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4 results for The State Vol. 49 Issue 5, Oct 1981
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Record #:
8677
Author(s):
Abstract:
On September 12, 1781, loyalist partisan Colonel David Fanning and his militia surrounded the temporary state capital, Hillsborough. The one-thousand-man force successfully captured state officers, army officials, and Governor Thomas Burke. While Fanning marched his men to loyalist stronghold Wilmington, Whig general John Butler quickly assembled 400 militia at the mill of Quaker Thomas Lindley to block Fanning. The Whigs were overpowered, however, and the loyalists were able to deliver their prisoners to Major James H. Craig in Wilmington.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 5, Oct 1981, p12-13, il, map
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Record #:
8678
Abstract:
In 1979, the Brookstown Mill restoration project was begun by Doris and Addison Brown of Chicago. Today, the Salem Cotton Company Restaurant, specializing in French cuisine, is located inside. Built in 1837, the mill was the first in the south to use electricity for lighting. Over 95 percent of the original beams and floors are still intact, as is the massive coal-fired boiler that now dominates the restaurant's dining room. Additional shops are planning to open in the mill soon.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 5, Oct 1981, p18-19, il
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Record #:
8681
Author(s):
Abstract:
Built in 1891, the Esmeralda Inn of Chimney Rock played host to a myriad of silent movie guests. In addition to several films being made there, the screen play for BEN HUR was written by Lew Wallace in room #9. Celebrities Clark Gable, Mary Pickford, and William S. Hart often came to stay at the Esmeralda. Because of its rich history, Gene and Linda Crawford began the restoration of the Esmeralda in 1975. The inn is still operational and has a restaurant.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 5, Oct 1981, p24-25, il
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Record #:
8679
Author(s):
Abstract:
For over 125 years, a porpoise fishery operated on Hatteras Island. After capturing and killing the animals, fishermen cut away the blubber and sent it to the porpoise factory to be processed for oils and hides. The oils were used in a variety of trades, including firearms, and watch and clock making. One kind of oil was used in lighthouse clocks used to control the lanterns. Once a highly lucrative venture, all porpoise operations in North Carolina ended in 1929 due to a downturn in profits.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 5, Oct 1981, p19-23, 39, il
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