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6 results for The State Vol. 54 Issue 11, Apr 1987
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Record #:
7863
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Abstract:
Lithium, the lightest of all solids, is an alkali metal found on every continent. But the most economic form of lithium, spodumene, is found in the greatest abundance in North Carolina from Lincolnton to Bessemer City. Lithium is used to make everyday items such as wash machines, refrigerators, eyeglass lenses, automobile headlights, and air conditioning systems, to name a few. It is also used in medicine as a tranquilizer. Lithium might be used as a super fuel someday, but in the 1980s the systems to harness its energy were slow to develop.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 11, Apr 1987, p16-17, il, por
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Record #:
7862
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Abstract:
When Pelham Humphries left the Appalachians in 1829, his family was content to forget about him. In 1835, he was killed in Texas by his friend William Inglish and suspicion arose that Inglish, through forgery, transferred Humphries's land into his own name. Inglish sold part of the land in the 1860s. But after oil was discovered in 1901, the ownership of the oil rich land was debated for years and several law suits were filed. By the 1980s the status of the land was still not determined.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 11, Apr 1987, p15,31, por
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Record #:
7861
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Thomas Dixon was the well-known author of “The Birth of a Nation.” But his brothers and sisters were also noteworthy North Carolinians. His brothers, Frank and Amzie, were ministers and lecturers. His sister Delia was the first woman to practice medicine in North Carolina. And his sister May was a lecturer and author of the controversial “Strange Death of President Harding,” as well as a contributor to newspapers and magazines.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 11, Apr 1987, p11-12, por
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Record #:
7864
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Eli Olive was known for throwing silver coins for the children to pick up as he rode his horse through Johnston County. He was also known for his pranks. Olive died in 1911, but when Taylor Jolliff decided to open a bed and breakfast establishment in the late 1980s in Johnston County, he chose to name it after Eli Olive because of his love for laughter.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 11, Apr 1987, p18,32, por
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Record #:
7865
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Jim Goble of Salisbury makes working train models from household items like jar lids and clothespins. He built his first replica in 1928, after becoming interested in the trains delivering mail to the Spencer Shops Roundhouse. Goble never worked on the railroad, yet his models are surprisingly accurate.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 11, Apr 1987, p20-21, il
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Record #:
7867
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Until 1971, when the state constitution was amended, the North Carolina General Assembly met six days a week. This tradition began because of the poor roads and transportation systems. It was too difficult for members to go back and forth between their homes and the capital. But because the State Constitution had mandated the length of these legislative sessions in 1868, even after transportation was improved the General Assembly continued to meet from Monday to Saturday. Secretary of State Thad Eure had participated in the Saturday sessions since 1925, and he made sure to be there for the last one on June 26, 1971.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 11, Apr 1987, p9-10, il, por
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