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7 results for The State Vol. 50 Issue 12, May 1983
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Record #:
8641
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Born in 1805, William H. Thomas was a key figure in preserving lands for the Cherokee Indians of North Carolina. The main locus of the tribe was called the Qualla. Thomas worked for the state senate from 1848 until 1861, when he resigned to work for the Confederacy. In 1862, Colonel Thomas recruited over 2,800 men, 400 of them Cherokee, to be a part of his Thomas Legion, which he commanded throughout the war. Due to their skill in the woods, the Cherokees were especially good at tracking down Yankees, who were trying to hide. After the war ended, several Cherokee soldiers were captured by the Union and contracted smallpox. In the spring of 1866, after some of the captives returned home, the disease spread through the Cherokee community. Despite the efforts of a doctor Colonel Thomas brought in to treat the Indians, more than one hundred Indians died.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 50 Issue 12, May 1983, p19-02, 62, por
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Record #:
8639
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On the night of July 16, 1945, reporter Luther M. Gideon, Jr., was working in the newsroom of the Greensboro Daily News. Despite the recent surrender of Germany, bulletins were still being sent from the Associated Press, United Press, and International News Service concerning the war. Around 2 a.m., a bulletin came across the wires reporting that a major explosion had occurred at a military base in New Mexico. Gideon “killed” a section of page one and put a story about the bulletin on the front page. Over the next few weeks, nothing more regarding the explosion came across the wires. It wasn't until several months later, when President Truman announced that a “powerful bomb” had been dropped on Japan, that North Carolina readers realized the New Mexico explosion was an atom bomb test.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 50 Issue 12, May 1983, p15, 63
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Record #:
8637
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According to the legend of the white doe, survivors of the Lost Colony took refuge among friendly Indians. The legend says two Indians were in love with Virginia Dare, the first European child born in the New World. One, named Chico, transformed her into a white doe. The other, Okisko, learned that if he shot her with an arrow dipped in a Roanoke Island spring, he could change her back into Virginia. During Okisko's efforts, Virginia was killed, but Okisko pleaded with the Great Spirit to save her. She was again transformed into a white doe, which still roams the Roanoke woods. Periodically, sightings of the white doe are reported, the most recent of which was in 1981.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 50 Issue 12, May 1983, p11-12, 56, il
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Record #:
8636
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Sarah Decrow of Perquimans County was recognized as the first woman postmaster in the United States. Although not much is known about her life, records show that she married twice and inherited land and an inn upon the deaths of her husbands. She was often in court disputing tenants' debts. She was appointed postmaster at Hertford in 1792 and held the position until at least the beginning of 1795. The date of her death is unknown but her will was filed for probate in May 1795.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 50 Issue 12, May 1983, p10
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Record #:
8635
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Emmy-award-winning CC-M Productions, managed by Clare Crawford Mason and her husband, recently came to New Bern's Tryon Palace to film reenactments of the Civil War. CC-M is making a documentary on the pivotal role Tryon Palace played in 18th-century North Carolina history. The film is sponsored by Pepsi-Cola, a company which originated in New Bern. Filmed over the span of one week, the documentary will play in the Tryon Palace auditorium and will be called “The American Palace.”
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 50 Issue 12, May 1983, p8-9, il, por
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Record #:
8638
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Using a forked or y-shaped stick, dowsers walk a patch of earth and wait for the stick to bend. A bending stick indicates the presence of an underground water reserve. Dowsing is very popular in the United States, and there is an American Society of Dowsers, comprised of nearly 25,000 members. Although there is no scientific proof regarding dowsing, many people use it as a primary way to locate underground water.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 50 Issue 12, May 1983, p14-15, por
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Record #:
8640
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A large pocosin, or raised swamp formed some 9000 years ago, is located in the Croatan National Forest. Pocosins are shrub-tree communities, with trees only about five feet in height.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 50 Issue 12, May 1983, p16-18, il, map
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