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5 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 75 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 2012
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Record #:
17414
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Over one hundred years ago anadromous fish had unrestricted movement up the Cape Fear River in the spring. These types of fish live in salt water and spawn in fresh water. However, construction of three locks and dams in the early 1900s blocked their movement. In June 2001, the Army Corps of Engineers began work on rock arch rapids at Lock & Dam No. 1. When completed this stepladder will allow the fish to swim past the dam and further upstream.
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Record #:
17413
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The puffer is a bizarre-looking fish. Its skin is like sandpaper. It has buck teeth. When alarms, they pull in water or air and expand to a ridiculous size. And puffers can be poisonous. Blowtoad is the most common name for it, along with others like balloonfish, globefish, and blowfish. Morris describes how to fillet and cook the puffer.
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Record #:
17415
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Animals and birds migrate for food and to reproduce. However, it's the \"how they do it\" that is the question researchers haven't answered yet. Some birds make 6,000-mile roundtrips; whales cross oceans; and monarch butterflies fly down to Mexico. All follow the routes of their ancestors, but the \"how\" remains.
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Record #:
17417
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In May, NC Wildlife Resources Commission biologists found a rare minnow in the Deep Swamp Branch in Hertford County. It is the first time the brindle shiner has been found in the Chowan River Basin.
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Record #:
17416
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Many predators eat quail. Ants, deer, hawks, and owls are included among the forty species that do. This, added to loss of habitat quality and quantity, contribute to the decline in the quail population. Jones examines possible solutions to the problem.
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