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4 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 65 Issue 1, Jan 2001
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Record #:
4897
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Artist Thomas Bennett is following in the footsteps of artists Audubon and Fuertes in painting highly detailed, accurate paintings of the state's extinct and endangered wildlife. In 1998, he embarked on a ten-year project depicting wildlife in North Carolina and the Southeast. When finished, the series will contain between 70 and 80 paintings. Several of Bennett's paintings hang in the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences in Raleigh, where he has been named the museum's first artist-in-residence.
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Record #:
4896
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Once almost 30 rice plantations producing millions of pounds of rice annually lined the lower Cape Fear River and its tributaries. Rice grew there from the 18th-century till the last harvest in 1931. Today the land is a refuge for wildlife. The North Carolina Coastal Land Trust has conserved 4,000 acres of this land and seeks to save more before developers can move in.
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Record #:
4898
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The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission reports on its activities and accomplishments from July 1, 1998 to June 30, 2000. Divisions reporting included Wildlife Enforcement; Wildlife Management; Inland Fisheries; Engineering Services; Conservation Education; and Administrative Services.
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Record #:
4899
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North Carolina is home to three species of tree squirrels. Red squirrels, also called \"boomers,\" are found in the mountains, while the gray squirrel inhabits the Piedmont area. Occupying the Coastal Plain is the largest of the squirrels, the fox squirrel, which measures between twenty and twenty-six inches.
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