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4 results for Water Resources Research Institute News Vol. Issue 276, July/Aug 1992
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Record #:
34207
Author(s):
Abstract:
At the fourth of six public hearings on proposed changes to state rules governing non-discharging waste disposal systems, representatives of the swine industry pleaded the need to keep local politics out of animal waste regulation. Strong local opposition to animal industry operations was evident at the hearing. Soil and Water Conservation Districts were urged to consider the issue of environmental equity in regulating animal operations.
Record #:
34208
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Division of Water Resources conducted a study at Currituck County Outer Banks in response to property owners requesting a Capacity Use Area designation under the Water Use Act of 1967. This would restrict water withdrawals from the surficial aquifer, which is the sole source of drinking water for Currituck. The study concluded that if a management plan is not prepared by 2000, then the designation should be considered.
Record #:
34206
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Environmental Management Commission rejected a recommendation to hold public hearings on changing the state’s water quality standard for dioxin, a by-product of chlorine bleaching linked to cancer and reproductive abnormalities. Instead, the commission voted in July to return the dioxin issue to the Water Quality Committee for additional study.
Record #:
34209
Author(s):
Abstract:
A study by the North Carolina State University Center for Transportation determined that thirty-five miles of highways on North Carolina’s Outer Banks are vulnerable to service disruption from coastal erosion, wave overwash, sand deposits, flooding, or undermining. Maintaining transportation service by relocation, beach nourishment, causeway construction, or shoreline hardening will cost the state $99 million between 1990 and 2010.