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7 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 15 Issue 6, June 1951
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Record #:
6595
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Seven species of poisonous snakes inhabit North Carolina. These divide into two groups: the coral snake, which is a group of one, and pit vipers, which include the copperhead, water moccasin, massasauga, and the pigmy, diamondback, timber, and canebrake rattlesnakes. Amundson briefly describes the snakes and discusses their habits.
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Record #:
38152
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After an increasing number of sportspeople became concerned with their wildlife conservation programs, they formed the North Carolina Wildlife Federation. The Durham County Wildlife Club in particular has been extremely active and achieved much since their formation in 1945.
Record #:
38153
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Whether or not fish can see in color has been debated by fishermen and scientists alike. The fishing tackle business has lines and lures in every color of the rainbow in the hopes of attracting fish.
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38154
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The Waynesville Hatchery for trout began its preseason stocking in March, with nearly 100,000 trout being distributed into lakes and streams.
Record #:
38156
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Fur resources biologist Ken Wilson recounts some of the things he has witnessed while working in the field, such as animal behaviors and encounters with trappers.
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38155
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Asking for advice on how to start a business of raising bait minnows, the author answers with the necessary items, such as customers and a pond.
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Record #:
38157
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As part of the feature ‘backyard conservation,” homemade bird baths are a great way to encourage bird conservation.