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7 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 77 Issue 4, Jul/Aug 2013
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Record #:
20290
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Zlotnicki describes the NC Wildlife Resources Commission's Game Lands Program. The program has over two million acres (including national forests) and the Commission actively manages about half a million of that. The program's primary purpose is to provide opportunities for hunting and at the same time conserve wildlife species. The Piedmont and Coastal Plains regions are highlighted.
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Record #:
20291
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Although ticks and mosquitoes are sometimes overlooked as a danger by people who love the outdoors, they are health threats that can cause skin irritations and diseases like Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever and Lyme. Brown Dog, Lone Star American Dog, and Black-Legged are the state's resident ticks.
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Record #:
20037
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A.J. Bullard is a retired dentist. A graduate of the University of North Carolina, he and his family settled on a Duplin County farm; he practiced dentistry in Mt. Olive. Although he has no formal horticultural training, he is recognized as one of the state's preeminent botanists and is known across the Southeast for his expertise in grafting fruit trees.
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Record #:
20036
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Rhodes Pond has a long history dating back to the 1700s. It has had a number of name changes and served a number of purposes such as sawmill, gristmill, and turpentine distillery. People have fished it for years. The NC Department of Transportation purchased it in 2004. The author describes the changes that have taken place since the purchase.
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Record #:
20295
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The white-nose syndrome continues to decimate bat populations in western North Carolina, with seven counties affected by the disease. It does not affect people, but the bats are hard hit. For example, over the past two years in retired mine located in Avery County, a bat population of 1,000 dropped to 65, and in a mine in Haywood County a population of 4,000 dropped to 250 in one year.
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Record #:
20292
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Just because a snake is tiny doesn't mean it's a baby snake. North Carolina, for example, has at least nine species that can reach maturity at less than a foot in length. They are the worm snake, brown snake, red-belly snake, rough earth snake, smooth earth snake, southeastern crowned snake, ringneck snake, pine woods snake, and black swamp snake.
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Record #:
20038
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Dean continues his brief history of bass lures, rods and reels, with an emphasis on the golden age of bass fishing from 1900-1940.
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