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5 results for Water Resources Research Institute News Vol. Issue 242, Mar 1987
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Record #:
33471
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina’s Pollution Prevention Pays Program has been cited as the nation’s most comprehensive and most focused on waste reduction. The program targets all forms of waste and works with local governments and state agencies, as well as business and industry. The program offers industries financial incentives, and supports university research aimed at developing techniques to reduce the generation of hazardous waste and prevent pollution.
Record #:
33470
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Environmental Management Commission has authorized an investigation to determine whether a capacity water use situation exists or may be emerging in the Upper Neuse River basin, including the Eno River. The Orange County Commissioners suspect that water emergencies experienced by the Hillsborough and Orange Alamance water systems during the droughts of 1983 and 1986 are likely to recur with greater frequency.
Record #:
33469
Abstract:
This article is a summary of presentations made at the fall Leaders Conference on Groundwater. Speakers discussed North Carolina’s groundwater standards and classifications, and current threats to groundwater quality.
Record #:
33472
Author(s):
Abstract:
A five-year study designed to reverse the trend of increasing pollution and declining fisheries in the Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds is now entering its initial research phase. The Albemarle-Pamlico Estuarine Study is being conducted by the Environmental Protection Agency’s National Estuarine Program and the North Carolina Department of Natural Resources and Community Development. Research will identify causes of pollution problems and implications to management strategies.
Record #:
33473
Author(s):
Abstract:
Groundwater levels in some areas of the North Carolina Coastal Plain have been lowered by over one-hundred feet since the turn of the century, according to a report by the United States Geological Survey. The area studied by this report is centered around the cities of Kinston and Greenville.