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6 results for The State Vol. 48 Issue 9, Feb 1981
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Record #:
8997
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Abstract:
This year marks the 190th anniversary of George Washington's visit to the Guilford Courthouse Battlefield. This year is the bicentennial celebration of that battle, and events will take place at the courthouse on April 14th and 15th.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 9, Feb 1981, p7-8, il
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Record #:
8998
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Abstract:
While watching children play with their grandmothers at a nearby park, the author is reminded of her own grandmother. Her grandmother told ghost tales about the Civil War and the Old West, and sang ballads, several of which are re-counted in this article.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 9, Feb 1981, p8-9, 30, il
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Record #:
9000
Author(s):
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The Egypt Coal mine on Deep River is rumored to be jinxed. The explosions of 1895 and 1915 are two examples of the many tragedies that have occurred there. Although the area has been periodically mined from the 1850s to early 1920, it is estimated that at least one million tons of good coal still lies hidden. There are currently no plan to re-open the mine.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 9, Feb 1981, p14-16, il
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Record #:
9002
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Sage of Belwood, Flay Willis, carves walking sticks he sells at his general store in Belwood Mall. Although his canes typically sell for around $100, his finest work is given to friends and fellow Masons. Not limited to North Carolina, President Gerald Ford and Senator Jesse Helms are a few people of influence who own Flay Willis canes.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 9, Feb 1981, p22-23, il
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Record #:
8999
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Abstract:
Much of the original electric wiring in Asheville's Biltmore Mansion is still intact in the three underground stories. Power for the house was originally taken from the nearby trolley line and converted into usable voltage. Although power is now supplied by Carolina Power and Light Company, many of the other technological marvels are still in use today.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 9, Feb 1981, p10-12, il, por
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Record #:
9001
Author(s):
Abstract:
Members of the North Carolina Historical Reenactment Society typically reenact scenes from the Civil War. Striving to stay as authentic as possible, the society demonstrates not only military life but also civilian life of the time.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 9, Feb 1981, p20-21, il
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