NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


4 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 50 Issue 1, Jan 1986
Currently viewing results 1 - 4
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
8630
Author(s):
Abstract:
At eighteen miles long and six miles wide, Lake Mattamuskeet in Hyde County is the state's largest freshwater lake. Total water surface is 40,000 acres. Beginning in 1789, many unsuccessful attempts have been made to drain it for other uses, particularly farming. In 1933, the last draining attempt failed, and in 1934, the federal government created the Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge. The lake is a haven for many waterfowl, especially Canadian geese. In the 1960s, Mattamuskeet was briefly the goose hunting capital of the world, with over 130,000 geese wintering there. Over the years the population has declined, with only 17,000 wintering there in 1985.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
9817
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina General Assembly enacted the Nongame Wildlife Tax Checkoff in 1983. This allows citizens to contribute a part or all of their state income tax refund to the management of nongame and endangered wildlife. Over 32,000 North Carolinians participated in 1985, contributing over $300,000 to the fund. Taylor summarizes how the funds were used for nongame and endangered wildlife and discusses plans for the third year of the program.
Full Text:
Record #:
8631
Author(s):
Abstract:
One hundred years before Audubon began painting birds, Mark Catesby was painting birds, plants, and animals in colonial America. Called the \"Colonial Audubon,\" Catesby published NATURAL HISTORY OF CAROLINA, FLORIDA, BAHAMAS in England between the years 1731 and 1743. The book, containing 109 bird illustrations, twenty color plates, and text, was a pioneering work in the field of scientific illustration.
Full Text:
Record #:
9827
Author(s):
Abstract:
Earley discusses the work of the North Carolina Natural Heritage Program. The program utilizes the skills of staff members, botanists, and biologists across the state to identify unique, rare plant areas. Their findings help the North Carolina Nature Conservancy in its efforts to acquire significant but endangered habitats.
Subject(s):
Full Text: