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5 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 49 Issue 9, Sept 1985
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Record #:
9795
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Carp were introduced in the country in 1831, primarily as a food fish. A great stocking program followed that reached its heyday in the 1880s, when 260,000 carp were distributed in 298 of the 301 United States Congressional Districts. Davies discusses how to fish for carp and why this fish has fallen into disfavor.
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Record #:
9798
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Beavers have made a dramatic comeback since the last recorded native beaver in the state was caught in 1897 in Stokes County. An unsuccessful attempt was made to reintroduce the beaver in 1932 near Asheville, but in 1939, a release of twenty-nine beavers in the Sandhills was successful.
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Record #:
9796
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Rohling describes some birds, common in some parts of the state and not in others, and where to look for them. They are the summer tanager, northern (Baltimore) oriole, rose-breasted grosbeak, scarlet tanager, indigo bunting, prothonotary warbler, common yellowthroat, and cedar waxwing.
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Record #:
9797
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Dean describes the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission's CATCH program or Carolina Anglers Teach Children How. The program seeks to teach young people the joys of fishing.
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Record #:
9799
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More peregrine falcons and bald eagles have been released in the state's reintroduction program which began in 1984. Ten peregrines were released from two sites--six from Grandfather Mountain and four from Yellow Mountain in the Nantahala National Forest. Ten bald eagles were released at the Lake Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge in Hyde County.
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