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Curricula and general information for the Greenville High School, Greenville, North Carolina : 1928-1929

Date: 1928 | Identifier: F264.G8 C87 1928
Curricula and general information for the Greenville High School, Greenville, North Carolina : 1928-1929. [Greenville, N.C. : Greenville High School, 1928] 16 p. ; 21 cm. Cover title. more...
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Curricula
And
General Information
For The
Greenville High School
Greenville, North Carolina

1928-1929









Foreword to Parents—

This booklet is published by the school for the pupils and the patrons of the school. The purpose of the booklet is to acquaint the pupils and their parents with the policies of the school. So far as possible all the things concerning the school which pupils and parents would profit by knowing have been written into the following pages.

Pupils and parents should bear in mind that a school is a two-sided affair: the parent-pupil group and the school official-teacher group. It is the business of the pupils to attend regularly, of the parents to see that the pupils attend and maintain a proper attitude toward the school. This attitude should be one of active reception. It is the business of the school officials to provide a proper place and environment and the right kind of teachers and see that school affairs are run off smoothly. It is the business of the teachers to present their subjects in such a manner that the great majority of the pupils can receive it (Not much less than 90 per cent if any) It is also the business of the teachers to set themselves up as good examples for young people It would seem, then, that there exists a contract of sorts between the two groups making up the school If one side fails to do his part then the school fails in accomplishing its purpose We of the school feel that the balance of effort lies at present on our side However, the faculty is ready at all times to discuss with the parents, individually or collectively, the policies relating to the handling of the pupils in our jurisdiction

As is set forth under the topic “Aims” on the next page, we feel that we cannot do better than to try with all that we have to so change the pupils who come under our tutelage that they will become honorable and useful members of the society in which they live

It is hoped that the patrons of the school will feel free to consult with the teachers and school officials at all times. Visitors are always welcome, they are requested to call at the office before visiting classes or teachers in the building.





Aims—

The generally accepted aims and objectives of secondary education are (1) health, (2) command of fundamental processes, (3) worthy home membership, (4) citizenship, (5) worthy use of leisure, (6) ethical character, (7) vocation. The Greenville High School aims to train its pupils to attain these objectives. In addition to these general aims the school is endeavoring especially to train the boys and girls to fit into the particular environment in which they live.

The School Day—

The school hours are from 8:30 a. m. to 3.10 p. m. There are six periods of sixty minutes each, five of which are for recitation and directed study. The sixth period will be used for study, assemblies, and some extra-curricular activities. All pupils are required to remain in school until 3.10.

The Lunch Period—

Lunch will be served in the lunch room below the front of the auditorium twice during the school day. There will be food enough for sale to provide an adequate lunch for every one. Pupils may bring their lunches with them but they must eat them in the lunch room with the rest of the pupils. No pupil will be allowed to leave the building during the lunch period unless he has a permit signed by his parents or guardian and the principal giving him the privilege to lunch elsewhere. The lunch period is thirty minutes long. A part of this time will be given to directed play in the gymnasium. The first lunch period will start at 11:40 and will close at 12:10. The second will begin at 12:40 and close at 1:10.

The Marking System—

Prior to the Fall of 1926 the passing grade for this school was 70. At the same time the grade required for recommendation to do college work was 70. This figure was supposed to have represented the percentage of work done by the pupils. Grades for the year 1926-7, for this year and until further notice will be given as follows: The passing grade is 4 but the college recommendation grade is 3. A grade of 5 constitutes a failure. A grade of 1 is the highest grade and a grade of 2 is next to the highest. These grades are not transmutable into percentages, as percentage is ordinarily interpreted. The second and third quarters of the group make up the grade of 3. The fourth quarter includes those who receive 2's and 1's and the first quarter includes those who receive 4's and 5's. The first quarter is, therefore, the lowest and the fourth the highest.





Examinations—

Examinations are given every half year. All pupils are required to stand these examinations. None are excused. The examination counts as one-third the semester's work and the daily work counts as two-thirds.

Promotion—

Required for full promotion:

To the Eighth GradeElementary School Cert.
To the Ninth Grade4 Units
To the Tenth Grade8 Units
To the Eleventh Grade12 Units
For Graduation16 Units

(1) A unit is given for a school subject that has at least five prepared recitations per week, pursued for one school year.

(2) A pupil who has failed of promotion may regain his standing with his class in either of two ways:

(a) He may pass make-up examinations in September in the subjects which he failed.

(b) A pupil who lacks one unit may, with the consent of the principal, take and extra subject. Whenever he passes the five subjects for two consecutive marking periods without a deficiency (5) he will be promoted to his original class.

Home Study—

No pupil carrying a full schedule can prepare all his work during school hours. An exact amount of time necessary for home study cannot be set by the school. It depends upon (1) the mental ability of the individual, (2) the amount and degree of application and his power to concentrate during the study periods in school and (3) the degree to which the pupil likes the work he is doing. The school will be pleased to assist the pupil and the parent in determining how much time he should spend in study outside of school hours.

The duty of the parent is to see (1) that the pupil reserves a fixed time every day for home study and that he is required to use this time for this purpose only, (2) that he has a place where he can study without interruption, (3) that he works under proper physical conditions of light, heat, ventilation, etc. It is very essential for success that this habit of home study be formed during the first year of high school.





Scholarship Rules—

(1) A pupil who fails in a school subject for three consecutive marking periods shall drop that subject. The principal shall make such arrangements for future work as are possible and seem wise.

(2) If a pupil is carrying five unit subjects and fails in one or more of them for two consecutive marking periods, he shall drop one of his subjects. The principal shall determine which subject shall be dropped.

(3) When a pupil fails in three unit subjects for any marking period, a written warning shall be sent to the parent by the principal.

(4) A pupil must pass at least two unit subjects once in three consecutive marking periods to remain in his class.

(5) Any pupil who fails for two consecutive marking periods in all of his subjects shall be dropped back to the grade from which he was promoted. A written warning shall be sent to the parent at the end of the first marking period.

(6) Pupils who are absent from classes more than 10 per cent of the time must present a doctor's certificate showing that absences exceeding 10 per cent of the time were due to personal illness. Pupils failing to do this must attain a grade of 3 or better in the subjects whose classes they have been absent in order to pass these subjects.

The Marking Period and Reports—

The school year is of thirty-six weeks or 180 teaching days duration and is divided into two main parts called semesters or half-years. These are of equal length having 18 weeks or 90 teaching days. Each semester is divided into three marking periods of six weeks each. On the Monday following the close of each marking period a report card will be issued to each pupil showing his grades in the subjects he is taking. Pupils are required to take these reports home and to have them signed by their parents or guardians and return them to the home-room teachers who issued them.

In addition to the above reports there will be issued a failure report at the end of the first three weeks of each marking period. This will be mailed to the parent or guardian.





College Preparation—

At the present time most colleges make for a considerable gap between the freshman year and the high school graduating year. Since this is so, and the fact that somewhat of the rating of the high school is based upon the records made by its graduates while in college, it seems best to inaugurate the following scheme of recommending high school graduates to go to college.

In order for the high school to recommend a pupil to go to college the pupil must have made grades of 3 or higher in 75 per cent of his work in high school and must not have made more than two grades as low as 4 during his last two years. The certificate grade is 3.

The Merit System—

Every pupil is given 100 merits at the beginning of the Fall semester. Misdemeanors cause the loss of merits. The following is a partial list of offences and their corresponding penalties.

First tardy2 merits
Second tardy4 merits
Third tardy8 merits
(Etc.)
First unexcused absence10 merits
Second ditto20 merits
Third ditto40 merits
(Etc.)
Cheating25 merits
Lying25 merits
Insubordination25 merits
Impudence20 merits
Cutting classes2 merits per class, first offence
Disorder in the hall2 merits
Disturbing a class4 merits

When a pupil has lost 40 merits he will be sent home and one of his parents or his guardian must return with him for a conference before he may be reinstated in school. Upon the loss of 50 merits (ten more after the conference with the parents or guardian) he may be expelled or suspended indefinitely from school. Should a pupil not lose more than five merits in a semester he will receive a reward of 20 merits for the following semester. That is, he will have 120 to start the semester.





The Telephone—

The telephone in the principal's office is for school use. Pupils desiring to use the phone may do so upon payment of five cents. Pupils will not be called to the phone except in the case of dire necessity. It will require a payment of five cents to answer the phone.

Pupils will take a receipt for all money given.

Lockers—

Every pupil will be required to rent a locker. The price of a locker key is fifty cents which will be refunded when the key is turned in at the close of the school year or in case the pupil leaves school and returns the key. There is in the office a master key which will open any locker. The pupils may have the service of this key upon payment of a fee of five cents to the one in charge of the key.

Pupils will take a receipt for all money given.

Pupils may not go t otheir lockers except at the times specified. Lockers left unlocked will be locked and a fine of five cents imposed upon the offender. Hats, caps, coats, or wraps of any kind and books left about the building will be brought to the office and may be had upon payment of five cents per article claimed. (Note: Money collected from fines will be turned over to the S. A. A. Council).

Pupils will take a receipt for all money given.

The Senior Boys Club—

This club, although it did not function in 1927-8, is composed of all the boys in the senior class together with boys selected from each of the lower classes on the basis of scholarship, and ability along extra-curricular lines. The purpose of the club is mainly social.

The Senior Girls Club—

This club is composed of all the girls in the senior class and three representatives from the junior class who are invited to become members. The sponsors of the senior class are the sponsors of the club. The purpose of the club is to offer some form of entertainment and wholesome amusement. The monthly meeting consists of a dinner and a program. The most important meeting of the year is Mother's Night. The club does not have elected officers. Each month the sponsor appoints officers for the next meeting—a chairman, a committee of three to be responsible for





the entertainment, a committee of three to plan the dinner, a transportation committee, and a collector who collects the dues necessary to pay the expenses of the meeting.

The Debating Club—

All pupils are eligible to become members of the debating club. The purpose of the club is to train pupils to appear in public to a good advantage and to improve their English diction. There will be several debates during the year. This school is a member of the High School Debating Union of North Carolina and as such is eligible to enter a team in the state debate. This debate is run off in triangles. Our triangle is composed of Greenville, Rocky Mount and Washington. Each school trains an affirmative and a negative team. Each team is composed of two speakers and their alternates. If both teams from one school win in the triangle then that school becomes eligible to enter the elimination contest at Chapel Hill for the Aycock Memorial Cup. The triangular debates take place about the first of April. In the fall just prior to the Christmas holidays there is an annual debate with Farmville High School. Other debates will be arranged for as time permits.

The Latin Club—

This club holds its meetings once each month for the purpose of giving Latin students a better knowledge of the life and manners of the people whose language they study. Much attention is paid also to the beautiful stories of Greek and Roman Mythology. Membership in the Latin Club is open to students taking third and fourth year Latin. Next year it will probably be open to all Latin students. It has the following officers for the year 1927-8: Consul, Charles Whedbee; Praetor, Nora Lee Harris; Quaester, Frances Morton; Aedile, Zelle Foley; Nuntius, Jane Hall.

The French Club—

The officers of this club are President, Rebecca Scoville; Vice-President, Lillian Hardee; Secretary-Treasurer, Elizabeth Skinner; Chairman of the program committee, Louise Richardson; chairman of the refreshment committee, Eleanor Tyson. The purpose of the club is to foster the study of the French language, to bring together students socially, and to promote mutual understanding and a spirit of friendship between the French and the Americans. Conversation in French is the chief aim. Meetings are held once a month. They consist of dramatizations, songs, games, talks on French life and customs, and discussions of letters received by pupils in correspondence with native French students.





The Home Economics Club—

The purpose of the Home Economics Club is to stimulate interest among the girls of high school for better home making and problems of charity which will draw public interest. Through organization such as programs, social gatherings and picnics it also furnishes opportunity for social life. The officers are President, Mabelle Bamber; Vice-President, Mary Frances Whitehurst; Secretary, Queenie Jones; Treasurer, Lala Brantley.

Boys and Girls Glee Clubs—

There will be both a Boys and a Girls Glee Club. Members will be determined by trial.

MISCELLANEOUS
Assemblies—

From time to time there will be assemblies of the entire school in the auditorium. These will occur during the sixth period. All pupils are required to attend. At other times there may be meetings of the various classes and all members will be required to attend. Parents and patrons are cordially invited to be present at any assembly.

Spelling—

Pupils may be required to take spelling according to their deficiency.

Chorus Singing—

Chorus singing, one or two periods each week, is required for all pupils in the eighth grade; optional for pupils in other grades.

Physical Education—

Physical education is required of all pupils in all grades at least twice each week.





The Greenville High School Student
Activity Association

The S. A. A. Council—

(1) The Student Activity Association Council is composed of the captain and student manager of the activity going on at the time of the meeting or concerned in the action taken in the meeting; the coaches in action; the president of the S. A. A.; the secretary-treasurer; the faculty manager of student activities; the principal of the school.

(2) The duties of the Council shall be to determine policies relating to the Student Activity Association; award letters and numerals; act as executive committee of the Association; nominate candidates for offices in the Association.

(3) The Council shall meet once each month on the first Wednesday.

Officers of the Student Activity
Association—

PRESIDENT—Elected by the members of the association (the student body). He shall preside over all meetings of the Association. He shall be selected from the incoming senior class. (Candidates proposed by Council).

VICE-PRESIDENT—Elected by the members of the Association from candidates selected from the incoming junior class by the council. He shall preside in the absence of the president.

SECRETARY-TREASURER—Elected by the members of the Association from candidates selected by the Council. He shall have charge of all money collected by the Association and all money collected and all money transactions carried on by any activity pertaining to the high school not taken care of in the office of the city superintendent and by the board of education. He shall make reports at regular meetings.

Meetings of the Association—

The annual meeting of the Student Activity Association will take place in the auditorium during the second week in May at which time all officers shall be elected. Other meetings shall be as follows: One in





the week following the close of the football season, one in the week following the close of the basketball season, and one in the week before the week of final examinations in the Spring. The Association may meet at any other time it may seem necessary.

Dues—

The dues of the Association shall be two dollars a year—payable in two installments as follows: (1) Seventy-five cents during the first week of school in September and (2) Seventy-five cents payable during the week following mid-year examinations. Upon payment of dues the member shall receive a pass to all games occuring in the half year of issue.

Eligibility—

The following eligibility rules govern the players on athletic teams and the debaters:

Rule 1—Participants must be in regular attendance in school.

Rule 2—For football, the players must have made an average attendance of 60 per cent from mid-year of the year previous to the date of playing. This holds good for all teams taking part prior to mid-year. For all teams taking part after mid-year the players must have made an average attendance of 60 per cent from the beginning of school in the semester preceding.

Rule 3—Players and participants must have made passing grades for the three months or longer term (semester) previous to the one in which they are playing in at least three regular subjects (clear of duplications) each carrying at least four recitations per week of 40 minutes each.

Rule 4—The players or participants must have made passing grades in at least three regular subjects (as in rule 3) for the month previous to the one in which he is playing.

Rule 5—Players and participants may not represent the school on any team or teams for more than four years including years in which they were player or participants for other secondary schools, above the seventh grade and doing college preparatory work.

Rule 6—No one may take part in any extra curricular activity sponsored by the Student Actiivty Association who has graduated or received a diploma





from this school or any other secondary school having four grades above the seventh.

Rule 7—No one may take part in any extra curricular activity sponsored by the Association who has ever matriculated or registered as a student in any university, college, or institution offering work above the high school grade.

Rule 8—No one may represent the high school in any extra-curricular activity sponsored by the Association who received or has received any remuneration for his participation in any extra-curricular activity of any school, club, or other society or institution.

Rule 9—No one may take part in any activity sponsored by the Association who has not paid his Association dues or is not a member of the Association.

Rule 10—No one may represent the high school during the season who is a member of or player on any organized outside team in the same branch of activity.

Rule 11—The parents of each representative must be living in this county and must have resided there since January 1 of the same year of the game or contest except those occuring between January 1 and April 1 in which case it must be January 1 of the previous year.





Notes and Regulations Concerning
the Curricula

1. These curricula have been outlined to aid pupils in the wise selection of studies according to the ultimate life purpose of each individual. He should, therefore, determine his vocational aim just as early in his school career as possible.

2. It is always difficult and often impossible to provide for changes in a pupil's schedule of studies after school opens in September. If changes appear necessary, the principal should be notified in writing before September 1.

3. There will be no classes in any elective subject unless a sufficient number elect it.

4. No pupil can possibly take more than five unit subjects. (A unit subject recites five times per week.)

5. For graduation a pupil must have met the requirements of one of the curricula outlined.

6. The schedule of studies of each pupil must have the signed approval of a parent or guardian and of the principal or a sponsor.





CURRICULA
College Academic
(For A. B. Degree)

EIGHTH GRADENINTH GRADE
English 8 (Gram. & Lit.)English 9 (Gram & Lit.)
Algebra 8Algebra 9
Latin 8Latin 9
CivicsHistory 9
TENTH GRADEELEVENTH GRADE
English 10 (Gram & Lit.)English 11
Geometry 10 (Plane)History 11 (American)
One or two foreignOne or two foreign
languages:languages:
(Latin 10 and French 10 or Spanish, Note 2)(Latin 11 and French 11 or Spanish 11, (Note 3)
ELECTIVES (Choose One Or Two)ELECTIVES (Choose One Or Two)
Chemistry 10
History 10 (Mod. European)Geometry 11 (Solid) 1st half and Trigonometry 2nd half yr. Mathematical review ½ year Home Economics 10 or 11
Chemistry 10
Home Economics 10

Note 1: All pupils are required to take physical education.

Note 2: A pupil may not start two foreign languages in the same year.

Note 3: Colleges do not accept one unit of a foreign language. Four units of foreign language are required in this curriculum.

Note 4: General Science will be given in the 8th grade only. One science is required of every graduate.





College Technical

EIGHTH GRADENINTH GRADE
English 8( Gram. & Lit.)English 9 (Gram. & Lit.)
Algebra 8Algebra 9
CivicsHistory 9 (Anc. & Med.)
Science 8 (General)
ELECTIVES (Choose One)
Science 9 (Biology)
Spanish 1
Latin 8
TENTH GRADEELEVENTH GRADE
English 10 (Gram. & Lit.)English 11
History 11 (American)
ELECTIVES (Choose Three)ELECTIVES (Choose Two)
Geometry 10 (Plane)Latin 9 or 10
History 10 (Mod. European)French 11
French 10Spanish 2
Spanish 1 or 2Science 10 (Chemistry)
Latin 8 or 9Home Economics 10 or 11
Science 10 (Chemistry)
Home Economics 10

Note 1: All pupils are required to take physical education.

Note 2: A pupil may not start two foreign languages in the same year.

Note 3: Colleges will not accept one unit of a foreign language.

Note 4: General Science will be given in the 8th grade only.





Business

EIGHTH GRADENINTH GRADE
English 8 (Gram. & Lit.)English 9 (Gram. & Lit.)
Algebra 8Business Arithmetic 9
Science 8 (General)
Civics
ELECTIVES (Choose Two)
Science 9 (Biology)
History 9 (Anc. & Med.)
Algebra 8
Spanish 1
TENTH GRADEELEVENTH GRADE
English 10 (Gram. & Lit.)English 11
Bookkeeping 10History 11 (American)
Typewriting & Shorthand 10
ELECTIVES (Choose One)
Bookkeeping 11
Typewriting & Shorthand 11
ELECTIVES (Choose One)ELECTIVES (Choose One)
Science 10 (Chemistry)Science 10 (Chemistry)
History 10 (Mod. European)Spanish 2
Spanish 1 or 2French 11
French 10Home Economics 10 or 11
Home Economics 10

Note 1: All pupils are required to take physical education.

Note 2: A pupil may not start two foreign languages in the same year.

Note 3: Colleges will not accept one unit of a foreign language.

Note 4: General Science will be given in the 8th grade only. One Science is required for graduation.





General

EIGHTH GRADENINTH GRADE
English 8 (Gram. & Lit.)English 9 (Gram. & Lit.)
Algebra 8Algebra 9
Science 8 (General)History 9 (Anc. & Med.)
CivicsELECTIVES (Choose One)
Science 9 (Biology)
Spanish 1
Latin 8
TENTH GRADEELEVENTH GRADE
English 10 (Gram. & Lit.)English 11
History 11 (American)
ELECTIVES (Choose Three)ELECTIVES (Choose Two)
Geometry 10 (Plane)Latin 9 or 10
History 10 (Mod. European)French 11
French 10Spanish 2
Spanish 1 or 2Science 10 (Chemistry)
Latin 8 or 9Home Economics 10 or 11
Science 10 (Chemistry)
Home Economics 10

Note 1: All pupils are required to take physical education.

Note 2: A pupil may not start two foreign languages in the same year.

Note 3: Colleges will not accept one unit of a foreign language.

Note 4: General Science will be given in the 8th grade only. One Science is required for graduation.









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