NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


4 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 68 Issue 12, Dec 2004
Currently viewing results 1 - 4
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
6978
Author(s):
Abstract:
Pollution of the Pigeon River began in 1908 when a paper mill in Canton began dumping waste materials into it. Pollution became so bad that Tennessee sued North Carolina to force a solution. In the 1980s, the EPA intervened and gave the paper mill a timetable and a clear set of rules for cleaning up its discharge. Once considered a sewage ditch, the river is now on the rebound, and the improved water quality has encouraged biologists to reintroduce native aquatic species.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
6977
Author(s):
Abstract:
Palms are a symbol for the tropics. Along the East Coast, these trees reach their northern limit in North Carolina. The state can claim two species of native palms -- the dwarf palmetto on Cape Hatteras and the cabbage palm on Bald Head Island. Perry describes the palms and discusses differences between palms and the state's other common trees.
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
6975
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Eastern tiger salamander is North Carolina's largest terrestrial salamander. Although it may grow to a foot in length, the salamander is such a secretive creature that few people have ever seen one. Most of the state's tiger salamanders are confined to the Sandhills region. This salamander is on North Carolina's endangered species list.
Full Text:
Record #:
6976
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ralph Jensen's love of woodworking and hunting evolved into a career of handcrafting furniture, waterfowl and turkey calls, and duck decoys. Jensen discusses his work and creations.
Full Text: