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5 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 69 Issue 6, June 2005
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Record #:
7224
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North Carolina has twenty-five species of nesting colonial water birds. Many, including herons, egrets, ibises, pelicans, skimmers, gulls, and terns, breed on the state's barrier islands and nearby ocean fronts. Some colonies are faring well; others face an uncertain future. Competition with people for prime beach real estate affects the flocks' habitats. Surveys of the birds' nestings began in 1976-1977. Cameron discusses how several of the species are surviving.
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Record #:
7226
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Because it is a shy, secretive creature, few North Carolinians know of the Eastern chicken turtle's existence. These turtles live in fewer than fifteen counties in the southeastern corner of the state. Their habitat is shallow, quiet waters, including cypress-gum swamps, beaver wetlands, slow-moving blackwater streams, large ephemeral ponds, and Carolina bays. A number of characteristics distinguish the chicken turtle from other turtles, including being almost exclusively carnivorous; having a long, flexible neck; spending the winter months on land; and being able to live nine months burrowed under dry land instead of pond bottoms.
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Record #:
7223
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The Big Rock Blue Marlin Tournament, held each June in the Gulf Stream off Morehead City, boasts five decades of history and millions of dollars in prize money. From a humble beginning in 1957, when a few boats competed for a $250 prize, the tournament has grown to 2004's competition with over 200 boats and a $700,000 prize to the winner. Blue marlins are highly prized for their fighting ability. They fight until they are either released or boated, and they have never been captured and kept alive in an aquarium.
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Record #:
7225
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Gabby Salazar of Guilford County shoots nature photographs like a professional. She is eighteen years old and is internationally recognized for her work. In 2004, she won the Young Wildlife Photographer of the Year Award, which is presented by BBC Wildlife Magazine and the Natural History Museum in London, England. The prize was worth $1,500. Collins discusses how Salazar became involved with photography and her accomplishments to date.
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Record #:
7222
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Abstract:
The number of wild turkeys harvested during the winter hunting season of 2005 declined from the 2004 season. There were 151 turkeys harvested in 2005, compared with 181 in 2004. Stokes County ranked first with twenty-three birds, and Person and Surry Counties reported the fewest birds with seven each. Harvest numbers reflect the participation of hunters in each county rather than the turkey populations. Overall, North Carolina's wild turkey population exceeds 130,000.
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