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6 results for The State Vol. 54 Issue 2, July 1986
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1
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Abstract:
Gen. William C. Lee, a native of Dunn, was credited with creating the airborne corps of the U.S. Army.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 2, July 1986, p12-13, il
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Record #:
7739
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Abstract:
North Carolina has a rich film history. Productions have ranged from local documentaries of the depression era to modern day blockbusters like King Kong. Film makers, such as William Lord (Walter Warner), became nationally recognized for their work with major motion pictures. H. Lee Waters became famous for his “Movies of Local People,” in North Carolina, Virginia, and Tennessee. North Carolina movies were creating a tradition of success long before Earl Owensby created his EO Studios in 1973.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 2, July 1986, p8-11, il
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Record #:
7744
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Abstract:
Randolph County was known as \"The Covered Bridge County,\" because it was home to over sixty covered bridges in the early 1900s. This amount was significantly more than other counties. By the 1980s, Randolph had two out of the four covered bridges left in the state. A new covered bridge was constructed over an artificial pond in Randolph County c.1986, but not in the traditional sense. The new bridge housed the first Covered Bridge Eatery and Pizza Parlor in North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 2, July 1986, p20-21, il
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Record #:
7740
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Abstract:
Individuals from Randolph County suggested that something be done to remember Trinity College before it was moved to Durham to become Duke University. Citizens suggested that a gazebo be constructed on the site of the former Trinity School using materials from the demolished building. In 1982 a committee was formed to raise $20,000 for the project. The non-ringing bell from Duke Chapel was displayed in the gazebo.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 2, July 1986, p16,37, il
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Record #:
7742
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Abstract:
Traveling back to days of Daniel Boone can be arranged by visiting the Calloway Cemetery on Highway 163, in Ashe County. Here, Boone left a stone marked ‘T.C' on the grave of his friend Thomas Calloway, who died in 1800. Boone had given the stone to Calloway several years before his death. Other cemetery markers date back to the 1700s on what used to be the Calloway plantation.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 2, July 1986, p19, il
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Record #:
7743
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lorenzo Dow was born in Connecticut in 1777 and preached Methodist doctrines in North Carolina, traveling forty to fifty miles per day through the countryside, giving sermons and his own medicinal concoctions to the sick. Dow died in 1834 at the age of 56 and was buried in a cemetery in the District of Columbia.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 2, July 1986, p17-18, por
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