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9 results for WNC Magazine Vol. 1 Issue 2, May/Jun 2007
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Record #:
22402
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John \"Brooks\" Dendy was a legendary golfer from Asheville during the 1930s. He wasn't allowed to play in the PGA because of a strict whites only policy, yet he left his mark on the sport. The title refers to an exhibition match in 1933. He arrived late and did not have time to warm up, so he just teed off. He hit a hole in one on the first, and then made three consecutive birdies, which gave him a six under par 1-2-3-4 start. He ended with a round of 59, which is still considered one of the sport's greatest feats.
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Record #:
22404
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Flat Rock, founded in 1827, was once a getaway for lowlanders in the nineteenth century. The people of Charleston, SC came to escape the summer heat, avoid yellow fever, and to buy land which was $1 an acre. Many built homes there and affectionately called the town \"The Little Charleston of the Mountains.\" Now, almost two hundred years later, tourists still are drawn to the town. Bartlett describes some things to see and do, including Flat Rock Outfitters, Hand in Hand Gallery, The Wrinkled Egg, Carl Sandburg's home, and the Flat Rock Playhouse, which was designated the State Theatre of North Carolina in 1961.
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Record #:
22405
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Mitchell Hicks, Principal Chief of the Eastern Band of Cherokee, \"feels it is the responsibility of his generation to protect, preserve and revitalize the Cherokee native language.\" Clarke describes how this is being accomplished. One way is to develop a new generation of speakers starting with the young. Language immersion means young children up to three years of age hear only Cherokee all day in classrooms on the reservation. Plans call for the program to include reading and writing Cherokee until the oldest students reach the fifth grade.
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Record #:
22403
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In the early part of the twentieth century, three of the nation's greatest writers found inspiration and intrigue in Western North Carolina. One was a native of Asheville (Thomas Wolfe), one came to stay while his wife battled mental illness (F. Scott Fitzgerald), and one, an artist, poet, and author, came to Flat Rock seeking a warmer climate, a pastoral place to write, and a place where he and his wife could raise prize-winning gaots (Carl Sandburg).
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Record #:
22406
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The summer only has so many weekends to pack activities into. The authors describe twenty-one weekends of things to do in Western North Carolina. These include shopping in Swain and Graham counties, rafting and kayaking on the Nantahala River, attending the music festival in Brevard, and strolling through some art studios in Buncombe, McDowell, Mitchell, and Yanncey counties.
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Record #:
22401
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Dea Sasso transitioned from a career in public health to one where she binds together treasured books and family histories. She is one of Asheville's only professional book restorers and is the founder of Light of Day Bindery. She binds material from private clients and educational institutions as well as teaching the craft. She apprenticed with Bill Streeter, a well-known bookbinder in Massachusetts.
Record #:
22407
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In John Payne's studio in the Asheville River District, art, metal and skill combine to bring life-size dinosaurs and prehistoric birds to life. The sculptures are supported and moved by pulleys and cables much like a marionette would be. His collection has about fourteen animals at the moment. Museums lease his skeletons and put them on three month displays. This exhibit \"Natural History Machines\" has appeared in museums all over the nation.
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Record #:
22412
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As tobacco farming dwindles in Western North Carolina, farmers are seeking other cash crops to help maintain their incomes. One contender is the shitake mushroom, an Asian edible. Sullivan describes how Madison Farmers grow the mushroom which can sell for up to $8 a pound.
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Record #:
22411
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Chef Wolfgang Green is owner of Wolfgang's Restaurant in Highlands. The restaurant is located in an 1890 Highlands home. Green has plied his culinary trade in Europe, New Orleans, Texas, Jamaica, and Western North Carolina.
Source:
WNC Magazine (NoCar F261 .W64), Vol. 1 Issue 2, May/Jun 2007, p125-126, il, por Periodical Website