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5 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 33 Issue 11, Nov 1969
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Record #:
8384
Abstract:
The success of the small game hunter is often determined by the access available. Forest roads and trails are important to game management programs and to hunting. The authors interviewed 553 small game hunters during the early-opening and late-opening seasons as they left the management areas after a day's hunt. Hunters were asked to describe how they used the roads and trails while hunting and to trace the route they had walked on a small-scale map of the hunting area. Responses were used to determine how access roads were used; how the hunters distributed themselves in the hunting area; what the game distribution was; and how far hunters penetrated into the woods from the access roads.
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Record #:
8383
Abstract:
The best squirrel hunting in the eastern section of the state is usually in the swamps or lowlands by rivers and streams. Squirrels are much more plentiful in those areas. One of the best places for local hunters is “Tickbite.” Located in northern Lenoir County near Grifton, \"Tickbite\" is a maze of trees with wet ground beneath them. Chauncey discusses hunting techniques, including never shooting the first squirrel that appears and keeping the gun's safety on until immediately before shooting at a squirrel.
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Record #:
8382
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Alert, elusive, and fairly abundant in the state, the squirrel is a worthy quarry of the small game hunter. North Carolina's squirrel hunting population consists of three species--the gray, fox, and red squirrel. The grey squirrel is the most popular among hunters because of its abundance and wide distribution. Gooch discusses squirrel characteristics, where to find them, hunting methods, and type of rifle to use.
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Record #:
8394
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There are sixty-seven species of the bird family Lanidae in the world, but only two, the loggerhead and northern shrike, are found in this country. The loggerhead, which is found year-round in North Carolina, is colored grey and white; is slightly smaller than a robin; and is often mistaken for a mockingbird. The shrike is the only one of the country's songbirds that became a predator, and this has earned it a questionable reputation. Not having talons, the loggerhead anchors its prey on a sharp twig or thorn to tear it apart. The bird's favorite prey is large insects, but in winter, when food is scarce, it will catch small birds and mice.
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Record #:
10929
Abstract:
J.P. Stevens is the nation's oldest textile manufacturer. Over one-fourth of its 50,000 workforce are employed in twenty textile plants in fifteen North Carolina communities. Trucking operations are directed from Greensboro, and the corporate general accounting offices are located in Charlotte.
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