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6 results for The State Vol. 50 Issue 9, Feb 1983
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Record #:
8601
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Abstract:
Following the defeat of the Regulators at the Battle of Alamance, a small group of North Carolinians settled in the Watauga Valley. In 1771, Raleigh native James Robertson led this group of dissenters who refused to take the oath of allegiance to the British Crown. In May of the following year, the settlers established the Watauga Government, which Theodore Roosevelt would later call “the first independent self-government with a written Constitution by native-born Americans.” In 1775, the Wataugans bought a large tract of land from Cherokee Indian chiefs. Today, that land is Alleghany, Ashe, and Watauga counties as well as a section of eastern Tennessee. Robertson settled Nashboro, Tennessee, now Nashville, in 1778, and President Andrew Jackson gave him the title of “Father of Tennessee.” The Wake County Historical Society located the Robertson Plantation, where James Robertson was living in 1771, and erected a historical marker there.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 50 Issue 9, Feb 1983, p8-9, il, por, map
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Record #:
8602
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North Carolina's seal has undergone changes up to a dozen times since its inception in the early 18th-century. The Lords Proprietors provided the first seal, depicting two Indians, one supporting two crossed cornucopias and the other holding an arrow. The Liberty figure first appeared on the seal in 1730, and the Plenty figure appeared in 1778. Between 1834 and 1882, the seal underwent many changes, and, in 1882, was criticized for Liberty and Plenty being too provocatively dressed. Because no official description of the seal existed, worn seals were replaced with inaccurate copies, resulting in this “too sexy” seal. In 1883, the first official description of the state seal was adopted, and both “May 20, 1775” and “Esse Quam Videri” were added in 1893.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 50 Issue 9, Feb 1983, p10-11, il
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Record #:
8604
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Henry Ford made his first Model T in 1903. When people bought the car, they had to buy a number of accessories to go with it, including a fanbelt guide so that the belt wouldn't slip off the pulley. For a number of years, the Model T had to be hand-cranked, which required training and practice. Anti-Rattlers could be purchased and attached to the Model T in various locations to reduce sound. Blacksmiths made bumpers for Model T owners and the car's tires punctured frequently. Despite these and other problems, the Model T brought towns closer together in proximity and put Americans on the roads.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 50 Issue 9, Feb 1983, p15-16, 31, il
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Record #:
8605
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The last major storm to strike the Outer Banks was on Ash Wednesday, March 5, 1962. The devastating storm destroyed hundreds of beach homes, as well as a large percentage of protective sand dunes from Dare and Currituck counties up to the Virginia state line. Wind gusts up to seventy miles per hour were recorded at Nags Head. At Southern Shores, sand drifts covered houses up to the roof tops. Although property damages totaled $12 million, only two people lost their lives. The National Weather Service declared the storm to be an abnormality, and no major storms have devastated the Outer Banks since.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 50 Issue 9, Feb 1983, p21-22, il
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Record #:
8603
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Lake Waccamaw, located in Columbus County, is a very young lake geologically speaking. It has been in existence for no more than a few thousand years. It is also small and shallow. Despite this, Lake Waccamaw is one of few lakes in America famous for forming new fish species from preexisting ones (called speciation). The lake has four species of fish that are endemic and exist due to rapid speciation. They are the Waccamaw shiner, the Waccamaw darter, the Waccamaw carter, and the Waccamaw killifish.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 50 Issue 9, Feb 1983, p12-13, por
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Record #:
8606
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Once occupying a space of over a thousand acres, Bill Parker's Trent River Plantation in Pollocksville, only now spans 15 acres. The Manor House, bordered by Highway 17 and the Trent River, contains antiques from up and down the east coast, all of which are for sale. Guests can reserve one of the huge bedrooms in the Manor House and swim in the 50-foot pool, stroll along forest lanes, or go fishing on the Trent River. There are over 250 farm animals at the plantation, all of which guests can pet and feed. Local schools host field trips to the plantation just to see the animals. New ideas for tourist attractions occur to Bill Parker each year. These include moonlight river cruises, a Tennessee walking horse breeding operation, and even complete 18th-century escape weekends, offered by the Manor House working in cooperation with other area historic attractions.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 50 Issue 9, Feb 1983, p24-26, il
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