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6 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 68 Issue 9, Sept 2004
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6842
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Before pollution and overharvesting all but wiped out the state's oysters, commercial oyster harvesters brought in almost one million bushels a year. Now the harvest is less than 50,000 bushels. Loss of oysters is not only a problem for seafood lovers. It also means a loss of cleaner waters, for oysters filter water for their food. New legislation passed in 2004 now allows dock owners to cultivate their own oysters for consumption. The Under the Dock Oyster Bill states that \"shellfish cultivation provides increased ecological benefits to the estuarine environment by promoting natural water filtration and increased fishery habitats.\"
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6841
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DuPont State Forest, comprising 10,268 acres, lies in Henderson and Transylvania Counties twelve miles from Hendersonville. The forest has a car-free policy, and visitors enjoy the lack of traffic. Three spectacular waterfalls, all within a thirty-minute walk, are another appealing feature. Hunting permits are chosen through lottery, and deer, grouse, and turkey are popular game-animals. Camping is not allowed. Mountain bikers and horse riders are permitted on some trails. DuPont Forest attracted 116,000 visitors in 2003.
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Record #:
6846
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In the early part of the 20th-century, wealthy Northern sportsmen purchased large tracts of marshland in North Carolina for use as their own private hunting preserves. Farseeing individuals on the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and other groups made purchases of waterfowl areas for public use. Powell gives a short summary of each of the following duck hunting areas: Currituck Sound, Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound, Lake Mattamuskeet, Pamlico River, the Piedmont, and southeastern Coastal Plain. \r\n
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Record #:
6843
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Jimmy Carter has been a fisherman and an advocate for wild places all his life. His prominence as a former United States president has given him and his wife Rosalynn access to top fishing locations and fishing guides all over the world for the past thirty years. In 2004, they fished the trout streams of Western North Carolina for the first time. In this WILDLIFE IN NORTH CAROLINA interview, President Carter rates his fishing experience in the state and discusses the future of fishing.
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Record #:
6845
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On June 19, 2004, the North Carolina record for a blue catfish caught on a hook and line was broken at Lake Norman. The catfish weighed eighty-five pounds and measured 51 and one-half inches long and 35 and one-half inches in girth. The record fish was certified by a biologist with the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission. The largest blue catfish on record weighed 116.12 pounds and was caught in the Mississippi River in Arkansas.
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Record #:
6844
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The 2004 wild turkey spring harvest season reports a drop of 10 percent. In 2003, there were 9,862 turkeys harvested compared to 8,846 in 2004. Only thirty-four of the state's one hundred counties reported increased kills over last year. Heavy rainfall and poor turkey reproduction were contributing factors. Wilkes County was the top county for turkey kills with 365 reported.
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