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33 results for We the People of North Carolina Vol. 31 Issue 11, Nov 1973
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Record #:
11223
Abstract:
According to Natural and Economic Resources Secretary James E. Harrington, three bills that originated in the 1973 North Carolina General Assembly \"will have more effect in more ways on more people than any single bill passed by the General Assembly in the last 50 years or more.\" He is referring to three land use planning bills...\" one dealing with coastal area management, another with mountain area management, and a third with all the state's land. Legislators feel the bills will pass the 1974 Legislature.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 31 Issue 11, Nov 1973, p81-82, 259-261, il
Record #:
11226
Abstract:
The Land Conservancy Bill was introduced in the 1973 North Carolina General Assembly. The purpose is to level the playing field when the state is competing with private buyers to buy land for uses such as preservation or limited recreational development. The bill creates the North Carolina Land Conservancy Corporation, a nonprofit organization which would have the authority to acquire land for the state or to sell the state's land with approval of the General Assembly.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 31 Issue 11, Nov 1973, p89-90, 236, il
Record #:
11221
Abstract:
Tenney Deane is Secretary of the Commerce Department, the agency that administers ten authorities, boards, and commissions. Decisions made by these entities probably affect more people in the state than any other department. He is discussed in this ongoing series of brief profiles of major newly elected and appointed state officials.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 31 Issue 11, Nov 1973, p64, 258-259, por
Record #:
11224
Abstract:
This article presents reactions of local governments to the state's three new land use bills, - the Coastal Area Management Act, the Mountain Area Management Act, and the State Land Use Policy Act.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 31 Issue 11, Nov 1973, p83, 235--236, il
Record #:
11225
Abstract:
Since 1969, Ronald F. Scott has worked for North Carolina as its state planning officer. Scott discusses land use planning and the effect of the three new land use bills.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 31 Issue 11, Nov 1973, p85-86, 239-240, il, por
Record #:
11222
Abstract:
Leonard Moretz is president of Carolina Mills, Inc. which was founded in Maiden, North Carolina in 1928. He is featured in We the People of North Carolina magazine's Businessman in the News.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 31 Issue 11, Nov 1973, p67, 70, 72-73, 234
Record #:
11228
Abstract:
Prior to being appointed Secretary of the Department of Natural and Economic Resources, James Harrington was an official of Pinehurst, Inc., six of them as president, and then six years as an official at Sugar Mountain Resort. He discusses industrial development plans and policies in the new administration.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 31 Issue 11, Nov 1973, p98-99, 238-239, por
Record #:
11231
Abstract:
John T. Minges was elected mayor of Rocky Mount in 1964 and is retiring this year after serving five terms. He is the single individual most responsible for ushering the city of 40,000 into the Age of the New South. Minges discusses his tenure as mayor, his role in turning a city from a \"one-crop town\" into a city and how other cities might achieve the same results.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 31 Issue 11, Nov 1973, p108-109, 262-264, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
11234
Abstract:
Adams Concrete Products Company was founded in Willow Springs in 1946, by T. Floyd Adams Sr. and his son Rod D. At that time the company produced one form of concrete masonry unit. Today the company markets over 150 shapes, sizes and colors of concrete masonry. The main office has since moved to Raleigh, and the company has seven production facilities throughout the state.
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Record #:
11227
Abstract:
North Carolina's U.S. Senators and five members of the Congressional delegation share their views on land use planning at the state level. They are Senators Sam Ervin, Jr. and Jesse Helms and Congressmen David Henderson, Walter B. Jones, Richardson Preyer, Charlie Rose, and Roy A. Taylor.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 31 Issue 11, Nov 1973, p92-94, il, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
11233
Abstract:
The Conover Manufacturing Company, with headquarters in Conover, began operations as the Conover Glove Manufacturing Company in 1961. Today the company's plants employ over 700 people, and its product line is one of the most complete lines of work gloves produced by any one company in the country.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 31 Issue 11, Nov 1973, p114-115, 253, il
Record #:
11235
Abstract:
In February 1971, RCA began manufacturing its Permacolor line of outdoor antennas in Asheville. The plant is located in Swannanoa and employs 150 people. The company also makes indoor antennas and an outdoor antenna with a built-in rotator.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
11232
Abstract:
This article presents information on North Carolina's chances of getting an offshore oil terminal and whether it is to the state's advantage to have one.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 31 Issue 11, Nov 1973, p110-111, 264-265, il
Record #:
11229
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article provides an account of the growth of industries with 300 or more employees since 1960 and a map indicating where they are located.
Source:
Record #:
11240
Abstract:
Houston Brisson founded his company, Peanut Processors, Inc., located in Duplin in 1961. Three plants dry, salt, inspect, grade, package, and ship the product, \"Houston's Roasted Peanuts,\" to all parts of the country. His company is recognized as the largest producer of salted-in-the-shell peanuts in the nation. An estimated 95 percent of the company's production is shipped outside of North Carolina.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 31 Issue 11, Nov 1973, p147-148, il, por