Capt. Russell S. Crenshaw Papers, 1945

Manuscript Collection #860

  • Descriptive Summary
     
    Title: Capt. Russell S. Crenshaw Papers
    Creator: Crenshaw, Russell Sydnor, Capt., 1 September 1886 - 2 July 1975
    Repository: ECU Manuscript Collection
    Language: English
    Abstract: This collection contains the Secret World War II Historical Narrative of District Operations Office and Inshore Patrol, Fifth Naval District, Norfolk, Virginia (August 31, 1945) Approved by R. S. [Russell Sydnor] Crenshaw, Captain, U.S.N. Assistant Commandant of the Fifth Naval District and commander of the Inshore Patrol during most of World War II.
    Extent: 0.45 Cubic feet, 1 box, 308 pages., Carbon typescript, Photographic prints, Tables, Maps, Appendices; looseleaf bound.
  • Description
     

    Capt. Russell S. Crenshaw Papers consist of the Secret World War II Historical Narrative of District Operations Office and Inshore Patrol, Fifth Naval District, Norfolk, Virginia (August 31, 1945). Crenshaw was the assistant commandant of the Fifth Naval District and commander of the Inshore Patrol during most of World War II. The history is divided into chapters, including Table of Contents, Introduction, and narrative chapters related to the main tasks assigned to the Inshore Patrol: Harbor Security; Keep Channels Clear of Mines; Patrol Defensive Areas; Protect Shipping; Appendix; and Photographs.

    The collection is arranged in two series:

    SERIES 1: MANUSCRIPT VOLUME: SECRET WORLD WAR II HISTORICAL NARRATIVE OF DISTRICT OPERATIONS OFFICE AND INSHORE PATROL, FIFTH NAVAL DISTRICT

    SERIES 2: PHOTOGRAPH PRINTS & INFORMATION FROM MANUSCRIPT VOLUME

    Note: For preservation reasons, processors removed nineteen original photographic prints and the backing sheets to which the prints were stapled from their original place in the Secret History and placed them into protective sleeves with interleaving sheets. They photocopied the original prints and backing sheets and inserted them into the original document where they had found the originals. They transferred the original prints and backing sheets to #0860.1.h.1 – 19.

  • Biographical / Historical Note
     

    Capt. R. S. [Russell Sydnor] Crenshaw was born on 1 September 1886, in Virginia. His mother was Sally Berkeley Nelson Robins Crenshaw (1887 – 1976). Crenshaw received an at-large appointment from Virginia and graduated as a member of the U. S. Naval Academy class of 1907. In 1912, Russell married Polly Robins Crenshaw, in Richmond. They had five children: William Robins Crenshaw (1914 – 1980s) who also became a naval officer; Sally Berkeley Crenshaw Southerland (1917-2009); Russell Sydnor Crenshaw, Jr. (1920 – 2017), Francis Nelson Crenshaw (1922 – 2012), and Alice Beauchamp Crenshaw Luhring (1924 – 2008).

    Crenshaw served in both world wars. During World War I he served in the Naval Overseas Transportation Service and received the Army Distinguished Service Medal for his actions in developing the convoy system for cargo (1919). Crenshaw served as director of the War Plans Division of the War Department during 1939 -1940.

    During World War II, Crenshaw commanded the 6th Naval District from 1 February 1942 – 3 June 1942. He was assistant commandant of the 5th Naval District, based in Norfolk, Virginia, from 18 June 1942 until the German surrender in August 1945. He was direct command of the Operating Division and during the writing of the Secret World War II Historical Narrative, 1943 - 1945. For his actions during World War II Crenshaw received the Legion of Merit Medal (1946) which reads: “for exceptionally meritorious conduct n the performance of outstanding services to the Government of the United States as Assistant Commandant FIFTH Naval District (Task Group o2.5) and in direct chart of the Operating Division from 18 June 1942 to the surrender of Germany, he promptly effected through coordination among various surface and air operating forces, and defense measures in this area including those of the Army and Coast Guard. As a result of his tireless and skillful directions of the various offensive and protective measures in the anti-submarine warfare in this area, convoys were successfully dispatched and received, losses from enemy mines were avoided, and the enemy submarines were constantly hunted and harassed, some sunk and some damaged, with the result that he losses to shipping were kept to a minimum.”

    He rose to the rank of captain in the Navy and continued in active duty until 1946 when he retired. Crenshaw died in Virginia Beach, Virginia on 2 July 1975.

    Capt. R. S. [Russell Sydnor] Crenshaw, Jr., the donor of this collection, was born 5 April 1920, in Virginia. Like his father, he received an at-large appointment from Virginia to Annapolis and graduated as a member of the U. S. Naval Academy Class of 1941. Like his father, he served in World War II and rose to the rank of captain. During the war Crenshaw served on destroyers in the Pacific theater of operations. He served on the USS MAURY (DD – 401) from the attack on Pearl Harbor, the Battle of Midway, the invasions of the Solomon and the Marshall Islands. He later served on the USS STORMES (DD-780) during the invasion of Okinawa in 1945. Crenshaw was then given command of the USS THOMAS J. GARY (DE-326) and a five ship Escort Division on a round the world cruise.

    After returning to the United States, he attended graduate classes in Ordnance Engineering earning a master’s degree in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He subsequently married Flavienne Gaubert whom he had met during his round the world cruise in 1945.

    Crenshaw was then assigned as gunnery officer of the flagship in Europe and in command of USS COGSWELL (DD-651). After this he served in the Navy’s Bureau of Ordnance. There he led the effort to build the first Terrier missiles and later the Talos missile, a long-range naval surface-to-air missile.

    From 1955 to 1960, Crenshaw served mainly at NATO headquarters in Europe. In 1960, he was assigned to the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, where he worked Surface Water projects in the Development Division. In 1963, he became commander of the USS SPRINGFIELD (CLG-7), which was then the flagship of the US Mediterranean fleet. In 1964, he was assigned to the Pentagon, where he worked on NATO programs.

    Crenshaw retired from the Navy on 12 October 1967 and started the Crenshaw Company which worked on international technology transfer in naval systems. During his retirement, Crenshaw researched and wrote several works related to the navy, including “Naval Ship handling,” the “South Pacific Destroyer,” and “The Battle of Tassafaronga”. Crenshaw earned a number of medals and awards for his naval service, including 13 battle stars on his Pacific service ribbon. Notably, he also received a Presidential Unit Citation for leadership on the MAURY, a Silver Star. He also received two Legion of Merits.

    Crenshaw inherited the “Secret History” from his father and donated it to the East Carolina Manuscript Collection. He died on 4 February 2017 at age 96.

    The Fifth Naval District, based in Norfolk, Virginia, was part of the United States’ Eastern Sea Frontier that coordinated defense of the East Coast. It had first been recommended by the Army – Navy Staff Planning Committee (1923) to coordinate the activities of the District and the Eastern Sea Frontier as well as the Atlantic Fleet and Naval Local Defense Forces. The Fifth District was responsible for the Chesapeake Bay region, the states of Maryland, Virginia, and West Virginia, and the northern coastal areas of North Carolina. In addition to the Norfolk base, the Fifth District included section bases in Little Creek, Virginia, Morehead City and Ocracoke, North Carolina.

    The Fifth Naval District was responsible for several tasks: •Provide for the security of harbors •Keep harbor channels and approaches thereto clear of mines •Patrol defensive sea areas and defensive coastal areas •Protect shipping in cooperation with units of the Naval Coastal Force

    In 1941, Navy Basic War Plan, Rainbow revised the tasks of the Naval Coastal Frontier Forces: •Defend the Naval Coastal Frontier •Protect and route shipping •Support the U. S. Atlantic Fleet •Support Army and associated forces within the coastal frontier; and to prepare operating plans for the Navy Local Defense Force of the District.

    To accomplish these tasks the Fifth Naval District had four task forces: •The inshore patrol •The offshore patrol •The escort force •A coastal force (In 1939 this force was transferred from the District Commandant to the Coastal Frontier Commander (Crenshaw).

    The Secret History describes the activities of the Fifth Naval District in accomplishing each of these tasks during World War II.

    Sources:

    World War II Historical Narrative of District Operations Office and Inshore Patrol, Fifth Naval District. Introduction (1945) (#860.1.b)

    Register of Alumni. United States Naval Academy Alumni Association, Inc., 1845 – 1973. (87th edition © 1973), pp. 44, 230.

    Military Times.com website: https://valor.militarytimes.com/hero/17414

    Wikitree website: https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Crenshaw-687

    Brinsfield Funeral Home website: http://www.brinsfieldfuneral.com/obituary/6189296

  • Administrative Information
     
    Accessions Information

    May 17, 2002 1 container, 0.32 cubic feet, 308 pages, 1 volume; Secret World War II Historical Narrative of District Operations Office and Inshore Patrol, Fifth Naval District, Norfolk, Virginia (August 31, 1945) Approved by R. S. [Russell S.] Crenshaw, Captain, U.S.N. Assistant Commandant, Mimeograph typescript. Bound loose leaf, 308 p. Maps, Appendices. Donor: Capt. Russell S. Crenshaw, Jr.

    Acquisition Information

    Gift of Capt. Russell S. Crenshaw, Jr.

    Access Restrictions

    No restrictions

    Copyright Notice

    Literary rights to specific documents are retained by the authors or their descendants in accordance with U.S. copyright law.

    Preferred Citation

    Capt. Russell S. Crenshaw Papers (#860), East Carolina Manuscript Collection, J. Y. Joyner Library, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina, USA.

    Processing Information

    Encoded by Apex Data Services, March 2002.

    Processing completed by Jonathan Dembo, 5/13/2019; Preliminary inventory, revised by Thomas Hall (intern) 6/29/2018

Container List

  • Manuscript volume: secret World War II historical narrative of district operations office and inshore patrol, fifth naval district
     

    • Box 1
       
      • Folder a
         
        Title Page (31 August 1945), Page: i (item 1)
        Table of Contents (3 June 1938 - 15 July 1945 (1945) Note: includes lists of "Fifth Naval District Roster of Officers Affecting Operations Up to 15 July 1945". Pages ii - v. (item 2)
      Introduction, 1923 - 1945 (1945) Note: includes 2 - page chart on the Fifth Naval District's War Organization, photograph of the U.S. Naval Section Base in Little Creek, Virginia and that base's Inshore Patrol Fifth Naval District organization chart, one photograph of the Naval Section Base in Morehead City, North Carolina, and one photograph of the Naval Section Base in Ocracoke, North Carolina. Pages 1 - 21.
      Task A: Harbor Security (August 1918 - 30 December 1944) Note: one table of contents page for chapter, six photographs of submarine and anti - torpedo nets, one map of underwater and other fixed defenses in the Hampton Roads - Chesapeake Bay area, one photograph of the tanker F. W. Abrams, two photographs of the ore carrier Chilore, one photograph of the tanker J.A. Mowinckel, one overlay map of Hatteras Mine field and positions of mine strikes, and one chart of the Lookout Bight Anchorage. Pages 22 - 92.
      Task B: Keep Channels Clear of Mines (28 January 1951 - 30 June 1945) Note: includes one table of contents page for chapter, six maps of mineswept channels in the Chesapeake Bay, one photograph of the freighter S.S. Cape Henlopen, two photographs of the S.S. Montana, one chart of exploded enemy mines, one chart of successfully mineswept enemy mines, and one overlay map of the first mineswept channel to Lookout Bight. Pages 93 - 125.
      Task C: Patrol Defensive Areas (1935 - 1945) Note: one table of contents for chapter, one map of channel patrol, with the Harbor entrance and outer patrols included, one map depicting patrols operating from the Morehead City Section Base, and one photograph of the Coastal Picket. Pages 126 - 185.
      Task D: Protect Shipping, 1942 - 1945 (1945) Note: includes one table of contents for the chapter, one map depicting early patrol sectors, two maps showing plots of enemy attacks, one photograph of air and surface controllers' desk in the Joint Operations Center in Norfolk, Virginia, and one photograph of S.S. George Ade. Pages 186 - 261.
      Appendix 5 November 1941 - 23 April 1945 (1945) (Note: includes lists of enemy attacks, summary of merchant ship damaged by the enemy action, enemy plots of attacks, evaluations of attacks on enemy submarines, German Submarine mine fields, and German - mined plots of areas, Inshore Patrol Operation Plan No.6 - 41, Defense Area Group Doctrine, 2 reports of minesweeping Operations, and an Organization Manual. Pages 262 - Appendix Page 46.
  • Photographs From Manuscript Volume
     

    • Box 1
       
      • Folder h
         
        Aerial View of U. S. Naval Base Section, Morehead City, North Carolina [1942 - 1944] Photo ID#: P - 860/2. Original location: #0860.1.b.1 or Page 15A in manuscript. (item 2)
        Aerial View of U. S. Naval Base Section, Ocracoke, North Carolina [1942 - 1944] Photo ID#: P - 860/3. Original location: #0860.1.b.1 or Page 18A in manuscript. (item 3)
        Submarine net running from Willoughby Spit to Old Point Comfort, Virginia. Looking South. Altitude: 1000 ft. (11 July 1942) Photo ID#: P - 860/4. Original location: #0860.1.c.1 or Page 30A in manuscript. (item 4)
        Anti - Torpedo Nets - Naval Operating Base - Norfolk, Virginia. Looking East. Altitude: 900 ft. (11 July 1942) Photo ID#: P - 860/5.) Original location: #0860.1.c.1 or Page 30B in manuscript. (item 5)
        Anti - Torpedo Nets - Norfolk Navy Yard, Portsmouth, Virginia (18 August 1945) Photo ID#: P - 860/6. Original location: #0860.1.c.1 or Page 30C in manuscript. (item 6)
        Anti - Torpedo Nets at Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company, Incorporated, Newport News, Virginia (18 August 1945) Photo ID#: P - 860/7. Original location: #0860.1.c.1 or Page 30D in manuscript. (item 7)
        Submarine Net Closing Mouth of York River, Virginia. Looking South West. Altitude: 1000 ft. (11 July 1942) Photo ID#: P - 860/8. Original location: #0860.1.c.1 or Page 32A in manuscript. (item 8)
        The tanker F. W. ABRAMS after hitting a mine in the Hatteras Mine Field 11 June 1942. The vessel subsequently sank completely. Latitude 35-01; Longitude 75-45. (11 June 1942) Photo ID#: P - 860/9. Original location: #0860.1.c.1 or Page 64A in manuscript. (item 9)
        The ore carrier CHILORE in the Hatteras Mine Field. After being torpedoed while in conveoy, she was further damaged by a friendly mine. Later, she was towed to the Virginia Capes, but capsized before reaching port. (18 August 1945) Photo ID#: P - 860/10. Original location: #0860.1.c.1 or Page 73A in manuscript. (item 10)
        The capsized ore carrier CHILORE with salvage vessels alongside. After being damaged first by an enemy portpedo and then by a friendly mine, she was not quite able to reach safety. While under tow from the Hatteras Mine Field, she capsized at the entrance to Chesapeake Bay, and after extensive salvage operations were unsuccessful, she was finally demolished as a menace to navigation. (18 August 1945) Photo ID#: P - 860/11. Original location: #0860.1.c.1 or Page 73B in manuscript (for description, look at section #0860.1.c.1 or Page 73B in manuscript. (item 11)
        The Tanker J. A. MOWINCKEL after being torpedoed by the enemy, made her way towards what she thought was a point of refuge. However, she entered the Hatteras Mine Field and suffered further damage by friendly mines. Here is is seen with salvage tug alongside. (18 August 1945) Photo ID#: P - 860/12. Original location: #0860.1.c.1 or Page 74A in manuscript. (item 12)
        Submarine Net at Cape Lookout, North Carolina. Looking East. Altitude 2000 ft. (14 July 1942) Photo ID#: P - 860/13. Original location: #0860.1.c.1 or Page 79A in manuscript. (item 13)
        The damaged bow of American freighter S. S. CAPE HENLOPEN, which rammed and sank the S.S. LILLIAN LUCKENBACK near Point "P" in the Chesapeake Bay Swept Channel, 26 March 1943 (10 April 1943) Photo ID#: P - 860/14. Original location: #0860.1.d.1 or Page 104A in manuscript. Note: other dates include 8/18/1945) (item 14)
        The S. S. MONTANA under tow, 1 June 1943, after collision during the night with the S. S. JOHN MORGAN near point "P" in the Chesapeake Swept Channel. The S. S. MONTANA was salvaged, the S. S. JOHN MORGAN blew up and sank (1 June 1943) Photo ID#: P - 860/15. Original location: #0860.1.d.1 or Page 104B in manuscript. (item 15)
        The S. S. MONTANA, 13 June 1943, with fires extinguished and salvage operations underway (13 June 1943) Photo ID#: P - 860/16. Original location: #0860.1.d.1 or Page 104C in manuscript. (item 16)
        Members of the crew check the rigging after wathering a winter storm offshore aboard the Coastal Picket CGR-2015 [1942 - 1943] Photo ID#: P - 860/17. Original location: #0860.1.e.1 or Page 177A in manuscript. (item 17)
        Air and surface controllers' desks in Joint Operations Center, NOB [Norfolk Operations Base] Norfolk, Virginia [1942] Photo ID#: P - 860/18, located on Page 234A in manuscript (1942) Original location: #0860.1.f.1 or Page 234A in manuscript. (item 18)
        Photo of S. S. GEORGE ADE, showing damage done by an external underwater explosion, believed to be an acoustic torpedo [September 1944] Photo ID#: P - 860/19. Original location: #0860.1.f.1 or Page 251A in manuscript. (item 19)

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Sensitive Materials Statement

Manuscript collections and archival records may contain materials with sensitive or confidential information that is protected under federal or state right to privacy laws and regulations, the North Carolina Public Records Act (N.C.G.S. § 132 1 et seq.), and Article 7 of the North Carolina State Personnel Act (Privacy of State Employee Personnel Records, N.C.G.S. § 126-22 et seq.). Researchers are advised that the disclosure of certain information pertaining to identifiable living individuals represented in this collection, without the consent of those individuals, may have legal ramifications (e.g., a cause of action under common law for invasion of privacy may arise if facts concerning an individual's private life are published that would be deemed highly offensive to a reasonable person) for which East Carolina University assumes no responsibility.

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Container List

  • Manuscript volume: secret World War II historical narrative of district operations office and inshore patrol, fifth naval district
     

    • Box 1
       
      • Folder a
         
        Title Page (31 August 1945), Page: i (item 1)
        Table of Contents (3 June 1938 - 15 July 1945 (1945) Note: includes lists of "Fifth Naval District Roster of Officers Affecting Operations Up to 15 July 1945". Pages ii - v. (item 2)
      Introduction, 1923 - 1945 (1945) Note: includes 2 - page chart on the Fifth Naval District's War Organization, photograph of the U.S. Naval Section Base in Little Creek, Virginia and that base's Inshore Patrol Fifth Naval District organization chart, one photograph of the Naval Section Base in Morehead City, North Carolina, and one photograph of the Naval Section Base in Ocracoke, North Carolina. Pages 1 - 21.
      Task A: Harbor Security (August 1918 - 30 December 1944) Note: one table of contents page for chapter, six photographs of submarine and anti - torpedo nets, one map of underwater and other fixed defenses in the Hampton Roads - Chesapeake Bay area, one photograph of the tanker F. W. Abrams, two photographs of the ore carrier Chilore, one photograph of the tanker J.A. Mowinckel, one overlay map of Hatteras Mine field and positions of mine strikes, and one chart of the Lookout Bight Anchorage. Pages 22 - 92.
      Task B: Keep Channels Clear of Mines (28 January 1951 - 30 June 1945) Note: includes one table of contents page for chapter, six maps of mineswept channels in the Chesapeake Bay, one photograph of the freighter S.S. Cape Henlopen, two photographs of the S.S. Montana, one chart of exploded enemy mines, one chart of successfully mineswept enemy mines, and one overlay map of the first mineswept channel to Lookout Bight. Pages 93 - 125.
      Task C: Patrol Defensive Areas (1935 - 1945) Note: one table of contents for chapter, one map of channel patrol, with the Harbor entrance and outer patrols included, one map depicting patrols operating from the Morehead City Section Base, and one photograph of the Coastal Picket. Pages 126 - 185.
      Task D: Protect Shipping, 1942 - 1945 (1945) Note: includes one table of contents for the chapter, one map depicting early patrol sectors, two maps showing plots of enemy attacks, one photograph of air and surface controllers' desk in the Joint Operations Center in Norfolk, Virginia, and one photograph of S.S. George Ade. Pages 186 - 261.
      Appendix 5 November 1941 - 23 April 1945 (1945) (Note: includes lists of enemy attacks, summary of merchant ship damaged by the enemy action, enemy plots of attacks, evaluations of attacks on enemy submarines, German Submarine mine fields, and German - mined plots of areas, Inshore Patrol Operation Plan No.6 - 41, Defense Area Group Doctrine, 2 reports of minesweeping Operations, and an Organization Manual. Pages 262 - Appendix Page 46.
  • Photographs From Manuscript Volume
     

    • Box 1
       
      • Folder h
         
        Aerial View of U. S. Naval Base Section, Morehead City, North Carolina [1942 - 1944] Photo ID#: P - 860/2. Original location: #0860.1.b.1 or Page 15A in manuscript. (item 2)
        Aerial View of U. S. Naval Base Section, Ocracoke, North Carolina [1942 - 1944] Photo ID#: P - 860/3. Original location: #0860.1.b.1 or Page 18A in manuscript. (item 3)
        Submarine net running from Willoughby Spit to Old Point Comfort, Virginia. Looking South. Altitude: 1000 ft. (11 July 1942) Photo ID#: P - 860/4. Original location: #0860.1.c.1 or Page 30A in manuscript. (item 4)
        Anti - Torpedo Nets - Naval Operating Base - Norfolk, Virginia. Looking East. Altitude: 900 ft. (11 July 1942) Photo ID#: P - 860/5.) Original location: #0860.1.c.1 or Page 30B in manuscript. (item 5)
        Anti - Torpedo Nets - Norfolk Navy Yard, Portsmouth, Virginia (18 August 1945) Photo ID#: P - 860/6. Original location: #0860.1.c.1 or Page 30C in manuscript. (item 6)
        Anti - Torpedo Nets at Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company, Incorporated, Newport News, Virginia (18 August 1945) Photo ID#: P - 860/7. Original location: #0860.1.c.1 or Page 30D in manuscript. (item 7)
        Submarine Net Closing Mouth of York River, Virginia. Looking South West. Altitude: 1000 ft. (11 July 1942) Photo ID#: P - 860/8. Original location: #0860.1.c.1 or Page 32A in manuscript. (item 8)
        The tanker F. W. ABRAMS after hitting a mine in the Hatteras Mine Field 11 June 1942. The vessel subsequently sank completely. Latitude 35-01; Longitude 75-45. (11 June 1942) Photo ID#: P - 860/9. Original location: #0860.1.c.1 or Page 64A in manuscript. (item 9)
        The ore carrier CHILORE in the Hatteras Mine Field. After being torpedoed while in conveoy, she was further damaged by a friendly mine. Later, she was towed to the Virginia Capes, but capsized before reaching port. (18 August 1945) Photo ID#: P - 860/10. Original location: #0860.1.c.1 or Page 73A in manuscript. (item 10)
        The capsized ore carrier CHILORE with salvage vessels alongside. After being damaged first by an enemy portpedo and then by a friendly mine, she was not quite able to reach safety. While under tow from the Hatteras Mine Field, she capsized at the entrance to Chesapeake Bay, and after extensive salvage operations were unsuccessful, she was finally demolished as a menace to navigation. (18 August 1945) Photo ID#: P - 860/11. Original location: #0860.1.c.1 or Page 73B in manuscript (for description, look at section #0860.1.c.1 or Page 73B in manuscript. (item 11)
        The Tanker J. A. MOWINCKEL after being torpedoed by the enemy, made her way towards what she thought was a point of refuge. However, she entered the Hatteras Mine Field and suffered further damage by friendly mines. Here is is seen with salvage tug alongside. (18 August 1945) Photo ID#: P - 860/12. Original location: #0860.1.c.1 or Page 74A in manuscript. (item 12)
        Submarine Net at Cape Lookout, North Carolina. Looking East. Altitude 2000 ft. (14 July 1942) Photo ID#: P - 860/13. Original location: #0860.1.c.1 or Page 79A in manuscript. (item 13)
        The damaged bow of American freighter S. S. CAPE HENLOPEN, which rammed and sank the S.S. LILLIAN LUCKENBACK near Point "P" in the Chesapeake Bay Swept Channel, 26 March 1943 (10 April 1943) Photo ID#: P - 860/14. Original location: #0860.1.d.1 or Page 104A in manuscript. Note: other dates include 8/18/1945) (item 14)
        The S. S. MONTANA under tow, 1 June 1943, after collision during the night with the S. S. JOHN MORGAN near point "P" in the Chesapeake Swept Channel. The S. S. MONTANA was salvaged, the S. S. JOHN MORGAN blew up and sank (1 June 1943) Photo ID#: P - 860/15. Original location: #0860.1.d.1 or Page 104B in manuscript. (item 15)
        The S. S. MONTANA, 13 June 1943, with fires extinguished and salvage operations underway (13 June 1943) Photo ID#: P - 860/16. Original location: #0860.1.d.1 or Page 104C in manuscript. (item 16)
        Members of the crew check the rigging after wathering a winter storm offshore aboard the Coastal Picket CGR-2015 [1942 - 1943] Photo ID#: P - 860/17. Original location: #0860.1.e.1 or Page 177A in manuscript. (item 17)
        Air and surface controllers' desks in Joint Operations Center, NOB [Norfolk Operations Base] Norfolk, Virginia [1942] Photo ID#: P - 860/18, located on Page 234A in manuscript (1942) Original location: #0860.1.f.1 or Page 234A in manuscript. (item 18)
        Photo of S. S. GEORGE ADE, showing damage done by an external underwater explosion, believed to be an acoustic torpedo [September 1944] Photo ID#: P - 860/19. Original location: #0860.1.f.1 or Page 251A in manuscript. (item 19)


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