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2 results for The State Vol. 58 Issue 4, Sept 1990
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Record #:
4182
Author(s):
Abstract:
The C. S. S. Neuse, a Southern ironclad built near Kinston during the Civil War, never saw combat. Measuring 158 feet long and 55 feet in width, the ship was protected by four inches of iron on its hull. It took from 1862 to 1864 to built the ship because of a shortage of workers and materials. When the Neuse was ordered to battle at New Bern, it stuck on a sandbar and later returned to port. It was scuttled in 1865 to avoid capture. The Neuse was raised in 1965, and the remains are displayed at the C. S. S. Neuse State Historic Site in Kinston.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 58 Issue 4, Sept 1990, p23-24, il
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Record #:
4181
Author(s):
Abstract:
Early America was explored for plants by hundreds of European botanists. André Michaux, France's most eminent botanist, was one of them. A world traveler, he came to America with his son in 1785, for what became ten years of exploration. He collected thousands of specimens, and his travels in North Carolina took him as far as the Black Mountains. He was the first white man to set foot in those mountains. In 1802, he journeyed to Madagascar, where he contracted a rare tropical fever and died.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 58 Issue 4, Sept 1990, p15-17, il
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