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3 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 33 Issue 10, Oct 1969
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Record #:
8380
Abstract:
Small game hunting is big business. Nationally in 1965, almost eleven million persons, aged twelve years and older, hunted small game. Over $600 million was spent, and hunters traveled four billion automobile miles on approximately 128 million hunting trips. In North Carolina there are over 400,000 licensed hunters, most of whom hunt small game. In interviews conducted with 553 small game hunters, the following characteristics were revealed: The hunter is male; married; a state resident; lives in a rural area within fifty miles of the wildlife management area where he hunts; is about forty years old; and has graduated from high school.
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Record #:
8379
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Abstract:
The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission has initiated an in-depth study to determine why the state's black bear population is declining. In 1969, it was estimated that the statewide bear population was between 2,000 and 3,000, or about a fourth of the number 20 years ago. The study seeks to determine the distribution and abundance of black bears in North Carolina; the impact of changing land use on the bear's habitat; the effect of hunting on bear populations; and biological characteristics of the species that influence its survivability in the 20th-century.
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Record #:
8381
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Abstract:
Smith Island, more popularly known as Bald Head, is the state's most isolated coastal area and one of the last remaining wilderness areas along the Atlantic Coast. A familiar island landmark is the Coast Guard Lighthouse, built in 1817. The island is home to a number of wildlife species and contains numerous salt marsh areas. Visitors to the island are occasional, and the place can be reached only by boat. How long the island will remain untouched before it disappears under a conglomeration of concrete, beach houses, and hotels is unknown.
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