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3 results for The State Vol. 9 Issue 46, Apr 1942
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Record #:
15163
Abstract:
Camps for boys and girls both along the coast and in the mountains outnumbered those in any other state. As reported in 1942, more than a million dollars was spent on camping within the state. One such camp was Camp Sequoyah located 16 miles from Asheville. This boys' camp covered 125 acres, had 42 buildings, and included athletic fields, a private lake, tennis courts, outdoor theater space, and riding field. Camp goers could engage in typical activities including nature and art lessons, carpentry, boating, etc.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 9 Issue 46, Apr 1942, p5, 20, il
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Record #:
18527
Author(s):
Abstract:
After Abraham Lincoln was elected President, he considered two Southerners for positions in his Cabinet--John A. Gilmer and Alexander H. Stephens. Both declined, although Gilmer would correspond with Lincoln and Seward, now Secretary of State. Gilmer went on to become a Confederate States Congressman, after serving as a state senator and U. S. Congressman. He died in Greensboro and is buried there.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 9 Issue 46, Apr 1942, p9, 22
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Record #:
18526
Author(s):
Abstract:
Montgomery County is a much diversified county with the Uwharrie Mountains in the north, peach orchards in the southeast, and fine farming land everywhere. The county was formed in 1779 and was named for General Richard Montgomery who was killed at the battle of Quebec in 1775.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 9 Issue 46, Apr 1942, p1-2, 16-18, il, por
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