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8 results for The State Vol. 51 Issue 6, Nov 1983
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Record #:
8806
Author(s):
Abstract:
Having recently sold his family's one hundred-acres Charlotte property, David Henderson worries about what will happen to the old farm. He knows that the area will soon become new condos, but he is really worried about the abundant wildlife that lives on the property. Henderson realizes, however, that he has seen wildlife throughout Charlotte. Animals have adapted to their changing environment and continue to flourish. With a little luck, the wildlife living on his family's old farm will continue to thrive and make their home Charlotte.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 6, Nov 1983, p9-10, il
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Record #:
8808
Abstract:
Captain George W. Kirk led an expedition of the Third North Carolina (Union) Volunteer Infantry into western North Carolina, in the summer of 1864. Kirk's men were stationed in east Tennessee, which was controlled by Union forces. Western North Carolina was still controlled by the Confederacy, but there were many Union sympathizers and Confederate deserters in the region. Kirk crossed into North Carolina on June 13, 1864. His forces reached a Confederate force at Camp Vance undetected. Comprised of reserves that were unarmed at the time of Kirk's arrival, the Confederates surrendered. Kirk failed, however, to capture a train on the Western North Carolina Railroad which he intended to take to Salisbury. There, Kirk had planned on rescuing Union prisoners held at the Salisbury prison. Without a train that could quickly take them to Salisbury, the Union forces decided to return to Tennessee. Union forces continued to raid western North Carolina until the end of the Civil War. Kirk was later called upon by North Carolina governor W. W. Holden to suppress Ku Klux Klan activities within the state in the early 1870s.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 6, Nov 1983, p11-13, il
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Record #:
8812
Abstract:
The Joel Lane house, located in Raleigh, was where the decision as to where to locate the state's capitol building was made. The home, built in 1760, was home to Joel Lane's family. Lane was born in Halifax County to parents who had emigrated from England. He served in the General Assembly and in 1770 introduced a bill that created Wake County. Following independence, the state legislature decided to locate the state's capital in Wake County. Lane hosted the nine-member committee whose job was to decide where in Wake County to place the capital. After an amusing night of entertainment in the Lane house, the committee decided to buy 1,000 acres of property that belonged to Joel Lane. This property became the site of North Carolina's capital. The home was bought by the Wake County of Colonial Dames in 1927. They began a major renovation project on the home in 1968 and the house was opened to the public in 1976.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 6, Nov 1983, p23-24, por
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Record #:
8811
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Thalian Hall was built in 1855 and has served as Wilmington's center for theatre arts. After its opening, the theatre became a major success and continued its role during the Civil War hosting many performances for Confederate Soldiers. During Reconstruction, Thalian Hall suffered financial difficulties, though it later recovered. Famous actors including Oscar Wilde, Buffalo Bill and Lillian Russell made appearances in the late 19th- and early 20th-centuries. Thalian Hall fell into disrepair during the 1940s and 1950s, but since 1973 a major renovation effort has taken place. The theatre retains much of its original architectural design and was used as a reference for the recent renovation of Ford's Theatre in Washington, DC.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 6, Nov 1983, p18-20, por
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Record #:
8807
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Abstract:
As a child, Billy Arthur spent his summers with family members in Cabarrus County. Saturdays took the appearance of small holidays as the whole family took baths throughout the day so that all would be clean for Sunday morning church. Bathing was done in order from youngest to oldest and ended when the oldest male finished his bath. During the summer months rural families usually used an outdoor tin wash tub, but some were lucky enough to have a porcelain tub. In the cold winter months, however, bathers stood in a wash bowl and sponged themselves in front of a fire. While progress has made the bathing process much easier, it has also taken away the simple pleasures that the weekly Saturday bath created.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 6, Nov 1983, p10
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Record #:
8813
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In the fall of 1925, New Bern High School's basketball team achieved an impressive accomplishment. They held Beaufort's basketball team, considered one of the best in eastern North Carolina, to zero points. New Bern's head coach, Vance Swift, learned of a new defense earlier that summer that incorporated a five-man zone defense. The defense was designed to limit inside shooting while also reducing fouls. It worked well as Beaufort failed to score any points in their game against New Bern. Swift's team finished the 1925-26 season with eight wins and four losses.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 6, Nov 1983, p24-25, por
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Record #:
8809
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Abstract:
Bob Padgett began collecting and eating mushrooms while living in the Shenandoah Valley. At first, the neighborhood children were hesitant about collecting mushrooms; however, as the author continued to eat mushrooms without getting sick, the children became interested in the hobby. Many people know that some mushrooms are poisonous to humans, but few know which ones these are. Almost all poisonous mushrooms belong to the family Amanita. Before one begins collecting mushrooms for consumption purposes, they should be familiar with which species belongs to the Amanita family. The neighborhood children soon became knowledgeable and even got their families hooked on eating wild mushrooms.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 6, Nov 1983, p14-15, por
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Record #:
8810
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Most Americans would agree that the English language varies throughout the country's different regions. To the British ear, however, American English is uniform throughout the United States. In 1920 H. L. Mencken argued that the British voice spanned two octaves while the American voice spanned only one octave. According to the author, the primary difference between American and British English is how vowels are pronounced. Beyond pronunciation, there are differences in word meanings such as “underground-subway” and “lift-elevator.” The differences between British and American English demonstrate the existence of a truly “American” language.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 6, Nov 1983, p16-17, por
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