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The Old flag v. 1, no. 1 (May 19, 1865)

Date: 1865 | Identifier: AP2 .O52
The Old flag. Plymouth, N.C. : Albert W. Chappell, 1865- Editor: A.A. Putnam. Contains civil war news and local advertisements. more...
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THE OLD FLAG.

VOL. 1. PLYMOUTH, N. C., FRIDAY, MAY 19, 1865. NO. 1.

THE OLD FLAG

IS ISSUED EVERY Friday Morning

At five cents per single copy.

A. A. PUTNAM,Editor.
ALBERT W. CHAPPELL,Publisher.

Military Orders.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF N. CAROLINA, (ARMY OF THE OHIO,) Raleigh, N. C., April 27th, 1865.

General Orders No. 31.

The Commanding General has the great satisfaction of announclng to the Army and to the People of North Carolina that hostilities within this State have definitely ceased; that for us the war is ended, and it is hoped that peace will soon be restored throughout our country.

It is now the duty of all to cultivate friendly relations with the same zeal which has characterized our conduct of the war, that the blessings of union, peace, and material prosperity may be speedily restored to the entire country. It is confidently believed and expected, that the troops of this army and the people of North Carolina will cordially unite in honest endeavors to accomplish this great end.

All good and peaceable citizens will be protected and treated with kindness, while those who disturb the peace, or violate the laws, will be punished with the severity of martial law.

The troops will be distributed so as best to secure the interests of the United States Government and protect the people, until a civil government can be established in harmony with the Constitution and laws of the United States. The most perfect discipline and good conduct are enjoined upon all officers and soldiers, and cordial support upon all good citizens.

All who are peaceably disposed are invited to return to their homes and resume their industrial pursuits. Such as have been deprived of their animals and wagons by the hostile armiss, will be temporarily supplied, as far as practicable, upon application to the nearest Provost Marshal, by loans of the captured property in possession of the Quartermaster's Department. The needy will also be supplied, for the time being, with subsistence stores from the Commissary Department.

It will be left to the Judicial Department of the Government to punish those political leaders who are responsible for secession, rebellion and civil war, with all its horrors. Between the Government of the United States and the people of North Carolina there is peace.

By command of MAJ. GEN. SCHOFIELD.

J. A. CAMPBELL, Assistant Adjutant Gen'l.

OFFICIAL:

J. A. JUDSON, Assistant Adjutant Gen'l.

HEADQUARTERS, STATION OF PLYMOUTH, PLYMOUTH, N. C., May 4th, 1865.

ORDERS.

All Officers and Soldiers of the so-called Confederate Army, are hereby notified that the uniform of that army is not permitted to be worn at this Station; or within the lines of actual occupation of this command, and must be discontinued at once.

This will be understood as applying alike to paroled prisoners, soldiers of the armies of Generals Lee and Johnston, and such other commands and detachments as have surrendered, and the soldiers thereof been paroled, and to deserters, and will be strictly respected and obeyed, except in the cases of officers and soldiers awaiting transportation for parole, and actual prisoners.

By command of MAJ. N. P. FULLER,

WM. G. HAEKELL, Lt. and Station Adj't.

HEADQUARTERS, STATION OF PLYMOUTH, PLYMOUTH, N. C., March 18th, 1865.

Owners of Cattle in this town are hereby notified that from and after this date, such animals will not be permitted to run at large.

Parties violating this order, or permitting it to be violated, will be subject to the following fines, besides the impounding of the cattle, which the Provost Guard are ordered to seize when found at large.

A fine of two (2) dollars on first seizure.

A fine of five (5) dollars on second seizure.

On third seizure the animals will be confiscated for the benefit of the Government.

DOG OWNERS are warned to keep their dogs in doors after dark, and any person finding such dogs at liberty after that time will be sustained in killing them, provided it be not done with fire-arms.

By command of COL. JONES FRANKLE,

WM. G. HASKELL, Lt. and Station Adjutant.

On the surrender of his army, Gen. Joe Johnson issued the following announcement of the surrender:

HEADQUARTERS, ARMY OF TENNESSEE, NEAR GREENSBUROUGH, N. C., April 27th, 1865.

General Orders No. 18.—By the terms of a military convention made on the 22d inst. by Maj. Gen. W. T. Sherman, U. S. A., and Gen. J. E. Johnston, C. S. A., the officers and men of this army are to bind themselves not to take up arms against the United States until properly relieved from that obligation, and shall receive guarantees from the United States officers against molestation by the U. S. authorities so long as they observe that obligation and the laws in force where they reside.

For these objects duplicate muster rolls will be mado out immediately and after the distribution of the necessary papers, the troops will be marched under their officers to their respective States, and there be disbanded, all retaining private property.

The object of this convention is pacification to the extent of the authority of the commanders who made it. Events in Virginia, which broke every hope of success by war, imposed on its General the duty of saving our country from further devastation, and our people from ruin.

(Signed) J. E. JOHNSTON, General.

Advertisements.

New Spring Goods.

A NEW AND LARGE STOCK OF DRY GOODS, GROCERIES, FANCY ARTICLES, &C.,

Purchased expressly for the wants of the people of this section, will be

OPENED IN A FEW DAYS

AT THE STORE OF J. B. CHESSON,

WHERE WILL BE FOUND CALICOES, GINGHAMS, MUSLINS, DeLAINES, LAWNS, DIAPERS,

MOURNING GOODS,

CAMBRICS,

MOSQUITO NETTINGS,

READY-MADE CLOTHING, HOOP SKIRTS, RIBBONS,

SPOOL COTTON,

PINS and NEEDLES, &c.

TOGETHER WITH Coffee, Sugar, Salt, Plows, Axes, Chains, Hoes, Tobacco, Snuff, Lard, Butter, Fruits, Flavoring Extracts, Perfumery, Combs, Buttons, AND OTHER ARTICLES TOO NUMEROUS TO MENTION.

Plymouth, N. C., May 19, 1856. 1-tf

NEW STORE!

NEW GOODS.

A Fresh Stock of Goods, fresh from New York, kept constantly on hand, which will be sold at the Lowest Market Rates, for CASH or COUNTRY PRODUCE. Call and see my stock of

Prints,Crockery,Medicines,
Lawns,Tin Ware,Candies,
Sheetings,Ploughs,Knives,
DeLaines,Shovels,Flour,

Boots and Shoes, Hats and Caps, Yankee Notions, Perfumeries, Glass and Nails, Sugar & Coffee, Clothing, Hoes, &c., &c.

In order to promote trade, I will take in exchange for Goods, N. C. BANK BILLS, COTTON, SHINGLES, STAVES, BEES-WAX, FLAX-SEED, TURPENTINE, &c.

PLEASE GIVE ME A CALL, BEFORE PURCHASING ELSEWHERE.

S. R. DICKERSON.

Piymouth, N. C., May 19, 1865. 4w-1

Eating House.


[Illustration:


Eagle and Shield Symbol]

Meals:

BREAKFAST from 7 to 9 A. M.

DINNER from 12 to 2 P. M.

SUPPER from 5 to 7 P. M.

PRICES OF MEALS:

Breakfast 75 cents. Dinner One-Dollar. Supper 75 cts.

Saloon in the Mary Lee House.

WM. RANKIN, Proprietor.

Plymouth, N. C., May 19, 1865. 4w-1

Variety Store & Barber's Shop.

AMOS PETTIFORD respectfully gives notice that he has opened a Store on Water Street, near Quartermaster's Stable, where he will keep constantly on hand a full supply of CAKES, CANDY, EGGS, LEMONADE, CIGARS, SNUFF and TOBACCO.

Mr. P. has also fitted up a Barber's Shop where he will be happy to wait on all who will give him their patronage.

EXPRESS BUSINESS.—Mr. P. will also attend to all kinds of Express work, and will convey goods to any part of the town.

MASON WORK of all kinds will be promptly attended to, by leaving your orders with me.

Plymouth, N. C., May 19, 1865. 1-tf

SHOEMAKING.

HARROLD & FRANCES respectfully give notice to the citizens of this and surrounding counties, that they are now prepared to do all kinds of BOOT or SHOE MAKING, in the best and most satisfactory manner. Heeling, Tapping, and all kinds of Repairing done at short notice. Please give us a call. Store on WATER STREET, opposite the Quartermaster's Stables.

WM. FRANCES.

GEO. T. HARROLD.

Plymouth, N. C., May 19, 1865. 1-tf

A few popular Songs for sale at the office of THE OLD FLAG





THE OLD FLAG.

  • “The union of hearts, the union of hands,
  • And the Flag of our Union forever.”

PLYMOUTH, N. C., May 19, 1865.

Salutatory.

We issue to-day to the people of Plymouth and vicinity the first number of a weekly newspaper, regretting however, that owing to the suddenness of the enterprise, the paper is not such as to size and matter as we could wish. Soon our facilities will be greater and we then expect to do better. Meanwhile we content ourselves with the reflection that a small and poor paper in this now war-worn but presently to be flourishing town is better than none at all.

Its name indicates what will be the controlling spirit—the governing principles of this humble sheet. We believe in and cherish a deathless devotion to the Old Flag which now floats victorious throughout the States and reunites them in the bonds of Union, we trust, forevermore. Under its ample folds the North and South are destined soon to be happy together. That is our faith. To this end—to the end of contributing in an humble way, through the influence of our journal, to the establishment of the more perfect Union for which our Fathers framed the Constitution, we respectfully solicit the patronage of this community.

The Dawn of Peace.

After four years of the darkness of war, the beneficent light of Peace dawns. The people breathe freer and are made happy, for mighty and fearful as has been the war, more mighty and grateful is the revolution that is wrought.—Rejoicing fills the land that so lately rang with the din and drank of the blood of more than Xerxian armies. Even the untimely death of the great and good man who so wisely and triumphantly conducted the nation through the perilous struggle and became the beloved of his people, has not altogether been able to robe the country in mourning, because great as was (and long will be) the popular grief, greater still is the popular joy and the giving of thanks.

Slavery has ceased to be an American institution, and the irrepressible conflict between the North and the South is no more. Together with a geographical oneness, which of itself ought to have been a sufficient argument against secession, we now have a country possessing, or soon to possess, the additional and stronger unity arising out of homogeneous society. Let the people of the South not take it sadly to heart that their rebellion is crushed—that their attempt to divide these States and set up a Confederacy upon the corner stone of Slavery has proven a stupendous failure. it is they who should most rejoice in their defeat. The victors desire and receive no spoils. The vanquished are the chief gainers. There is no exultation with the loyal people over the mere fact of the defeat and dispersion of the forces in rebellion. It is simply a hearty and wholesome feeling of satisfaction that the Government is saved—that the Union is preserved and is to be perpetual.

Rejoice, men of the South, whether you have heretofore held slaves or have held them not—whether you have been fighting against your country or are guiltless of the stain. There is abundance for your joy.—Though the land is thick with the marks of cruel war, and desolation widely reigns, the States still exist, and the old Flag, now altogether triumphant, has by her stars, through all the battles, numbered every State, and will continue to number them to the end. The soil of the South is still rich, her forests are yet immense and her rivers are as full of majesty as ever. Under the genius of free labor, her wide and fertile fields, her gigantic forests, and her mill driving and shipbearing rivers, are destined to yield a wealth compared with which their yield heretofore has been strangely out of proportion. How grand seems the future that is before us! How easy to be acquired is a national prosperity unsurpassed!—To develop the full resources of this wonderful land—to cultivate the arts of peace—to educate the millions set free and the generations as they come on, it is to be hoped, will be one settled policy as against any war-waging for the sake of war and conquest. The prospect of further internal dissensions of our own rising to the magnitude of open hostility, is too remote to excite alarm, while the restoration of the Union now “more perfect,” the extent of our military experience and the extraordinary means we possess for defence or offensive operations would seem to insure us an easy triumph in the event of any possible combination of foreign powers against us as a people.

Nor is this the language of glorification. It is simply the truth perceived by the untaught freedman equally with the astute observer.—It is simply the necessary result of an extraordinary coincidence of circumstances and the concatenation of events. Let us accept the fact and be wisely proud of the fortune of our position. Under this summer sunshine of peace now breaking over the land, let us, citizens of the North, the South, the East and the West, strike hands, and address ourselves to the christian duty of reconciliation and the cultivation of a brotherhood complete. Our Government will be the mild sway of Liberty, and as such it deserves our love and fostering care. Let us cherish and treasure the blessing and be industriously devoted to the enterprises of glorious Freedom.

SIGNIFICANT.—We learn from the Newbern Times that Hon. Wm. W. Holden, editor of the Raleigh Standard, has been requested by President Johnson to visit Washington on important business connected with the welfare of the Old North State.

The rebel Vance, late Governor of this State, has had the consummate impudence to issue a “Proclamation” to the people, setting himself forth as still in actual power as the Chief Executive of the State, and announcing his plans for the present and his purposes for the future. The audacious pretender cooly declares “that, under God, I will do all that may be in my power to settle the government of the state, to restore the civil authority in her borders, and to further the great ends of peace, domestic tranquility, and the general welfare of the people.” Bah!

EUROPEAN.—While expressing their sympathy for the loss of our late President, the English are in a terrible stew about Canada—believing and fearing that “Uncle Sam” will turn his eyes toward her and “gobble” her up in a twinkle; while the Frog Eaters are in a perspiration of consternation about his probable intentions with regard to Mexico. “Evil consciences need no accusers.”

GOLD closed in New York on the 11th at 131 1/2.





Latest News.
Capture of Davis!

The Secretary of War furnishes the official report of Gen. Wilson, giving the particulars of the capture of Jeff. Davis in Irwin county, Georgia, by Col. Pritchard and the 4th Michigan cavalry. Jeff., when captured, was disguised in one of his wife's dresses, having hastily assumed this unchivalric oostume on finding his hiding place surrounded. Thus attired, he ran into the forest, where, on being discovered, he drew a bowie knife and flourished it threateningly in the face of his pursuers. He soon, however, submitted to his fate, but expressed much indignation regarding the energy with which he was pursued, considering it as very unmagnanimous on the part of the government. With Jeff. were captured his family, together with his wife, sisters and brother; his Postmaster General, Reagan; his private secretary, Col. Harrison; Col. Johnson, aid de camp on Davis’ staff; Cols. Morris and Lubeck and Lieut. Hathaway; also a train of five wagons and three ambulances, making a most perfect success. Breckinridge, the War Secretary, was not captured with Davis, but a son of his was taken on the previous day, and such dispositions of the national cavalry had been made as it was believed would completely cut off the escape of Breckinridge, as well as of Judah P. Benjamin and the other Cabinet officers and fellow criminals. All the captives would, it was thought, reach Macon, Ga., on Saturday last, and would be forwarded to Washington as soon as possible.

Immense Offerings of Money
to the Government!

The subscriptions to the government seven and three tenths per ct. loan on last Saturday reached the astonishing amount of considerably over Thirty Mtllions of Dollars. Ninety-eight millions of dollars worth of tnese bonds have been taken the past week, and three hundred millions since the first of last month!

Local News.
UNION MEETING NEXT SATURDAY.

The loyal citizens of Washington county are earnestly requested to meet at LEES’ MILLS, on SATURDAY, May 27th, at 10 o'clock, a. m., to ascertain the sentiments of the people in regard to future action.

MANY CITIZENS.

At the time of the occupation of Plymouth by the forces under Col. Frankle last November, the population of the town consisted of but five families of white people besides a few negroes, and there was not a shop or store at which could be bought the least article of the necessaries of life. At the present time the resident population, exclusive of the blacks who are very many, numbers several hundreds, while groceries and dry goods stores, which are doing a flourishing business, have risen to the number of eight. The appearance of the town has been much improved by clearing up and fencing grounds, pulling down and carting away the bricks of old chimneys, cleaning out the ditches of the streets, leveling useless earthworks, &c. Plymouth is yet to be the beautiful place it was once, and made more attractive than formerly by an increase of its business.

As some little alarm has been excited by the report of a case of yellow fever among the colored population of the town, it is proper to state that the physicians did not, as the report had it, pronounce the case referred to one of yellow fever. As a matter of precaution, however, the citizens should feel it a personal duty to aid the authorities in every possible way looking to the sanitary condition of the town. Owing to the abundance of refuse matter outside the line of works, the low ground by which we are surrounded, and the many places that harbor standing water, too great solicitude cannot be felt for the health of the community the coming season.

As there seems to be a doubt in the minds of some in this community in regard to slaves, we give the following extract from a late order in regard to the same. “All persons formerly held as slaves will be treated in every respect as entitled to the rights of freedmen, and such as desire their services will be required to pay for them,” * * “and all colored persons having places of employment are-advised to remain, whenever the persons by whom they are employed recognize their rights and agree to compensate them for their services.”

By the advertisements of J. B. Chesson, L. H. Hornthal and S. R. Dickerson, which appears in today's paper, it will be seen that they are now opening large stocks of new goods; and we sincerely trust that in accordance with the President's proclamation (to be found in another column), removing restrictions on trade, that our friends from the country will soon be able to trade untrammeled by the present system of permits, &c.

We are now having the most beautiful weather, though very dry for the season, and our farmer friends are making the most of it in preparing to cultivate large crops. From present indications we are detined to have an immense crop of fruit this season.

We are pleased to learn, says the Newbern Times, that among the discharges of steamboats, the Massasoit and Pilot Boy are to be retained in the service. These two steamers were engaged in the Burnside Coast Division in their first efforts in North Carolina, and have remained in these waters ever since.—Two honorable landmarTs of a successful expedition under one of Nature's noblemen, Gen. AMBROSE E. BURNSIDE.

We cail the attention of the public to the advertisement of Mr. WM. RANKIM. He has fitted up a first-class Eating Saloon, in the Mary Lee house, where will be found, on his table, the best the market afords.

UNION MEETINGS in various parts of the State are reported. One held in Wayne passed the following resolutions unanimously:

Resolved, That we are in favor of immediately holding a State-Convention to return North Carolina to the Union, and would suggest that the 20th of May would be a suitable day to repeal the abominable and detestable ordinance of secession.

Resolved, That in WM. W. HOLDEN we recognize the patriot and statesman, who, in the hour of our trials and troubles, has stood the firm and steadfast friend of the people, and a bold defender of the constitutional rights of the citizens; therefore we recommend him as our first choice for Chief Magistrate of the State.

A great Union meeting was held at Raleigh on Saturday evening. May 8th, and appropriate resolutions, in favor of immediately holding a Convention, were passed unanimously. Also one in favor of WM. W. HOLDEN as Governor of the State.

A meeting was held by the citizens of Pasquotank county, in the town of Nixonton, on the 6th of May, for the purpose of appointing a Committee of twenty, to superintend a flag raising in that place on the 20th inst. The flag is the original one belonging to the place, and the last taken down in the State after the rebellion began.

The citizens of Beaufort and Pitt counties assembled in Washington on the 15th inst., in large numbers, and passed resolutions to the memory of the late President, and asking President Johnson to adopt measures at an early day for the restoration of civil law in the State... Also, calling back those who fled from their homes for fear of oppression and tyranny, and extending them a cordial invitation as friends and patriots of our common country.

By-the-bye is it not time that the loyal men of this and the neighboring towns made a like movement?

We are indebted to Mr. BENJAMIN NORCOM for some luscious strawberries, the largest and best we have seen. [Ben and your humble servant (being in two different armies in Virginia) were in the habit of enjoying themselves in shooting bullets at each other, and now he is retaliating by shooting strawberries at us. Strange powder, Ben; we will set our “devil” afoul of you!]

ANOTHER SURRENDER.

WASHINGTON. May 8th.

Information was received at army headquarters to day of the final and complete surrender of Dick Taylor and the army under his command in Alabama and Mississippi, to Gen Canby. The flag end of the rebellion therefore vanishes to the wilds of Texas. All guerilla warfare will now be outlawed.

The Emperor of France, it is said, on the receipt of the news of the fall of Richmond, proposed to England to enter into an alliance defensive and offensive against the United States. The idea was instantly repudiated by the British Ambassador at Paris, acting under instructions from his government.

GOOD NEWS FOR THE SOLDIERS.—The Treasury Department is making arrangements to pay all the back indebtedness, including the arreareges and bounties to the army. We think it is about time.





STARTLING INTELLIGENCE!
The Murdered President.

Evidence that Jeff. Davis, Jacob Tompson, C. C. Clay, Beverly Tucker, Geo. N. Sanders, and W. C. Cleary

WERE ACCOMPLICES OF THE MURDERER!

A Price set on their Heads.

A PROCLAMATION BY THE PRESIDENT.

Whereas, it appears from evidence in the Bureau of Military Justice that the atrocious murder of the late President, Abraham Lincoln, and the attempted assassination of the Hon. W. H. Seward, Secretary of State, were incited, concerted and procured by and between Jeff. Davis, late of Richmond, Va., and Jacob Thompson, Clement C. Clay, Beverly Tucker, George N. Sanders, W. C. Cleary and other rebels and traitors against the government of the United States, harbored in Canada:

Now, therefore, to the end that justice may be done, I, Andrew Johnson, President of the United States, do offer and promise for the arrest of said persons, or either of them within the limits of the United States, so that they can be brought to trial, the following rewards:

One hundred thousand dollars for the arrest of Jefferson Davis.

Twenty-five thousand dollars for the arrest of Clement C. Clay.

Twenty five thousand dollars for the arrest of Jacob Thompson, late of Mississippi.

Twenty five thousand dollars for the arrest of George N. Sanders.

Twenty five thousand dollars for the arrest of Beverly Tucker, and

Ten thousand dollars for the arrest of William C. Cleary, late clerk of Clement C. Clay.

The Provost Marshal General of the United States is directed to cause a description of said persons with notice of the above rewards, to be published.

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand, and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.

Done at the city of Washington, the second day of May, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-five, and of the independence of the United States of America the eighty-ninth.

ANDREW JOHNSON.

By the President:

W. HUNTER, Act'g Sec'ry State.

Mr. Holden, the editor of the Raleigh Standard, who is suggested as the Governor of this State, takes decided ground against the restoration to power of Governor Vance and the existing Legislature. He favors the adoption of the constitutional amendment abolishing slavery, and recognizing the constitution of the United States as paramount to any State constitution.

The 10th army corps, Maj. Gen. Terry, and the 23d, Maj. Gen. Cox, constituting the Army of the Ohio, all under command of Maj. Gen. Schofield, is to remain in this State for the present. They will doubtless be scattered in small garrisons throughout the State.—The policy of the Administration seems to be foreshadowed in this, viz:—to protect the Unionists until they can elect their officers, and again obtain the civil power of the State.

The Union Armies recently in Virginia and North Carolina, with the exception of a few corps left to protect the loyal citizens, are ordered to Washington, where they are to have a grand review preparatory to the mustering out of a large portion of them.

Both from St. Louis and New Orleans we have the announcement that negotiations for the surrender of all the rebel forces of the Trans-Mississippi Department, under command of Kirby Smith, were recently in progress on the Mississippi river, near the mouth of Red river. The terms are said to be the same as accorded to Lee and Johnston.

101 battle flags and guidons, captured during the late battles in Virginia, were presented to the War Department at Washington on the 24th ult.

Winding up the Rebellion.

Important Order from President Johnson.

Removal of Restrictions on Trade in various Southern States.

Executive Chamber, Washington, April 29th, 1865.

Being desirous to relieve all loyal citizens and well disposed persons residing in the insurrectionary States from unnecessary commercial restrictions, and to encourage them to return to peaceful pursuits, it is hereby ordered—

First—That all restrictions upon internal, domestic and coastwise commercial intercourse be discontinued in such part of the States of Tennessee, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, and so much of Louisiana as lies east of the Mississippi river, as shall be embraced within the lines of the national military occupation, excepting only such restrictiens as are imposed by the acts of Congress, and regulations in pursuance thereof prescribed by the Secretary of the Treasury, and approved by the President, and excepting also from the effect of this order the following articles, contraband of war, to wit: Arms, ammunition, and all articles from which ammunition is manufactured; gray uniforms and cloth, locomotives, cars, railroad iron and machinery for operating railroads; telegraph wires, insulators and instruments for operating telegraph lines.

Second—All existing military and naval orders in any manner restricting internal, domestic and coastwise commercial intercourse and trade with or in the localities above named be and the same are hereby revoked, and that no military or naval officer in any manner interrupt or interfere with the same, or with any boats or other vessels engaged therein under proper authority pursuant to the regulations of the Secretary of the Treasury.

ANDREW JOHNSON.

The Senate of Tennessee have adopted a resolution offering a reward of $5000 for the arrest and delivery of the rebel Governor Isham G. Harris to the civil authorities of that State.





THE OLD FLAG.

VOL. 1. PLYMOUTH, N. C., FRIDAY, MAY 26, 1865. NO. 2.

THE OLD FLAG

IS ISSUED EVERY

Friday Morning

At five cents per single copy.

A. A. PUTNAM,Editor.
ALBERT W. CHAPPELL,Publisher.

NOTICE.—I shall open in a few days, a new and well selected stock of DRY GOODS, GROCERIES, BOOTS and SHOES, &c., which I will sell at the Lowest Prices, wholesale or retail.

Drafts taken in New York at sight, for Goods.

Please call before purchasing elsewhere.

J. T. MIZELL.

Plymouth, May 26, 1865.

Peace, Peace!

L. H. HORNTHAL

HAS JUST RECEVED FROM NEW YORK

$10,000 worth of Goods!

WHICH HE WILL SELL AT

A GREAT REDUCTION FROM FORMER PRICES.

Bleached and Brown Cottons, Mouslin de Laines, Bareges, Plain and Blk Alpaccas, Calico, Linen Towels, Moorehair for dresses, Ladies & Gents Hose, Children's Hose, Ladies Gloves, Hair Netts, Parasols, Yankee Notions, Ladies and Gents Straw Hats, Linen Handkerchiefs, EVERY VARIETY OF RIBBONS and MILLINERY GOODS.

A LARGE STOCK OF Boys and Gents SUMMER CLOTHING.

One of the Largest Stocks of BOOTS and SHOES, Which we will sell at a GREAT REDUCTION.

Wool and Fur Hats, Linen and Flannel Shirts, Also, a large lot of GROCERIES.

Ladies and Gents will find it to their advantage to see the new stock before buying their Summer suits. All that is most fashionable this season can be had or made up to surpass any house in style. Please call and see

L. H. HORNTHAL.

Plymouth, May 26, 1865.

New Spring Goods.

A NEW AND LARGE STOCK OF DRY GOODS, GROCERIES, FANCY ARTICLES, &c., Purchased expressly for the wants of the people of this section, and

Now Opened

AT THE STORE OF J. B. CHESSON,

WHERE WILL BE FOUND CALICOES, GINGHAMS, MUSLINS, DeLAINES, LAWNS, DIAPERS,

MOURNING GOODS,

CAMBRICS,

MOSQUITO NETTINGS,

COTTON CARDS,

PATENT MEDICINES,

SPOOL COTTON,

PINS and NEEDLES, &c.

TOGETHER WITH

Coffee, Suger, Salt, Plows, Axes, Chains, Hoes, Tobacco, Snuff, Lard, Butter, Fruits, Flavoring Extracts, Perfumery, Combs, Buttons, AND OTHER ARTICLES TOO NUMEROUS TO MENTION.

Plymouth, N. C., May 19, 1856. 1-tf

Eating House.

Meals

BREAKFAST from 7 to 9 A. M.

DINNER from 12 to 2 P. M.

SUPPER from 5 to 7 P. M.

PRICES OF MEALS: Breakfast 75 cents. Dinner One Dollar. Supper 75 cts.

Saloon in the Mary Lee House.

WM. RANKIN, Proprietor.

Plymouth, N. C., May 19, 1865. 4w-1

Variety Store & Barber's Shop.

AMOS PETTIFORD respectfully gives notice that he has opened a Store on Water Street, near Quartermaster's Stable, where he will keep constantly on hand a full supply of CAKES, CANDY, EGGS, LEMONADE, CIGARS, SNUFF and TOBACCO.

Mr. P. has also fitted up a Barber's Shop where he will be happy to wait on all who will give him their patronage.

EXPRESS BUSINESS.—Mr. P. will also attend to all kinds of Express work, and will convey goods to any part of the town.

MASON WORK of all kinds will be promptly attended to, by leaving your orders with me.

Plymouth, N. C., May 19, 1865. 1-tf

LOOK HERE!

I have just received from New York one of the largest stocks of Goods ever seen in Plymouth or vicinity, consisting of

Dry Goods, Groceries, Fancy Articles, &c.

—ALSO,—

Boots and Shoes, AND EVERY ARTICLE That is necessary for the people.

Give me a call, and I will guarantee you perfect salisfaction in Goods, Prices, &c.

LEVI JACKSON.

Plymouth, May 26, 1865.

NEW STORE!

NEW GOODS.

A Fresh Stock of Goods, fresh from New York, kept constantly on hand, which will be sold at the Lowest Market Rates, for CASH or COUNTRY PRODUCE. Call and see my stock of Prints, Crockery, Medicines, Lawns, Tin Ware, Candies, Sheetings, Ploughs, Knives, DeLaines, Shevels, Flour, Boots and Shoes, Hats and Caps, Yankee Notions, Perfumeries, Glass and Nails, Sugar & Coffee, Clothing, Hoes, &c., &c.

In order to promote trade, I will take in exchange for Goods, N. C. BANK BILLS, COTTON, SHINGLES, STAVES, BEES-WAX, ELAX-SEED, TURPENTINE &c.

PLEASE GIVE ME A CALL, BEFORE PURCHASING ELSEWHERE.

S. R. DICKERSON.

Plymouth, N. C., May 19, 1865. 4w-1

SHOEMAKING.

HARROLD & FRANCES respectfully give notice to the citizens of this and surrounding counties, that they are now prepared to do all kinds of BOOT or SHOE MAKING, in the best and most satisfactory manner. Heeling, Tapping, and all kinds of Repairing done at short notice. Please give us a call. Store on WATER STREET, opposite the Quartermaster's Stables.

WM. FRANCES.

GEO. T. HARROLD

Plymouth, N. C., May 19, 1865. 1-tf





THE OLD FLAG.

  • “The union of hearts, the union of hands,
  • And the Flag of our Union forever.”

PLYMUTH, N. C., MAY 26, 1865.

A Slight Difference.

Jeff. Davis and several of his associates in wickedness being now incarcerated in a fit retreat for felons, awaiting justice, the people see that the war of “Peaceable Secession” has drawn to a close, and perceive the sun of peace beginning to shed its effulgent rays upon this lately benighted land of the South, and are preparing to enjoy its blessings and congenial warmth.

The true men that were torn from their sorrowing families by the damnable conscription, return home rejoicing that the Government of our Fathers has vindicated its majesty and caused its power to be felt; while the contemptible, white-livered “secesh,” who caused the poor man to be forced to the carnival of death, while they fought the “Yankees” by speculating upon the necessities of the starving widows and orphans, come in at the eleventh hour and swallow the oath of allegiance as they would a dose of arsenic, in the vain hope that they can palm themselves off as loyal men and be permitted to take possession of and retain property that they would “burn before it should be polluted by sheltering the vandals of the North.” But that matter will be decided by civil tribunals composed of men of known loyalty, and who can distinguish the sheep from the goat. So mote it be.

We learn from the New York Herald of the 22d inst. that an order has been issued from the War Department, providing for the mustering out of the service of “all officers and men whose time expires previous to September 13th, 1865.”

The Union Meeting to-morow.

Let every loyal man of this town and vicinity attend the Union meeting at Lee's Mills on Saturday.—Work, earnest work is now required to bring the old North State back into the Union from which she was so ruthlessly torn. Good speakers will be present to address the meeting. Union men of Plymouth! see that none of your number remain at home to-morrow; but be sure that every man who has remained true to the Old Flag attends this meeting, which will take place at 10 o'clock in the morning. Let there be a full attendance.

A great many families are constantly arriving here in every steamer from Newbern. Some of them have been absent from the time the war commenced, and are now returning to their homes.—Alas! they too often find them burnt to the ground, and nothing left to remind them of their once happy homes but bricks and rubbish.—a sad memorial of the beauties of secession.

We learn from a great many sources that a large number of the officers and men belonging to the different regiments that have been in this State intend to return after they are mustered out, and settle down. Let them come, they will meet with a cordial reception.—Yankee enterprise and labor would place the old North State far ahead of some of her more fortunate sister States.

Gen. Lee, it is said, proposes, if permitted by government, to retire to his estate at White House on the Pamunkey river, and there spend the remainder of his days.

GOLD.—The price of gold in New York on Saturday, 22d inst., was $1.30.

Captured Rebels.

The following distinguished rebel leaders are now in confinement in Northern forts, some awaiting disposition as soldiers, and others as criminals:

Civilians.

Jeff. Davis, rebel President.

Alex. H. Stephens, rebel Vice President.

John H. Reagan, Postmaster-General.

B. N. Harrison, Jeff's secretary.

Clement C. Clay, Senator from Alabama.

Joseph E. Brown, Governor of Georgia.

Zebulon B. Vance, Governor of North Carolina.

Senator R. M. T. Hunter, of Virginia.

J. A. Campbell, of Alabama.

Lieutenant Generals.

R. H. Anderson. of S. Carolina.

R. S. Ewell, of Virginia.

Major Generals.

W. R. N. Beale, of Mississippi.

E. Johnston, of Georgia.

J. R. Wheeler, of Alabama.

and a large number of Brigadier Generals and Colonels.

The troops now stationed at this post will soon leave for Newbern or elsewhere. One company has already left. The guns in the fort have been dismounted and sent off, and the fortifications are to be levelled, as is also all the defensive works. Citizens are requested to read the order of Col. Frankle (inregard to the formation of companies to act as special policemen, and for their own protection) published in another column.

TO THE LADIES.—If you wish to purchase a beautiful hat, of the latest style, just step into the store of MR. JOHN CHESSON, and you will be sure to get suited.—John is one of the best natured fellows we are acquainted with, and not only this, but [good gracious! what will his better half say?] he is decidedly a—a—a lodies’ man. There! we have said it. [Forgive us, John; but it is the truth, or else they would not flock to your store in the way they do.]

We would say to the citizens of this and surrounding counties, that there are at the Provost Marshal's office a large number of letters for people belonging to this town. The list would have been published if we had had the material to do so. If not called for within two weeks from date, they will be sent to the Dead Letter office at Washington, D. C. A list can be found at the office.





Latest News.


[Illustration:

JEFF. DAVIS LOOKING FOR THE LAST DITCH, ON HIS favorite steed!
]

We received yesterday, through the kindness of a friend, the New York Herald of the 22d, from which we glean the following news.

Jeff. Davis and his party have arrived at Fortress Monroe, and the casemates of the fort are being prepared for the reception of the party.

Gov. Vance of this State has also arrived there from Newbern under guard, and he will be disposed of the same as the other prisoners.

About five tons of rebel government documents, hurried off into North Carolina from Richmond on the evacuation of that city by the Jeff. Davis conclave, arrived at Fortress Monroe on Friday last from Newbern, in charge of Col. Treat of Gen. Schofield's staff.—They were captured by the Federal troops in this State.

The examination of witnesses for the prosecution in the assassination conspiracy trial at Washington, was concluded on the 22d inst. The counsel for the prisoners, it is said, have about two hundred witnesses to testify in their behalf.

The grand Review at Washington of Sherman's army, Potomac army, Sheridan's troopers and other veterans, comprising altogether about 200,000 men, took place on Tuesday and Wednesday last. The spectacle was one of the grandest ever seen in this country, and rarely in the history of the world. The city was densely crowded with people on the occasion.

Gen. Sheridan has left Waskington for his new command, and intends to clean out the army of Kirby Smith and the other fragments of the rebellion west of the Mississippi river.

Gen. Molineaux, of New York, has taken formal possession of Augusta, Georgia, and has found about 100,000 bales of cotton, 10,000,000 dollars worth of ordnance and other rebel stores, and 45,000 dollars in bullion. A part of Jeff. Davis's specie train was captured, and one hundred and eighty-five thousand dollars in gold was secured.

The rebel Commodore Farrand, of Mobile, has surrendered himself and all his command to Rear-Admiral Thatcher.

It will be seen by the order of Gen. Schofield, published in this paper, that the Brigades of Generals Palmer and Hawley are to garrison the Coast Districts of this State for the present. Among the regiments in. Gen. Palmer's command, is the 2d Massachusetts Artillery, Col. Frankle, four companies of which have been in this place for the last six months. The regiment has been in service nearly two years, in this department, and, although it has garrisoned some of the most unhealthy places in the State and done a great deal of hard work, yet it numbers some 1800 men at the present time. Quite a number of these are one year's men, whose time of service expires in September next. The health of the regiment at present is very good, although quite a large number of the men are troubled with the fever and shakes, a malady very prevalent in this department.

In accordance with the President's proclamation, all restrictions on trade, except the necessary Treasury regulations, have been removed, as has also the pass system. People can now visit Plymouth without being obliged to have a pass.

There is now telegraphic communication between Washington and Macon, Ga., and the same wires which were recently used by the rebels were lately employed in transmitting the President's Proclamation, offering a reward for the arrest of Jeff. Davis and others.

HEADQUARTERS, DEPARTMENT OF NORTH CAROLINA, (ARMY OF THE OHIO,) Raleigh, N. C., May 4th, 1865.

General Orders No. 35.

Maj. Gen. J. D. Cox, with his own corps and two Brigades of Gen. Kilpatrick's Cavalry, will occupy Greensboro’, Salisbury, Charlotte and such other points as he may deem necessary, and take care of the Western portion of the State.

Maj. Gen. A. H. Terry, with his corps and one brigade of Gen. Kilpatrick's cavalry, will occupy Raleigh, Goldsboro’, Fayetteville and such other points as he may deem necessary, and take care of the Central portion of the State.

Brig. Gens. Palmer and Hawley will command the Coast Districts as heretofore.

The troops will visit all parts of the State, disperse or capture ali bands of guerillas and marauders, and collect all military arms (other than the side arms of paroled officers) which may be found in the State.

The Corps and District Commanders will, as soon as practicable, send to each county under their jurisdiction, a discreet officer, with a sufficient force to organize a small company of the most responsible loyal citizens to serve as a local police force until further orders. As far as necessary the companies so organized will be furnished with captured arms and ammunition, but will receive no compensation for their services.

All the members will be required to take the oath of allegiance to the Government of the United States, and an oath to preserve the peace, prevent crime, and arrest criminals, as far as practicable, within their county, and to obey all lawful orders of the U. S. Military authorities.

Criminals arrested by the police companies will be sent to the nearest Military Post, for trial by Military Commission. A full statement of the crimes and the names of witnesses, must be sent with the prisoners in each case.

By command of MAJ. GEN. SCHOFIELD,

J. A. CAMPBELL, Assistant Adjutant Gen'l.

Official: J. A. JUDSON, Ass't Adj't Gen'l.

HEADQUARTERS STATION OF PLYMOUTH,

Plymouth, N. C., May 22d, 1865.

In accordance with the foregoing order, the loyal citizens of Washington and Martin Counties are requested to meet at this place on or before Thursday, the 25th inst., to organize local companies.

As the presence of a body of U. S. soldiers at this Station may be of but short duration, it behooves the citizens of this and the neighboring counties to provide for their own security. Like action is recommended to the citizens of Hyde, Tyrrell, Bertie and other counties where there is no armed force.

By command of COL. JONES FRANKLE,

WM. G. HASKELL, Lt. and Station Adj't

T. F. NEWTON would respectfully call the attention of the public to his new and splendid stock of

Dry Goods, Groceries, Fancy Articles, &c.

—ALSO,—

Boots and Shoes.

Authorized Government Agent

FOR THE PURCHASE OF

TAR, TURPENTINE, STAVES, SHINGLES, COTTON, TOBACCO, LUMBER, &c.

Give me a call.

T. F. NEWTON.

Plymouth, May, 1865.





Wonders of Natural History.

The following curious and beautiful account of the wonders of Natural History is taken from St. Pierre, the author of “Paul and Virginia.” If the same things were told in fable we should be inclined to look upon the author as a man of marvelous fancy.

“One day in summer, while I was busy in putting in order some observations which I had made upon the harmonies of this globe, I perceived upon a strawberry plant, which had been accidentally placed in my window, some small flies, which were so exceedingly beautiful, that I took a fancy to describe them. Next day I saw a different sort upon the plant, and these, too, I described. In the course of three weeks, proceeding in this manner, I wrote descriptions of thirty seven different species of insects which resorted to my strawberry plant.—At length they came in such crowds and presented such a variety that I was obliged to relinquish this study, though very amusing, because I had neither leisure, nor, to confess the truth, expression.

The insects, which I observed, were all distinguished from each other by their colors, their forms, and their motions. There were some that shone like gold; others were of the color of silver, and others of brass; some were spotted, some striped, blue, green, brown, chesnut colored. The heads of some were rounded like a turban; those of others were drawn out in the figure of a cone; some were dark, like a tuft of black velvet; others sparkled like a ruby. There was no less diversity in their wings. In some they were long and brilliant, like transparent plates of mother-of-pearl; in others, short and broad, resembling the net work of the finest gauze. Each had a particular manner of disposing and managing his wings. Some carried their's perpendicular; others horizontally, and then seemed to take pleasure in displaying them. Some flew spirally, like butterflies: others rose into the air by flying against the wind, like a paper kite which rises while the wind is against it.

Some settled upon the plant merely to deposit their eggs; others to shelter themselves from the sun. But the greater part came for reasons with which I am totally unacquainted; for some came and went in incessant motion; others remained a considerable time, moving only parts of their bodies. A great number were entirely motionless, and were occupied, perhaps, like myself, in making observations.

I paid no attention to many that were attracted by my strawberry, because they were sufficiently well known; such as the snail, which nestles under the leaves; the butterfly, which hovers round; the beetle, which digs at the root; the small worm, which finds the means of life in the leaves; the wasp and the honey bee, which hum around the blossoms; the gnat which sucks the juice of the stem; the ant, which licks up the gnat; and to outwit the rest, the spider, which makes prey of most of these, and which, to catch, them, spreads his net all over the neighborhood.

Upon examining the leaves of this plant with a magnifying glass, which magnified only a trifling degree, I found them divided into compartments, surrounded by bristles, separated by canals, and strewn with glands. These compartments appeared to me like large verdant enclosures, their bristles like vegetables of a particular order, of which some forked, and some hollowed into tubes, from the extremity of which a liquid is distilled; and their canals, as well as their glands, seemed full of a brilliant fluid. In plants of a different species, these bristles and their glands exhibit forms, colors and fluids, totally different. There are even glands which resemble basins, round, square, or radiated.

It is credible, then from analogy, that there are animals feeding upon the leaves of plants, like cattle up on our meadows, which repose under the shade of those bristles or buihes, imperceptible to our eyes, and who drink from the glands liquors of the color of gold and silver. Every part of the flower must exhibit to them spectacles of which we can have no idea. The yellow antherial of flowers suspended by fillets of white, exhibit to their eyes double rafters of gold, balanced upon pillars fairer than ivory; the corolla must seem to them an arch of unbounded magnitude, decorated with the ruby and the topaz; the nectarium, rivers of sugar; the other parts of the flower must show cups, urns, pavilions, domes, which neither the architect nor the goldsmith has yet learned to imitate.

I do not say this from conjecture, for, having one day examined with a microscope the flowers of thyme, I distinguished, with extreme admiration, superb flagous with long necks, which were formed of a substance resembling the amathyst, from the gullets of which seemed to flow ingots of liquid gold I have never examined the corolla of the smallest flower, without finding it composed of admirable substances, half transparent, studded with brilliants, and tinted with the most lively colors. Beings which live under such rich canopies must have ideas very different from ours, of light, and of the other phenomena of nature. A drop of dew, filtering in the capillary and transparent tubes of a plant, presents to their eyes a thousand cascades. The same drop, fixed as a wave on the extremity of one of the bristles, must seem to be an ocean without a shore.

Such then must have been my strawberry plant, and its natural inhabitants, in the eyes of the winged insects which alighted upon it; for the reader will remember that I have been speaking only of those minute creatures, which are imperceptible to the naked eye; but if I had been capable of acquiring as much knowledge in respect to the plant, as is possessed by these itinerant insects, I should still have been far from acquiring the full history of it.”

How beautiful! How full of material for pleasant reflection! Who can study Nature without becoming better and wiser!

The perfume of a thousand roses soon dies, but the pain caused by one of their thorns remains long after. A saddened remembrance in the midst of mirth is like that thorn among the roses.

A country saw-filer has the following over his door—“James Nokes, Saw Dentist.”

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