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Historic district, Elizabeth City, North Carolina

Date: 1900 - 1999 | Identifier: F264.E4 H57 1900Z
Historic district, Elizabeth City, North Carolina. Elizabeth City, N.C. : Elizabeth City Area Chamber of Commerce, [19--?] [13] p. : ill., map ; 22 cm. Cover title. National register of historic places. more...
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[Illustration:

Moth Boat Regatta
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[Illustration:

Duck Hunting Scene
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[Illustration:


Albermarle Hospital]


[Illustration:

S.L. Sheep School
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Elizabeth City

A CENTER OF HISTORIC LORE

In Dare county the vacationist may visit restored Fort Raleigh view the colorful historic pageant staged on the site where the first white men settled in America, and enjoy fine modern hotels, resting and exploring the Carolina coast, all at very moderate cost.

Kill Devil Hill, where Orville and Wilbur Wright made the first flight in a power driven airplane on December 17, 1903, is on the beach highway to Roanoke Island. Here a national monument has been erected.

Cape Hatteras on the Outer Banks is reached from Elizabeth City through Currituck, Kitty Hawk and via the Oregon Inlet ferry. Cape Hatteras National Park will extend from the Cape to include much of the Dare County coast to the north. The old lighthouse at Hatteras has been preserved. One of the tallest in America, it served for many years to guard ships from the treacherous Diamond shoals, “Graveyard of the Atlantic.”

Thirty miles south of Elizabeth City on U. S. route 17 is Edenton where at St. Paul's Episcopal church, built in 1736, are the graves of colonial governors Charles Eden and Henderson Walker, a memorial to Joseph Hewes, signer of the Declaration of Independence, and the home of James Iredell, Justice of the U. S. Supreme Court from 1790-99 and Attorney General of North Carolina during the Revolution. Also at Edenton is “Hayes” home of Samuel Johnston, revolutionary leader, governor and U. S. Senator.

The Albemarle Assembly, initial law-making body in Carolina, first met in Pasquotank County in 1665 and the first known school in North Carolina was taught by Charles Griffin in this county from 1705-08.

Additional up to the minute information and more specific market data about both Elizabeth City and Pasquotank County will be furnished gladly by the Elizabeth City Chamber of Commerce.





SOME INTERESTING FACTS ABOUT PROGRESSIVE
ELIZABETH CITY


[Illustration:

Lost Colony Waterside Theater
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[Illustration:

Yact Basin of Elizabeth City Shipyard
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[Illustration:

Sand Dunes of Dare County
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Elizabeth City, on U. S. 17, the Ocean Hiway or Atlantic Coastal Highway, and U. S. 158, the friendly central point for ten north-eastern North Carolina counties — and Pasquotank County welcome you to a region rich in history and full of great promise for the future.

Elizabeth City has enjoyed a steady growth until today it is believed its population, including suburbs immediately adjacent to the city limits, approximates 15,000. In 1940, its population was 11,564 — in 1930, 10,037.

Unlike much of the South, which is dependent on tobacco or cotton, Pasquotank County is one of the richest truck growing sections on the Eastern seaboard. This diversified farming brings money to its farmers all summer long — from early May to late October. This county ranks fourth among the 100 North Carolina counties in value per farm.

Elizabeth City is the commercial and financial capital of the entire section encircling the Albemarle sound, drawing a large volume of trade from ten agricultural counties which produce 23% of all the fruits and vegetables, 34% of all the com and hogs, 38% of all the peanuts and 27% of all the soya beans grown in North Carolina.

Consequently Elizabeth City, although twenty-first in population, ranks tenth in effective buying income among North Carolina cities, with $2,192 per family. Pasquotank County's effective buying income per white family is $2,610 — not only exceeding the North Carolina state average by almost a thousand dollars, but above the average for the entire United States.

Elizabeth City is not an industrial center, yet it has an industrial payroll of approximately $35,000 weekly from hosiery mills, textile plants, lumber mills, ice plants, and furniture, candy, paper box, brick, basket and barrel factories and marine railways.

It has the most modern and progressive retail stores in the state with new businesses being added monthly.

Justly proud too, is the city of its school system, with new plant equipment valued at nearly a million dollars and separate buildings for primary, grade, and high schools. Elizabeth City State Teachers’ College (Negro) valued at over a million dollars is located in Elizabeth City.

Elizabeth City's Coast Guard air station, built at a cost of millions of dollars with hangars, barracks and landing fields on the shore of the Pasquotank river, is the location of the Coast Guard Aviation Repair and Supply Station and nearby is also the Naval Air Facility, previously the U. S. Naval Air Station (Blimp Base).

The Albemarle Hospital with 100 beds, has recently been renovated and enlarged with a new operating suite, a new obstetrics suite, new X-ray equipment, sterilizing equipment, and an ideal kitchen with new refrigeration and new furniture at a total cost of $320,000. In addition, a modern Medical Building and Medical Center are located downtown. Elizabeth City is also headquarters for the District Health Department housed by the Health Center, which was erected during the war at the cost of approximately $60,000.

Churches of all major denominations are located in Elizabeth City.


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Map of Route 17 along Eastern seaboard]

ELIZABETH CITY—LOCATED on U. S. HIGHWAYS 17 & 158

A PLEASANT STOPPING PLACE ON THE NEW YORK TO FLORIDA OCEAN HIWAY ROUTE






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View from Capital Airlines Plane
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[Illustration:

Elizabeth City Golf Course
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[Illustration:

Harness Race Track
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[Illustration:

Blackbeard's Home
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[Illustration:

Dismal Swamp Canal--Part of Inland Waterway
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[Illustration:

A Typical Catch of Channel Bass
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Scene at the Beach
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Elizabeth City has two hotels with a total of 150 rooms where traditional Southern Hospitality is exemplified. The Virginia Dare Hotel is fireproof, the finest and most modern in Eastern North Carolina.

Living conditions are good, with modern public improvements, 25 miles of paved streets and 35 miles of paved sidewalks in Elizabeth City, low city and county tax rates, mayor-city manager and county board of commissioners form of government.

Electric light, power, water and sewer services are municipally operated, with modern telephone and telegraph services and gas plant.

The average temperature is 60 degrees and the average yearly rainfall is 45.5 inches in Elizabeth City and Pasquotank County.

The Inland Waterway runs through Elizabeth City, bringing much traffic through the town by way of the Dismal Swamp canal and the Pasquotank River, Elizabeth City is also served by the main line of the Norfolk & Southern railroad, is located on the line of the Norfolk & Southern Bus Corp., the line of the Virginia Dare Transportation Co., and other truck lines and is also a stop on the East-West route of the Capital Airlines—PCA.


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Virginia Dare Hotel Eastern Carolina's Finest
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Elizabeth City is the home of the Moth type sail boats and regattas are held here on the Pasquotank every year. Its yacht basin, one of the largest between New York and Florida, attracts many luxurious craft which stay over for weeks and months for overhauling, repairing and storage.

Excellent fishing and hunting are nearby. Currituck and Dare Counties, only a few miles away, are becoming more popular each year for their wild fowl hunting and deep sea fishing. Likewise Dare County's beaches are attracting many thousands of tourists and vacationists each summer.

Elizabeth City has a lighted athletic field, two race tracks (one lighted), a golf course, five theatres and other recreation facilities. A War Memorial consisting of stadium, parks, and playgrounds is also planned.

Bear and deer are found in the Dismal Swamp to the north and in other localities close to Elizabeth City, and these woods are also full of small game.

Sixty-five miles southeast is Roanoke Island, site of the first English settlements in the New World, in 1585-87 and the birthplace of Virginia Dare, first child born of English parents in America, August 18, 1587.


[Illustration:

Hatteras Lighthouse
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[Illustration:

Pasquotank County Courthouse
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[Illustration:

Elizabeth City High School Band
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[Illustration:

Lumber Plants--A Major Industry
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[Illustration:

U.S. Coast Guard Air Station
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[Illustration:

View from Navy Blimp Hangar
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[Illustration:

Grand Champion Steer--First Albermarle Livestock Show
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