Rev. Frederick N. Skinner, 1896-1906; the Rev. Anthony R. Parshley, 1919-1923; and finally the Rev. Addison Hosea, rector of the parish from 1949 to 1954, under whose leadership the dream of a Parish House was finally realized.

During its history two members of St. Paul's Church have entered the Priesthood: the Rev. Theodore H. Partrick and the Rev. Harold Lewis. The membership of St. Paul's has increased throughout the years, and its people are zealous and awake to the possibilities of their Church and confident of its future. The beautiful new Parish House, dedicated today, is a monument to that confidence and hope.

This sketch can end in no better manner than did that first history, written by hands now dead, “May God's richest Blessings rest upon this people, forever, Amen.”

—Katharine Shields Melvin, Historian

* * * * * * * *

NOTE: The new reredos was constructed of paneling originally used in old St. John's Church of Wilmington which was built in 1853, and the window to be dedicated today in the new Parish House was also obtained from St. John's Church and was originally located in the sanctuary of St. John's above the altar.

The new Parish House to be dedicated today [illegible text] constructed at a cost of about $22,000. Members [illegible text] friends of St. Paul's contributed a total of about $9,000 and the remainder of the costs has been financed by a loan of $13,000.

The new heating plant in the church building was financed by an additional loan of $2,000.

* * * * * *

A LIST OF RECTORS

Visiting ministers to the Episcopal congregation meeting in Mrs. Holmes's parlor, prior to 1830:

The Rev. Adam Empie, 1825-26

The Rev. Thomas Mott, diocesan missionary, 1827-1828.

St. Paul's Parish organized in 1830. First Episcopal visitation, 1832.

1830: The Rev. Thomas Mott (first stationed rector)

1831: The Rev. W. D. Carnes, of Wilmington.

1835: The Rev. Jarvis B. Buxton, Fayetteville.

The Rev. Cameron F. McRae

The Rev. R. E. Parham

1854: The Rev. Payton Gallagher

1856: The Rev. N. F. Rolfe

The Rev. Fred Fitzgerald

The Rev. A. F. Olmstead

The Rev. George Benton

The first Church built 1860. Finished after 1866. Consecrated, 1872. Destroyed by hurricane, 1880.

1860: The Rev. Lucien Holmes

1863: The Rev. John C. Tennant

1864: The Rev. John Huske Tillinghast

1868: The Rev. George W. Stickney

1872: The Rev. Edwin Robins Rich

1875: The Rev. William Britten

1876: The Rev. J. W. Lamour, of Goldsboro.

1877: The Rev. E. W. Gilliam






The second Church built 1882. Consecrated, 1899. Destroyed by fire, 1902.

1881-83: The Rev. R. B. Windley

1886 : The Rev. J. M. Hillyar

1888-92: The Rev. John B. Gibble

1896-1906: The Rev. Frederick Nash Skinner

The third, and present Church, built 1902.

1907-09: The Rev. Walter R. Noe

1911-12: The Rev. G. E. Williams

1913-16: The Rev. J. Letcher Showell

The Rev. G. F. Hill, Good Shepherd Church, Wilmington.

The Rev. Edward Wooten

1917-18: The Rev. Louis T. Hardin, Deacon

1919-23: The Rev. Anthony Roberts Parshley, III

1924-27: The Rev. Herbert D. Cone

1933-34: The Rev. Frank Bloxham

1936-38: The Rev. J. D. Beckwith

1938-39: The Rev. O. Worth May

1940-44: The Rev. C. L. Alligood

1945-46: The Rev. E. B. Ferguson

1947-49: The Rev. Robert M. Kellerman

1949-54: The Rev. Addison Hosea

BISHOPS

The Rt. Rev. Sulliman (or Sullivan) B. Ives

The Rt. Rev. Thomas Atkinson

The Rt. Rev. T. B. Lyman

The Rt. Rev. Alfred A. Watson

The Rt. Rev. Robert Strange

The Rt. Rev. Thomas C. Darst

The Rt. Rev. Thomas H. Wright

NOTES






NOTES

COMMUNICANTS OF ST. PAUL'S CHURCH
1954

Aman, Herbert L., Jr.Kerr, Sadie AlcockAman, Anne DeHavenKirven, Clarence, Jr.Aman, Herbert Lincoln, IIIKirven, Ellen RossAman, RichardLockerman, NoliaBarbrey, Gabriel JosephMathews, Randolph C.Barbrey, Martha FrancesMathews, Nancy IreneBeech, Pattie RossMathews, Kay YelvertonBell, EdnaMatthis, Jane PennebakerBirch, Mary Elizabeth RussellMatthis, ParmaBizzell, Annie LaurieMatthis, JaneBizzell, JaniceMcKinnon, LutherBritt, Lizzie (Mrs. John L.)Melvin, Katherine ShieldsBritt, JeanetteMichaux, Alice KerrButler, Algernon LeeMoore, ClaudeButler, Josephine BroadwellMoore, Eleanor GrahamButler, Algernon Lee, Jr.Moore, Mary EleanorButler, Eva JosephineMoore, William FleetButler, Edwin E.Moore, Beatrice PriceButler, Beverly GeorgeMorris, H. IrvingButler, Mossette LeeMorris, Ruth (Mrs. H.I.)Butler, Betty FeltonMorris, RuthDebnam, ThyraNeely, FrankDuBose, Mrs. C. DudleyNeely, Mary Langdon MoriseyDudley, Josephine ReynoldsOsborne, Helen Elizabeth PalmerEvans, GeoffreyPowell, Henry EmmettEvans, Maylo RichnellPowell, Mildred FlemingEvans, Diana MaryReynolds, JoeFerrell, Annie SloanRichards, Frances ButlerGill, William Shurley, Jr.Royal, JoeGill, Sarah Louise GavinSeay, Edward Eggleston, Sr.Gill, ShurleySeay, EvaGlenn, Roland A.Seay, Edward Eggleston, Jr.Glenn, Julia MartinSeay, CorneliaGraham, Archibald McLeanSeay, James W.Graham, Allie LeeSeay, Hazel ChesnuttHairr, Ida JaneSmith, Minnie May SuttonHerring, Annie Laurie PartrickStrickland, PeggyHerring, William H.Taylor, Cary Buxton, Jr.Herring, Irene NicholsTaylor, Margaret BethuneHiatt, EllaWarner, Rebecca HerringHondros, George S.Weatherly, Jo Ann PowellHosea, Jane MarstonWellman, Elizabeth HolmesHubbard, Jennie (Mrs. Joseph C.White, Paul BarberHubbard, CelesteWright, PaulHunt, IsabelWright, Louise O'QuinnJohnson, Maude PartrickWright, George DavidKerr, EdwinWright, NelsonKerr, Elizabeth HubbardWright, Stanley EdwinKerr, Langdon Chevis, Sr.Yelverton, Albert Lloyd, Jr.Kerr, Lena Barber WhiteYelverton, Elizabeth BarnesKerr, Richard L.Yelverton, Albert Lloyd, IIIKerr, BonnieYelverton, Minnie Elizabeth






St. Paul's Parish House - 1954

IN APPRECIATION

St. Paul's gratefully acknowledges the excellent work of our Senior Warden, Edwin W. Kerr, in designing the plans and supervising the construction of our new Parish House.

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