NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


4 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 54 Issue 2, Feb 1990
Currently viewing results 1 - 4
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
7924
Author(s):
Abstract:
Carolina Biological Supply in Burlington produces scientific educational products that include everything from maggots to tarantulas to kits that teach genetic engineering. Dr. Thomas Powell, Jr., an Elon College biology professor, founded the company in 1927. The company sells to science teachers, medical schools, and other science organizations around the world from an inventory of over 30,000 items. Prior to this, science teachers were expected to go into the field and stream to get their specimens for classroom use.
Full Text:
Record #:
7930
Author(s):
Abstract:
The southernmost home of the northern flying squirrel is high in the mountains of western North Carolina. They do not fly, but glide, using a flap of skin that runs down their sides. Because they only come out at night, they are difficult to observe and study. Flying squirrels are the only gliding mammal found in the western hemisphere. The northern flying squirrel is distributed throughout the northern United States and Canada. Its smaller relative in the southern Appalachians is confined to the higher elevations. Scientists speculate that this species was marooned on the mountains by a warming climate and the retreat of the glaciers during the last Ice Age.
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
687
Abstract:
Gladys Baker told her middle school classes in Zebulon that they wouldn't learn about nature by looking in a book. Forty years later, former students of one of the state's first environmental educators still remember that she made science fun.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
7923
Author(s):
Abstract:
The coastal plain is the primary wintering range for woodcocks. Most woodcocks head north in the spring, but a number live and breed in the state year-round. The woodcock's population has declined over the past twenty years because of habitat alteration and destruction, winter mortality, and predation.
Subject(s):
Full Text: