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6 results for Upland Gazette Vol. 17 Issue 1, Spring 2012
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18569
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In 1948 the state's wild turkey population was around 10,000. By 1970 it had bottomed out at about 2,000. Restoration efforts brought turkeys back to their current population of 260,000 all across the state. However, there is cause for concern over an occurrence known as the Southeast Wild Turkey Decline. For some reason turkey productivity is going down in a number of Southern states. In Arkansas the population has dropped by 100,000 since the early 2000s. North Carolina for the moment has not experienced decline but as Stanford reports it's a time bomb waiting to happen.
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18571
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Eight North Carolina conservation organizations, which represent over 100,000 citizens, have joined together to promote common goals for wildlife habitats across the state. This article describes the work of the group and the impact of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Farm Bill on wildlife habitats on private lands.
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Record #:
18567
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The decline of quail throughout their range is widespread, and it's a big problem that does not come with easy answers. The required habitat changes are expensive and difficult to achieve because changes would impact large acreages of mostly privately owned lands. Without enough habitat to reverse the trend, hunters have proposed other solutions to the decline.
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18570
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John Peeler, a land management consultant specializing in wildlife habitat projects, owns a farm in Davie County. Riley describes the results that occurred on Peeler's farm when he implemented some of the practices in the CURE (Cooperative Upland habitat Restoration and Enhancement) program.
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Record #:
18568
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Research conducted at the North Carolina Wildlife Resource Commission's Southeastern Focal Area (SEFA) shows that quail populations can be improved with proper wildlife management given enough land, time, and financial commitment from landowners.
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Record #:
18586
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Squirrels are highly sensitive to smells and use their noses in a number of ways, such as finding a mate, determining when territory is claimed by another squirrel, and locating buried nuts.
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