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8 results for The State Vol. 51 Issue 3, Aug 1983
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Record #:
8503
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The author recalls her youth and summers spent at her grandmother's home near Beaufort.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 3, Aug 1983, p12
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Record #:
8510
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O. Max Gardner's so-called Shelby Dynasty swept the 1936 state elections while taking a stance against Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal programs. Candidates supported by Gardner won both the governor's and lieutenant governor's offices. The next two campaigns, 1940 and 1944, were overshadowed by the Second World War, and no strong opponents rose to challenge the Gardner machine. In 1948, however, opponents did face off against the Shelby Dynasty. Returning soldiers and young citizens who grew up under Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal reforms were able to vote, and they wanted improvement. Both W. K. Scott and R. Mayne Albright ran against Gardner's candidate, Charles Johnson. W. K. Scott won the gubernatorial race and became the first farmer-governor since Elias Carr in 1892. Scott's victory also signaled the end of the Shelby Dynasty which, in addition to the Simmons Machine, had dominated North Carolina's politics for over a half century.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 3, Aug 1983, p8-11, por
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Record #:
8504
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Harmony Hall was the home of Richard Caswell from 1777 till 1782. During this time, the Kinston home served as North Carolina's unofficial capital. Because New Bern was susceptible to British attack, Caswell, North Carolina's first Governor, moved the state's records to his home. Caswell gave Harmony Hall to his son, Richard, in 1782, where it remained in the family till 1824. Since then the home has served as a hospital, a church, a public library, and a Women's Club. In 1830, two one-story additions were built on each side. The Preservation for Harmony Hall Committee has recently completed its restoration of the home, and it now serves as a museum and social hall. Rooms, such as the second-story master bedroom, are restored to 18th-century condition, while the kitchen is furnished with modern appliances so that it can serve the Kinston Noon Rotary Club. Harmony Hall is Kinston's only 18th-century structure still standing.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 3, Aug 1983, p13-16, il, por
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Record #:
8509
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The North Carolina Shakespeare Festival is based out of High Point. The festival began as a local production but the company has gained national renown. Actors come from all over the United States to join the company, in part because the festival's growing reputation and because they simply enjoy living and working in North Carolina. For the 1983 season the company is producing four plays: Shakespeare's “Two Gentlemen of Verona,” Moss Hart's “Light Up the Sky,” O'Neill's “Long Day's Journey into Night,” and Steinbeck's “Of Mice and Men.” Following the summer productions, the company will begin an autumn tour of “Othello.” \r\n\r\n
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 3, Aug 1983, p27-28, por
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Record #:
8507
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Abstract:
Buckhorn Dam was built by the Cape Fear Power Company in the early 1900s. In 1908, the hydroelectric dam began producing power for Fayetteville. During the dam's construction the death of several workers and financial difficulties threatened the project. The Cape Fear Power Company was bought out by the New York firm Electric Bond & Share Company. Only six months after the dam began producing power, the EB&S added the Buckhorn Dam property to the company's holdings in Raleigh and Sanford, and formed the Carolina Power & Light Company. The dam was soon supported by coal power and later nuclear power. The Buckhorn hydroelectric dam was permanently close in 1963. When it first opened in 1908, the dam produced 2500 kilowatts of electricity. The new Shearon Harris Nuclear Power Plant, located seven miles from Buckhorn Dam, produces 720 times as much electricity.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 3, Aug 1983, p20-22, por
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Record #:
8508
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The North Carolina School of Horseshoeing is located in Guilford County and is one of only six horseshoeing schools in the United States. The school lasts for two months, as students learn the proper way to approach a horse, how to hold its legs without endangering the horse or themselves, how to make right and left shoes, and how to hammer in nails. The school's emphasis is on safety for both the horse and horseshoer. Even though the training is difficult, few students drop out of the school. Graduates of the horseshoe school earn an average of around $20,000 a year as horseshoers.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 3, Aug 1983, p23-24, por
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Record #:
8506
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Watermelons are coveted items on a hot summer day. A great problem with watermelons is that they can grow only during the summer and early fall. There is a way, however, that ensures that you can enjoy this summer fruit year round - dehydration. During the summer you can take a ripe watermelon and dehydrate slices in an oven or in the sun. Dehydrated watermelon tastes especially sweet because the fruit's natural sugars are concentrated after the water is removed. The watermelon rind can be pickled, too, thus enabling the entire watermelon to be enjoyed year round.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 3, Aug 1983, p18-19, por
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Record #:
8505
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Tryon and Saluda are two neighboring towns in western North Carolina. Tyron, according to its Chamber of Commerce, was the richest town per capita in America. Saluda, on the other hand, was always considered a poor town. The two towns were connected in one aspect. In 1887, the first train ran between the two towns. It was an occasion for celebration as each town's citizens dressed up and waved to the passing train. This became a tradition that lasted well into the 20th-century.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 3, Aug 1983, p17, il
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