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5 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 81 Issue 3, May-June 2017
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Record #:
28571
Author(s):
Abstract:
Good fishing can be found at most of the state parks in North Carolina. The best places to fish, the type of fish stocked at each park, and the best times of year to fish are described for 12 state parks. The fishing at Lake Norman, New River, South Mountains, Jordan Lake, Kerr Lake, Morrow Mountain, Fort Fisher, Fort Macon, Merchants Millpond, Pettigrew, Hanging Rock, and Eno River State Parks are all detailed. Hanging Rock, Eno River, and Fort Macon are highlighted with anecdotes and advice from parks employees and local fishing experts.
Record #:
28570
Author(s):
Abstract:
With the projects described, land owners can welcome more wildlife onto their property. Some easy projects to help welcome wildlife include creating a mini food plot, creating brush piles, cutting standing softwoods, creating an early successional area, girdling non-masting trees, and leaving standing den trees. The importance of planning, directions how to complete each project, and which types of wildlife will be attracted by these projects are all detailed.
Record #:
28585
Author(s):
Abstract:
This is the first installment in a three-part series about the Mountains-to-Sea Trail. The history of the trail dates back to 1977 and is detailed here. The trail stats at Clingman’s Dome near the Tennesse border and ends at Jockey’s Ridge on the Outer Banks near the Atlantic Ocean. The Mountains portion of the trail covering trail segments 1-5 are covered here. The views, wildlife, and the work needed to maintain the trail are described. Allen De Hart's biography is also included as was the founder of the Friends of the Mountain-to-Sea Trail group and its staunchest supporter.
Record #:
28586
Author(s):
Abstract:
The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission and N.C. State University are tracking black bear movement in and around Asheville. This study is groundbreaking because it studies the habits of urban bears. Biologists have set up traps throughout Asheville and has collect3ed data on 153 different bears over the past three years by outfitting them with GPS radio collars, tattooing the bears, and attaching ear tags. The study will help determine if Asheville lies along a dispersal corridor for bears, as well as a source or sink population bears.
Record #:
28587
Author(s):
Abstract:
Reptiles and amphibians don’t wander aimlessly. They know where they are, what they are doing, and everything else about their home range. Home ranges for reptiles and amphibians, their homes, territories, and behaviors are detailed.