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5 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 62 Issue 2, Feb 1998
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Record #:
3595
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Abstract:
The state's striped bass population declined during the 1970s. Because of migration patterns, multi-state cooperation was needed to manage recovery. The 1984 federal Atlantic Striped Bass Conservation Act accomplished this, and the bass is now restored.
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Record #:
3631
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Abstract:
Pocosins, a unique wetland occurring only in the Southeastern United States and mostly in North and South Carolina, are a paradox. They are a product of water, but to survive, they need to burn periodically, either naturally or by controlled fire.
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Record #:
3594
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Abstract:
With populations of a number of songbirds in decline, state biologists are participating in the Monitoring Avian Productivity and Survivorship (MAPS) Program. Demographic data will help explain the decline as well as provide data on conserving birds.
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Record #:
3593
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Abstract:
Benefits of fire to woodland and wetland areas include ecosystem restoration. While many agree that more prescribed burning - the controlled burning of forests - is needed, encroaching developments near these areas make it difficult to accomplish.
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Record #:
3630
Author(s):
Abstract:
Before the 1970s, quail were abundant for Sandhills' hunters, but the population has rapidly declined since then. One possible answer is that the number of naturally occurring fires, which can revitalize wildlife habitats, have been controlled by man.
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