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4 results for The State Vol. 49 Issue 4, Sept 1981
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Record #:
8674
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hill Greene of Boone was ordered to take down his six-hundred-foot American flag after it was found to be in violation of City Ordinance V-4. The ordinance states that no over-sized business signs can be erected along the stretch of highway where Greene's Phillips 66 service station is located. One of Greene's employees, Eddie Cole, wrote to the Watauga DEMOCRAT and the story received national attention. Reporters from CBS, the White House, and even GLOBE, a tabloid out of Canada, flooded Greene's station to cover the story. On June 25th, the city announced it would not be enforcing the regulation in Greene's case, and his flag was allowed to continue flying. The ordinance will probably now be amended.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 4, Sept 1981, p12-13, il, por
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Record #:
8673
Abstract:
n 1817, Major Peter Hairston bought 2,570 acres near Mocksville from General Jesse Pearson. It was here that his great-grandson, Peter Wilson Hairston, built Cooleemee Plantation in 1853. Shaped like a Greek cross, the house took two years to complete. A few years ago, it was declared a National Historic Landmark by the U.S. Department of the Interior. The plantation remains in the Hairston family who host open houses for the public at least once a year.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 4, Sept 1981, p10-11, il
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Record #:
8675
Author(s):
Abstract:
During the last weekend of September, Mule Days is held in Benson. Conceived in 1949 by Nowell Smith, Jr., Mule Days is a four-day long festival. There are beauty pageants, livestock sales, nightly dancing, and a three-day rodeo. Mrs. Nowell Smith heads the annual parade as Grand Marshal. Thousands of people attend the festival each year. Although North Carolina's mule population dwindled in the past, it has grown steadily in the last twenty years, spurred in part by Mule Days.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 4, Sept 1981, p14-15, 32, il
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Record #:
8676
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1912, W.J. Grandin came from Pennsylvania to Wilkes County to build the Watauga Railroad. The completed line ran from Wilkesboro to Elkville, where there was a switch. One section of the line went to Gardin and the other to Darby. Although mostly for freight, the train ran one passenger excursion on Sundays. The railroad was ruined by the flood of 1916, and again in 1918, after which it was not rebuilt.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 4, Sept 1981, p16-19, il, por, map
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