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4 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 30 Issue 1, Jan 1966
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Record #:
6832
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North Carolina possesses one of the last remaining wilderness areas along the Atlantic Coast. It's called Smith Island, more popularly known as Bald Head. The island is home to a number of wildlife species and contains numerous salt marsh areas which produce food for resident fish and sea mammals. Cooper writes, “It is the last vestige in North Carolina of a primitive coast line. Unfortunately, plans are being made for its development, and, if steps are not taken to preserve its natural features, this last North Carolina coastal wilderness will disappear, transformed into a jungle of concrete, beach houses, and hotels.”
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Record #:
6830
Abstract:
The wood duck is the only waterfowl species native to North Carolina and is found all over the state. This bird has a tangible and intangible value to the state-–tangible through duck hunters and their purchases, which contribute materially to the economy, and intangible through the enjoyment of people who hunt with binoculars and cameras. Hardister discusses management of the species, distribution, and nesting habits.
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Record #:
6831
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Of the four species of large eared bats that inhabit the temperate parts of North and Central America, only Rafinesque's bat occurs in North Carolina. Its most notable feature is its enormous, flexible ears. Although the bat's body measures less than four inches, it possesses a wingspan of eleven inches. Two colonies have been found in the state, one in Beaufort County and the other in Brunswick County.
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Record #:
6833
Abstract:
The eastern hognose snake is found mostly in the coastal plain and piedmont, although it has been reported in the mountains as high as 3,000 feet. This snake is known by a number of names, including spreading adder, puff adder, and cornfield adder. What sets it apart from other snakes is the flat, slightly upturned snout. The hognose has an extremely variable coloration and is harmless to man.
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