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5 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 76 Issue 3, May/June 2012
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Record #:
16683
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The acrylic painting, \"Redheads in Needlerush,\" by Delaware artist Richard Clifton is this year's 2012 North Carolina Waterfowl Conservation Stamp and Print. This is the second year in a row that his painting won, and he placed second in the 2010 contest. Over thirty wildlife artists from twenty states submitted entries.
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Record #:
16680
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North Carolina is known for its salamander diversity; however one stands out from the rest and that is the Eastern hellbender. It inhabits clean, cold rivers and larger streams, and in the state they are found in the western mountain rivers. They can measure up to two feet and have a brown mottled coloration.
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Record #:
17757
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The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission implemented new largemouth bass regulations for Randleman Reservoir this spring. These regulations allow for liberal harvesting of the fish at a certain size, allowing for the regeneration of the species at other sizes.
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Record #:
16678
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Anthony Hipps of Lexington discusses why fly-fishermen should fly-tie their own lures. He describes the material he uses to make his poppers and how to tie them, then demonstrates how to use them while fishing.
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Record #:
16682
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North Carolina is the second most-dangerous state for lightning strikes, averaging eleven flashes per square mile each year. Florida ranks first with twenty-five flashes. Barnes defines lightning and identifies the common types and lists ways to avoid being struck.
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