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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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8 results for WNC Magazine Vol. 2 Issue 2, March/April 2008
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23729
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North Carolina was home to the first gold rush in the U.S., the sole source of gold between 1804 and 1827. One particularly lucrative area was the Blue Ridge Mountains. A jeweler named Christopher Bechtler (1782-1842) helped mint North Carolinas gold into coins.
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Record #:
23730
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Hot Springs served as a German internment camp during World War I. The merchant marines were captured from German and Austrian commercial ships during the war and forced to set up camp in the small town from 1917 to 1918.
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Record #:
23731
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Susie Hamrick Jones is executive director of the Foothill's Conservancy of North Carolina, based in Morganton. Jones works to prevent developers from dividing large wooded areas and she also pushes for restrictions on tree removal.
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Record #:
23734
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Eco-friendly homes are turning up everywhere in Western North Carolina, the main hub being Asheville. Larkin presents a selection of people and their reasons for going green.
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Record #:
23733
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Google's new data center in the old furniture town of Lenoir, North Carolina brought jobs and an economic boost to a flailing local economy. Clarke examines the history of the data facility and its importance for the future of the area.
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Record #:
23735
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Bird watchers track broad trends in avian behavior that may help scientists understand today's environmental health and make predictions about the climatic future.
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Record #:
23732
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Loewer highlights four gardeners in Western North Carolina who transform their work into art.
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Record #:
22546
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Artist Nava Lubelski, who moved from New York City to her River Arts District studio in Asheville, North Carolina, creates paper sculpture from old tax records. The pieces carry a message of environmental sustainability and reuse.
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