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6 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 67 Issue 1, Jan 2003
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Record #:
5720
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Between 70,000 and 80,000 tundra swans winter in North Carolina, the highest population along the Atlantic Flyway. Unregulated hunting caused the population to drop in the 1930s, and restrictions were put on hunters. This restored the swans to today's levels. In 1984, a limited hunting season began. Only a limited number of hunting permits are issued, and hunters are allowed a bag limit of only one swan.
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5722
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Charlie Woodhouse, whose work as a district biologist with the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission started in 1947, was one of the state's first wildlife biologists. Nickens discusses his life and work.
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Record #:
5728
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The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission reports on its activities and accomplishments from July 1, 2000 to June 30, 2002. Division reports included Inland Fisheries, Conservation Education, Wildlife Enforcement, Wildlife Management, Engineering Services, and Administrative Services.
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Record #:
5729
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The Venus's flytrap, which occurs naturally only in a few counties in North and South Carolina, is on the state's Species of Special Concern list. It is also a much-sought plant on the world-wide black market for insectivorous plants. Recently 200 poached plants were recovered and replanted in a remote section of the Holly Shelter Game Land.
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Record #:
5723
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The wild turkey has made a remarkable recovery in North Carolina. From a low of 2,000 in 1970, wild turkeys now number 130,000 and are found in all one hundred of the state's counties. To better manage restoration, the state dropped the fall hunting season in 1972, and instituted a spring one. Powell discusses the possible return of the fall season.
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Record #:
5724
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North Carolina has a native scorpion, Vaejovis carolinianus, a small, rather innocuous creature. Two other species, one from the Great Plains and the other native to Florida, have been accidentally introduced into the state. Sorenson discusses their possible impact on the environment.
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