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6 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 68 Issue 11, Nov 2004
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6902
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In May 2002, the first incidence of woolly adelgids on hemlocks in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park was reported. Adelgids are natives of eastern Asia and were found in the western United States in 1924. They are fatal to hemlocks. Currently, half of the tree's eastern range is infected. Peeples discusses how the loss of hemlocks would impact on the environment of streams and wildlife and what biologists are doing to eradicate the pests. One approach is to introduce an adelgid predator from eastern Asia, though this is not without its own possible consequences.
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Record #:
6910
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Freshwater mussels benefit the environment by cleaning water as they filter it for food particles. Because many of the mussels are classified as endangered, their presence in a particular location can cause trouble with plans for growth and development. Since 1999, one hundred and nine road projects were delayed in North Carolina while local ordinances, stormwater controls and other measures were put into place to safeguard the federally protected mussels. Early encourages smart planning to direct growth to where it will do the least harm to one of the most threatened natural resources in the state.
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Record #:
6900
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Jenkins discusses the Cape Hatteras Anglers Club Annual Invitational Surf Fishing Tournament. The club organized in 1957, and the tournament began the following year. The event is held around the first weekend in November. Competition is between teams of six members each. The current number of teams is one hundred, the maximum number that will fit into the space the Park Service allows the club to use. There is a waiting list of fifty-eight teams. When one team dropped out in 2003, the team that replaced it had been waiting on the list for twelve years. Teams compete not for money, but for a replica of the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse.
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Record #:
6899
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A long-range goal of the North Carolina Department of Marine Fisheries is to have all of the state's major fish species in a viable or recovering category within the next ten years. Currently eighteen out of the forty stocks are in these classifications. New additions are the Atlantic croaker, which moved from concerned to viable, and the monkfish, which moved from overfished to recovering.
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Record #:
6898
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Duane Raver, North Carolina's premier wildlife artist, is also one of the nation's best. Coupled with that distinction is fifty-four years of service to the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission as fisheries biologist, editor of WILDLIFE IN NORTH CAROLINA, calendar artist, and outdoor writer. Raver's subjects for painting run the gamut from insects to white-tailed deer.
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Record #:
6901
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Almy offers suggestions for hunters who are in search of the biggest and best whitetail deer. His suggestions include practicing shooting, hunting river bottoms, hunting escape routes, hunting small pockets of cover, and hunting all day.
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